Thinking About Dumping Your Psychiatrist? You Might Not Need To

It’s tempting. I’ve been there. You hit a rough patch with your psychiatrist and you think, “I’m outta here.” There may be some things you can do to not only get your relationship back on track but also give it a turbo boost. I want to explore just a few of the things we can do to improve our relationships with our doctors. First some basic facts. Psychiatry is a rare discipline of medicine and the population of psychiatrists is aging and not being replaced quickly enough by younger physicians. There are many areas of the country, small town and rural particularly, that have few to no psychiatrists. Some of us get our psychiatric care from a clinic or public health facility. Our choices are limited in these settings also. Maybe you’ve heard of the phrase “doctor hopping.” That’s when we bounce from one psychiatrist to another looking for our perfect match. The problem with doctor hopping is that many of us don’t have a lot of options to jump to. Also, doctor hopping destroys our continuity of care and puts us at risk for relapse and misdiagnosis. What if I told you that we can create the match we want with our current doctors? No, I don’t have a magic wand, but I do have some ideas you can try that may empower you. Our relationships with our psychiatrists are exactly that, relationships. We are 50% of the partnership, and our psychiatrists are the other 50%. We are a team with the goal being the best mental h...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Bipolar Communication Personal Psychotherapy PTSD Schizophrenia Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

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This article contains discussion of suicide and self-harm In 2014, the Samaritans launched what seemed like an innovative new project: Radar. Designed to provide what the charity described as an “online safety net”, users could sign up to Radar to receive updates on the content of other people’s tweets, with emails sent out based on a list of key phrases meant to detect whether someone was feeling distressed. In principle, this meant people could keep an eye on friends who were vulnerable: if they missed a tweet where somebody said they felt suicidal or wanted to self-harm, for example, Radar would send ...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Facebook Feature Mental health Twitter Source Type: blogs
  What is the link between addiction and mental illness? Is addiction a choice? In today’s Not Crazy podcast, Gabe and Lisa discuss whether addiction should be classified as a disease and whether or not it should require medical treatment. Gabe also shares his personal story of addiction and how it tied in with his bipolar disorder. What’s your take? Tune in for an in-depth discussion which covers every angle of this often controversial topic. (Transcript Available Below) Please Subscribe to Our Show: And We Love Written Reviews!  About The Not Crazy podcast Hosts Gabe Howard is an award-winning...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Addiction General Mental Health and Wellness Not Crazy Podcast Recovery Source Type: blogs
(CNN) — Weekly sessions of yoga may ease depressive symptoms in people with other mental health issues, according to a systematic review and meta-analysis of existing research. “This is a great result to now encourage people who might be thinking about trying yoga that there’s some scientific evidence that it can be effective for helping reduce depressive symptoms,” said exercise physiologist and study author Jacinta Brinsley, a doctoral candidate at the University of South Australia. Depression is often associated with other mental health conditions. For example, 20 to 40% of people diagnosed with ...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health News Syndicated CBSN Boston CNN Yoga Source Type: news
Abstract OBJECTIVE: To assess whether physically active yoga is superior to waitlist control, treatment as usual and attention control in alleviating depressive symptoms in people with a diagnosed mental disorder recognised by the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM). DESIGN: Systematic review and meta-analysis following the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines. DATA SOURCES: Data were obtained from online databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsychINFO, CENTRAL, EMCARE, PEDro). The search and collection of eligible studies was conducted up t...
Source: British Journal of Sports Medicine - Category: Sports Medicine Authors: Tags: Br J Sports Med Source Type: research
This article reviews the role of the main components of the ECS as biomarkers in certain psychiatric disorders. Studies carried out in rodents evaluating the effects of pharmacological and genetic manipulation of cannabinoid receptors or endocannabinoids (eCBs) degrading enzymes were included. Likewise, the ECS-related alterations occurring at the molecular level in animal models reproducing some behavioral and/or neuropathological aspects of psychiatric disorders were reviewed. Furthermore, clinical studies evaluating gene or protein alterations in post-mortem brain tissue or in vivo blood, plasma, and cerebrospinal fluid...
Source: Frontiers in Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
Men and women experience schizophrenia differently; from the age of onset to symptoms and how society treats those with mental disorders.  Schizophrenic, Rachel Star Withers and co-host Gabe Howard continue the discussion of the differences from the last episode but change the focus to men.  Jason Jepson, an author who has schizophrenia joins for a man’s perspective and Dr. Hayden Finch returns to explain the clinical side of the issues. Highlights in “Schizophrenia in Men” Episode [01:30] Age of onset [04:00] Symptoms in men vs women [05:00] Interview with Jason Jepson [07:30] Jason discusses ...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Inside Schizophrenia Men's Issues Psychiatry Psychology Living With Schizophrenia Mental Disorder Mental Health Mental Illness Symptoms Of Schizophrenia Source Type: blogs
Across the landscape of mental health research and diagnosis, there is a diverse range of questionnaires and interviews available for use by clinicians and researchers to determine patient treatment plans or investigate internal and external etiologies. Although individually, these tools have each been assessed for their validity and reliability, there is little research examining the consistency between them in terms of what symptoms they assess, and how they assess those symptoms. Here, we provide an analysis of 126 different questionnaires and interviews commonly used to diagnose and screen for 10 different disorder typ...
Source: Frontiers in Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
Comorbidity is the presence of one or more additional conditions co-occurring with a primary condition. In this episode, host schizophrenic Rachel Star Withers with her cohost Gabe Howard will be discussing comorbidity with schizophrenia. Comorbidity is associated with worse health outcomes, more complex clinical management and increased health care costs. Occupational therapist and host of the podcast Occupied, Brock Cook, will be joining us to discuss ways that he works with people with schizophrenia to manage multiple health issues.  Highlights from “Comorbidity with Schizophrenia” Episode [01:28] What ...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Antipsychotic Inside Schizophrenia Mental Health and Wellness Psychiatry Psychology Psychotherapy Bipolar disorder and schizophrenia comorbid comorbid psychiatric conditions Comorbidities Comorbidity Diagnosis Of Schizophrenia Livi Source Type: blogs
Alcohol is a dangerous substance. It is addictive, can deteriorate one’s health, and puts innocent people in danger. However, it is embraced and celebrated in society and there are many opportunities throughout life to try alcohol. Knowing that alcohol is dangerous and addictive can leave many people wondering, “why do people drink alcohol?” Soothe an Underlying Mental Health Condition One of the major reasons that individuals who suffer from alcohol use disorder drink are because they are suffering from an underlying mental health condition and are using alcohol to self-medicate. This condition can be e...
Source: Cliffside Malibu - Category: Addiction Authors: Tags: Alcohol Alcohol Rehab Information Alcoholism alcohol abuse alcohol treatment alcohol treatment center Source Type: blogs
Epidemiological studies demonstrate an association between asthma and mental health disorders, although little is known about the shared genetics and causality of this association. Thus, we aimed to investigate shared genetics and the causal link between asthma and mental health disorders. We conducted a large-scale genome-wide cross-trait association study to investigate genetic overlap between asthma from the UK Biobank and eight mental health disorders from the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium: attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), anxiety disorder (ANX), autism spectrum disorder, bipolar disorder, eating diso...
Source: European Respiratory Journal - Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Tags: Asthma and allergy Original Articles: Asthma Source Type: research
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