Microbiological and chest X-ray studies on influenza B virus-associated pneumonia

Conclusions: High clinical suspicion is required to detect pneumonia in influenza B virus patients. Based on the CXR findings, the study also suggests that patients with pleural effusion and positive bacterial culture need more attention for the severity of clinical outcome. Moreover, critical care should be given to paediatric patients having higher WBC count, higher CRP level and lower Hgb. These parameters would be helpful to differentiate primary pneumonia from non-pneumonic influenza.
Source: Indian Journal of Medical Microbiology - Category: Microbiology Authors: Source Type: research

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ConclusionA third of patients receiving broad ‐spectrum antibiotics with a positive RV PCR had an opportunity for antimicrobial optimization, although this did not translate into a significant impact on the time to antibiotic deescalation or overall antibiotic use. Combination of RV PCR results with biomarkers to rule out bacterial coinfectio ns and chest radiographic findings may help enhance the likelihood of accepted antibiotic deescalation recommendations and represents an area of future research.
Source: Pharmacotherapy: The Journal of Human Pharmacology and Drug Therapy - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Authors: Tags: Original Research Article Source Type: research
ConclusionA third of patients receiving broad ‐spectrum antibiotics with a positive RV PCR had an opportunity for antimicrobial optimization, although this did not translate into a significant impact on the time to antibiotic de‐escalation or overall antibiotic use. Combination of RV PCR results with biomarkers to rule out bacterial co‐in fections and chest radiographic findings may help enhance the likelihood of accepted antibiotic de‐escalation recommendations and represents an area of future research.This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
Source: Pharmacotherapy: The Journal of Human Pharmacology and Drug Therapy - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Authors: Tags: Original Research Article Source Type: research
Authors: Kim JH, Kwon JH, Lee JY, Lee JS, Ryu JM, Kim SH, Lim KS, Kim WY Abstract Background: To investigate the clinical features of coinfection due to Mycoplasma pneumoniae (M. pneumoniae), a common copathogen in influenza, in influenza pneumonia patients. Methods: We reviewed 4,465 patients with influenza who visited a tertiary care hospital emergency department in Seoul (Korea) from 2010 through 2016, and underwent immunoglobulin M (IgM) serology or polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for M. pneumoniae. Influenza pneumonia was defined as laboratory-confirmed influenza plus radiographic pneumonia. Patients with ...
Source: Journal of Thoracic Disease - Category: Respiratory Medicine Tags: J Thorac Dis Source Type: research
​I recently met with a group from our children's hospital to standardize the hospital management of bronchiolitis according to the latest American Academy of Pediatrics guidelines. (Pediatrics 2014;134[5]:e1474; http://bit.ly/2QIGbMX.) Unfortunately, these guidelines seem to cause confusion for experienced and inexperienced emergency physicians alike.This confusion comes from the guidelines raising unaddressed issues and new questions, most importantly not tackling important aspects of frontline clinical practice. These guidelines were developed with the best evidence currently available, and their application mostly cau...
Source: M2E Too! Mellick's Multimedia EduBlog - Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs
CONCLUSIONS: We suggest for outpatient adults with acute cough due to suspected pneumonia, the following clinical symptoms and signs are suggestive of pneumonia (cough, dyspnea, pleural pain, sweating/fevers/shivers, aches and pains, temperature 38°C or greater, tachypnea and new and localizing chest examination signs. Those suspected of having pneumonia, should have a chest radiograph to improve diagnostic accuracy. While the measurement of C-reactive protein strengthens both the diagnosis and exclusion of pneumonia, there was no added benefit of measuring procalcitonin in this setting. We suggest for outpatient adult...
Source: Chest - Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Tags: Chest Source Type: research
​BY GREGORY TAYLOR, DO, &JACKLYN M​CPARLANE, DO​A 33-year-old woman with a past medical history of sickle cell SS presented to the emergency department with chest pain, difficulty breathing, and a cough for two days. Her chest pain was diffuse, without radiation, and partially reproducible. Her cough was nonproductive, and she also reported fever and chills.The patient noted this was different from her normal back and leg pain from past sickle cell crises. She was following up with a sickle cell specialist, and was compliant with her hydroxyurea treatment.Her temperature was 102.8°F, blood pressure was 94/60 ...
Source: The Case Files - Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: research
Discussion Normal kidneys regulate water balance to maintain a plasma osmolality of 275-290 mOsm/kg normally. Thirst and arginine vasopressin or antidiuretic hormone (ADH) are the primary regulators of plasma osmolality. ADH is made in the hypothalamus and released by the posterior pituitary gland. ADH acts on the kidney’s distal collecting duct to increase water reabsorption. ADH is appropriately released in hypovolemic states, such as dehydration caused by gastroenteritis. ADH has an ~10 minute half-life and therefore can respond to rapid changes in volume status. Sodium balance is regulated by aldosterone (as part...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news
Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is an acute infection of the lung parenchyma acquired outside of the hospital or less than 48 hours after hospital admission. CAP is classified into typical and atypical subtypes, differentiated by their presentation and causative pathogens. This illustration focuses on the classic features of typical CAP. The most common cause of typical CAP is Streptococcus pneumoniae. It is an encapsulated, gram-positive, lancet-shaped diplococcus bacterium. Other common causative pathogens include Haemophilus influenzae, Moraxella catarrhalis, gram-negative bacilli (e.g., Klebsiella), a...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - Category: General Medicine Authors: Tags: Conditions Infectious Disease Pulmonology Source Type: blogs
Conclusion: Streptococcus pneumoniae, Legionella, and influenza constitute the most common etiological agents for north Indian adults with CAP requiring hospitalization. Appropriate antibiotic therapy and preventive strategies such as influenza and pneumococcal vaccination need to be considered in appropriate groups.
Source: Lung India - Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Source Type: research
Abstract Pleuritic chest pain is characterized by sudden and intense sharp, stabbing, or burning pain in the chest when inhaling and exhaling. Pulmonary embolism is the most common serious cause, found in 5% to 21% of patients who present to an emergency department with pleuritic chest pain. A validated clinical decision rule for pulmonary embolism should be employed to guide the use of additional tests such as d-dimer assays, ventilation-perfusion scans, or computed tomography angiography. Myocardial infarction, pericarditis, aortic dissection, pneumonia, and pneumothorax are other serious causes that should be r...
Source: American Family Physician - Category: Primary Care Authors: Tags: Am Fam Physician Source Type: research
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