The Chemosensory Pleasure Scale: A New Assessment for Measuring Hedonic Smell and Taste Capacities.

We examined the reliability and validity of the CPS in our study. First, we conducted exploratory factor analysis (EFA) and confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) to identify and examine the structure of the CPS. Second, the CPS's validity and test-retest stability were investigated. The CPS was correlated with other measurements of anhedonia and pleasure experience. Furthermore, the empirical validity of CPS was also examined in our study. The results indicated that the CPS is a reliable and valid measure for assessing an individual's hedonic capacity for smell and taste pleasure in nonclinical samples. Further application of the CPS for various populations is also discussed herein, especially for patients with mental disorders such as depression, schizophrenia and autism. PMID: 31201424 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Chemical Senses - Category: Biochemistry Authors: Tags: Chem Senses Source Type: research

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 In this episode of Inside Schizophrenia, our hosts tackle the topic of early onset – or childhood – schizophrenia. Host Rachel Star discusses her personal experiences with schizophrenia symptoms as an adolescent and Dr. Joseph Gonzalez-Heydrich from Harvard Medical School discusses some of the latest research. Listen in now! About Our Guest Joseph Gonzalez-Heydrich, MD is Director of the Developmental Neuropsychiatry Clinic at Boston Children’s Hospital and an Associate Professor of Psychiatry at the Harvard Medical School. He did his undergraduate and medical school at Johns Hopkins, his residency t...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Disorders Inside Schizophrenia Psychiatry Source Type: blogs
Publication date: Available online 2 July 2019Source: Pharmacological ResearchAuthor(s): Maria Rosaria Domenici, Antonella Ferrante, Alberto Martire, Valentina Chiodi, Rita Pepponi, Maria Teresa Tebano, Patrizia PopoliAbstractAdenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) is a G-protein coupled receptor that regulates several important functions in the central nervous system. Large amount of preclinical data suggests that the A2AR could represent a target for the development of new therapeutic strategies for different neuropsychiatric conditions. In this review we will recapitulate and discuss the most relevant studies on the role of A2ARs...
Source: Pharmacological Research - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 2 July 2019Source: Seminars in Cell &Developmental BiologyAuthor(s): Daniela D. Pollak, Ulrike Weber-StadlbauerAbstractPrenatal exposure to infectious or inflammatory insults is increasingly recognized in the etiology of neuropsychiatric diseases, including schizophrenia, autism, depression and bipolar disorder. New discoveries highlight that maternal immune activation can lead to pathological effects on brain and behavior in multiple generations. This review describes the transgenerational consequences of maternal immune activation in shaping brain and behavior anomalies and disease ...
Source: Seminars in Cell and Developmental Biology - Category: Cytology Source Type: research
IMPORTANCE: Abnormalities in amygdala response to threatening faces have been observed in anxiety disorders, autism, bipolar disorder, depression, posttraumatic stress disorder, and schizophrenia. Abnormally hyperactive and hypoactive responses have typica...
Source: SafetyLit - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news
CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest a causal role of insomnia in autism spectrum disorder and bipolar disorder. Future disease models should include insomnia as a factor for these two disorders to develop effective interventions. More detailed mechanism studies may also be inspired by this causal inference. PMID: 31234011 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Journal of the Association of European Psychiatrists - Category: Psychiatry Tags: Eur Psychiatry Source Type: research
Transposable elements (TEs) are highly repetitive DNA sequences in the human genome that are the relics of previous retrotransposition events. Although the majority of TEs are transcriptionally inactive due to acquired mutations or epigenetic processes, around 8% of TEs exert transcriptional activity. It has been found that TEs contribute to somatic mosaicism that accounts for functional specification of various brain cells. Indeed, autonomous retrotransposition of long interspersed element-1 (LINE-1) sequences has been reported in the neural rat progenitor cells from the hippocampus, the human foetal brain and the human e...
Source: Frontiers in Genetics - Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Source Type: research
In conclusion, this review highlights the importance for clinicians to investigate for the presence of chronic nightmares along with other sleep difficulties (most commonly, insomnia and sleep apnea), to consider the potential influence of nightmares on the course of the primary mental disorder, and to be prepared to grant access to treatments targeting nightmares. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2019 APA, all rights reserved)
Source: Dreaming - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research
ConclusionsOur results suggest a causal role of insomnia in autism spectrum disorder and bipolar disorder. Future disease models should include insomnia as a factor for these two disorders to develop effective interventions. More detailed mechanism studies may also be inspired by this causal inference.
Source: European Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 22 June 2019Source: Seminars in Cell &Developmental BiologyAuthor(s): Maude Bordeleau, Micaël Carrier, Giamal N. Luheshi, Marie-Ève TremblayAbstractIn addition to their traditional role as immune sentinels, recent discoveries over the last decade have shown that microglial functions now include regulation of neuronal/glial cell migration, differentiation and maturation, as well as neuronal network formation. It was thus proposed that disruption of these microglial roles, during critical periods of brain development, could lead to the pathological onset of several neurodeve...
Source: Seminars in Cell and Developmental Biology - Category: Cytology Source Type: research
Yes: there are opiates that derive from various food proteins that exert peculiar effects on the human brain. The worst? The opiates that come from the gliadin protein of wheat and related grains. Opiate receptor researchers at the National Institutes of Health originally coined the term “gluteomorphin” nearly 40 years ago when it was determined that the gliadin protein of wheat undergoes partial digestion (since humans lack the digestive enzymes to fully digest proline-rich amino acid sequences in proteins from seeds of grasses) to yield peptides that are 4- to 5-amino acids long. Some of these peptides w...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: Opioids addictive binge eating bulimia eating disorders Gliadin opiates wheat belly Source Type: blogs
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