Book Review: It ’ s Not What You ’ re Eating, It ’ s What ’ s Eating You

We live in a weight-obsessed world. Not only are we exposed to a constant barrage of images of the “perfect body,” but when it comes to attaining it we tend to focus on all the wrong things. We cut our carbohydrate intake, follow any exercise program that promises quick results, and even resort to fasting if we have to – all to attain the body that promises happiness. But, according to Shari Brady, a licensed professional counselor who specializes in eating disorders and is herself recovered from anorexia, achieving freedom from eating disorders starts with stopping the focus on food as the answer to life’s problems. In her new book, It’s Not What You’re Eating, It’s What’s Eating You: A Teenager’s Guide To Preventing Eating Disorders – And Loving Yourself, Brady offers teenagers a way to happiness and a healthy relationship to food that begins with their relationships with themselves. “Our relationship with food begins at birth and never ends. How we feel about our body and eating is a direct reflection of how we feel about ourselves. Life can be difficult and unfair at times, and nobody is born with the knowledge of how to navigate through its many challenges. Sometimes, turning to food becomes the only way we cope with life” writes Brady. Brady describes emotional eating as “consumption that is triggered by something other than hunger.” One telltale sign of emotional eating, says Brady, is ...
Source: Psych Central - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tags: Anorexia Binge Eating Book Reviews Bulimia Diet & Nutrition Disorders Eating Disorders Parenting Self-Help Treatment Weight Loss Carbohydrate Intake Losing Weight Source Type: news

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There is no such thing as a life free of distress. And yet in the distress — by learning to move through it, find strengths that help us cope, and most importantly, not avoid it — we often find the path to growth. This path, from finding escape from the distress of life to finding growth in it, is also the journey that underlies the recovery from an eating disorder. “People with eating disorders, like all people, flourish when they feel a sense of agency,” write authors Laura J. Goodman and Mona Villapiano. In their new book, Eating Disorders: The Journey to Recovery Workbook, 2nd Ed., Laura J. Good...
Source: Psych Central - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tags: Addictions Anorexia Binge Eating Book Reviews Bulimia Diet & Nutrition Disorders Eating Disorders General Habits Healthy Living Psychology Self-Esteem Self-Help Trauma Treatment Weight Loss books on how to recover from an Source Type: news
Eating disorders are biologically based brain illnesses influenced by environmental and psychological factors. Environmental risk factors for developing an eating disorder include weight and appearance pressures, media messaging, and weight bullying. Biological factors include dieting/food exposure, genetics, neurochemistry, neurobiology, and hormones (notably estrogen). Psychological factors include stress, life transitions, identity, trauma, anxiety, depression, and substance use. While risk factors predispose certain individuals to eating disorders, precipitating factors such as significantly altering how one eats or s...
Source: Psych Central - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tags: Anorexia Binge Eating Bulimia Bullying Children and Teens Eating Disorders Neuroscience Psychology Women's Issues Body Dysmorphia Body Image bulimia. food addiction Source Type: news
Eating disorders can be easy to hide. Know what to look for. Often when I work with parents they say they had no idea their child’s eating disorder was going on as long as it was. Eating disorders are easy to hide so it’s important, as a parent to be aware of what signs you should look for in your child. Eating disorders are secretive and can be very easy to hide from loved ones, especially in the beginning. Sometimes, the person experiencing an eating disorder is not fully aware that what they are doing is not healthy so it makes it that much more important for parents to be fully educated on what to look fo...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Anorexia Binge Eating Bulimia Caregivers Children and Teens Eating Disorders Parenting Perfectionism Personal Psychotherapy Stories Women's Issues Adolescence Body Image Cognitive Distortion Dissociation Self-Esteem Source Type: blogs
Abstract Although empirical evidence identifies dietary restraint as a transdiagnostic eating disorder maintaining mechanism, the distinctiveness and significance of the different behavioural and cognitive components of dietary restraint are poorly understood. The present study examined the relative associations of the purportedly distinct dietary restraint components (intention to restrict, delayed eating, food avoidance, and diet rules) with measures of psychological distress (depression, anxiety, and stress), disability, and core eating disorder symptoms (overvaluation and binge eating) in patients with anorexi...
Source: Appetite - Category: Nutrition Authors: Tags: Appetite Source Type: research
Abstract Eating disorders (ED) are prevalent mental illnesses composed mainly of anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa and binge eating disorders. Anxiety disorders are another set of mental illnesses, with phobic disorder (PD) being the most prevalent disorder. ED and PD are highly comorbid. The aim of this study is to assess, in 131 individuals attending an outpatient clinic for different health issues, the level of fear related to situations generating avoidance such as in social anxiety and specific phobias according to the fear questionnaire (FQ), the level of disgust according to the disgust scale (DS-R) and the...
Source: Eating and weight disorders : EWD - Category: Eating Disorders & Weight Management Authors: Tags: Eat Weight Disord Source Type: research
We describe the effects of LDX (50mg and 70mg) on the Sheehan Disability Scale (SDS; exploratory endpoint) from both studies. Design: The SDS was assessed at baseline, Week 6, and Week 12/early termination. Analyses included mixed-effects models for repeated measures for the examination of SDS total and domain score changes and a generalized estimating equation model to assess dichotomized remission status (remission [total score ?6] versus nonremission [total score>6]). Results: Least squares (95% confidence interval [CI]) mean treatment differences for SDS total score change from baseline at Week 12 were -2.80 (-3.98,...
Source: Innovations in Clinical Neuroscience - Category: Neuroscience Authors: Tags: Current Issue Drug Development Original Research binge eating disorder disability functionality lisdexamfetamine dimesylate Sheehan Disability Scale Source Type: research
As a relatively new and still poorly recognized concept, few people come to therapy identifying as suffering from Complex Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (C-PTSD). As a rule, a diagnosis of C-PTSD comes only after the process of self-discovery in therapy has begun. When people suffering from C-PTSD are referred to a therapist, or decide to seek help for themselves, it is usually because they are seeking help for one of its symptoms, including dissociative episodes, problems forming relationships, and alcohol or substance abuse. One of the more common issues that leads to the discovery of C-PTSD is the presence of an eating ...
Source: Psych Central - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tags: Addictions Anorexia Binge Eating Bulimia Eating Disorders Loneliness Psychology PTSD Trauma Treatment affect regulation Bingeing Body Image C-PTSD Child Abuse child neglect Childhood Trauma complex posttraumatic stress di Source Type: news
If you have struggled with an eating disorder like anorexia, you most-likely know how to plan. By extracting a very basic human need, the brain must use a maximum amount of energy to deny instinct. Calorie counting, eating only at certain times of the day, obsessing over exercise routines, and meticulously shopping for the “right” kinds of food, are all examples of how an eating disorder can shape time. Most people who struggle with eating disorders are ambivalent about recovery.  They may want to have a life that doesn’t follow such rigidity, but worry about losing control.  There are many reas...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Anorexia Binge Eating Bulimia Eating Disorders Impulse Control Self Control Source Type: blogs
Everyone ruminates. We especially ruminate when we’re stressed out. Maybe you’re ruminating about an upcoming test—you have to score an A to keep your scholarship. Maybe you’re ruminating about an upcoming presentation because you want to impress your boss. Maybe you’re ruminating about an upcoming date and the many ways it could go. Maybe you’re ruminating about a bad performance review. Maybe you’re ruminating about an injury that’s really been bothering you. “We are evolutionarily wired to obsess,” according to psychiatrist Britton Arey, M.D. We are wired to se...
Source: Psych Central - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tags: Anorexia Anxiety Binge Eating Bulimia Depression Disorders Eating Disorders General Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder Panic Disorder Psychology Stress Treatment Anxiety Disorders Distressing Thoughts Mindfulness Negative Thinki Source Type: news
AbstractEating disorders (EDs), including anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, and binge-eating disorder, constitute a class of common and deadly psychiatric disorders. While numerous studies in humans highlight the important role of neurobiological alterations in the development of ED-related behaviors, the precise neural substrate that mediates this risk is unknown. Historically, pharmacological interventions have played a limited role in the treatment of eating disorders, typically providing symptomatic relief of comorbid psychiatric issues, like depression and anxiety, in support of the standard nutritional and psycholog...
Source: Neurotherapeutics - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
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