TWiV 567: Outbreaks and a breakout

The TWiV team covers outbreaks of eastern equine encephalitis virus in the US and poliovirus in the Philippines, and explain how a chemokine induced by HIV-1 infection helps release more virus particles from cells. Hosts: Vincent Racaniello, Dickson Despommier, Alan Dove, Rich Condit, Kathy Spindler, and Brianne Barker Subscribe (free): iTunes, Google Podcasts, RSS, email Become a patron of TWiV! Links for this episode Poliomyelitis returns to the Philippines (Mashable, virology blog) EEE in the USA (Am J Trop Med Hyg) Chemokine helps HIV-1 release (eLIFE) Image credit Letters read on TWiV 567 Timestamps by Jolene. Thanks! Weekly Science Picks Brianne - History of infectious disease before/after vaccines Alan - NIH Ham Radio Club Rich - Renewable jet fuel from air Dickson - Newly Discovered Comet Is Likely Interstellar Visitor Kathy - How professors spend their time Vincent - Non-polio enterovirus surveillance network Listener Picks Alexey - Periodic Table Podcasts and Videos Intro music is by Ronald Jenkees. Send your virology questions and comments to twiv@microbe.tv
Source: This Week in Virology - MP3 Edition - Category: Virology Authors: Source Type: podcasts

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Publication date: Available online 15 November 2019Source: Trends in Food Science &TechnologyAuthor(s): Heera Jayan, Hongbin Pu, Da-Wen SunAbstractBackgroundMicrobial contamination is an increasing concern in the food industry. In order to understand the effect of microorganisms, the study of their characteristics and behavior in various platforms is of prime importance. Over the years, time-consuming and labor-intensive, culture-based enumeration techniques have become obsolete for real-time applications, and increasing concerns on foodborne outbreaks necessitate rapid, on-site and sensitive methods for the detection ...
Source: Trends in Food Science and Technology - Category: Food Science Source Type: research
The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of pulsed light (PL) treatment, a novel antimicrobial (LAPEN) wash and combinations thereof in inactivating Salmonella on stem scars of cherry tomato. The treatment effects on background microbiota and sensory quality was also investigated while in storage for 21 days at 10 °C. Three serotypes of Salmonella enterica were chosen to prepare inoculum for the current investigation for their link with tomato and produce outbreaks. Stem scars of tomato were spot inoculated before being treated with PL (1–63 J/cm2), LAPEN sanitizer (2 min) or combinatio...
Source: Food Control - Category: Food Science Source Type: research
Authors: Gatti M, Raschi E, De Ponti F Abstract BACKGROUND: The management of Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase producing (KPC) infections represents a major challenge. Several safety and efficacy concerns are shared by available antibiotics used in KPC infections, leading to the occurrence of serious adverse drug reactions (ADRs), with ceftazidime-avibactam possibly showing a more favourable risk-benefit profile. We investigated the potential impact of resistance on ADR reports in countries with different prevalence of KPC isolates (Italy vs. United Kingdom [UK]), and described safety profile of newer and older ...
Source: BMC Pharmacology and Toxicology - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Tags: BMC Pharmacol Toxicol Source Type: research
This study not only determined the primary reason for the atypical IBD epidemic, but also remind us of the urgency for developing new vaccines against novel variant IBDV.
Source: Veterinary Microbiology - Category: Veterinary Research Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 15 November 2019Source: Veterinary MicrobiologyAuthor(s): Xian-Wei Wang, Mi Wang, Jing Zhan, Qian-Yu Liu, Lin-lin Fang, Chen-yao Zhao, Ping Jiang, Yu-Feng Li, Juan BaiAbstractSince late 2010, highly virulent PEDV G2-genotype strains have emerged globally extracting heavy losses on the pork industries of numerous countries. We investigated the characteristics of a field strain of PEDV (PEDV strain SH) isolated from a piglet with severe diarrhea on a farm in Shanghai China. Whole genome sequencing and analysis revealed that the SH strain belonged to subtype G2a and has a unique 12-aa deleti...
Source: Veterinary Microbiology - Category: Veterinary Research Source Type: research
In this study, we designed a simple strategy to achieve the co-delivery of a DNA vaccine and hydrophobic immune adjuvant (R848) and to enhance the adjuvanticity of R848 via the synergistic effect of GO and R848. Thiolated low-molecular-weight polyethylenimine (TPEI1.8) was crosslinked with 4-aminothiophenol-modified GO (TGO) via the formation of disulfide bonds. Thus, TGO with its assembled TPEI1.8 could not only load R848 but also electrostatically interact with the DNA vaccine. Owing to the reducibility of the disulfide bond in the cellular environment, the DNA vaccine could be readily released. This system can significa...
Source: Journal of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry - Category: Chemistry Source Type: research
Publication date: 16 November 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 244, Issue 3256Author(s): Sam WongA vaccine based on a weakened version of the dengue virus was 80 per cent effective at preventing infections after one year in a trial of 20,000 children
Source: New Scientist - Category: Science Source Type: research
Discussion Facial nerve palsy has been known for centuries, but in 1821 unilateral facial nerve paralysis was described by Sir Charles Bell. Bell’s palsy (BP) is a unilateral, acute facial paralysis that is clinically diagnosed after other etiologies have been excluded by appropriate history, physical examination and/or laboratory testing or imaging. Symptoms include abnormal movement of facial nerve. It can be associated with changes in facial sensation, hearing, taste or excessive tearing. The right and left sides are equally affected but bilateral BP is rare (0.3%). Paralysis can be complete or incomplete at prese...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news
Abstract Enteroviruses are among the most common human viruses around the world. More than 100 different serotypes that can cause a range of clinical pathologies have been identified, although the most frequent are those that affect the central nervous system, such as aseptic meningitis, encephalitis or paralysis, which in some cases can be very severe or even fatal. In recent years, enterovirus outbreaks associated to new diseases have been reported all over the world, and as a result some serotypes have been considered 'emerging' pathogens. Yet, our knowledge about these viruses, especially about the non-polio e...
Source: Revista de Neurologia - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: Rev Neurol Source Type: research
We describe recent outbreaks of human enteroviruses and summarize knowledge gaps regarding their burden, spectrum of diseases and epidemiology. Summary: Reported outbreaks of respiratory, neurological, skin and eye diseases associated with human enteroviruses have increased in frequency and size in recent years. Improved molecular diagnostics and genetic sequence analysis are beginning to reveal the complex dynamics of individual serotypes and genotypes, and their contribution to these outbreaks. However, the biological mechanisms underlying their emergence and transmission dynamics remain elusive. They are likely to invol...
Source: Current Opinion in Infectious Diseases - Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: GASTROINTESTINAL INFECTIONS: Edited by A. Clinton White Jr and Gagandeep Kang Source Type: research
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