Molecular Typing of Mycoplasma pneumoniae Strains in Sweden from 1996 to 2017 and the Emergence of a New P1 Cytadhesin Gene, Variant 2e Bacteriology

Mycoplasma pneumoniae causes respiratory infections, such as community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), with epidemics recurring every 3 to 7 years. In 2010 and 2011, many countries experienced an extraordinary epidemic peak. The cause of these recurring epidemics is not understood, but decreasing herd immunity and shifts in the strains’ antigenic properties have been suggested as contributing factors. M. pneumoniae PCR-positive samples were collected between 1996 and 2017 from four neighboring counties inhabited by 12% of Sweden’s population. A total of 578 isolates were characterized directly from 624 clinical samples using P1 typing by sequencing and multilocus variable number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA). A fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-PCR approach was also used to detect mutations associated with macrolide resistance in the 23S rRNA gene. Through P1 typing, the strains were classified into type 1 and type 2, as well as variants 2a, 2b, 2c, and a new variant found in nine of the strains, denoted variant 2e. Twelve MLVA types were distinguished, and 3-5-6-2 (42.4%), 4-5-7-2 (37.4%), and 3-6-6-2 (14.9%) predominated. Several P1 and MLVA types cocirculated each year, but type 2/variant 2 strains and MLVA types 3-5-6-2 and 4-5-7-2 predominated during the epidemic period comprising the peak of 2010 and 2011. In 2016 and 2017, type 1 became more common, and MLVA type 4-5-7-2 predominated. We also found that 0.2% (1/578) of the strains carried a macrolide ...
Source: Journal of Clinical Microbiology - Category: Microbiology Authors: Tags: Bacteriology Source Type: research

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CONCLUSIONS: Non-influenza respiratory microorganisms frequently co-circulated during the epidemic peaks of influenza, which easily being ignored in CAP therapy. In patients with bacterial and viral co-infections, identifying the etiologic agent is crucial for patient's therapy. PMID: 31174691 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Comparative immunology, microbiology and infectious diseases. - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Comp Immunol Microbiol Infect Dis Source Type: research
As a medical student, the place I dreaded most was the ward at the children’s hospital where they kept the chronic ventilator patients. Unlike the other floors, where there was shouting and laughter and tears, and all the commotion and turbulence of youth, here it was dark and lifeless and eerie, with no sound except the hum of the ventilators, and the rattle of air being forced through plastic tubes. It was a place of failure and defeat, the desolate aftermath of some vast and tragic battle. An unexpected aftermath of measles My patient was a teenager who had been in a coma for years. His limbs had stubbornly twiste...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Children's Health Infectious diseases Men's Health Vaccines Women's Health Source Type: blogs
Kay B. Barnes1†, Karleigh A. Hamblin1†, Mark I. Richards1, Thomas R. Laws1, Andreas Vente2, Helen S. Atkins1,3,4 and Sarah V. Harding1* 1Defence Science and Technology Laboratory, Salisbury, United Kingdom 2MerLion Pharmaceuticals, Berlin, Germany 3University of Exeter, Exeter, United Kingdom 4London School of Hygiene &Tropical Medicine, London, United Kingdom The efficacy of the novel fluoroquinolone finafloxacin was evaluated as a potential therapeutic in vitro and in vivo, following an intranasal infection of Francisella tularensis strain SchuS4 in BALB/c mice. We demonstrated that short t...
Source: Frontiers in Microbiology - Category: Microbiology Source Type: research
Corinne Loeuillet1, Anais Mondon1, Salima Kamche1, Véronique Curri2, Jean Boutonnat2,3, Pierre Cavaillès1 and Marie-France Cesbron-Delauw1* 1BNI Team, Grenoble Alpes, CNRS, Grenoble INP, TIMC-IMAG, Grenoble, France 2Therex Team, Grenoble Alpes, CNRS, Grenoble INP, TIMC-IMAG, Grenoble, France 3Unit of Anatomopathology, Institute of Biology and Pathology, Grenoble Alpes Hospital, Grenoble, France Toxoplasmosis is considered as an opportunistic parasitic disease. If post-natally acquired in children or adults, it may pass unnoticed, at least with strains of European origin. However, in the wild bioto...
Source: Frontiers in cellular and infection microbiology - Category: Microbiology Source Type: research
Conclusions: We present the most detailed genomic analysis of MRSA isolated in Sri Lanka to date. The analysis identified a PVL-positive ST5-MRSA-IVc that is prevalent among MRSA causing clinical infections in Sri Lanka. Furthermore, this clone was also found among isolates from the United Kingdom and Australia. Introduction Worldwide, Staphylococcus aureus is the primary causative agent of community-acquired skin and soft tissue infections (SSTI) and is an important cause of hospital-associated invasive infections including bacteremia, pneumonia and endocarditis (Bell et al., 2002; David and Daum, 2010). Panton-Va...
Source: Frontiers in cellular and infection microbiology - Category: Microbiology Source Type: research
In conclusion, we unraveled a mechanism of immune evasion of Kpn KPC ST258, which may contribute to design more effective strategies for the treatment of these multi-resistant bacterial infections. Introduction Klebsiella pneumoniae (Kpn) is a Gram-negative pathogen causing a wide range of infections from urinary tract infections to pneumonia. Kpn is a member of the so-called ESKAPE group of microorganisms, a term that emphasizes the fact that they effectively “escape” the effects of antibacterial drugs (1). Antimicrobial resistance is a significant problem for the treatment of infectious diseases caused ...
Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
This study identified prophages as mediators of bacterial virulence in a model of infectious endocarditis, probably through promotion of interaction with extracellular matrix components. Further studies are needed to identify mechanisms leading to promotion of intrinsic virulence. Introduction Challenges related to Staphylococcus aureus infections in the human and veterinary clinics mobilized important human and technical resources. S. aureus can colonize 20–30% of the general population asymptomatically but is also capable of causing a wide spectrum of diseases ranging from benign infections, to particularly...
Source: Frontiers in Microbiology - Category: Microbiology Source Type: research
Conclusion This study revealed that Enterococcus species with biofilm potentials and extracellular virulence properties extensively occur in retail RTE shrimps. A significant number of isolated strains are resistant to antibiotics and harbor resistant and virulent genes, denoting a significant route of resistance and virulence dissemination to bacteria in humans. There is an inadequate understanding of the intricacies of antibiotic-resistant enterococci of food origin that belong to enterococci aside from E. faecium and E. faecalis. Findings from this study reveal detailed antibiotic resistance of E. durans, E. casselifla...
Source: Frontiers in Microbiology - Category: Microbiology Source Type: research
Conclusions: Human challenge studies and systems biology approaches are important tools that should be used in concert to advance our understanding of influenza infection and provide targets for novel therapeutics and immunizations. Introduction Although influenza virus was recognized as an important pathogen over a century ago, influenza continues to cause a significant burden of disease. In the United States alone, it's estimated that in the 2017–2018 season there were 959,000 hospitalizations related to influenza illness, and 79,400 deaths (CDC, 2018). Worldwide, WHO estimates that annual influenza...
Source: Frontiers in cellular and infection microbiology - Category: Microbiology Source Type: research
In this study, we sought to investigate whether SH0165 (serovar 5, high-virulent strain) and HN0001 (serovar 6, non-virulent strain) infection induces autophagy and the specific role of autophagy in bacterial invasion and inflammation during H. parasuis infection. Moreover, we explored the mechanism underlying autophagy regulated inflammation through inflammatory signaling cascades during H. parasuis infection. This observation could provide useful information for further understanding the role of autophagy in H. parasuis infection and improve our knowledge of new strategies against this pathogen. Materials and Methods B...
Source: Frontiers in cellular and infection microbiology - Category: Microbiology Source Type: research
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