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Enterovirus D68: How can I protect my child?
(Source: MayoClinic.com - Ask a Specialist)
Source: MayoClinic.com - Ask a Specialist - September 12, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Still No Cause Found for Mysterious Paralysis in Children
(MedPage Today) -- Several, but not all, patients tested positive for enterovirus (Source: MedPage Today Pediatrics)
Source: MedPage Today Pediatrics - August 10, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Source Type: news

Diabetes vaccine entering human testing could also prevent the common cold
A diabetes vaccine based on enteroviruses and ready to enter clinical trials could immunise against other ailments like the common cold. Newsweek (Source: Society for Endocrinology)
Source: Society for Endocrinology - July 25, 2017 Category: Endocrinology Source Type: news

Provention Bio evaluates vaccine to prevent onset of T1D
Provention Bio said today that it licensed an enterovirus vaccine platform that it plans to evaluate as a way to prevent the onset of Type I diabetes by vaccinating against infection by a coxsackievirus B pathogen. Previous work has shown that CVB infection could be responsible for 50% of Type I diabetes cases worldwide, according to the Lebanon, N.J.-based company. Get the full story at our sister site, Drug Delivery Business News. The post Provention Bio evaluates vaccine to prevent onset of T1D appeared first on MassDevice. (Source: Mass Device)
Source: Mass Device - July 18, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Sarah Faulkner Tags: Clinical Trials Diabetes Pharmaceuticals Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation (JDRF) proventionbio Source Type: news

$420,000 grant funds study on polio-like virus
(Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center El Paso) Haoquan Wu, Ph.D., has received a two-year, $420,000 grant from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease (NIAID) to study Enterovirus 71 (EV71), a relatively new virus that has been compared to polio. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - February 21, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

'Mini-guts' offer clues to pediatric GI illness
(Washington University School of Medicine) Using immature stem cells to create a miniature model of the gut in the laboratory, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and the University of Pittsburgh have determined how infection-causing enteroviruses enter the intestine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 30, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Researchers shed light on how viruses enter the intestine
(University of Pittsburgh Schools of the Health Sciences) Researchers use 'mini-gut' model to show how enteroviruses invade the intestine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 30, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

New insights in genetic defect allow prevention of fatal illnesses in children
A team of scientists was able to characterize a new genetic immunodeficiency resulting from a mutation in a gene named STAT2. This mutation causes patients to be extremely vulnerable to normally mild childhood illnesses such as rotavirus and enterovirus. The comprehensive analysis of the genetic defect allows clinicians to provide children with the proper therapies before illnesses prove fatal. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - January 18, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Common Virus May Have Ties to Type 1 Diabetes
But enterovirus infections probably aren't the only culprit, researchers say (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - January 10, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Common Virus May Have Ties to Type 1 Diabetes
But enterovirus infections probably aren't the only culprit, researchers saySource: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Pages: Diabetes Type 1, Viral Infections (Source: MedlinePlus Health News)
Source: MedlinePlus Health News - January 10, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Common Virus May Have Ties to Type 1 Diabetes
TUESDAY, Jan. 10, 2017 -- From Finland comes more evidence that a common group of viral infections may play a role in the development of at least some cases of type 1 diabetes. The viruses are known as enteroviruses. These viruses cause a number of... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - January 10, 2017 Category: Journals (General) Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Type 1 diabetes linked to enterovirus infection in children
A new prospective study suggests a link between enterovirus infections and the autoimmune processes that lead to type 1 diabetes. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - January 10, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Diabetes Source Type: news

Could Viral Infection Predispose to Type 1 Diabetes? (CME/CE)
(MedPage Today) -- Kids with islet autoantibodies were more likely to have had previous enterovirus infection (Source: MedPage Today Cardiovascular)
Source: MedPage Today Cardiovascular - January 9, 2017 Category: Cardiology Source Type: news

Twins contract viral meningitis in womb and are forced to fight for their lives
Nancy and Rita Holgate, from Middlesborough, now three months, were rushed back to hospital just four days after they were born. Doctors discovered their mother had inadvertently passed on her enterovirus. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - December 6, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Girl With Rare Disorder Leaves Boston Hospital In Time For Thanksgiving
BOSTON (CBS) — It was a giant step in the right direction for a 10-year-old from East Boston with an extremely rare disease. The little girl has endured months of grueling physical therapy after a virus triggered illness, paralyzing her legs. Even though she still has a hard road ahead, she’s going home for Thanksgiving. Paulina Lopez is one tough kid, leaving Franciscan Children’s in Boston after a long two months. “She basically had her nervous system attacked. She had suffered something called Acute Flaccid Myelitis, after getting a common virus called enterovirus,” says Dr. David...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - November 23, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health Local News Seen On WBZ-TV Syndicated Local Watch Listen East Boston Franciscan Children's Lisa Hughes Source Type: news

Enterovirus D68 in Children With Acute Flaccid Myelitis Enterovirus D68 in Children With Acute Flaccid Myelitis
This report sheds light on the possible association between enterovirus D68 infection and acute flaccid myelitis among children.Emerging Infectious Diseases (Source: Medscape Pathology Headlines)
Source: Medscape Pathology Headlines - November 11, 2016 Category: Pathology Tags: Pediatrics Journal Article Source Type: news

A Mysterious Neurological Condition Is Paralyzing Children
The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is investigating the rise of a rare polio-like illness that tends to strike children. Acute flaccid myelitis, a condition that affects the nervous system, has sickened 89 people across 33 states so far this year, and doctors aren’t sure what causes it.  Scientists still only have a preliminary understanding of how AFM affects children, but it appears to affect muscle tone, sometimes to the point of long-term paralysis.   Symptoms include sudden weakness in the limbs, loss of muscle strength and decreased reflexes. Other signs of the disease include droopy ...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - November 3, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

A Mysterious Neurological Condition Is Paralyzing Children
The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is investigating the rise of a rare polio-like illness that tends to strike children. Acute flaccid myelitis, a condition that affects the nervous system, has sickened 89 people across 33 states so far this year, and doctors aren’t sure what causes it.  Scientists still only have a preliminary understanding of how AFM affects children, but it appears to affect muscle tone, sometimes to the point of long-term paralysis.   Symptoms include sudden weakness in the limbs, loss of muscle strength and decreased reflexes. Other signs of the disease include droopy ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - November 3, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Why Viruses Thrive On College Campuses
By: Rachael Rettner, Senior Writer Published: 09/16/2016 11:23 AM EDT on LiveScience More than a dozen students at Florida State University (FSU) are sick with hand, foot and mouth disease, an illness that’s usually seen in young children. So why are college-age adults contracting the disease? The viral illness can cause fever, painful mouth sores, and a skin rash on the hands and feet, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). It usually affects kids younger than 5 years old. But it’s not surprising to see cases of the disease on a college campus, as it can sometimes affect adults, sai...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - September 19, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

When hot gets too hot: keeping children safe in the heat
Follow me on Twitter @drClaire Heat is part of summer — and for the most part, children do fine in the heat. But sometimes, heat can be dangerous, even deadly. As summer heats up — and as much of the country sits in a heat wave — it’s important to know about those dangers so that you can keep children safe. Here’s what you need to know about heat and children: Never leave a child in a car in the heat. Children’s bodies can heat up incredibly quickly — leading to damage to organs and even death. Every year children die from being in a hot car — because their caregiver thought ...
Source: New Harvard Health Information - July 26, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Claire McCarthy, MD Tags: Children's Health Parenting Prevention Safety Source Type: news

Fewer allergies: A possible upside of thumb sucking and nail biting
Follow me on Twitter @drClaire As a pediatrician, I get a lot of questions about thumb sucking and nail biting. Both worry parents a lot: they worry about damage to teeth, about infections, and about teasing from other children. Now a study published in the journal Pediatrics, the official journal of the American Academy of Pediatrics, says that there may actually be benefits to having your fingers in your mouth. As part of the Dunedin Multidisciplinary Health and Development Study, researchers in New Zealand followed about a thousand people born in 1972-1973 out until their 38th birthday. When they were 5, 7, 9 and 11 the...
Source: New Harvard Health Information - July 19, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Claire McCarthy, MD Tags: Asthma and Allergies Children's Health Parenting Prevention Source Type: news

Enterovirus (Non-Polio Enterovirus Infection)
(Source: eMedicineHealth.com)
Source: eMedicineHealth.com - July 8, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Source Type: news

When treating stomach bugs, the best solution may be the simplest one
This study underlines what our grandmothers knew instinctively: when it comes to caring for sick children, most of the time, simple is best. Related Post:Protecting your children against Enterovirus D68Why your wheezing baby may need TLC, not medicationHoliday travels: Keeping kids safe and healthyKidney stones are on the riseThe latest on a simple way to help prevent food allergies inThe post When treating stomach bugs, the best solution may be the simplest one appeared first on Harvard Health Blog. (Source: New Harvard Health Information)
Source: New Harvard Health Information - June 14, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Claire McCarthy, MD Tags: Children's Health Digestive Disorders Parenting Source Type: news

Summer colds
Most viral infections in summer months are caused by enteroviruses. We studied illnesses in about 400 kids aged 4-18 years seen in private pediatric practice and were surprised by what we found.... (Source: Pediatric News)
Source: Pediatric News - May 10, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Source Type: news

Recurrent viral respiratory tract infections during first 6 months and risk of T1 diabetes
The associations between infection types during the first 2 years of life and between respiratory tract infections in the first 6 months and type l diabetes (T1D) have been the focus of recent research. Viral infections, particularly enteroviruses, have been hypothesized to cause T1D. Recent studies suggest that respiratory tract infections are associated with increased T1D risk if they are encountered within the first 6 months. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - May 3, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Noah’s story: Enterovirus and a race against the clock
“I’m so excited to babyproof my house,” says Elisa Holt. “I haven’t had to. Now, Noah wants to climb and do all of these normal baby things.” The toddler, born in March 2014, sailed through his first six months of life. As summer turned to fall, enterovirus D68 (EV-D68), a mysterious virus linked with paralysis, started to dominate headlines. On Oct. 3, 2014, Elisa was nursing Noah when she realized something was wrong with her son. “I went to sit him up and he just fell over. I did it again and the same thing happened.” When she realized he wasn’t moving his feet, legs...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - May 2, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Lisa Fratt Tags: Our Patients’ Stories Department of Neurology Dr. Donna Nimec Dr. Mark Gorman enterovirus D68 Guillain Barre Syndrome Source Type: news

Children's Hospital Colorado experts publish article on the 2014 enterovirus D68 outbreak
(Children's Hospital Colorado) From August to September 2014, a nationwide outbreak of enterovirus D68 (EV-D68) left resources constrained for Children's Hospital Colorado (Children's Colorado) and pediatric organizations throughout the nation. Researchers and operational experts at Children's Colorado looked at the change in hospital resources utilized during the outbreak periods and compared the data to what would have been expected during a calm respiratory season, which allowed the team to indirectly estimate the impact of the virus. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 1, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Watch: Mom Says Daughter Remains Partially Paralyzed 18 Months After Enterovirus Infection
Kim Dillashaw said her daughter Kinley Galbreath, 7, can only move her right leg and her left hand months after the infection. (Source: ABC News: Health)
Source: ABC News: Health - February 12, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Health Source Type: news

Mom Says Daughter Remains Partially Paralyzed 18 Months After Enterovirus Infection
Doctors still working to definitively cause link between virus and rare symptom. (Source: ABC News: Health)
Source: ABC News: Health - February 12, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Health Source Type: news

Lead poisoning: What everyone needs to know
Follow me at @drClaire The lead poisoning of thousands of children in Flint, Michigan is tragic — and should never have happened. If we are going to make sure that nothing like it happens again, all of us, especially parents, need to learn about lead poisoning. Lead is a chemical that used to be commonly found in paint, gasoline, and factory emissions. It also was used to make pipes, as well as the solder that holds them together. But once the toxicity of lead was fully understood, there were laws and regulations put in place to limit its use, and to limit the exposure of children and pregnant women to lead. The prob...
Source: New Harvard Health Information - February 2, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Claire McCarthy, MD Tags: Children's Health Family Planning and Pregnancy Prevention Safety Source Type: news

Why your wheezing baby may need TLC, not medication
Follow me at @drClaire When a baby is sick with fever, cough, and a wheeze, it’s natural to think that what they need is medication — like an antibiotic, or one of the medications used to treat wheezing in children with asthma (such as albuterol). But it turns out that if a condition called bronchiolitis is the culprit, the best treatment is no treatment. Bronchiolitis is a bad cold (caused by various viruses) that settles into the lungs. When it does, it leads to fever, lots of congestion, cough, and noisy or wheezy breathing. It’s incredibly common. In fact, one in five babies under 12 months ends up at...
Source: New Harvard Health Information - January 12, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Claire McCarthy, MD Tags: Children's Health Cold and Flu Parenting wheezing Source Type: news

Holiday travels: Keeping kids safe and healthy
Traveling with your children can be a great way to explore new places, spend time together as a family, and visit with those friends and family members who don’t live nearby. To have the safest and healthiest trip possible, keep in mind these travel tips. Bring the important things from your medicine cabinet Pack any prescription medicines your child takes. Check to be sure you have enough for the whole trip. Bring commonly used over-the-counter medicines, such as acetaminophen (Tylenol) or ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin), antibiotic ointment, cold medications (as recommended by your doctor), and diphenhydramine (Benadryl...
Source: New Harvard Health Information - December 21, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Claire McCarthy, MD Tags: Health Children's Health Parenting Behavioral Health traveling holiday travel Source Type: news

A Rapid Method for Engineering Recombinant Polioviruses or Other Enteroviruses
The cloning of large enterovirus RNA sequences is labor-intensive because of the frequent instability in bacteria of plasmidic vectors containing the corresponding cDNAs. In order to circumvent this issue we have developed a PCR-based method that allows the generation of highly modified or chimeric full-length enterovirus genomes. This method relies on fusion PCR which enables the concatenation of several overlapping cDNA amplicons produced separately. A T7 promoter sequence added upstream the fusion PCR products allows its transcription into infectious genomic RNAs directly in transfected cells constitutively expressing t...
Source: Springer protocols feed by Infectious Diseases - December 15, 2015 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Isolation and Characterization of Enteroviruses from Clinical Samples
Enterovirus infections are common in humans worldwide. Enteroviruses are excreted in feces during infection and can be detected from stool specimens by isolation in continuous laboratory cell lines. Characterization of enteroviruses is based on their antigenic and/or genetic properties. (Source: Springer protocols feed by Infectious Diseases)
Source: Springer protocols feed by Infectious Diseases - December 15, 2015 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Isolation and Characterization of Poliovirus in Cell Culture Systems
The isolation and characterization of enteroviruses by cell culture was accepted as the “gold standard” by clinical virology laboratories. Methods for the direct detection of all enteroviruses by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, targeting a conserved region of the genome, have largely supplanted cell culture as the principal diagnostic procedure. However, the World Health Organization’s Global Polio Eradication Initiative continues to rely upon cell culture to isolate poliovirus due to the lack of a reliable sensitive genetic test for direct typing of enteroviruses from clinical specimens....
Source: Springer protocols feed by Infectious Diseases - December 15, 2015 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Quality Assurance in the Polio Laboratory. Cell Sensitivity and Cell Authentication Assays
The accuracy of poliovirus surveillance is largely dependent on the quality of the cell lines used for virus isolation, which is the foundation of poliovirus diagnostic work. Many cell lines are available for the isolation of enteroviruses, whilst genetically modified L20B cells can be used as a diagnostic tool for the identification of polioviruses. To be confident that cells can consistently isolate the virus of interest, it is necessary to have a quality assurance system in place, which will ensure that the cells in use are not contaminated with other cell lines or microorganisms and that they remain sensitive to the vi...
Source: Springer protocols feed by Infectious Diseases - December 15, 2015 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Teaching gratitude this holiday season – and all year long
(Follow me at @drClaire) For most children, the holidays are, well, about presents. It’s understandable; it was certainly my favorite part of the holidays when I was growing up. But sometimes expectations can get out of hand. And often parents find themselves wondering why their children aren’t a bit more grateful for what they have. Gratitude is important — and not just because it’s a good social grace to have. It’s also essential for overall happiness. When we’re grateful, we understand that there are still good things in our lives even when things don’t work out the way we&rsquo...
Source: New Harvard Health Information - November 27, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Claire McCarthy, MD Tags: Behavioral Health Children's Health Mental Health Parenting gratitude Source Type: news

Many babies and toddlers use mobile devices every day
This likely isn’t a surprise to anyone who has been paying attention to the world around them, but a study just published in the journal Pediatrics shows that 44% of children under the age of 1 use mobile devices every day. By the age of 2, that jumps to 77%. By age 4, half of the children in the study had their own TV — and three-quarters had their own mobile device. And these weren’t rich kids, either; the study was done at an urban, low-income practice in Philadelphia. When the researchers asked parents about different situations where they let their children use the devices, here’s what they sai...
Source: New Harvard Health Information - November 12, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Claire McCarthy, MD Tags: Children's Health Parenting mobile devices Source Type: news

Is it ADHD—or Autism?
Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and autism can look a lot alike. Children with either one can be very active and impulsive, and can have trouble focusing and interacting with other people. In fact, it can be hard to tell the difference between the two. But telling the difference is very important. In a study just published in the journal Pediatrics, researchers looked at about 1,500 children between the ages of 2 and 17 who had a current diagnosis of autism (as reported by their parents). They found that those who got an ADHD diagnosis before they got an autism diagnosis were diagnosed with autism an averag...
Source: New Harvard Health Information - October 27, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Claire McCarthy, MD Tags: Children's Health Mental Health Source Type: news

Enterovirus D68 No Deadlier for Kids Than the Common Cold
CDC still doesn't know if unusual paralysis cases are caused by this virus Source: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Pages: Children's Health, Common Cold, Viral Infections (Source: MedlinePlus Health News)
Source: MedlinePlus Health News - October 15, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Enterovirus D68 Appears More Virulent, Not More Lethal in KidsEnterovirus D68 Appears More Virulent, Not More Lethal in Kids
Infected pediatric patients were more likely to have breathing difficulties than patients infected with other enterovirus strains, but were no more likely to die from their infection. Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Pediatrics Headlines)
Source: Medscape Pediatrics Headlines - October 15, 2015 Category: Pediatrics Tags: Infectious Diseases News Source Type: news

Enterovirus D68 Not Tied to Elevated Risk for Death in Kids During 2014 Outbreak (FREE)
By Kelly Young Edited by David G. Fairchild, MD, MPH, and Lorenzo Di Francesco, MD, FACP, FHM Children diagnosed with enterovirus D68 (EV-D68) in late 2014 were not at greater risk for death … (Source: Physician's First Watch current issue)
Source: Physician's First Watch current issue - October 14, 2015 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news

How EMS Can Be Prepared for Enterovirus D68 and Other Re-Emerging Infectious Diseases
Learning Objectives >>Learn about the possible causes of emergences and re-emergences of infectious diseases and how diseases spread. >>Understand when to have a high index of suspicion for enterovirus D68, which can present with many different signs and symptoms. >>Identify ways EMS systems can adapt during an outbreak to ensure provider safety while also still protecting and treating the community. Key Terms >>Emerging disease: A disease not previously recognized. >>Fomites: Any objects, including an EMS worker’s uniform, that can be contaminated by infectious pathogens and can play a ...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - September 4, 2015 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: James F. Goss, MHA, MICP Tags: Infectious Diseases Patient Care Source Type: news

Enterovirus and Human Parechovirus Surveillance — United States, 2009–2013
(Source: CDC Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report)
Source: CDC Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report - September 3, 2015 Category: American Health Source Type: news

Looking for Autism
Autism isn’t exactly something parents want to find in their child, so it’s understandable that parents might feel uneasy about looking for it. But looking for autism is important — and something that has become part of routine pediatric care. Currently, one out of every 68 children has been diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder. That means autism is really common. And — this is what’s really important — getting help early makes all the difference. At every single visit in the early years, pediatricians carefully follow the development of children. We ask about how they are learning to...
Source: New Harvard Health Information - August 26, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Claire McCarthy, MD Tags: Children's Health autism Source Type: news

IOC Increasing Water Tests In Rio After Alarming Levels Of Sewage Reported
RIO DE JANEIRO (AP) — The International Olympic Committee said Sunday it will order testing for disease-causing viruses in the sewage-polluted waters where athletes will compete in next year's Rio de Janeiro Games. Before, the IOC and local Olympic organizers in Rio said they would only test for bacteria in the water, as Brazil and virtually all nations only mandate such testing to determine the safety of recreational waters. But after an Associated Press investigation published last week revealed high counts of viruses directly linked to human sewage in the Olympic waters, the IOC reversed course after being ad...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - August 2, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

New Gene Test Speeds Diagnosis of Stomach Bug That Strikes Kids
Enterovirus D68 sickened more than 1,000 U.S. children last year, 14 deaths reported (Source: Pulmonary Medicine News - Doctors Lounge)
Source: Pulmonary Medicine News - Doctors Lounge - July 25, 2015 Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: webmaster at doctorslounge.com Tags: Infections, Pediatrics, Pulmonology, Research, News, Source Type: news

Diagnostic test developed for enterovirus D68
A diagnostic test to quickly detect enterovirus D68, a respiratory virus that caused unusually severe illness in children last year, has been developed by researchers. The outbreak caused infections at an unprecedented rate, with over 1,000 confirmed cases and 14 reported deaths nationwide, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - July 22, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Diagnostic test developed for enterovirus D68
(Washington University School of Medicine) Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have developed a diagnostic test to quickly detect enterovirus D68, a respiratory virus that caused unusually severe illness in children last year. The outbreak caused infections at an unprecedented rate, with over 1,000 confirmed cases and 14 reported deaths nationwide, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 22, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Child paralysis outbreak: Different virus may be cause
A mysterious outbreak of child paralysis cases previously linked to enterovirus D68 may instead have another cause, doctors are cautioning after determining that a stricken child appeared to be suffering from a different virus. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - July 16, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news