Tips for Social Anxiety Sufferers
Do you usually feel apprehensive around others due to fear of possible embarrassment? Do you develop sweaty palms, shaky legs or feel you have butterflies in your stomach when called up to speak before an audience? Do you feel others are constantly scrutinizing your every move with a view that’s critical of you? If so, you are not alone. You have lots of company. In the United States alone, about 40 million American adults suffer from various forms of anxiety disorders, with over 15 million adults suffering from social anxiety, according to the Anxiety and Depression Association of America (ADAA). The problem affects...
Source: Psych Central - November 11, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Irving Schattner, LCSW Tags: Agoraphobia Anxiety General Social Phobia anxious thoughts Loneliness making friends Social Anxiety Source Type: news

What Bipolar II Disorder Really Looks & Feels Like
Bipolar II disorder is a less severe version of bipolar I disorder. That’s likely an assumption you’ve already come across. Maybe you read it in an article. Maybe you heard it from someone else, maybe even a mental health professional. Author Julie Kraft has heard bipolar II called “bipolar light” and “diet bipolar.” This is a common belief, because mania is a defining feature of bipolar I disorder. And mania has devastating consequences. Empty bank accounts. Soaring debt. Lost jobs. Broken relationships. Divorce. Car accidents and injuries. But bipolar II isn’t less severe than b...
Source: Psych Central - November 10, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Margarita Tartakovsky, M.S. Tags: Bipolar Disorders General Personal Stories Self-Help Stigma Treatment being healthy with bipolar Bipolar 2 Bipolar II disorder Depression Hypomania Hypomanic Episode Major Depressive Episode managing bipolar II disorder Source Type: news

Surprising Research on Cannabis
Much of what we think we know about cannabis may soon change as a result of new research that uncovers some surprising facts. Indeed, the topic, which can be emotionally charged, is the focus of intense scientific study. Is cannabis good for you? Is it addictive? What long-term harms can use cause? The answers to these questions are multi-layered and not always clear-cut, which is why cannabis research continues with even more urgency. FACTS ON CANNABIS ADDICTION AND DEPENDENCE Current estimates are that one in 10 cannabis users will develop cannabis addiction or dependence. The potency of the delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol ...
Source: Psych Central - November 9, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Suzanne Kane Tags: Addictions Habits Healthy Living Memory and Perception Miscellaneous Drugs Neuroscience Substance Abuse Source Type: news

What Helps Individuals with Bipolar II Disorder Successfully Manage Their Illness
For the first three decades of Julie Kraft’s life, every day was a struggle. “From the minute I woke up to the moment my head hit the pillow each night, my mind would spin with worries and fears—most of them irrational—about the past, present and the future,” Kraft said. “I was anxious over every aspect of normal daily life—showering, driving, shopping, paying bills, answering the phone, school drop-offs, birthday parties. There was rarely a waking moment when my mind was quiet.” Outside of her home, Kraft did her best to hide these struggles, which only exhausted and frustra...
Source: Psych Central - November 7, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Margarita Tartakovsky, M.S. Tags: Bipolar Disorders General Self-Help Treatment Bipolar II disorder Bipolar II disorder treatment managing bipolar II disorder Source Type: news

Depression Hotline Numbers
Depression isn’t just feeling down or sad for a few days in a row. Major depressive disorder is when a person feels like there is no hope, their mood is filled with sadness and emptiness, and there’s nothing anyone can do to help them. Major depression is a serious mental disorder — one that causes a person distress in every area of their life (school, work, relationships, friends, etc.). You can reach out and call someone today on a depression hotline number. These free national hotlines are available to anyone who calls, at any time during the day (24/7), 365 days a year. You do not have to be suicidal ...
Source: Psych Central - November 6, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: John M. Grohol, Psy.D. Tags: Depression Disorders Self-Help crisis helpline crisis hotline depression helpline depression hotline Depressive Disorder help for depression Major Depressive Disorder Source Type: news

Book Review: Owning Bipolar
The subtitle of Michael Pipich’s new book, Owning Bipolar: How Patients and Families Can Take Control of Bipolar Disorder, should be enough for those with bipolar disorder and their family members to want to pick up this book and embrace it. Bipolar disorder takes away a person’s feeling of self-control and this book gives hope that control can be taken back. People who are bipolar will appreciate that Pipich understands how it feels to the patient. He tries to remove the stigma of having bipolar, explaining that it is NOT the patient’s fault. This alone makes the book worth reading. He then provides a t...
Source: Psych Central - November 5, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Book Reviews Tags: Bipolar Book Reviews Disorders Family General Genetics Medications Motivation and Inspiration Psychiatry Psychological Assessment Psychology Stigma Treatment accepting bipolar disorder bipolar disorder stigma Michael Pipich Source Type: news

The Worst, Most Persistent Myths about OCD
This is what most people think obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) looks like: washing your hands excessively because you’re a germaphobe. Sometimes, people think it’s also needing to have a neat, orderly home, and checking to see if you locked the door way too many times. And while some of this is true for some people with OCD, it misses the majority of individuals with the illness. As psychologist Martin Hsia, Psy.D, said, “OCD takes many different forms that don’t get written about.” The Many, Many Forms of OCD “To paraphrase Tolstoy, in Anna Karenina, famously speaking abou...
Source: Psych Central - November 2, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Margarita Tartakovsky, M.S. Tags: Disorders General Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder Self-Help Stigma Treatment Compulsions Intrusive Thoughts Obsessions Ocd OCD facts OCD myths Unwanted Thoughts what OCD feels like what OCD looks like Source Type: news

Childhood Abuse, Complex Trauma and Epigenetics
Epigenetics refers to the study of a natural phenomenon and to the phenomenon itself. Epigenetics is the study of the mechanisms that turn on and off the expression of our genes without altering the DNA sequence. Epigenetics is also used to refer to the changes in expression of our genes. Factors such as age, nutritional habits, psychological stress, physical activity, working habits and substance abuse can trigger changes in gene expression (Alegría-Torres, 2011). These changes in gene expression, epigenetics, happen all the time in the natural world. For example, two identical twins, born with the exact same DNA s...
Source: Psych Central - October 30, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Fabiana Franco, Ph.D. Tags: Abuse Children and Teens Genetics Neuroscience PTSD Trauma Child Abuse child neglect Childhood Trauma epigenetics gene expression Transgenerational trauma Source Type: news

Depersonalization: A Strange Mental Illness Captured in Films, Music & Celebrity Confessions
For many in the world, depersonalization isn’t really a familiar word. Sometimes, it is used to refer to the act of removing human characteristics or individuality from someone or something. Almost no one you meet on the street would be able to tell you what depersonalization means in the psychiatric sense of the word. Depersonalization (DP) is a dissociative disorder whereby a person experiences a distortion in how they experience their self. A person going through DP may feel disconnected from themselves and often report that they feel like watching a movie of oneself. It’s a bewildering experience that can l...
Source: Psych Central - October 27, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Swamy G Tags: Creativity Dissociative disorders Essays Personal Stories Depersonalization Derealization Dissociation film media Mental Illness Music Source Type: news

Book Review: Little Panic:  Dispatches from an Anxious Life
“Everyone is ahead of me; I’m always trying to catch up, but I never do. I’m always the littlest and the last to understand. I picture their brains with long legs racing down the block, but my brain has little-kid legs, too short to keep up,” writes Amanda Stern. In her vivid memoir, Little Panic: Dispatches from an Anxious Life, Stern offers a poignant account of a life full of anxiety and yet teeming with strength, raw honesty, and the enduring desire to feel safe. Early on, Amanda recognizes that she, unlike other children, does not feel safe. She writes, “One day, I’ll have to live o...
Source: Psych Central - October 25, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Claire Nana Tags: Anxiety Book Reviews Disorders General Memory and Perception Motivation and Inspiration Personal Stories Psychology Relationships & Love A Memoir Honesty Little Panic Source Type: news

Love Bombing as a Narcissistic Attachment Style
Getting hit by a love bomb feels glorious! The lavish attention and affection seems to answer our prayers. We’ve found Mr. or Ms. Right — our soul mate; unsuspecting that we’ve been targeted by a narcissist. The bomber abruptly changes colors and loses interest, and our dream comes crashing down. The rejection is excruciating, especially at the height of romance. It’s a traumatic shock to our heart. We feel duped, betrayed, and abandoned. We’re confused and try to make sense of the nightmare that was once a dream. What we thought was real was in fact a mirage. We search for answers, doubt and ...
Source: Psych Central - October 23, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Darlene Lancer, JD, MFT Tags: Abuse Codependence Narcissism Relationships & Love Attachment Style controlling behavior Emotional Abuse Emotional Intimacy Idealization and Devaluation love bombing Manipulation Narcissistic Personality Disorder narcissistic suppl Source Type: news

Book Review: The Worry Workbook for Kids
If the goal of child rearing is to help children develop into independent adults, it’s hard to imagine how that is possible if worry prevents them from doing the very activities that will build their confidence. Further, much of life is uncertain, and fear of uncertainty can become a seemingly insurmountable barrier for kids and parents alike, leaving courage and resilience far out of reach. In their new book, The Worry Workbook for Kids: Helping Children Overcome Anxiety & the Fear of Uncertainty, Muniya S. Khanna, PhD, and Deborah Roth Ledley, PhD, address this very issue, drawing on current and effective strat...
Source: Psych Central - October 19, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Claire Nana Tags: Anxiety Book Reviews Children and Teens Disorders Family General Memory and Perception Mindfulness Parenting Psychology Self-Help Students Anxiety And Worry Avoidance kids The Worry Workbook for Kids worry cycle Source Type: news

Book Review: The Neuroscience of Emotion:  A New Synthesis
Emotions, while ubiquitous across species and one of the most common topics of conversation, are still, it seems, misunderstood. Do emotions have biological roots and, if so, where? And how do physiological factors influence how emotions are felt, expressed, and understood? For Ralph Adolphs and David J. Anderson, developing a comprehensive science of emotions began with trying to create a framework that is scientifically rigorous, inclusive, cumulative, and yet provides clear operationalization of the relevant concepts of emotions. Their new book, The Neuroscience of Emotion: A New Synthesis, offers a new way to understan...
Source: Psych Central - October 16, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Claire Nana Tags: Anger Book Reviews Disorders General Grief and Loss Happiness Memory and Perception Neuroscience Personality Psychology Emotions Feelings The Neuroscience of Emotion Source Type: news

Domestic Violence, PTSD and Triggers
People catch colds because they were exposed to a virus or infection.   Some people get cancer because cells have begun endlessly dividing in their body. We get itchy because an irritant has affected our skin.   We get hungry because our body needs nourishment on a regular basis, or thirsty because we aren’t sufficiently hydrated. I could go on and on … usually the things that we experience in our daily lives are a cause and effect thing; this happens because that happened, and so on. PTSD is similar, but also so very different. It happens when someone has experienced a traumatic event and...
Source: Psych Central - October 15, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Deborah Gray Tags: Personal Stories PTSD Trauma Abusive Relationship Domestic Violence Spousal Abuse triggers Source Type: news

Book Review: The Polyvagal Theory in Therapy
In her new book, The Polyvagal Theory in Therapy: Engaging the Rhythm of Regulation, Deb Dana offers a window into the inner life of a traumatized person and a way out of trauma and back to finding joy, connection, and safety through enlightening theory, rich experiential practice, and practical steps. “The autonomic nervous system,” Deb Dana writes, “responds to challenges in daily life by telling us not what we are or who we are, but how we are.” Informing, guiding, and regulating our experiences, the autonomic nervous system tells us when we are safe and can proceed forward and when we are under ...
Source: Psych Central - October 14, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Claire Nana Tags: Book Reviews Disorders General Memory and Perception Neuroscience Psychology Psychotherapy Stigma Stress Trauma Treatment Autonomic Nervous System Deb Dana Polyvagal Theory Source Type: news

Anxiety Experts Reveal What They Really Want Everyone to Know About Anxiety
Anxiety seems like a simple, straightforward topic. After all, it’s a common emotion—everyone feels anxious from time to time. And it’s a common condition. In fact, it’s the most common mental illness in the U.S. Anxiety disorders affect about 18 percent of adults every year. And yet there are many, many misconceptions. Misconceptions that affect how we view anxiety and how we see ourselves. Misconceptions that affect how we navigate anxiety and how we navigate our lives—limiting them and making them less joyful. We asked anxiety experts to share what they really want readers to know about anx...
Source: Psych Central - October 13, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Margarita Tartakovsky, M.S. Tags: Anxiety Disorders General Self-Help Stress Trauma Treatment Anxiety Disorder anxiety facts anxiety myths Source Type: news

Book Review: Calm Clarity:  How to Use Science to Rewire Your Brain
While there are many goals we may pursue in life — a better career, a better relationship, a greater sense of meaning, and deeper connection with those around us — they all start with first gaining a sense of clarity over what is getting in our way, what is helping move us toward our goals, and how we can begin to take ownership of our brains in a way that allows us to live the kind of lives we want. For Due Quach, a survivor of PTSD and a successful management consultant, understanding how to improve her brain function wasn’t just necessary, but advantageous. She writes, “It took many years for me ...
Source: Psych Central - October 13, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Claire Nana Tags: Book Reviews Disorders General Habits Happiness Memory and Perception Mindfulness Motivation and Inspiration Personal Stories Psychology Self-Help Trauma Calm Clarity Due Quach Higher Self Inner Sage PTSD Source Type: news

Pedophilia OCD: The Conundrum to Let Go of the Fight
If you experience pedophilia OCD, you are someone who loves children. You may also struggle with unwanted sexual thoughts. Before OCD began to trigger you with this type of thoughts, you may have believed such thoughts would never cross your mind. And when they did, you felt ashamed, guilty, and confused. Trying to suppress and fight those thoughts appeared to be the most logical solution. The idea of not doing anything about intrusive thoughts seems despicable. Your mind may say, “If I let those thoughts happen without doing anything, it probably means I enjoy them!” You may respond, “Of course not! But...
Source: Psych Central - October 11, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Annabella Hagen, LCSW, RPT-S Tags: Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder Anxiety Anxiety Disorder Avoidance Pedophilia OCD pOCD Source Type: news

How to Recognize the Manipulation of a Drug Addict
Anyone who has a close friend or relative that has struggled with a substance use disorder knows all too well about the manipulative ways of a person who is controlled by their addiction. These behaviors cause extreme heartache and pain and they even have the power to break up families and end marriages. Amid a relationship that has been damaged by addiction, it’s not always easy to identify manipulative behaviors, let alone how to respond in a healthy way. However, if you can take a step back and peel back the filter from your eyes, you might just see that your loved one is manipulating you into fueling his or her a...
Source: Psych Central - October 10, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Kelsey Brown Tags: Addictions Codependence Relationships & Love Substance Abuse Addiction Recovery Drug Addiction Emotional Manipulation Manipulative Behavior Source Type: news

Evening Eating —“Are You a ‘Light’ Eater?”
The following is an excerpt from Let Go of Emotional Overeating and Love Your Food by Arlene B. Englander. (Copyright © 2018. Published by Rowman & Littlefield. All rights reserved.) Anyone who has ever tried to lose weight or keep weight off realizes that evening can be the make or break time of day in terms of permanent success. Consider this. In my community there currently is a radio-based advertising campaign touting the effectiveness of a weight loss formula that I will refer to as the Weight Loss Answer. This liquid, taken at bedtime, is to be consumed on an empty stomach. The purchaser is told no...
Source: Psych Central - October 8, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Arlene B. Englander, LCSW, MBA Tags: Addictions Binge Eating Diet & Nutrition Eating Disorders Personal Stories calorie counting Eating Habits Source Type: news

Is My Teenager Depressed or Just Moody? 8 Questions to Consider Before Getting Help
Teenagers are supposed to be moody, right? One moment they are happy and laughing about a silly Youtube video and the next they are slamming their door to their room and crying into their pillow.  You tell yourself “Its just hormones,” and try to brush it off. Chances are you are right. Most teenagers do fluctuate in mood to some extent and that is normal. I have a friend who even nicknamed her teen the “Threen-ager” because her daughter resorted to teen meltdowns when she didn’t get her way. But how do you know if your teen is just moody or if he or she is depressed or even anxious? Kno...
Source: Psych Central - October 5, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Amy Topelson, MA, MA, LPC, NCC Tags: Children and Teens Depression Parenting School Issues Students Suicide Source Type: news

Why Accepting a Diagnosis of Bipolar Disorder Is So Difficult —and What Actually Helps
One of the biggest challenges in treating bipolar disorder is actually accepting the diagnosis. Because, of course, if you don’t believe you have an illness, you won’t focus on managing it. Psychotherapist Sheri Van Dijk, MSW, RSW, has run a group for individuals with bipolar disorder for over a decade. When she starts teaching the skill of Radical Acceptance, about 95 percent of her clients say they’re currently struggling or have struggled with accepting their diagnosis. Because acceptance is hard. And it’s hard for various reasons. It’s hard because acceptance entails grief and loss. &ldquo...
Source: Psych Central - October 4, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Margarita Tartakovsky, M.S. Tags: Bipolar Disorders Family General Psychotherapy Self-Help Stigma Treatment accepting bipolar disorder accepting diagnosis bipolar disorder self-help bipolar disorder tips bipolar disorder treatment family support Source Type: news

10 Simple Ways to Relieve Depersonalization
Depersonalization Disorder is a persistent feeling of being disconnected from your body and thoughts. It can feel like you’re living in a dream, or looking at yourself from outside your body. The world may feel like it’s flat and unreal, as if it’s in 2D or behind a pane of glass. Depersonalization Disorder can be an intensely frightening experience. It’s generally brought on by trauma (from violence, abuse, panic attacks) or, as is becoming more common, a bad drug experience. It’s also a surprisingly common condition: It’s estimated that 50% of all people will experience feelings of dep...
Source: Psych Central - October 3, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Shaun O' Connor Tags: Anxiety Dissociation Dissociative Personal Stories Psychology Self-Help Trauma Depersonalization Source Type: news

Complex PTSD: Trauma, Learning, and Behavior in the Classroom
Complex post traumatic stress disorder (CPTSD) occurs with repeated ongoing exposure to traumatic events. Often CPTSD is a result of early traumatic relationships with caregivers. In this article we consider the effects of early traumatic relationships on learning. Many children with a history of trauma have trouble with learning in the classroom and do not perform as well as their peers. The connection between early interpersonal trauma and learning is particularly relevant when considering the ability to maintain attention and concentration. Often, early traumatic relationships impair more than emotion regulation abiliti...
Source: Psych Central - October 2, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Fabiana Franco, Ph.D. Tags: Abuse Attention Deficit Disorder Bullying Children and Teens PTSD School Issues Students Trauma C-PTSD Childhood Trauma Classroom Behavior complex post-traumatic stress disorder Source Type: news

Sexual Assault: What Is It? How to Empower Recovery for Survivors
Despite growing awareness, sexual assault is not going away. In fact, every 98 seconds, someone in America is sexually assaulted, reports RAINN, a leading support provider for sexual assault survivors. Most incidents of rape or sexual assault — 69% — happen to people between ages 12 and 35.  Each of us can learn something and do something safely to make a huge difference to reduce risk, prevent trauma, and help more people heal. Victims include men, women and children. Assaults are most often carried out by someone they know. Sexual assault is most prevalent among younger women: 9 in 10 victims of rape a...
Source: Psych Central - September 29, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Robyn Brickel, MA, LMFT Tags: Abuse Domestic Violence PTSD Stigma Students Trauma Violence & Aggression Women's Issues Source Type: news

Book Review: What Your ADHD Child Wishes You Knew
While ADHD can rob children of the executive functioning skills that are pivotal in life, it can also rob both them and their parents of the very relationship that can help improve those skills. More often than not as ADHD children struggle to complete tasks, remember important items, and focus attention long enough to hold a conversation, their parents find themselves equally frustrated, and most likely, not in the best place to parent them. What is missing is understanding. In her new book, What Your ADHD Child Wishes You Knew: Working Together to Empower Kids for Success in School and Life, Sharon Saline, Psy.D., offers...
Source: Psych Central - September 27, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Claire Nana Tags: Attention Deficit Disorder Book Reviews Children and Teens Disorders Family General Parenting Psychology Students Treatment books on adhd childhood adhd book what your ADHD child wishes you knew Source Type: news

Deprogramming Codependent Brainwashing
Codependency is learned. It’s based on false, dysfunctional beliefs we adopt from our parents and environment. The most damaging belief codependents learn is that we’re not worthy of love and respect — that we’re somehow inadequate, inferior, or just not enough. This is internalized shame. Last year, I published a blog, “Codependency is based on Fake Facts,” explaining the effects of this programming, which squelches our true self. Romantic love that’s mutual can for a brief time liberate our natural, true self. We get a glimpse of what it would be like to live unshackled by shame ...
Source: Psych Central - September 27, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Darlene Lancer, JD, MFT Tags: Abuse Borderline Personality Codependence Narcissism PTSD Relationships & Love Brainwashing Emotional Abuse Source Type: news

Book Review: Ethics Challenges in Forensic Psychiatry & Psychology
I used to work at a community mental health center. A client could be there totally on his or her own (which was the exception) or could have been referred by any of the following, and sometimes by more than one: state probation and parole (which sometimes included out-of-state referrals), community corrections local probation, federal probation and parole, DUI and drug possession probation, child protective services, adult protective services, juvenile probation, direct referral from various court systems, special justice ordered outpatient care in lieu of inpatient hospitalization, etc. The referral could include an eva...
Source: Psych Central - September 25, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Stan Rockwell, PsyD Tags: Book Reviews Caregivers Children and Teens Disorders Dual Diagnosis Education Ethics & Morality Family General Medications Policy and Advocacy Professional Psychiatry Psychological Assessment Psychology Psychotherapy Treatm Source Type: news

Book Review: Understanding Antidepressants
One in five Americans will have a major depressive episode in their lives and many will seek help from a mental health provider, which may include treatment with medication. As with all medication, there is no one-size-fits-all treatment plan when it comes to antidepressants. The terminology alone is confusing. There are SSRIs, tricyclics, and other drugs that have off-label uses. For those who take antidepressants, it is a challenge to find the right one. Some work better than others for individuals, and family members may not understand why it is difficult to find something that “works.” In Understanding Anti...
Source: Psych Central - September 23, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tina Arnoldi Tags: Antidepressants Book Reviews Depression Disorders General Medications Psychology Treatment book on antidepressants understanding antidepressants Source Type: news

Book Review: Social Courage:  Coping & Thriving With the Reality of Social Anxiety
“Most people who feel trapped by shyness or social anxiety will settle with the status quo and never seek help, be it from a knowledgeable therapist or from finding a scientifically based self-guided program and tackling it on their own,” writes Dr. Eric Goodman. Instead, social anxiety becomes a sort of silent suffering that is endured for years, coloring the way we think, interact, and feel when around other people. Yet, the idea that social anxiety is a disease that needs to be cured is just one of the many myths that often keeps us from getting help. In his new book, Social Courage: Coping and Thriving...
Source: Psych Central - September 22, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Claire Nana Tags: Anxiety Book Reviews Disorders General Habits Loneliness Memory and Perception Mindfulness Motivation and Inspiration Psychology Self-Esteem Self-Help Social Phobia books on social anxiety social anxiety book social courage Source Type: news

Book Review: DBT Therapeutic Activity Ideas for Working with Teens
Teenagers are the greatest enigma. Maturing, yet still young in so many ways, teenagers are in a unique place in life, and when each young person brings with them not only a diagnosis, but a personality, a temperament, dreams, talents, struggles, and histories, the best therapies are designed that take all of this into account, giving room for each teen to be treated individually. In her interactive work, DBT Therapeutic Activity Ideas for Working With Teens, Carol Lozier takes all she has learned about working with teenagers with borderline personality disorder, depression, anxiety, and other emotional sensitivities and c...
Source: Psych Central - September 21, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Bethany Duarte Tags: Book Reviews Children and Teens DBT Disorders Family General Parenting Psychology Psychotherapy Self-Help Students Treatment DBT book DBT book for teens DBT therapeutic activity Source Type: news

Book Review: The Anxiety Management Workbook
Although it is a normal human emotion and an adaptive response to threatening situations, anxiety can feel overwhelming, often trapping us in a loop of automatic thoughts that lead to physiological responses that convince us something is wrong. The result is a host of behaviors that help us avoid anything that triggers our anxiety, but which, over time, only causes it to increase. Moreover, should we reach for something to help us calm down — such as alcohol, a cigarette, or marijuana — it can make our anxiety even worse. Overcoming anxiety, says Renee Mill, takes more than a little practice. In her new book, T...
Source: Psych Central - September 19, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Claire Nana Tags: Anxiety Book Reviews Disorders General Healthy Living Mindfulness Motivation and Inspiration Neuroscience Psychology Relaxation and Meditation Self-Help Treatment anxiety management book anxiety management workbook anxiety work Source Type: news

Book Review: The Anxiety Management Manual
Anxiety can feel paralyzing. It can keep us from doing the things we love. It can keep us from pursuing our goals. It can keep us from enjoying our lives. Yet anxiety need not be a roadblock. “Even if you have a genetic tendency for anxiety, or you have been anxious for a long time, it is still possible to make changes,” writes Renee Mill. In her new book, The Anxiety Management Manual: A Therapist Guide for an Effective 10-Session CBT Treatment Program, Mill harnesses a powerful yet succinct treatment program complete with a 4-step procedure to effectively begin the process of stimulating the brain circuitry t...
Source: Psych Central - September 19, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Claire Nana Tags: Anxiety Book Reviews Disorders General Memory and Perception Mindfulness Motivation and Inspiration Neuroscience Psychology Relaxation and Meditation Self-Help Stress anxiety management book anxiety management manual Source Type: news

Couples Therapy for Borderline Personality Disorder
How can couples therapy for Borderline Personality Disorder help to overcome splitting behavior? Can couples therapy help BPD? Those suffering from Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) are usually depicted as having stormy relationships. One moment, the person with BPD can’t wait to leave their relationship, and the next moment, things are all good in their relationship. The relationship can feel very confusing for their partner, who gets mixed messages when they feel pushed away, and then pulled back into the relationship again. They may feel blamed or accused of not loving their partner, and then expecte...
Source: Psych Central - September 18, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Nancy Carbone Tags: Borderline Personality Codependence General Relationships & Love black and white thinking splitting borderline personality disorder Source Type: news

Book Review: Trauma & the Struggle to Open Up
Our relationships can be our greatest source of pain, and yet without relationships, we cannot heal from pain. For some people, the pain is too overwhelming and avoidance seems the only option. Others may try to be open about their experiences and find themselves feeling too exposed, too vulnerable, and worse off than before. In either case, healing from trauma requires that we find and allow ourselves to experience a healing relationship. In his new book, Trauma and the Struggle to Open Up: From Avoidance to Recovery and Growth, Robert T. Muller, who is also the author of Trauma and the Avoidant Client, takes us inside th...
Source: Psych Central - September 17, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Claire Nana Tags: Book Reviews Disorders General Memory and Perception Personal Stories Psychology Psychotherapy PTSD Trauma Treatment books on trauma trauma book Source Type: news

Why I Never Did Hard Drugs
“Drugs are a waste of time. They destroy your memory and your self-respect and everything that goes along with your self-esteem.” – Kurt Cobain I grew up in a close-knit, fairly religious family where children were seen and not heard, where mealtime meant everyone sat down together and exchanged pleasantries while enjoying the prepared-at-home repasts, complete with dessert. There was no distraction, either from television or radio, and the telephone ringing was a rare occurrence, quickly dispatched once the caller learned we were eating. In fact, nothing was so urgent back then. It was, indeed, a peacefu...
Source: Psych Central - September 17, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Suzanne Kane Tags: Addictions Substance Abuse Alcoholism Drug Abuse Opioid Addiction Source Type: news

Facing Major Life Changes with Bipolar Disorder
Major life changes. They say for those of us with mental illness that major life changes can be more difficult. Things like making a move to a new home, a new job or having a baby. They change your life so drastically that they make everything else in your life come to a stop. Recently, even though I have bipolar 1 disorder, I decided to not just tackle one major life change but two of them simultaneously. I stopped driving in 2014 after I received a DUI for my medication for my bipolar disorder. I decided not to start driving again because my medication isn’t an option for me, sometimes I do not realize that I ...
Source: Psych Central - September 13, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tosha Maaks Tags: Antidepressants Benzodiazepines Bipolar Medications Mood Stabilizers Personal Stories Stigma Stress Work Issues Source Type: news

Book Review: The Emotional Foundations of Personality
The Emotional Foundations of Personality: A Neurobiological and Evolutionary Approach is the last work of Jaak Panksepp. Kenneth Davis was a student of Panksepp many years ago and became a colleague and co-author. As Davis wrote, this work was like taking a multi-year seminar with Panksepp. The result is truly remarkable. It is so filled with research, critical thought, history, and knowledge, it is difficult to know where to begin. Emotional Foundations of Personality is a history of our ongoing efforts to define just what personality is and how to measure it. We have used language and description for most of our testing ...
Source: Psych Central - September 11, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Stan Rockwell, PsyD Tags: Book Reviews Disorders General Genetics Memory and Perception Neuroscience Personality Professional Psychiatry Psychological Assessment Psychology Treatment books on emotions Emotional Life jaak panksepp ken davis Source Type: news

How to Best Support a Loved One with Bipolar Disorder
Bipolar disorder is a difficult illness. For Arden Tucker, an episode of depression can be especially debilitating. Like many who experience bipolar disorder, Tucker fears she won’t recapture the essence of who she really is, the person she was before the depression began. “My bipolar depression can feel insidious,” she said. That’s because even though Tucker takes medication, her depression is cyclical, so it’ll return “again, and again, and again.” Her partner of 35 years is a tremendous support. One of the most important ways Tucker’s partner supports her is by checking on...
Source: Psych Central - September 8, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Margarita Tartakovsky, M.S. Tags: Bipolar Disorders Family General Relationships & Love Self-Help Bipolar Depression Bipolar Disorder bipolar disorder support Friends Suicide Prevention Awareness Month Source Type: news

Depression Treatment: Where We Are Missing the Mark
Depression affects 450 million people worldwide and 15 million adults in the United States (U.S.) alone. Suicide is the 10th leading cause of death in the United States, claiming over 40,000 lives every year. We see these heartbreaking stories making headlines too often, and there are tens of thousands more we do not know about. The scariest part? There is no end in sight. Antidepressants are one of the three most commonly used therapeutic drug classes in the United States. Approximately 1 in 9 Americans of all ages reported taking at least one antidepressant medication — a number that was less than 1 in 50 just th...
Source: Psych Central - September 7, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Sachin Mehta, M.D. Tags: Antidepressants Bipolar Depression Medications Mood Stabilizers Neuroscience Suicide Treatment Deep brain stimulation Deep transcranial magnetic stimulation Depression Treatment Electroconvulsive Therapy Major Depressive Disorder Source Type: news

Book Review: You Are Not A Rock
No one wants to feel sad, angry, lonely, or anxious, but by avoiding those feelings, we may only make things worse. In You Are Not A Rock: A Step-By-Step Guide to Better Mental Health (For Humans), Mark Freeman encourages readers to feel feelings because we are not rocks. We do feel things and he provides steps to do this without becoming overwhelmed by our emotions. Freeman shares his personal experiences with compulsion and how he engaged in OCD behaviors to avoid unpleasant emotions. And he admits that his attempts at dealing with his feelings were a problem. Feelings can help us practice emotional fitness, which may in...
Source: Psych Central - September 4, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tina Arnoldi Tags: Book Reviews Disorders General Mindfulness Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder Personal Stories Psychological Assessment Psychology Psychotherapy Treatment mark freeman mental health book you are not a rock Source Type: news

10 Questions and Answers to Help Prevent Suicide
Suicide is tremendously hard to talk about. It can be especially overwhelming for people without mental health training. Yet friends and family are often the first to learn that a loved one is having suicidal thoughts. As therapists, we can do more to help someone in crisis. Underestimating this need is a terrible mistake. Suicide is the second leading cause of death for 10 to 34-year-olds, says the National Institute of Mental Health.   We can help people learn safe, helpful ways to respond to those whose suffering is so great, they see no other way out. Here are 10 questions and answers about talking with someone wh...
Source: Psych Central - August 27, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Robyn Brickel, MA, LMFT Tags: Depression Suicide Suicide Prevention Source Type: news

The Adaptive Care Model: Treating the Whole Person, Not Just the Eating Disorder
Eating disorders are dangerous, life-threatening conditions that affect all aspects of the individual. In the past, many treatment models focused solely on the psychological, medical and nutritional components of the eating disorder itself rather than treating the complete, individual person. Now there is a model that builds off the traditional methods to focus on healing all dimensions of the whole person. To do this, clinicians must understand the biological underpinnings that cause eating disorders and the behaviors that help maintain them long-term, and work together in multi-disciplinary teams to achieve total health....
Source: Psych Central - August 23, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Nicole Siegfried, Ph.D, CEDS Tags: Addictions Alcoholism Neuroscience Substance Abuse Treatment Source Type: news

Addiction Recovery: Letting Go of Generational Sin
I recently learned of something called Generational Sin. As you can probably guess it is Sin that is passed down by generation, but not in that you’ve learned sinful traits and acted upon them, more in the way of that the past generations “Spirit of Sin” is stuck to you. So if you think about Karma and what goes around comes around, I suppose it would be similar except that what happened in your family from past generations is in your DNA — and not just your DNA, but your “Spiritual DNA”. When I was conceived by two people under the influence of drugs and alcohol. The woman having l...
Source: Psych Central - August 22, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Melissa Steussy Tags: Addictions Alcoholism Children and Teens Genetics Parenting Psychology Spirituality Substance Abuse Source Type: news

Object Constancy:  Understanding the Fear of Abandonment and Borderline Personality Disorder
This article focuses on the fear of abandonment, which, to its excess, could show up as a lingering feeling of insecurity, intrusive thoughts, emptiness, unstable sense of self, clinginess, neediness, extreme mood fluctuations and frequent relationship conflicts. On the flip side, one might also cope by cutting off completely, and become emotionally numb. Neuroscientists have found that our parents’ response to our attachment-seeking behaviors, especially during the first two years of our lives, encode our model of the world. If as infants, we have healthy attachment interactions with an attuned, available, and nurt...
Source: Psych Central - August 16, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Imi Lo Tags: Borderline Personality Codependence DBT Psychology Psychotherapy Relationships & Love Trauma Treatment Source Type: news

How Discovering Your Core Values Could Prevent Discontent
In conclusion, I would like to add a value quote that I came across during my research. I feel this is something that we all could reflect on. Consider the following food for thought: “When the way you think, speak and behave match your values, life feels very good. You feel whole, content, in control. But when these do not align with your personal values, then things feel… wrong. Life feels uneasy. You feel out of sorts, disconnected, restless, and unhappy.” – Melli O’Brien (Source: Psych Central)
Source: Psych Central - August 13, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Cerena Reid-Maynard, LICSW Tags: Depression Essays Ethics & Morality General Motivation and Inspiration Personal Stories core values discontent Happiness Resentment Source Type: news

How to Recognize a Psychopath
“I don’t feel guilty for anything. I feel sorry for people who feel guilt.” – Ted Bundy We’re all familiar with the famous villains in movies and TV such as Hannibal Lecter in “The Silence of the Lambs,” Norman Bates in Alfred Hitchcock’s psychological thriller, “Psycho,” Dexter Morgan in the Showtime series “Dexter.” In real life, we’ve read about the horrific murders committed by the likes of two executed serial killers from the 1970s: Theodore (Ted) Bundy, killer, rapist and necrophile, and John Wayne Gacy, Jr., who murdered 33 boys. What the...
Source: Psych Central - August 10, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Suzanne Kane Tags: Abuse Anger Bullying Ethics & Morality Narcissism Neuroscience Personal Stories Trauma Violence & Aggression Source Type: news

Bipolar Disorder & Finding the Right Psychiatrist
Finding the right psychiatrist is a difficult task. For me it took almost 10 years and three different doctors. It seems like finding a doctor would be a simple thing, however it’s very personal and you are putting yourself in a vulnerable position when you speak with a psychiatrist. By the time you get to a psychiatrist you have either spoken with your primary care doctor or a therapist who have referred you to go see the psychiatrist. So, you have already told someone your secret of not feeling well mentally and the fact that you feel like you need some help. Most people go to see a psychiatrist reluctantly. When...
Source: Psych Central - August 5, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tosha Maaks Tags: Bipolar General Personal Stories Psychiatry Psychotherapy Bipolar Disorder Psychiatrist Therapeutic Relationship Source Type: news

PTSD Is Like a Ghost: On Surviving Domestic Violence
And he knows you intimately. He knows everything about you. He knows what you love, he knows who you love, he knows your favorite places to go, favorite things to do. He knows your favorite colors, music, TV shows, hobbies, friends.   Some people (usually the people who enabled this ghost to enter your life) would say he’s imaginary. He’s made up. He doesn’t exist. You’re crazy or sick. You’re looking for attention. You’re dwelling on things and you should just get over it.   If only … I wish he was imaginary and that I just made him up. I wish I was crazy some...
Source: Psych Central - August 3, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Deborah Gray Tags: Abuse Bullying Domestic Violence PTSD Relationships & Love Trauma Women's Issues Abusive Relationships complex ptsd Domestic abuse Spousal Abuse Source Type: news

How to Help Your Partner Through Their Depression
When your spouse has depression, you might be very worried, and feel utterly helpless. After all, depression is a stubborn, difficult illness. Your partner might seem detached or deeply sad. They might seem hopeless and have a hard time getting out of bed. They might be irritable with a swiftly shrinking fuse. They might be tired all the time and say really negative things about everything. You also might be confused. “[M]any symptoms of depression can be poorly understood, particularly irritability or apathy, which partners can mistakenly label as ‘being crabby’ or ‘lazy,’” said Melissa...
Source: Psych Central - August 1, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Margarita Tartakovsky, M.S. Tags: Depression Disorders General Relationships & Love Self-Help Clinical Depression depression and relationships depression support Marriage Mood Disorder Source Type: news