NIH Helping to End Addiction Over the Long-term Initiative

This Viewpoint discusses the National Institutes of Health ’s Helping to End Addiction Long-term, an interdisciplinary program aimed at advancing addiction and pain research in the United States.
Source: JAMA - Journal of the American Medical Association - Category: General Medicine Source Type: research

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According to Merriam-Webster Dictionary, hope is: “a feeling of expectation and desire for a certain thing to happen,” “a feeling of trust,”  “want something to happen or be the case.” When used to describe the sense of desire for recovery regarding mental health, it carries with it, the belief that some positive outcome can ensue, that things can improve and that symptoms can abate. When a person succumbs to the illness, often it is because he or she has relinquished the possibility of healing. This month the suicides of designer Kate Spade and chef Anthony Bourdain had many quest...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Addiction Anxiety and Panic Depression Grief and Loss Inspiration & Hope Interview Substance Abuse overcoming adversity Resilience Source Type: blogs
The current opioid crisis highlights an urgent need for better paradigms for prevention and treatment of chronic pain and addiction. Although many approach this complex clinical condition with the question, “Is this pain or is this addiction?,” it is more than the sum of its parts. Chronic pain among those with dependence and addiction often evolves into a complex disabling condition with pain at multiple sites, psychosocial dysfunctions, medical and psychiatric disorders, polypharmacy, and polysub stance use, all interacting with each other in complex ways (multimorbidity). The authors offer an integrative the...
Source: Medical Clinics of North America - Category: Primary Care Authors: Source Type: research
Efforts to improve treatment of pain using opioids have to adequately take into account their therapeutic shortcomings which involve addictiveness. While there are no signs of an “opioid epidemic” in Germany s...
Source: BMC Family Practice - Category: Primary Care Authors: Tags: Research article Source Type: research
Excessive cell phone use is a trend that is growing every day. We are consumed with life behind the screen. But why? Because often, in the digital world, flowers are blooming and the sun is always shining. Many of us seek and gain validation from likes and comments on photos or ideas we post online, and naturally, we crave more of that every day. But when does this craving become obsessive and possibly an addiction? Many individuals form a smartphone addiction because they can’t live without the acceptance and information they have access to on their devices. We should avoid getting trapped in the infatuation of wha...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Addiction Habits Happiness Mental Health and Wellness Self-Help Sleep Technology Phone addiction Smartphone Technology And Culture Source Type: blogs
​​BY STUART ETENGOFF, DO, &ABDULLAH ​BOKHARI​, AB, DOA 20-year-old Caucasian man presented via EMS with a chief complaint of withdrawal from ketamine and secondary complaints of abdominal pain, blood in his urine, and painful urination with urgency for two days.He said he had been using ketamine intravenously daily for the past five days, up to 35 grams over the past week. His last use was 24 hours prior to presentation to the ED. He stated that he had been using ketamine regularly for four years and that he has used it intravenously, orally, and intranasally.He reported a history of ADHD and a family hist...
Source: The Case Files - Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: research
You’re struggling with anxiety. Maybe you had your first panic attack when you were in high school while taking a final. Maybe you had a panic attack in college while driving or grocery shopping. Maybe since then you’ve been having panic attacks regularly. Maybe it’s not panic attacks at all. Instead you’re constantly on edge. If they gave out medals for worrying, you’d no doubt take first place. Everything makes you anxious and uncomfortable. And it’s absolutely exhausting. Whatever the specific circumstances surrounding your anxiety and how it manifests, you feel like a complete and ut...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Anxiety and Panic Disorders General Happiness Mental Health and Wellness Self-Help Stress Source Type: blogs
There is a seminal article by Barbara Fredrickson titled ‘What good are positive emotions?’ which introduces the broaden-and-build theory of positive emotions. As per this theory, while negative emotions are associated with specific action tendencies, positive emotions broaden the thought-action repertoire available at that moment and help build physical, social and intellectual resources over the long run. To take an example, joy is associated with creativity, and more loose associations, etc, all involving a move away from rigidity and fixedness to flexibility and fluency in thinking ;  joy is also assoc...
Source: The Mouse Trap - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: emotion adaptations emotions evolution play Source Type: podcasts
The experience of falling in love can be indescribable. We don’t know why, we can’t explain it, but we just feel irrisistably drawn to someone. However, according to Ross Rosenberg, these magnetic attractions can allure us into sacrificing our own dreams, desires, and even freedom for what quickly begins to feel a lot less like love. In his new book, The Human Magnet Syndrome: The Codependent Narcissistic Trap, Rosenberg delves into this seductive love force to uncover what it looks like, why it happens, and how we can turn it around. “Since the dawn of civilization, people have been magnetically and irre...
Source: Psych Central - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tags: Abuse Addictions Book Reviews Codependence Narcissism Relationships & Love Self-Help human magnet Source Type: news
As hard as it may sound to pull out of this stress reaction cycle, it is possible. The first step in creating any positive change is always raising your awareness of what the cycle is, how you participate in it, and what pains the cycle creates. Why? Because you can’t change a habit you don’t know you have. And if you don’t recognize the pain the habit is creating, you won’t have the motivation you need to make new choices and break out of the cycle that has become familiar despite the fact that it is destructive. The practice of mindfulness is an incredibly powerful tool to help you find that awa...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Agitation Anxiety and Panic General Habits Happiness Mindfulness Self-Help Stress Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction Stress Response Source Type: blogs
A driving force behind this is the growing effort to find a long-term replacement for opioids, an addictive painkiller that has plunged the country into an epidemic of death and addiction.
Source: WebMD Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
More News: Addiction | American Medical Association (AMA) | General Medicine | National Institutes of Health (NIH) | Pain | USA Health