Brain Tumor Classification Using Principal Component Analysis and Artificial Neural Network

The abnormal growth of cells in the brain is known as brain tumor. A brain tumor is a kind of disease that can hit children, adults, and older adults. In this work, a proposed method for brain tumor detection and classification using MATLAB and based on magnetic resonance imaging plays an essential role in the brain-tumor disease diagnostic application that is based on manual and automatic detection. Moreover, various kinds of tumors exist so it is complicated to detect, and thus it is hard to make decisions. Correct segmentation and image enhancement give an accurate classification of brain tumor types. A probabilistic neural network was applied for classification. Two steps were used for making the correct decision: first is feature extraction based on principal component analysis, and second is the classification done using a probabilistic neural network. The known classifications are “normal,” “benign,” and “malignant.”
Source: Journal of Clinical Engineering - Category: Medical Devices Tags: FEATURE ARTICLES Source Type: research

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Publication date: Available online 24 April 2019Source: NeurocomputingAuthor(s): Hao Chen, Zhiguang Qin, Yi Ding, LAN Tian, Zhen QinAbstractGliomas are the most frequent primary brain tumors, which have a high mortality. Surgery is the most commonly used treatment. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is especially useful to assess gliomas and evaluate the success of the treatment in clinical practice. So accurately segmenting the brain tumor from MRI images is the key to clinical diagnostics and treatment planning. However, a large quantity of data produced by MRI prevents manual segmentation in a reasonable time. So automati...
Source: Neurocomputing - Category: Neuroscience Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 24 April 2019Source: Journal of Clinical NeuroscienceAuthor(s): Mehmet Osman Akçakaya, Assel Saryyeva, Hans E. Heissler, Elvis J. Hermann, Joachim K. KraussAbstractOccurrence of gliomas in patients with chronic deep brain stimulation (DBS) has been reported few. It has been speculated whether there could be a causal relationship. Here, we report the development of a pilocytic astrocytoma in close vicinity of a DBS electrode during the course of chronic DBS. A 38-year-old man with refractory dystonic head tremor underwent bilateral implantation of quadripolar DBS electrodes in the t...
Source: Journal of Clinical Neuroscience - Category: Neuroscience Source Type: research
In conclusion, while rs-fMRI use in clinical neuroradiology practice is limited, enthusiasm appears to be quite high and there are several possible avenues in which further research and development may facilitate its penetration into clinical practice. Introduction Techniques for quantifying spatial and temporal brain activity have developed rapidly since the first demonstrations that MRI could be used to measure modulations in blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) tissue contrast (1). The observation that MRI could be used to monitor temporally correlated low-frequency activity fluctuations in spatially remote brain a...
Source: Frontiers in Neurology - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
Conclusion: Clear evidence demonstrates that GBCAs lead to gadolinium deposition in the brain in a dose-dependent manner; however, only linear GBCAs have been associated with gadolinium deposition visualized on MRI. To date, no evidence links gadolinium deposition with any adverse health outcome. Updated medical society guidelines emphasize the importance of an individualized risk-benefit analysis with each administration of GBCAs. PMID: 30983897 [PubMed]
Source: Ochsner Journal - Category: General Medicine Tags: Ochsner J Source Type: research
Wei Li1†, Wei-Min Xiao1†, Yang-Kun Chen1*, Jian-Feng Qu1, Yong-Lin Liu1, Xue-Wen Fang2, Han-Yu Weng1 and Gen-Pei Luo11Department of Neurology, Dongguan People’s Hospital, Dongguan, China2Department of Radiology, Dongguan People’s Hospital, Dongguan, ChinaBackground: Anxiety is prevalent after a stroke. The pathophysiological mechanisms underlying the development of poststroke anxiety (PSA) remain unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical and neuroimaging risk factors for development of PSA and examine the effects of PSA on activities of daily living (ADL) and quality of life (...
Source: Frontiers in Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
Ivy D. Deng1, Luke Chung2, Natasha Talwar3,4, Fred Tam1, Nathan W. Churchill3, Tom A. Schweizer3,4,5,6† and Simon J. Graham1,2*† 1Physical Sciences Platform, Sunnybrook Research Institute (SRI), Toronto, ON, Canada 2Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada 3Neuroscience Research Program, Keenan Research Centre for Biomedical Science, Toronto, ON, Canada 4Institute of Medical Science, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada 5Division of Neurosurgery, St. Michael’s Hospital, Toronto, ON, Canada 6Institute of Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering, Univer...
Source: Frontiers in Human Neuroscience - Category: Neuroscience Source Type: research
Discussion Nystagmus is periodic eye movement that is involuntary where there is a slow drift of fixation. The slow drift can be followed by a fast saccade back to fixation. The pathological movement is the slow phase, but nystagmus is described by the fast phase (i.e. horizontal nystagmus, vertical nystagmus). Spasmus nutans (SN) is a movement disorder that is rare. The classic triad includes nystagmus, head bobbing or titubation, and torticollis, with these problems being in the absence of any ophthalmological or neurological condition. Onset is in the first year of life but ranges from 6-36 months. Time to resolution ...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news
Discussion Nystagmus is periodic eye movement that is involuntary where there is a slow drift of fixation. The slow drift can be followed by a fast saccade back to fixation. The pathological movement is the slow phase, but nystagmus is described by the fast phase (i.e. horizontal nystagmus, vertical nystagmus). Spasmus nutans (SN) is a movement disorder that is rare. The classic triad includes nystagmus, head bobbing or titubation, and torticollis, with these problems being in the absence of any ophthalmological or neurological condition. Onset is in the first year of life but ranges from 6-36 months. Time to resolution ...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news
AbstractPurposePositron emission tomography(PET) using O-(2-[18F]fluoroethyl)-L-tyrosine ([18F]FET) improves the diagnostics of cerebral gliomas compared with conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Sodium MRI is an evolving method to assess tumor metabolism. In this pilot study, we explored the relationship of [18F]FET-PET and sodium MRI in patients with cerebral gliomas in relation to the mutational status of the enzyme isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH).ProceduresTen patients with untreated cerebral gliomas and one patient with a recurrent glioblastoma (GBM) were investigated by dynamic [18F]FET-PET and sodium MRI us...
Source: Molecular Imaging and Biology - Category: Molecular Biology Source Type: research
Conclusions: The baseline deficit in a covariance-based network-like spatial component comprising of insula and IFG is predictive of the clinical course of schizophrenia. We do not find any evidence to support the notion of symptoms per se being neurotoxic to gray matter tissue. If judiciously combined with other available predictors of clinical outcome, multivariate morphometric information can improve our ability to predict prognosis in schizophrenia.IntroductionOver the last five decades, several neuroimaging studies have reported numerous morphological abnormalities in the brain, especially in the gray matter volume (G...
Source: Frontiers in Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
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