Study Combines PD-1 and CAR-T Immunotherapy to Treat Mesothelioma

At the 2019 American Society of Clinical Oncology annual meeting, Dr. Prasad Adusumilli from Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center shared exciting new results from his study on combination immunotherapy for malignant pleural mesothelioma. Among the 18 mesothelioma patients in the study, 14 received a combination of two different immunotherapy treatments. Eleven of this group experienced a complete response, a partial response or stable disease. The latest results from this phase 1 clinical trial were presented June 4. They demonstrate the promise of using two immunotherapy approaches at one time. Phase 1 studies are designed only to test the safety, side effects, best doses and timing of a new treatment, not cure cancer. They typically include patients not helped by other treatments. Still, the results are encouraging and pave the way for further research on combining two distinct types of immunotherapy to treat aggressive, incurable cancers. Targeting Mesothelin from Two Angles Mesothelin is a protein found on mesothelioma and other cancer cells. Researchers have been searching for ways to help the human immune system better recognize mesothelin and attack the cancer cells displaying it. To leverage the immune system against mesothelioma, the researchers combined CAR T-cell therapy and PD-1 drugs. CAR T-cell therapy begins with collecting a patient’s own immune cells. These T-cells are then engineered in the lab to better recognize a specific feature — in this...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Source Type: news

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Background: Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) is an aggressive cancer, with a five-year survival rate of
Source: European Respiratory Journal - Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Tags: Pleural and mediastinal malignancies Source Type: research
Results from a phase III clinical trial comparing Keytruda (pembrolizumab) to standard chemotherapy shows the immunotherapy drug still has a long way to go as a viable treatment option for malignant pleural mesothelioma. Keytruda did not improve progression-free survival for mesothelioma patients who progressed after first-line chemotherapy. The disappointing results from the PROMISE-meso study were presented at the European Society of Medical Oncology (ESMO) annual meeting last week. It was the first randomized trial comparing progression-free survival between immunotherapy and first-line chemotherapy for mesothelioma p...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Source Type: news
A promising and expensive type of immunotherapy, called CAR T-cell therapy, is now covered by Medicare. This news may affect mesothelioma patients in the future. Chimeric antigen receptor T-cell, or CAR T-cell, therapy involves the laboratory reprogramming of a patient’s T cells, which are a type of white blood cell responsible for protecting the body against infection and disease. The T cells are genetically modified to better recognize and attack cancer. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved the immunotherapy procedure for non-Hodgkin lymphoma and B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia. It is...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Source Type: news
This study quantifies the disturbing trend that, despite the expansion in the number of patients eligible for expensive and potentially toxic ICIs [immune checkpoint inhibitors], the ratio of those benefiting is decreasing,” wrote Dr. Daniel V.T. Catenacci, co-author of an editorial that accompanied the study in JAMA Network. “Observations in this article are sobering and remind us to keep expectations realistic.” Both Catenacci and Haslem agreed that the study should serve as a reminder to patients, physicians and policy makers to have more realistic discussions about the use of, and expectations of, the...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Source Type: news
The National Cancer Institute has opened a clinical trial using mesothelioma patients and their family members to explore predisposition to the cancer and potential solutions to negating it. The trial is a follow up to an earlier study of a genetic mutation that creates susceptibility to various cancers but a longer-than-normal survival with platinum-based chemotherapy treatment. “This is an important, long-term study that could have implications not only for a patient, but for family members, too,” Dr. Raffit Hassan, NCI senior investigator told The Mesothelioma Center at Asbestos.com. “Progress can be m...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Source Type: news
Researchers at Osaka University in Japan have identified a key component of physical health associated with response to immunotherapy drugs. Among people with non-small cell lung cancer, higher levels of muscle mass predicted a better response to PD-1 inhibitor immunotherapy. Sarcopenia — the term used to describe low muscle mass levels — appears to reduce the benefits a person receives from immunotherapy cancer treatment. “Sarcopenia at baseline is a significant predictor of worse outcome in patients with advanced NSCLC [non-small cell lung cancer] receiving PD-1 blockade,” the study investigators ...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Source Type: news
Doctors in China may have uncovered an effective second- or third-line treatment option for patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma. Dr. RongQin Meng, an oncologist at 363 Hospital in Cheng Du, said the investigational drug Apatinib (rivoceranib) could become part of a much-needed advance in mesothelioma treatment. After first- and second-line chemotherapy combinations had failed to slow tumor growth in a 58-year-old woman, Apatinib provided a five-month progression-free survival. “I was surprised at the result,” Meng told The Mesothelioma Center at Asbestos.com. “After taking the drug, the quality o...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Source Type: news
Physicians may soon use artificial intelligence (AI) and medical images to study tumors without a biopsy. The techniques developed to study tumors in this new way are described in the September 1 issue of The Lancet Oncology. Along with helping physicians learn more about tumors without surgery, the new approach should help identify which cancer patients will respond best to cutting-edge immunotherapy treatments. The AI techniques could be useful for “predicting clinical outcomes of patients treated with immunotherapy when validated by further prospective randomized trials,” the authors wrote. Immunotherapy tre...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Source Type: news
Oncologists in Spain are recruiting patients for the randomized phase of the pleural mesothelioma clinical trial involving ONCOS-102, the promising immunotherapy vaccine. Optimism surrounding the trial stems from encouraging results obtained recently in the six-patient safety cohort used as a precautionary lead-in. The trial involves the vaccine in combination with standard-of-care chemotherapy for patients with inoperable disease. ONCOS-102 is a scientifically engineered adenovirus that is designed to activate a patient’s immune system to selectively target cancer cells. It is being developed by Targovax, a Scandina...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Source Type: news
A clinical trial testing a new therapeutic modality on patients with pleural and peritoneal mesothelioma is officially underway. Selecta Biosciences, a clinical-stage biopharmaceutical company, and the National Cancer Institute (NCI) teamed up for the phase 1 clinical trial under the Cooperative Research and Development Agreement. The trial will evaluate safety and tolerability of SEL-403, Selecta’s investigational new drug combination consisting of a potent anti-tumor agent (LMB-100) and a drug that prevents an immune response (SVP-Rapamycin). LMB-100 and SVP-Rapamycin have been studied separately in clinical trials...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Source Type: news
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