Unmet Psychosocial Needs of Patients Newly Diagnosed with Ulcerative Colitis: Results from the Nationwide Prospective Cohort Study in Korea.

Unmet Psychosocial Needs of Patients Newly Diagnosed with Ulcerative Colitis: Results from the Nationwide Prospective Cohort Study in Korea. Gut Liver. 2019 Sep 20;: Authors: Moon JR, Lee CK, Hong SN, Im JP, Ye BD, Cha JM, Jung SA, Lee KM, Park DI, Jeen YT, Park YS, Cheon JH, Kim H, Seo B, Kim Y, Kim HJ, MOSAIK study group of the Korean Association for the Study of Intestinal Diseases (KASID) Abstract Background/Aims: Limited data are available regarding psychosocial distress at the time of diagnosis of ulcerative colitis (UC). We investigated the psychosocial burden and factors related to poor health-related quality of life (HRQL) among patients newly diagnosed with moderate-to-severe UC who were affiliated with the nationwide prospective cohort study. Methods: Within the first 4 weeks of UC diagnosis, all patients were assessed using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), Work Productivity and Activity Impairment questionnaire, Inflammatory Bowel Disease Questionnaire (IBDQ), and 12-Item Short Form (SF-12) health survey. A multiple linear regression model was used to identify factors associated with HRQL. Results: Between August 2014 and February 2017, 355 patients completed questionnaires. Significant mood disorders requiring psychological interventions, defined by a HADS score ≥11, were identified in 16.7% (anxiety) and 20.6% (depression) of patients. Patients with severe disease were more likely to have presenteeism, loss of wor...
Source: Gut and Liver - Category: Gastroenterology Tags: Gut Liver Source Type: research

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 In the first full episode of Not Crazy, we learn a little more about the new co-host, Jackie, and her history with chronic illness and depression. Gabe rants about person-first language and how nitpicking verbiage is distracting from more pressing matters in the lives of those living with mental illness.  Overall, we decide that “crazy” is not a dirty word and there are other, more time-sensitive, things we should be focusing on that can benefit the mental health community.  SUBSCRIBE &REVIEW About The Hosts Gabe Howard is an award-winning writer and speaker who lives with bipolar disorder...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: General Not Crazy Podcast Self-Help Stigma Source Type: blogs
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Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: A Bipolar, A Schizophrenic, and a Podcast Mental Health and Wellness Not Crazy Podcast Self-Help Source Type: blogs
Children with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) may be at higher risk for psychiatric disorders and suicide attempt, according to a large, population-basedstudy published inJAMA Pediatrics.The risk for psychiatric disorders and suicide among children with IBD was greater when compared with siblings without IBD, indicating that the risk is likely related to IBD itself and not to genetic or environmental factors shared with siblings."Particularly concerning is the increased risk of suicide attempt," wrote Agnieszka Butwicka, M.D., Ph.D., of the Karolinska Institute in Sweden and colleagues. "Long-term psycholog...
Source: Psychiatr News - Category: Psychiatry Tags: ADHD anxiety autism Crohn's disease IBD inflammatory bowel disease mood disorders personality disorders suicide ulcerative colitis Source Type: research
AbstractBackgroundIn youth with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), health-related quality of life (HRQOL) has been shown to be affected by individual disease factors and specific psychological factors. The innovative aim of this study is to examine thecombined impact of psychological factors (illness perceptions, cognitive coping, anxiety, and depression) on HRQOL, over and above the associations of demographic and disease factors with HRQOL in youth with IBD.MethodData on clinical disease activity, illness perceptions, cognitive coping, anxiety, depression, and HRQOL were prospectively collected in 262 consecutive youth (a...
Source: International Journal of Behavioral Medicine - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
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Source: Wheat Belly Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: SIBO grain-free probiotic undoctored wheat belly Source Type: blogs
Conclusion: Disease activity and modifiable psychological constructs are associated with unfavorable PRO in patients with IBD. These factors could assist with identifying high-risk patients, many of whom may benefit from targeted interventions to improve health outcomes.
Source: The Saudi Journal of Gastroenterology - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Source Type: research
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Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Research Source Type: news
Authors: Piacentino D, Cesarini M, Badiali D, Pallotta N, Biondi M, Corazziari ES Abstract BACKGROUND: Biopsychosocial models for both organic and functional gastrointestinal (GI) disorders can be found in the literature. To clarify the role of psychopathological factors and their relationship with GI symptom severity, several studies have examined them in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) - occasionally distinguishing between ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD) - and in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), leading to unclear results. AIMS: We aimed to evaluate the psychopathological features of IBD and ...
Source: Rivista di Psichiatria - Category: Psychiatry Tags: Riv Psichiatr Source Type: research
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Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Complementary and alternative medicine Digestive Disorders Health Mind body medicine Pain Management Source Type: blogs
Over the past several decades, research into factors that influence patient outcomes in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have been steadily expanding beyond immunology to include genetics, microbiome and the environment, and, more recently, psychological elements. Psychosocial aspects, seen not long ago as largely irrelevant, are increasingly recognized as important in shaping the disease course. Along with the physical symptoms of their ulcerative colitis (UC) or Crohn ’s disease, anxiety, depression, and stress are integral to the morbidity with which many patients contend.
Source: Gastroenterology - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Tags: Editorial Source Type: research
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