rSjp40 inhibits activated hepatic stellate cells by promoting nuclear translocation of YB1 and inducing BMP-7/Smad1/5/8 pathway

Activation of hepatic stellate cells is the dominant pathogenic event during the process of liver fibrosis. Bone morphogenic protein (BMP)-7 has recently been identified as an anti-fibrotic factor and leads to...
Source: Parasites and Vectors - Category: Microbiology Authors: Tags: Research Source Type: research

Related Links:

Publication date: Available online 3 July 2019Source: International Journal for Parasitology: Parasites and WildlifeAuthor(s): Amy S. Northover, R.C. Andrew Thompson, Alan J. Lymbery, Adrian F. Wayne, Sarah Keatley, Amanda Ash, Aileen D. Elliot, Keith Morris, Stephanie S. GodfreyAbstractFauna translocations play an integral role in the management of threatened wildlife, though we are limited by our understanding of how the host-parasite community changes during translocation. During this longitudinal field-based study, we monitored gastrointestinal, blood-borne and ectoparasite taxa infecting woylies (Bettongia penicillata...
Source: International Journal for Parasitology: Parasites and Wildlife - Category: Parasitology Source Type: research
The gastrointestinal tract hosts the largest collection of commensal microbes in the body. Infections at this site can cause significant perturbations in the microbiota, known as dysbiosis, that facilitate the expansion of pathobionts, and can elicit inappropriate immune responses that impair the intestinal barrier function. Dysbiosis typically occurs during intestinal infection with Toxoplasma gondii. Host resistance to T. gondii depends on a potent Th1 response. In addition, a Th17 response is also elicited. How Th17 cells contribute to the host response to T. gondii remains unclear. Here we show that Class I-restricted ...
Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Alessandro Poggi1*, Roberto Benelli2, Roberta Venè1, Delfina Costa1, Nicoletta Ferrari1, Francesca Tosetti1 and Maria Raffaella Zocchi3 1Molecular Oncology and Angiogenesis Unit, IRCCS Ospedale Policlinico San Martino, Genoa, Italy 2Immunology Unit, IRCCS Ospedale Policlinico San Martino, Genoa, Italy 3Division of Immunology, Transplantation and Infectious Diseases, IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy It is well established that natural killer (NK) cells are involved in both innate and adaptive immunity. Indeed, they can recognize molecules induced at the cell surface by stress signals ...
Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Conclusion: ROS promote CD8+ T cell activation by facilitating autoantigen cross-presentation by DCs. ROS scavengers could potentially represent an important component of therapies aiming to disrupt autoantigen presentation and activation of CD8+ T cells in individuals at-risk for developing T1D. In Type 1 Diabetes (T1D), pancreatic β cells are attacked by a T cell mediated autoimmune response and lose their ability to produce insulin (1–3). While a number of immune cell subsets are involved throughout the development of T1D, cytotoxic CD8+ T cells (CTLs) function as primary effectors of β cell damag...
Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
This article provides an overview of this interplay with an emphasis on autophagy. Lysosomal degradation is an important mechanism of defense against numerous pathogens. This can be accomplished not only through the endocytic pathway but also through macroautophagy (called herein autophagy) (Levine et al., 2011). Autophagy is a homeostatic mechanism whereby large portions of cytosol or entire organelles are encircled by a double membrane (isolation membrane) leading to the formation of an autophagosome (Klionsky and Emr, 2000; Yoshimori, 2004; Mizushima et al., 2010). This structure fuses with lysosomes resulting in...
Source: Frontiers in cellular and infection microbiology - Category: Microbiology Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 25 April 2019Source: International Journal for Parasitology: Parasites and WildlifeAuthor(s): Rae Marvin Smith, Raksha Vasantrai Bhoora, Antoinette Kotze, J. Paul Grobler, Desire Lee DaltonAbstractTranslocation of animals in fragmented habitats is an important means of dispersal and gene flow, however, the movement of animals has led to the spread of various diseases globally and wildlife are often the reservoirs of these diseases. Currently, Cape mountain zebra are translocated within South Africa as a management method for augmentation of isolated and fragmented populations. The movemen...
Source: International Journal for Parasitology: Parasites and Wildlife - Category: Parasitology Source Type: research
Wanbo Zhu1,2†, Jingyang Li1,3†, Faustina Pappoe4, Jilong Shen1* and Li Yu1* 1Department of Microbiology and Parasitology, Anhui Provincial Laboratory of Microbiology and Parasitology, Anhui Key Laboratory of Zoonoses, Anhui Medical University, Hefei, China 2Graduate School of Affiliated Anhui Provincial Hospital, Anhui Medical University, Hefei, China 3The Clinical Laboratory of the Third People’s Hospital of Heifei, Hefei, China 4Department of Microbiology and Immunology, School of Medical Sciences, University of Cape Coast, Cape Coast, Ghana One of the most successful intracellular paras...
Source: Frontiers in Microbiology - Category: Microbiology Source Type: research
In this study, we first generated L. passim clone expressing fluorescent marker and then attempted to use CRISPR/Cas9 for the genome editing. We will discuss how these approaches can be used to better understand honey bee-trypanosomatid parasite interactions. Materials and Methods Culture of L. passim Lotmaria passim strain SF (PRA-403) was obtained from the American Type Culture Collection (ATCC) and cultured in the modified FP-FB medium (Salathe et al., 2012) at 25°C without CO2. To monitor the growth rate of L. passim, the parasites were first inoculated at 5 × 105/mL and their number during the culture was...
Source: Frontiers in cellular and infection microbiology - Category: Microbiology Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 24 April 2019Source: Parasitology InternationalAuthor(s): Ben-Yeddy Abel Chitama, Shinya Miyazaki, Xiaotong Zhu, Wataru Kagaya, Kazuhide Yahata, Osamu KanekoAbstractPlasmodium falciparum, an obligate intracellular protozoan parasite which causes the severe form of human malaria, exports numerous proteins to the infected red blood cell that are important for its survival and of severe pathological effect to its host. These proteins and their export mechanisms are candidates for drug and vaccine development, and among them is the Plasmodium SURFIN family of proteins. Previously we showed th...
Source: Parasitology International - Category: Parasitology Source Type: research
Tatiane S. Lima and Melissa B. Lodoen* Department of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry and the Institute for Immunology, University of California, Irvine, Irvine, CA, United States Toxoplasma gondii is an intracellular protozoan parasite of global importance that can remarkably infect, survive, and replicate in nearly all mammalian cells. Notably, 110 years after its discovery, Toxoplasmosis is still a neglected parasitic infection. Although most human infections with T. gondii are mild or asymptomatic, T. gondii infection can result in life-threatening disease in immunocompromised individuals and in the develop...
Source: Frontiers in cellular and infection microbiology - Category: Microbiology Source Type: research
More News: Liver | Microbiology | Parasitic Diseases | Parasitology | Translocation | Urology & Nephrology