Race and disease risk and Berlin ’s singing nightingales

Noncancerous tumors of the uterus —also known as fibroids—are extremely common in women. One risk factor, according to the scientific literature, is “black race.” But such simplistic categories may actually obscure the real drivers of the disparities in outcomes for women with fibroids, according to this week’s guest. Host Meagan Cantwell speaks with Jada Benn Torres, an associate professor of anthropology at Vanderbilt University in Nashville, about how using interdisciplinary approaches— incorporating both genetic and cultural perspectives—can paint a more complete picture of how race shapes our understanding o f diseases and how they are treated. In our monthly books segment, book review editor Valerie Thompson talks with David Rothenberg, author of the book Nightingales in Berlin: Searching for the Perfect Sound, about spending time with birds, whales, and neuroscientists trying to understand the aesthe tics of human and animal music. This week’s episode was edited by Podigy. Download the transcript (PDF) Listen to previous podcasts. About the Science Podcast [Image: Carlos Delgado/Wikipedia; Matthias Ripp/Flickr; Music: Jeffrey Cook]
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

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The study tasked individuals with Tourette Syndrome ages 11 to 19 years with modifying their behavior while viewing a brain region associated with their tics.
Source: Yale Science and Health News - Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news
Publication date: Available online 16 August 2019Source: Brain, Behavior, and ImmunityAuthor(s): V. Baglioni, E. Coutinho, D.A. Menassa, M.P. Giannocaro, L. Jacobson, M. Buttiglione, O. Petruzzelli, F. Cardona, A. Vincent, the EMTICS collaborative groupAbstractIn Tourette Syndrome (TS) a role for autoantibodies directed against neuronal proteins has long been suspected, but so far results are still inconsistent. The aim of this study was to look for antibodies to specific or undefined neuronal proteins that could be involved in the aetiology of the disease.Sera from children with Tourette syndrome or another chronic tic di...
Source: Brain, Behavior, and Immunity - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
Abstract In Tourette Syndrome (TS) a role for autoantibodies directed against neuronal proteins has long been suspected, but so far results are still inconsistent. The aim of this study was to look for antibodies to specific or undefined neuronal proteins that could be involved in the aetiology of the disease. Sera from children with Tourette syndrome or another chronic tic disorder (TS/TD), collected as part of the longitudinal European Multicentre Tics in Children Study, were investigated. Participants included 30 siblings of patients with TS/TD prior to developing tics (preclinical stage) and the same children ...
Source: Brain, Behavior, and Immunity - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: Brain Behav Immun Source Type: research
Tics wax and wane regarding their severity, while their expression is affected by non-motor sensory or cognitive elements that are mostly known as ‘premonitory urges’. Since premonitory urges are often used in non-pharmacological interventions to decrease tic severity, it is of interest in the present study to examine whether premonitory urges can actually predict tic severity. 52 children and adolescents diagnosed with tics and Tourette syndrome (29 children with provisional tic disorder, 16children with chronic motor tic disorder, and 7 children with Tourette syndrome) were included in the study. Their age ra...
Source: Frontiers in Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
Feeling your baby twist, wriggle, punch, kick, and hiccup is simply one of pregnancy’s biggest thrills (and it sure beats heartburn, puffy feet, an aching back, and some of the other hallmarks of these nine months). There may be no better proof that a brand-new — and impressively energetic — life is developing within you. But fetal movement during pregnancy can also drive a mom-to-be batty with questions and doubts: Is my baby kicking enough? Too much? Does my baby have four legs (because it sure feels that way when the kicking starts)? Although every baby is different when it comes to fetal movement, and...
Source: Cord Blood News - Category: Perinatology & Neonatology Authors: Tags: babies brain development parents pregnancy private cord blood bank Source Type: blogs
Activity in the supplementary motor area (SMA) has been associated with tics in Tourette Syndrome (TS). The aim of this study was to test a novel intervention – real-time functional magnetic resonance imaging (rt-fMRI) neurofeedback from SMA – for reduction of tics in adolescents with TS.
Source: Biological Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tags: Archival Report Source Type: research
This study suggests that there is no difference in aggressive behavior between children with tics without comorbidities and healthy children. It is possible that aggressive behavior in children with tic disorders is predominantly associated with comorbid attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder.
Source: European Child and Adolescent Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
Authors: Giuli MV, Giuliani E, Screpanti I, Bellavia D, Checquolo S Abstract Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is a subgroup of 15%-20% of diagnosed breast cancer patients. It is generally considered to be the most difficult breast cancer subtype to deal with, due to the lack of estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), which usually direct targeted therapies. In this scenario, the current treatments of TNBC-affected patients rely on tumor excision and conventional chemotherapy. As a result, the prognosis is overall poor. Thus, the identification and...
Source: Journal of Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: J Oncol Source Type: research
PURPOSE OF REVIEW The purpose of this article is to present current information on the phenomenology, epidemiology, comorbidities, and pathophysiology of tic disorders and discuss therapy options. It is hoped that a greater understanding of each of these components will provide clinicians with the necessary information to deliver thoughtful and optimal care to affected individuals. RECENT FINDINGS Recent advances include the finding that Tourette syndrome is likely due to a combination of several different genes, both low-effect and larger-effect variants, plus environmental factors. Pathophysiologically, increasing e...
Source: CONTINUUM: Lifelong Learning in Neurology - Category: Neurology Tags: REVIEW ARTICLES Source Type: research
Feeling your baby twist, wriggle, punch, kick, and hiccup is simply one of pregnancy’s biggest thrills (and it sure beats heartburn, puffy feet, an aching back, and some of the other hallmarks of these nine months). There may be no better proof that a brand-new — and impressively energetic — life is developing within you. But fetal movement during pregnancy can also drive a mom-to-be batty with questions and doubts: Is my baby kicking enough? Too much? Does my baby have four legs (because it sure feels that way when the kicking starts)? Although every baby is different when it comes to fetal movement, and...
Source: Cord Blood News - Category: Perinatology & Neonatology Authors: Tags: babies brain development parents pregnancy private cord blood bank Source Type: blogs
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