Personality traits, illness behaviors, and psychiatric comorbidity in individuals with psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES), epilepsy, and other nonepileptic seizures (oNES): Differentiating between the conditions.

CONCLUSIONS: This study provides an important stepping stone in the understanding of demographic and seizure factors, personality domains, abnormal illness behaviors, and psychiatric comorbidity in the South African population with PNES. The study also reported on a cutoff score of 12 on the BAI-PC predicting PNES with 80% sensitivity and 89% specificity in a private hospital sample. PMID: 31382179 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Epilepsy and Behaviour - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: Epilepsy Behav Source Type: research

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ConclusionsThis study provides an important stepping stone in the understanding of demographic and seizure factors, personality domains, abnormal illness behaviors, and psychiatric comorbidity in the South African population with PNES. The study also reported on a cutoff score of 12 on the BAI-PC predicting PNES with 80% sensitivity and 89% specificity in a private hospital sample.
Source: Epilepsy and Behavior - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
Conclusion: Our results indicate similar prevalence rates of comorbid psychiatric symptoms to studies carried out in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region and relatively high attendance and referral rates to psychiatric services.Implications: The results shed light on the clinical profile of patients in this region and support the need for integrated collaborative medical services. Moreover, findings have important implications for health care policies pertaining to resource distribution and funding.IntroductionMedical care has traditionally been dominated by a separation between disciplines catering to physiologi...
Source: Frontiers in Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
DiscussionAs detailed above, the “elements” in both a classical and a contemporary sense have effects on our mental health and are potentially modifiable aspects that can be harnessed as therapeutic interventions. The most robust interventional evidence currently available shows tentative support for several use of the elements via horticultural and nature-exposure therapy, green exercise/physical activity, sauna and heat therapy, balneotherapy, and breathing exercises. It should be noted that, in many cases, these interventions were not studied in definitive diagnosed psychiatric disorders and thus it is prema...
Source: Frontiers in Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
Ryan R. Kelly1,2†, Lindsay T. McDonald1,2†, Nathaniel R. Jensen1,2, Sara J. Sidles1,2 and Amanda C. LaRue1,2* 1Research Services, Ralph H. Johnson VA Medical Center, Charleston, SC, United States 2Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC, United States The significant biochemical and physiological effects of psychological stress are beginning to be recognized as exacerbating common diseases, including osteoporosis. This review discusses the current evidence for psychological stress-associated mental health disorders as risk factors for os...
Source: Frontiers in Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
Stereoelectroencephalography (SEEG) vs.Mindstrong HealthMood Monitoring via Invasive Brain Recordings or Smartphone SwipesWhich Would You Choose?That's not really a fair question. The ultimate goal of invasive recordings is one of direct intervention, by delivering targeted brain stimulation as a treatment. But first you have to establish a firm relationship between neural activity and mood. Well, um, smartphone swipes (the way you interact with your phone) aim to establish a firm relationship between your “digital phenotype” and your mood. And then refer you to an app for a precision intervention. Or to your t...
Source: The Neurocritic - Category: Neuroscience Authors: Source Type: blogs
In conclusion, the studies presented in the current review demonstrate that CBD has the potential to limit delta-9-THC-induced cognitive impairment and improve cognitive function in various pathological conditions. Human studies suggest that CBD may have a protective role in delta-9-THC-induced cognitive impairments; however, there is limited human evidence for CBD treatment effects in pathological states (e.g. schizophrenia). In short, they found that CBD may help alleviate the negative impact of a person with schizophrenia from taking cannabis, both in the psychotic and cognitive symptoms associated with schizophrenia. T...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Alternative and Nutritional Supplements Disorders General Research Treatment cannabidiol Cannabis cbd cbd oil Marijuana THC Source Type: blogs
According to this study, CBD causes hormonal changes that can lessen the intensity of anxiety disorders including generalized anxiety disorder, PTSD, and social anxiety. Regulates Behaviour &Cognition CBD interacts with a broad range of receptors, and through complicated processes, it works as a therapeutic agent. While behavioral patterns tend to be complicated for many people, there are ways that CBD can reduce destructive behavior and facilitate positive change. For instance, addiction is one of the areas that lead to unproductive behavioral patterns, and CBD has been used successfully to treat different forms of ad...
Source: PickTheBrain | Motivation and Self Improvement - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: featured health and fitness self improvement brain cbd oil pickthebrain Source Type: blogs
Marijuana has proved to be a powerful aid in easing chronic pain and helping battle nausea, but results are mixed or largely inconclusive on other health benefits, as well as detriments, according to a massive new scientific review of cannabis studies. The report, released Thursday by the National Academies of Science, Engineering, and Medicine, analyzes an astounding 10,000 scientific studies on the drug. “The Health Effects of Cannabis and Cannabinoids: The Current State of Evidence and Recommendations for Research” concludes that marijuana definitely provides some health benefits, though other claims ab...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
When you feel her calming energy, you would never guess Kata went through a crippling car accident that left her in constant pain. At the time, the damage to her neck and spine was so severe, her doctors started preparing her for multiple surgeries. They told her she’d be in a neck brace for the rest of her life. But today, Kata is living pain free. Her spine is long and relaxed, and she has full range of motion in her neck. And she did it without surgery. Instead of going under the knife, Kata turned to yoga. What is yoga? Yoga is a mind-body practice that combines stretching exercises, controlled breathing and ...
Source: Al Sears, MD Natural Remedies - Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Tags: Fitness Anti-Aging disease prevention natural cures telomeres wellness yoga Source Type: news
“Research on the brain is surging,” declared the New York Times the other day:Yet the growing body of data — maps, atlases and so-called connectomes that show linkages between cells and regions of the brain — represents a paradox of progress, with the advances also highlighting great gaps in understanding.So many large and small questions remain unanswered. How is information encoded and transferred from cell to cell or from network to network of cells? Science found a genetic code but there is no brain-wide neural code; no electrical or chemical alphabet exists that can be recombined to say “...
Source: The Neurocritic - Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Authors: Source Type: blogs
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