The Evolving Modern Management of Brain Metastasis.

The Evolving Modern Management of Brain Metastasis. Clin Cancer Res. 2019 Jun 18;: Authors: Fecci PE, Champion CD, Hoj J, McKernan C, Goodwin CR, Kirkpatrick J, Anders CK, Pendergast AM, Sampson JH Abstract The incidence of brain metastases is increasing as cancer therapies improve and patients live longer, providing new challenges to the multidisciplinary teams that care for these patients. Brain metastatic cancer cells possess unique characteristics that allow them to penetrate the blood brain barrier, colonize the brain parenchyma, and persist in the intracranial environment. Additionally, brain metastases subvert the innate and adaptive immune system, permitting evasion of the anti-tumor immune response. Better understanding of the above mechanisms will allow for development and delivery of more effective therapies for brain metastases. In this review, we outline the molecular mechanisms underlying development, survival, and immunosuppression of brain metastases. We also discuss current and emerging treatment strategies, including surgery, radiation, disease-specific and mutation-targeted systemic therapy, and immunotherapy. PMID: 31213459 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Clinical Cancer Research - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Clin Cancer Res Source Type: research

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Abstract Traditional cancer therapies, such as treatment with anthracyclines and chest radiation, are known to induce cardiovascular complications. Currently, the increase of cancer therapies will involve new mechanisms such as cancer immunotherapies, also called immune checkpoint inhibitors (PD-1, PD-L1 and CTLA-4 inhibitors). These treatments have shown long-term remissions in subgroup of cancers, including melanomas, non-small-cell lung cancer, urothelial carcinoma, renal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck and colorectal cancer. Although these treatments will change the natural course ...
Source: Bulletin du Cancer - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Bull Cancer Source Type: research
In conclusion, our data show how oncogenic and tumor-suppressive drivers of cellular senescence act to regulate surveillance processes that can be circumvented to enable SnCs to elude immune recognition but can be reversed by cell surface-targeted interventions to purge the SnCs that persist in vitro and in patients. Since eliminating SnCs can prevent tumor progression, delay the onset of degenerative diseases, and restore fitness; since NKG2D-Ls are not widely expressed in healthy human tissues and NKG2D-L shedding is an evasion mechanism also employed by tumor cells; and since increasing numbers of B cells express NKG2D ...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
This study elucidates the potential to use mitochondria from different donors (PAMM) to treat UVR stress and possibly other types of damage or metabolic malfunctions in cells, resulting in not only in-vitro but also ex-vivo applications. Gene Therapy in Mice Alters the Balance of Macrophage Phenotypes to Slow Atherosclerosis Progression https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2019/07/gene-therapy-in-mice-alters-the-balance-of-macrophage-phenotypes-to-slow-atherosclerosis-progression/ Atherosclerosis causes a sizable fraction of all deaths in our species. It is the generation of fatty deposits in blood vessel...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
In this study, analysis of antioxidant defense was performed on the blood samples from 184 "aged" individuals aged 65-90+ years, and compared to the blood samples of 37 individuals just about at the beginning of aging, aged 55-59 years. Statistically significant decreases of Zn,Cu-superoxide dismutase (SOD-1), catalase (CAT), and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activities were observed in elderly people in comparison with the control group. Moreover, an inverse correlation between the activities of SOD-1, CAT, and GSH-Px and the age of the examined persons was found. No age-related changes in glutathione reductas...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Dr. Maria Martinez-Lage was  kind enough to write the following summary of events at today ’s American Association of Neuropathologists meeting in Atlanta:The opening day of the 95th Annual Meeting of the American Association of Neuropathologists in Atlanta featured a special course dedicated to a topic both old and new: what happens when treatments go awry? Under the title “Unintended Consequences: The Iatrogenic Neuropathology of Systemic Therapies” the faculty discussed neurologic adverse effects of novel immunotherapies,other cancer and non-cancer related t...
Source: neuropathology blog - Category: Radiology Tags: meetings Source Type: blogs
In this study, we found that cofilin competes with tau for direct microtubule binding in vitro, in cells, and in vivo, which inhibits tau-induced microtubule assembly. Genetic reduction of cofilin mitigates tauopathy and synaptic defects in Tau-P301S mice and movement deficits in tau transgenic C. elegans. The pathogenic effects of cofilin are selectively mediated by activated cofilin, as active but not inactive cofilin selectively interacts with tubulin, destabilizes microtubules, and promotes tauopathy. These results therefore indicate that activated cofilin plays an essential intermediary role in neurotoxic signaling th...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Conclusion and Future Perspectives This review illustrates our current knowledge of USP7, including its source and characterization, structure, binding partners and substrates in various biological processes. Besides, how USP7 regulates various aspects of a cell under both normal and pathological states are elaborated in detail. As the processes of ubiquitination and deubiquitination are extremely dynamic and context-specific, a series of studies have linked USP7 to different cancers. The biology, particularly the immune oncology mechanisms, reveal that USP7 inhibitors would be useful drugs, thus it is vital to develop hi...
Source: Frontiers in Pharmacology - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: research
Michal Yalon1†, Amos Toren1,2†, Dina Jabarin2, Edna Fadida3, Shlomi Constantini3 and Ruty Mehrian-Shai1* 1Pediatric Hemato-Oncology, Edmond and Lilly Safra Children's Hospital and Cancer Research Center, Sheba Medical Center, Ramat Gan, Israel 2The Sackler School of Medicine, Tel-Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel 3Department of Pediatric Neurosurgery, Dana Children's Hospital, Tel-Aviv-Sourasky Medical Center, Tel Aviv, Israel Pediatric brain tumors are the most common solid tumor type and the leading cause of cancer-related death in children. The immune system plays an important r...
Source: Frontiers in Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
Xuequn Xu†, J. N. Rashida Gnanaprakasam†, John Sherman† and Ruoning Wang* Center for Childhood Cancer and Blood Diseases, Hematology/Oncology &BMT, The Research Institute at Nationwide Children's Hospital, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, United States The adoptive transfer of T cells expressing chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) through genetic engineering is one of the most promising new therapies for treating cancer patients. A robust CAR T cell-mediated anti-tumor response requires the coordination of nutrient and energy supplies with CAR T cell expansion and function. Howe...
Source: Frontiers in Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
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