The use of hemodynamics to predict mortality in patients undergoing primary PCI for ST-elevation myocardial infarction.

The use of hemodynamics to predict mortality in patients undergoing primary PCI for ST-elevation myocardial infarction. Expert Rev Cardiovasc Ther. 2018 Jul 05;: Authors: Goins AE, Rayson R, Yeung M, Stouffer GA Abstract INTRODUCTION: Challenges remain in predicting mortality and severe myocardial dysfunction in patients undergoing primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PPCI) for ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). Areas covered: Cardiogenic shock is associated with a high mortality rate. Less well characterized are patients who are not in cardiogenic shock but will die from pump failure as a result of a STEMI. There is a long history of using hemodynamics to risk stratify patients with acute MI with the Killip class being shown to provide prognostic information in the pre-reperfusion, thrombolytic and PPCI eras. Recent studies have identified low systolic blood pressure (SBP), elevated heart rate, elevated left ventricular end diastolic pressure (LVEDP) and low SBP/LVEDP ratio as hemodynamic parameters associated with early mortality in patients undergoing PPCI. Although infrequently used, prognostic information can be obtained from right heart catheterization in the setting of STEMI with the best studied parameters being cardiac power, pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP), cardiac output, right atrial pressure/PCWP ratio and pulmonary artery pulsatility index. Expert commentary: Hemodynamic parameters measured at the time of PPCI provi...
Source: Expert Review of Cardiovascular Therapy - Category: Cardiology Tags: Expert Rev Cardiovasc Ther Source Type: research

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Post by Smith and MeyersSam Ghali (https://twitter.com/EM_RESUS) just asked me (Smith):" Steve, do left main coronary artery *occlusions* (actual ones with transmural ischemia) have ST Depression or ST Elevation in aVR? "Smith and Meyers answer:First, LM occlusion is uncommon in the ED because most of these die before they can get a 12-lead recorded.But if they do present:The very common presentation of diffuse STD with reciprocal STE in aVR is NOT left main occlusion, though it might be due to subtotal LM ACS, but is much more often due to non-ACS conditions, especially demand ischemia. ...
Source: Dr. Smith's ECG Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Source Type: blogs
A 60-something presented with hypotension, bradycardia, chest pain and back pain.She had a h/o aortic aneurysm, aortic insufficiency, peripheral vascular disease, and hypertension.  She had a mechanical aortic valve.  She was on anti-hypertensives including atenolol, and on coumadin, with an INR of 2.3. She was ill appearing.  BP was 70/49, pulse 60.A bedside echo showed good ejection fraction and normal right ventricle and no pericardial fluid. Here is the initial ECG:What do you think?This ECG actually looks like a left main occlusion (which rarely presents to the ED alive):  ST Elevation in...
Source: Dr. Smith's ECG Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Source Type: blogs
Authors: Ginanjar E, Yulianto Y, Salim S, Setyawan W Abstract Myocardial infarction simultaneously involving two or more culprit lesions is extremely rare and usually has a poor clinical outcomes including mortality. Management of this complicated condition is challenging and limited time. Nevertheless, autopsy studies revealed that thrombotic occlusion of more than one major epicardium coronary artery is not uncommon. A 68-year-old woman presented with sudden onset of limited breath and chest discomfort since two hours prior to admission. She also felt exert dyspnoea since one month ago. She has two risk factors t...
Source: Acta medica Indonesiana - Category: Internal Medicine Tags: Acta Med Indones Source Type: research
One of our graduates, Rochelle Zarzar, who is now an education fellow, sent me this from one of the hospitals she works at now:An elderly woman presented with chest pain.  She had been nauseous the night before and did not feel well, then awoke 2 hours prior with chest pain.She had had a completely normal angiogram 3 months prior.Here is that angiogram report:The left main coronary artery is normal.Left anterior descending is a type 3 vessel and is normal.Left circumflex is nondominant and normal.The right coronary artery is dominant and normal.The nurses immediately recorded an ECG.  This was 2 hours after the o...
Source: Dr. Smith's ECG Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Source Type: blogs
We report the case of a 70 year-old male patient with cholangiocarcinoma who was admitted to our hospital with worsening fatigue and weakness. His stay was complicated by uncontrolled bleeding secondary to rivaroxaban use and advanced liver disease. By the end of the prothrombin complex concentrate infusion used to reverse his coagulopathy, patient developed ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction with cardiogenic shock and passed away. This is the first reported case of acute myocardial infarction that occurs in a patient without hemophilia and after the first prothrombin complex concentrate infusion. PMID: 2968156...
Source: Drug Discoveries and Therapeutics - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Tags: Drug Discov Ther Source Type: research
This case comes from Sam Ghali  (@EM_RESUS). A 60-year-old man calls 911 after experiencing sudden onset chest pain, palpitations, and shortness of breath. Here are his vital signs:HR: 130-160, BP: 140/75, RR:22, Temp: 98.5 F, SaO2: 98%This is his 12-Lead ECG:He is in atrial fibrillation with a rapid ventricular response at a rate of around 140 bpm. There are several abberantly conducted beats. There is ST-Elevation in aVR of several millimeters and diffuse ST-Depression with the maximal depression vector towards Lead II in the limb leads and towards V5 in the precordial leads.ECG reading is all ab...
Source: Dr. Smith's ECG Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Source Type: blogs
AbstractTakotsubo syndrome is a recently recognized acute cardiac disease entity with a clinical presentation resembling that of an acute coronary syndrome. The typical takotsubo syndrome patient has a unique circumferential left (bi-) ventricular contraction abnormality profile that extends beyond a coronary artery supply territory and appears to follow the anatomical cardiac sympathetic innervation. The syndrome predominantly affects postmenopausal women and is often preceded by emotional or physical stress. Patients with predisposing factors such as malignancy and other chronic comorbidities are more prone to suffer fro...
Source: Clinical Autonomic Research - Category: Research Source Type: research
Conclusions:Although the frequency of pericarditis, mural hemorrhage and subsequent myocardial rupture after MI is declining following PCI, clinicians should be mindful of this potential complication in tPA treated patients with recent MI. Further, cardiac wall rupture should be considered in patients who develop acute hypotension and bradycardia following tPA administration. The current literature is limited and insufficient to provide generalizable guidance on managing AIS patients with recent MI.Disclosure: Dr. Neu has nothing to disclose. Dr. Albright has nothing to disclose. Dr. Lyerly has nothing to disclose.
Source: Neurology - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: Cerebrovascular Disease Case Reports II Source Type: research
We report our experience using percutaneous removal of right heart thrombus using vacuum aspiration. METHODS: Patients with right atrial mass who were hemodynamically stable and underwent vacuum thombectomy using the AngioVac system (AngioDynamics) at our institution were included in this analysis. Between December 2012 and August 2014, a total of 7 patients (2 men, 5 women) with a mean age of 51.5 years (range, 20-83 years) underwent right atrial thrombectomy. Data during the procedure and follow-up period were collected and analyzed. RESULTS: All patients were hemodynamically stable before the procedure. The proc...
Source: The Journal of Invasive Cardiology - Category: Cardiology Tags: J Invasive Cardiol Source Type: research
This study found that though it is often associated with coronary artery disease (CAD), it can also occur in those without significant CAD. It was not specifically associated with disease of right coronary artery disease. This cardioinhibitory response may be a manifestation of the Bezold-Jarisch reflex. Bezold-Jarisch reflex inhibits sympathetic activity (sympathetic withdrawal) and increases parasympathetic activity, resulting in bradycardia, which may be associated with vasodilatation, nausea and hypotension. Bezold-Jarisch has been described in the setting of inferior wall infarction and coronary angiography. Origin...
Source: Cardiophile MD - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: Cardiology MCQ Cardiology X-ray Featured Source Type: blogs
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