Patient-centered management of actinic keratosis. Results of a multi-center clinical consensus analyzing non-melanoma skin cancer patient profiles and field-treatment strategies.

Patient-centered management of actinic keratosis. Results of a multi-center clinical consensus analyzing non-melanoma skin cancer patient profiles and field-treatment strategies. J Dermatolog Treat. 2019 Oct 18;:1-30 Authors: Philipp-Dormston WG, Battistella M, Boussemart L, Di Stefani A, Broganelli P, Thoms KM Abstract Introduction: Actinic keratosis (AK) is a chronic skin condition that can be a precursor to cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma. AK can recur and patients are likely to undergo multiple treatments. It is important that AK lesions are managed appropriately, and that patients are involved in treatment decisions. Materials and methods: The Supporting Professional Expertise in AK (SPEAK) program aims to facilitate this patient-centered care by identifying patient needs and aiding healthcare practitioners (HCPs) in selecting optimal treatment and communication strategies for different types of patients. Twenty-two dermato-oncologists with established expertise in the treatment of AK collaborated to describe commonly encountered psychosocial patient profiles, and to develop respective communication and treatment strategies. Results and conclusion: Six patient profiles were defined based on different psychosocial characteristics and were used to develop appropriate management approaches. We provide a systematic way of identifying these patient profiles in clinical practice and we outline communication strategies tailored to the primary needs of eac...
Source: Journal of Dermatological Treatment - Category: Dermatology Tags: J Dermatolog Treat Source Type: research

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This article is one of a series discussing cancer prevention and detection in primary care. Here we focus on the most common types of skin cancer: melanoma, squamous cell carcinoma and basal cell carcinoma. We describe the main risk factors and prevention advice. We summarise key guidance on the sy mptoms and signs of skin cancers and their management, including their initial assessment and referral. In addition, we review emerging technologies and diagnostic aids which may become available for use in primary care in the near future, to aid the triage of suspicious skin lesions.
Source: Advances in Therapy - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: research
In the last two decades, the U.S. has seen a dramatic rise in the rates of both melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancers, which are linked to ultraviolet radiation exposure.1 Non-melanoma skin cancer, which include basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma, are the most common malignancies in the U.S.. Melanoma is the fifth most common cancer, and it has been projected that nearly 100,000 new cases of melanoma will be diagnosed in this country by the end of 2019.2
Source: The American Journal of Medicine - Category: General Medicine Authors: Tags: Review Source Type: research
ConclusionsThe use of NSAIDs might reduce the risk of SC, but many factors including study population, drug subtype, and disease subclass affect the significance of the association.Graphical abstract
Source: Pharmacological Research - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: research
In this report, we analyzed gene expression profiles of paired specimens of keratinocyte carcinomas with their matched normal skin tissues as the control. Among several novel findings, we discovered a significant number of zinc finger encoding genes up-regulated in human BCC. In BCC, a novel link was found between hedgehog signaling, Wnt signaling, and the cilium. While the SCC cancer-stem-cell gene signature is shared between human and mouse SCCs, the hair follicle stem-cell signature of mice was not highly represented in human SCC. Differential gene expression (DEG) in human BCC shares gene signature with both bulge and ...
Source: Genes and Diseases - Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Source Type: research
Authors: deShazo R, Soltani-Arabshahi R, Krishnasamy S, Langley RG, Kalia S, Ståhle M, Langholff W, Goyal K, Fakharzadeh S, Galindo C, Srivastava B, Krueger G Abstract To the Editor: Patients with psoriasis are at increased risk of developing non melanoma skin cancer (NMSC), including squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and basal cell carcinoma (BCC).1,2 The risk is especially elevated among those who previously received systemic treatment or phototherapy.2 Systemic treatments, including biologic therapies and methotrexate (MTX), are effective in managing immune-mediated diseases; however, they may increase suscept...
Source: Journal of Drugs in Dermatology - Category: Dermatology Tags: J Drugs Dermatol Source Type: research
Abstract Skin cancers represent the most common type of malignancy. The incidence rate of melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancer depicts a continuous rise worldwide, which is attributed mainly (but not exclusively) to the growing incidence of non-melanoma skin cancer in the elderly population. Most skin cancer types are sensitive to immunotherapy. Melanoma, Merkel cell carcinoma, cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma showed response rates of at least 40% for PD-1 inhibitor therapy as reported in recent articles. In this article we review the current and future immunotherapy agents and procedures for skin cancers. ...
Source: Magyar Onkologia - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Magy Onkol Source Type: research
Non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) is the most common cancer worldwide. Australia has the highest incidence of skin cancer in the world, exceeding 2000 per 100  000 person-years and it is increasing [1]. In the USA, more than 3 million individuals are diagnosed with NMSC each year [2,3]. In the UK, during 2014–2016, about 147 000 new NMSC cases were diagnosed every year, more than 400 every day [4]. Data show that between 1976 and 1984, the overall inc idence of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) increased by 145% and of cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (cSCC) by 263%.
Source: Clinical Oncology - Category: Radiology Authors: Tags: Editorial Source Type: research
Keratinocyte cancers – basal and cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (BCC, cSCC) – are the most common forms of non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) and there has been a significant increase in their incidence globally in recent decades. Although the majority of BCC and cSCC are cured with conventional surgery or radiother apy, certain tumour or patient-determined factors may result in these modalities being inadequate or inappropriate, for example, locally advanced or metastatic disease, high tumour multiplicity, patient comorbidities and patient preferences.
Source: Clinical Oncology - Category: Radiology Authors: Tags: Overview Source Type: research
Transplant recipients have a significantly higher risk of developing non-melanoma skin cancers compared with the general population and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and basal cell carcinoma (BCC) are the most common post-transplant malignancies. Although in the general population BCC outnumbers SCC 4:1, in transplant patients this ratio is reversed and SCC is more common, with a 65- to 250-fold increased incidence. As patients in immunosuppressed states are living longer after transplants, the incidence of skin cancer in this population continues to increase.
Source: Clinical Oncology - Category: Radiology Authors: Tags: Overview Source Type: research
Cutaneous Squamous Cell Carcinoma (cSCC) represents about 20% of all non-melanoma skin cancers, with a dramatic increase in incidence in immunosuppressed patients. Since metastases of this disease are associated with a poor prognosis, there is interest in identifying new biomarkers of SCC metastasis as this could indicate new therapeutic targets. One potential candidate is the serine/threonine kinase AKT. AKT exists in two isoforms in the skin- AKT1 and AKT2- which perform different functions during skin homeostasis.
Source: Journal of Investigative Dermatology - Category: Dermatology Authors: Tags: Melanoma and Other Skin Cancers Source Type: research
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