A peridomestic Aedes malayensis population in Singapore can transmit yellow fever virus

by Elliott F. Miot, Fabien Aubry, St éphanie Dabo, Ian H. Mendenhall, Sébastien Marcombe, Cheong H. Tan, Lee C. Ng, Anna-Bella Failloux, Julien Pompon, Paul T. Brey, Louis Lambrechts The case-fatality rate of yellow fever virus (YFV) is one of the highest among arthropod-borne viruses (arboviruses). Although historically, the Asia-Pacific region has remained free of YFV, the risk of introduction has never been higher due to the increasing influx of people from endemic regions and the recent outbreaks in Africa and South America. Singapore is a global hub for trade and tourism and therefore at high risk for YFV introduction. Effective control of the main domestic mosquito vectorAedes aegypti in Singapore has failed to prevent re-emergence of dengue, chikungunya and Zika viruses in the last two decades, raising suspicions that peridomestic mosquito species untargeted by domestic vector control measures may contribute to arbovirus transmission. Here, we provide empirical evidence that the peridomestic mosquitoAedes malayensis found in Singapore can transmit YFV. Our laboratory mosquito colony recently derived from wildAe.malayensis in Singapore was experimentally competent for YFV to a similar level asAe.aegypti controls. In addition, we capturedAe.malayensis females in one human-baited trap during three days of collection, providing preliminary evidence that host-vector contact may occur in field conditions. Finally, we detectedAe.malayensis eggs in traps deploye...
Source: PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases - Category: Tropical Medicine Authors: Source Type: research

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We describe the unexpected binding of S-layer to cells devoid of DC-SIGN but also confirm that the presence of DC-SIGN was essential for S-layer’s antiviral activity. S-layer protein exerted its antiviral effect with different kinetics than mannan, a known viral inhibitor that also acts on DC-SIGN (Yu et al., 2017). Together our results suggest that inhibition of viral entry by S-layer occurs via a novel S-layer/DC-SIGN interaction. Materials and Methods Isolation of S-Layer Proteins S-layer proteins were extracted from overnight cultures of L. acidophilus ATCC 4356 cells grown in MRS medium at 37°C by using 6...
Source: Frontiers in Microbiology - Category: Microbiology Source Type: research
Conclusion and Perspectives Arbovirus infections, such as CHIKV, have been growing worldwide and are becoming a major public health problem, especially in immuno-compromised classes such as children and the elderly. CHIKV is dangerous since it can cause arthritis, fever and other impairments, making it necessary to seek new ways to counter the proliferation of this virus. Knowing the vector’s competence is fundamentally important, including an understanding of the vector virus interaction and the modulation of this interaction. Despite advances in the knowledge of mosquito competence in the transmission of CHIKV, li...
Source: Frontiers in Microbiology - Category: Microbiology Source Type: research
In this study, we were able to demonstrate that our measure for mosquito-borne viral suitability is informative in the context of Myanmar, despite the lack of ento-epidemiological datasets with high spatio-temporal resolution. By estimating suitability through climate variables and known ento-epidemiological parameters, we were able to project mosquito-born virus (MBV) suitability at the district level, a resolution for which epidemiological data and mosquito abundance measures are not generally available. Here, we discuss the national and subnational public health and control implications for MBVs in the context of our pr...
Source: PLOS Currents Outbreaks - Category: Epidemiology Authors: Source Type: research
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog aka Tropical Travel Trouble 010 Peer Reviewer: Dr Jennifer Ho, ID physician QLD, Australia You are an ED doc working in Perth over schoolies week. An 18 yo man comes into ED complaining of fever, rash a “cracking headache” and body aches. He has just hopped off the plane from Bali where he spent the last 2 weeks partying, boozing and running amok. He got bitten by “loads” of mosquitoes because he forgot to take insect repellent. On e...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Tags: Clinical Cases Tropical Medicine arthralgia dengue fever rash Source Type: blogs
DAVID E. BLOOM is the Clarence James Gamble Professor of Economics and Demography, DANIEL CADARETTE is a research assistant, and JP SEVILLA is a research associate, all at Harvard University’s T.H. Chan School of Public Health.By David E. Bloom, Daniel Cadarette and JP SevillaWASHINGTON DC, Jul 3 2018 (IPS)Infectious diseases and associated mortality have abated, but they remain a significant threat throughout the world.We continue to fight both old pathogens, such as the plague, that have troubled humanity for millennia and new pathogens, such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), that have mutated or spilled over ...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tags: Active Citizens Development & Aid Economy & Trade Global Headlines Health TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news
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Source: PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases - Category: Tropical Medicine Authors: Source Type: research
In conclusion, the old literature on arboviruses in Mozambique is relevant for assessing the gaps and current risk of occurrence of these pathogens at the region, particularly in a time in which they are spreading worldwide. PMID: 29845522 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology - Category: Research Tags: Adv Exp Med Biol Source Type: research
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Source: PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases - Category: Tropical Medicine Authors: Source Type: research
In this study we explore the potential for autochthonous, but not necessarily sustained, transmission of CHIKV in Canada. We used a stochastic mathematical model parameterized for Ae. albopictus under climatic conditions in the warmest months of the year in locations across Canada. We then combined the climatic suitability for CHIKV transmission potential in the warmest months of the year (condition C4) with climatic suitability indicators for the endemic presence of Ae. albopictus (condition C3) to produce risk maps identifying areas in Canada most suitable for autochthonous CHIKV transmission under recent and projected c...
Source: EHP Research - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Research Source Type: research
Public health officials in Brazil suspect that a small yellow fever outbreak in Minas Gerais, a populous landlocked state adjacent to São Paulo state, has infected 110 people and killed 30, according to a Friday report. There is a vaccine for yellow fever, but because the outbreak is taking hold in areas with low vaccination rates, officials are concerned that the disease could continue to spread beyond the state’s borders and cause a larger epidemic, according to the World Health Organization. Yellow fever is spread by the same mosquito that spreads Zika virus, dengue fever and chikungunya.&nbs...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
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