Kidney regeneration...science and song

Leading scientists and cutting-edge SMEs in Europe and Australia teamed up in the EU-funded STELLAR project. Their mission? Explore the regenerative potential of new cell types for tackling chronic kidney disease, develop methods to exploit it, and tools to promote the findings, including a dedicated song, of all things!
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - Category: Research Source Type: news

Related Links:

DISCUSSION: Physical activity, diet, body mass index, the presence of diabetes, and the presence of chronic kidney disease were strong risk factors for hypertension. Many of these risk factors are modifiable and highlight targets for future prevention strategies. PMID: 30785634 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Health Reports - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Health Rep Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 19 February 2019Source: Biochimica et Biophysica Acta (BBA) - General SubjectsAuthor(s): Laura Ferreras, Anna Moles, Gerhard R. Situmorang, Rana el Masri, Imogen L. Wilson, Katie Cooke, Emily Thompson, Marion Kusche-Gullberg, Romain R. Vivès, Neil S. Sheerin, Simi AliAbstractOne of the main feature of chronic kidney disease is the development of renal fibrosis. Heparan Sulfate (HS) is involved in disease development by modifying the function of growth factors and cytokines and creating chemokine gradients. In this context, we aimed to understand the function of HS sulfation in rena...
Source: Biochimica et Biophysica Acta (BBA) General Subjects - Category: Biochemistry Source Type: research
Condition:   Chronic Kidney Diseases Interventions:   Behavioral: PRO-based follow-up;   Behavioral: PRO-based telephone consultation Sponsors:   University of Aarhus;   Regional Hospital West Jutland;   Aarhus University Hospital;   TrygFonden, Denmark;   Karen Elise Jensen Foundation;   Sygekassernes Helsefond Active, not recruiting
Source: ClinicalTrials.gov - Category: Research Source Type: clinical trials
Nephrons scar and involute during aging, increasing the risk of chronic kidney disease. Little is known, however, about genetic mechanisms of kidney aging. We sought to define the signatures of age on the renal transcriptome using 563 human kidneys. The initial discovery analysis of 260 kidney transcriptomes from the TRANScriptome of renaL humAn TissuE Study (TRANSLATE) and the Cancer Genome Atlas identified 37 age-associated genes. For 19 of those genes, the association with age was replicated in 303 kidney transcriptomes from the Nephroseq resource.
Source: Kidney International - Category: Urology & Nephrology Authors: Tags: Clinical Investigation Source Type: research
Tubulointerstitial fibrosis is considered a hallmark of maladaptive repair processes after tubular injury leading to chronic kidney disease. Nakamura and colleagues show that, upon injury, myofibroblasts promote epithelial repair by producing retinoic acid in place of injured tubular cells. These results suggest that resident fibroblasts turning into myofibroblasts maintain a cross-talk that protects tubular epithelial cells from injury and can restore tissue integrity and functionality, challenging the concept that fibrosis is only detrimental in nature.
Source: Kidney International - Category: Urology & Nephrology Authors: Tags: Commentary Source Type: research
Chronic kidney disease (CKD) has received increased attention as a leading public health problem worldwide. Globally surveillance systems for kidney disease are still lacking, especially in developing countries like China, which constitutes an obstacle to develop effective preventive strategies. China Kidney Disease Network (CK-NET) was initiated in 2014 and further developed in accordance with the national strategy of prompting Big Data application in China. One major output of CK-NET is to generate an Annual Data Report (ADR) providing resourceful information regarding kidney disease in China.
Source: Kidney International - Category: Urology & Nephrology Authors: Tags: Executive Summary Source Type: research
Condition:   Chronic Kidney Diseases Interventions:   Behavioral: PRO-based follow-up;   Behavioral: PRO-based telephone consultation Sponsors:   University of Aarhus;   Regional Hospital West Jutland;   Aarhus University Hospital;   TrygFonden, Denmark;   Karen Elise Jensen Foundation;   Sygekassernes Helsefond Active, not recruiting
Source: ClinicalTrials.gov - Category: Research Source Type: clinical trials
Abstract: Diabetes mellitus is the leading cause of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in the US. An increasing number of glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists are available for diabetes management. Differences between medications in this class, as well as limited data on patients with CKD, underscore the importance of a patient-centered approach to care.
Source: The Nurse Practitioner - Category: Nursing Tags: Feature: TYPE 2 DIABETES MELLITUS: CE Connection Source Type: research
In this study, we investigated the protective effects of flavonoid morin against ER stress induced apoptosis in human renal proximal tubular HK-2 cells. Morin downregulated the expression of GRP78, central regulator of ER stress response, induced by ER stress inducer tunicamycin. Interestingly, morin selectively inhibited the IRE1 pathway among the three major arms of the ER stress responses. The increased expression of XBP1-sp, phosphor-IRE-1α, and phosphor-JNK by TM were markedly suppressed by the pretreatment of morin. Morin also decreased the intracellular ROS production and the apoptosis induced by TM in HK-2 ce...
Source: Biomedicine and Pharmacotherapy - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: research
The same underlying molecular and cellular damage of aging contributes to both calcification of blood vessel walls and the development of atherosclerosis, but researchers here argue that calcification can be considered on its own, an independent risk factor for cardiovascular dysfunction and mortality in later life. The presence of senescent cells is one of the common underlying factors that accelerates the progression of both atherosclerosis and calcification of blood vessels. This is due to the inflammatory signaling produced by these cells. That signaling distorts the behavior of macrophages trying to clear up deposits ...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs
More News: Australia Health | Chronic Kidney Disease | Research | Science | Urology & Nephrology