Dense breasts on a mammogram? What to know and do

You’re staring at a letter from your mammography facility. Your breast exam was normal, great. But then you see a note on the bottom: you have high breast density, which could put you at higher risk for breast cancer in the future. Now what? “The finding of dense breasts on a mammogram can be stressful and confusing for patients,” says Dr. Toni Golen, acting editor in chief of Harvard Women’s Health Watch. It’s information that may concern them, but they don’t know what to do about it. What is breast density? Breasts are composed of: lobules, which produce milk ducts, tubes that carry milk to the nipple fatty tissue, similar to fat in other parts of your body fibrous connective tissue, which gives the breast its characteristic shape. Dense breasts have more active tissues — lobules, ducts — and less fat. The only way to tell if you have high breast density is by having a mammogram. Dense breasts don’t feel or look any different from breasts that have a larger proportion of fatty tissue. Density is typically gauged by the radiologist who reads the mammograms. It is classified on a scale of 1 to 4, with 1 being the least dense and 4 being the most. Women who score a 3 or a 4 are typically said to have high density. Breast density often changes over time. Younger women typically have higher density than older women, and density typically declines after menopause. But this is not always the case. Some older women still have ...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Breast Cancer Health Tests and procedures Women's Health Source Type: blogs

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Abstract Introduction: Clinicopathologic and prognostic significance of body mass index (BMI) in breast cancer (BC) patients remained conflicting. We aimed to investigate and modify the impact of BMI on clinicopathological significance and survival in western Chinese BC patients. Materials and Methods: 8,394 female BC patients from Western China Clinical Cooperation Group (WCCCG) between 2005 and 2015 were identified. Multivariable logistic regression and Cox proportion hazard regressions were used to examine the difference of clinicopathologic and survival characteristics between BMI categories. Results...
Source: Biomed Res - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Biomed Res Int Source Type: research
This study found U ‐shaped patterns for the associations of age at first birth and durations from first/last birth to diagnosis with breast cancer prognosis, particularly for premenopausal women; a relatively long interval between first and second birth may benefit prognosis of breast cancer. AbstractReproductive factors associated with breast cancer risk may also affect the prognosis. This study aimed to evaluate the associations of multiple reproductive factors with breast cancer prognosis and the modifying effects of menopausal status. We obtained data from 3805 breast cancer patients recruited between October 2008 an...
Source: Cancer Medicine - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: ORIGINAL RESEARCH Source Type: research
Abstract The breast is the leading cancer site in women throughout the world. That said, breast cancer incidence varies widely, ranging from 27/100,0002 (Central-East Asia and Africa) to 85-94/100,0002 (Australia, North America and Western Europe). Its frequency in France is among the highest in Europe. While in most countries, its incidence has been increasing for more than 40 years, in a few other countries (USA, Canada, Australia, France…), it has been decreasing since 2000-2005. Possibly due to a substantial reduction of hormone-based treatments at menopause, the decrease may be transient. It is al...
Source: Presse Medicale - Category: General Medicine Authors: Tags: Presse Med Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: The targeted metabolomics with PCI-IS quantification method successfully established prediction models for breast cancer detection. Further study is essential to validate these proposed markers. PMID: 31693758 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Rapid Communications in Mass Spectrometry : RCM - Category: Chemistry Authors: Tags: Rapid Commun Mass Spectrom Source Type: research
Natural menopause is defined as amenorrhea for at least 12 months after the last menstrual period without pathologic or surgical causes [1]. It is common to categorize age at natural menopause into premature (under 40 years) [2], early menopause (between 40 and 44 years) [3], normal menopause (usually between 45 and 55 years) [4] and late menopause (over 55 years) [5]. Premature and early menopause have been shown to increase all-cause mortality [6,7], while later menopause has been associated with higher life expectancy [5] and also with adverse health outcomes such as an increased risk of breast cancer [8].
Source: Maturitas - Category: Primary Care Authors: Source Type: research
Purpose of review To delineate the current state of evidence on the impact of night shift work on age at natural menopause. Recent findings The only direct evidence is from a single observational study, which indicates that women who work night shifts are at moderately higher risk for earlier menopause and that this risk is more pronounced among younger women. Underlying biological mechanisms have yet to be sufficiently substantiated. A long-held line of inquiry, most strongly propagated by the observed link between night shift work and female breast cancer, is the ‘Light at Night’ hypothesis, which sugges...
Source: Current Opinion in Endocrinology, Diabetes and Obesity - Category: Endocrinology Tags: REPRODUCTIVE ENDOCRINOLOGY: Edited by Wendy Kuohung Source Type: research
Abstract The combination of some parameters, including the neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio (NLR), platelet to lymphocyte ratio (PLR), lymphocyte to monocyte ratio (LMR) and neutrophil to monocyte ratio (NMR), which are associated with patient prognosis, our goal is to find the best indicator to predict the efficacy of neoadjuvant chemotherapy(NAC)in breast cancer patients. A cohort of 808 breast cancer patients treated with NAC and subsequent surgery was analyzed retrospectively. In addition, 2424 people without breast cancer served as the normal group, which included three-fold more individuals compared with t...
Source: Cancer Biology and Therapy - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Cancer Biol Ther Source Type: research
Metalloestrogenic effects of cadmium are absent in long-term estrogen-deprived MCF-7 cells: evidence for the involvement of constitutively activated estrogen receptor α and very low expression of G protein-coupled estrogen receptor 1. Toxicol Lett. 2019 Nov 02;: Authors: Hirao-Suzuki M, Takeda S, Kodama Y, Takiguchi M, Toda A, Ohara M Abstract Cadmium (Cd) has estrogen-like activities in breast cancer; it acts as a metalloestrogen in humans. Prospective cohort studies of Cd and breast cancer risk suggest a significant relationship between increased Cd intake and cancer incidence, with more prono...
Source: Toxicology Letters - Category: Toxicology Authors: Tags: Toxicol Lett Source Type: research
This study aimed to evaluate the impacts of 21-gene recurrence score (RS) and St. Gallen International Expert Consensus on treatment decision and prognosis of patients with invasive breast cancer. We retrospectively analyzed the therapy protocol and outcome of 134 cases based on age, body mass index (BMI), menopause, pathological types, tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) stages, percentage of estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), human epidermal growth factor 2 (HER2), Ki-67, molecular subtype, and tumor biomarkers. RS was calculated based on 21-gene assay following traditional (old RS cutoff) and updated (new ...
Source: Cancer Biology and Therapy - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Cancer Biol Ther Source Type: research
Rossana C. Zepeda Plant-derived compounds have recently attracted greater interest in the field of new therapeutic agent development. These compounds have been widely screened for their pharmacological effects. Polyphenols, such as soy-derived isoflavones, also called phytoestrogens, have been extensively studied due to their ability to inhibit carcinogenesis. These compounds are chemically similar to 17β-estradiol, and mimic the binding of estrogens to its receptors, exerting estrogenic effects in target organs. Genistein is an isoflavone derived from soy-rich products and accounts for about 60% of total isof...
Source: Molecules - Category: Chemistry Authors: Tags: Review Source Type: research
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