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6 Ways to Navigate Anxiety
Anxiety is frustrating. You feel like a stranger inside your own body. You feel like there are mini explosions inside your head, inside your heart. Sometimes, you shake. Sometimes, you sweat. Sometimes, the sensations are hard to describe: You simply feel off or downright terrible. Your thoughts race each other around a very large track for hours. Sometimes, these thoughts speak of inevitable, impending doom. Sometimes, they’re more subtle, whispering and strengthening your self-doubt. And, naturally, you let these anxious thoughts and sensations dictate your life. You let your anxiety determine whether you go to the...
Source: Psych Central - April 19, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Margarita Tartakovsky, M.S. Tags: Anxiety Disorders General Habits Self-Help anxiety tips anxious thoughts managing anxiety navigating anxiety struggling with anxiety Source Type: news

Book Review: From Anxiety to Love
“My anxiety journey was one of the worst, most terrifying experiences of my life. Yet once I allowed it to become my greatest teacher, it also became one of the best,” writes Corinne Zupko. In her new book, From Anxiety to Love: A Radical New Approach For Letting Go of Fear and Finding Lasting Peace, Zupko shows readers how anxiety can become an awakening, directing us on a new pathway toward love and inner peace. “Every experience you have can serve one of two purposes – and you get to choose which. It can help you awaken to the peace that is already in you, or it can help you stay unaware of this ...
Source: Psych Central - April 18, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Claire Nana Tags: Anxiety Book Reviews Happiness Mindfulness Self-Help Spirituality Source Type: news

Affect Dysregulation and C-PTSD
One of the most important features of Complex Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (C-PTSD) is that of ‘affect dysregulation’. The meaning of this somewhat opaque sounding term is perhaps made clearer by using its synonym: emotional dysregulation. It consists of strongly felt emotions, in particular anger and fear, which seize the sufferer rendering him or her powerless to control them. These emotional outbursts can be terrifying both for the victim and anyone else present, lasting anywhere from seconds to a few hours. They are typically prompted by minor stimuli that most people would barely react to, if at all and ...
Source: Psych Central - April 13, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Fabiana Franco, Ph.D. Tags: Abuse Bipolar Psychology Psychotherapy PTSD Trauma affect dysregulation Bipolar Disorder C-PTSD Child Abuse child neglect Childhood Trauma Comorbid Disorders complex ptsd complex trauma Coping Skills Dissociation Emotiona Source Type: news

Exposure and Response Prevention Therapy for OCD
This article titled “Common Pitfalls in Exposure and Response prevention (EX/RP) for OCD” by Seth J. Gillihan was published in the Journal of Obsessive-Compulsive and Related Disorders in May 2012 and discusses various mistakes that well-meaning therapists might make while using ERP therapy. For example, some therapists don’t encourage their clients to go far enough in their exposures — to do what is most difficult for them. Other therapists might choose the wrong type of exposures, or even interfere with proper therapy by encouraging the use of distraction. Some other topics discussed in the articl...
Source: Psych Central - April 10, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Janet Singer Tags: Caregivers Family Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder Parenting Psychology Psychotherapy Treatment anxious thoughts Avoidance Desensitization exposure Exposure Response Prevention Therapy Obsessions Ocd Rituals Source Type: news

The Damaging Beliefs of Bipolar Disorder
When writer Elaina J. Martin was diagnosed with bipolar disorder, she felt “less than.” “I felt like other people were better than me, less damaged than I was.” In the first few years of her diagnosis, psychotherapist Colleen King, LMFT, worried she’d never be able to function at a higher level. “During those years of struggle, I saw myself deteriorate, become less capable, and felt like a failure in many ways.” Bipolar disorder is a difficult illness that can shatter one’s self-worth and sense of self. Beliefs tend to differ in different people, depending on the person&rsquo...
Source: Psych Central - April 8, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Margarita Tartakovsky, M.S. Tags: Bipolar Disorders General Self-Esteem Self-Help Stigma Bipolar Disorder Depressive Episode managing bipolar disorder Mental Health Stigma Negative Beliefs Sense Of Self Source Type: news

Bullying and Mental Health Consequences
According to the American Psychological Association, bullying is a form of aggressive behavior in which someone intentionally and repeatedly causes another person injury or discomfort. Even though bullying commonly happens in childhood, the impact can last well into adulthood. Duke University recently conducted research that shows the rates for agoraphobia and panic disorders greatly increases with bullying. Mental health issues such as depression, anxiety, and low esteem haunt many adults who were once bullied in childhood. In previous generations, many children were supposed to handle their own issues. “Let th...
Source: Psych Central - April 7, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Rebecca Lee Tags: Abuse Anger Anxiety Bullying Children and Teens Parenting School Issues Students Adolescence Coping Skills cyberbullying Envy Insecurity Jealousy online harassment relational bullying sexual bullying Source Type: news

Book Review: 5 Types of People Who Can Ruin Your Life
High conflict people are everywhere among us. Because we are often caught off guard by them, Bill Eddy, author of 5 Types of People Who Can Ruin Your Life says we are also often unprepared for how to deal with them. “There are five types of people who can ruin your life. They can ruin your reputation, your self-esteem, or your career. They can destroy your finances, your physical health, or your sanity. Some of them will kill you, if you give them the opportunity,” writes Eddy. Kara is one example. While she initially drew the attention of Tom with her unique ability to pull him out of his shell and captur...
Source: Psych Central - March 29, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Claire Nana Tags: Book Reviews Borderline Personality Narcissism Relationships & Love Self-Help HCP high conflict personalities personality types Social awareness Source Type: news

Book Review: The Pocket Guide to the Polyvagal Theory
I came across the polyvagal theory some time ago in my ongoing study of finding ways to help people recover from trauma. I have come to realize that there is so much to this theory that pervades all of our behavior and feelings. Stephen Porges’ polyvagal theory is truly phenomenal. Porges’ book, The Pocket Guide to the Polyvagal Theory: The Transformative Power of Feeling Safe is another in the Norton series on interpersonal neurobiology and was written to give a nontechnical overview of the theory. It is organized in the form of edited interviews and conversations, mostly with Ruth Buczynski of the Nation...
Source: Psych Central - March 28, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Stan Rockwell, PsyD Tags: Book Reviews Neuroscience Psychiatry Psychological Assessment Psychology PTSD Trauma eastern philosophy Polyvagal Theory Psychophysiology Source Type: news

Discovering Your True Self — Who You Really Are
Codependents often wonder what is normal. They feel insecure and wonder how others perceive them. Many tell me they don’t really know themselves. They’ve become people-pleasers, editing what they say and adapting their behavior to the feelings and needs of others. Some sacrifice themselves — their values, needs, wants, and feelings — to someone they care about. For other codependents their behavior revolves around their addiction, whether it’s to a drug, a process, such as sex or gambling, or to pursuing prestige or power in order to feel secure. They usually do so to the detriment of themselv...
Source: Psych Central - March 27, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Darlene Lancer, JD, MFT Tags: Abuse Addictions Alcoholism Anger Binge Eating Codependence Eating Disorders Personality Relationships & Love Self-Esteem Substance Abuse Abusive Relationships Authentic Self Codependency Dysfunctional Family emotional needs Source Type: news

Book Review: It ’ s Not Always Depression
How many of us are truly connected to our emotions? Since emotions can be uncomfortable, we can all probably admit to dealing with them in an unhealthy manner at some point. Maybe we cope through our addiction to technology, through comfort eating, or other things. In It’s Not Always Depression: Working the Change Triangle to Listen to the Body, Discover Core Emotions, and Connect to Your Authentic Self, Hilary Jacobs Hendel talks about techniques we can use to stay connected to our emotions rather than the traditional therapy model of discussing thoughts and personal histories. “Everyone of us can benefit from...
Source: Psych Central - March 26, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tina Arnoldi Tags: Book Reviews Depression Disorders is it depression not always depression Source Type: news

Preventing Interpersonal Violence in Relationships, Part 2
This is Part 2 in a series on interpersonal violence in relationships. Read Part 1 here. Risk Factors — People Who May Be Vulnerable to Dating Abuse It can be hard to imagine why any person would allow a partner to hurt them and frighten them, while remaining in the relationship. A number of common risk factors may make some individuals more vulnerable to the risk of relationship abuse: A trauma history – Adverse experiences, especially in childhood, can impair a person’s ability to function well psychologically, emotionally, and in relationships. Especially when the trauma is not recognized and trea...
Source: Psych Central - March 26, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Robyn Brickel, MA, LMFT Tags: Abuse Alcoholism Anxiety Codependence Family Parenting Relationships & Love Substance Abuse Trauma Women's Issues #metoo controlling behavior dating abuse dating violence Domestic Violence Emotional Abuse emotional dependen Source Type: news

Preventing Interpersonal Violence in Relationships, Part 1
As a therapist, I want to help survivors of dating violence, domestic violence, and abusive relationships recover their sense of safety and self-fulfillment in life. And I want to do more. I want more people to know how grave the damage is to survivors of abuse and sexual assault. I want to see more action and education to stop dating and interpersonal violence and prevent it. Artists and performers can be powerful allies for awareness. In a song “The Whole Damn Year,” singer songwriter Mary J. Blige explains the harrowing experience of a person living with relationship trauma: Bad, how deep the pain is Oh, you...
Source: Psych Central - March 25, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Robyn Brickel, MA, LMFT Tags: Abuse Anger Codependence PTSD Relationships & Love Trauma Women's Issues #metoo controlling behavior dating abuse dating violence Domestic Violence Emotional Abuse Insecurity Intimate Partner Abuse intimidation Jealousy R Source Type: news

6 Tips for Effectively Managing Your Bipolar Disorder — From Pill Trays to Practitioners
Bipolar disorder is a difficult illness. It affects everything. In addition to affecting your mood, it affects your judgment, concentration, memory, energy and sleep. It affects your relationships. It affects your everyday. It can bring about a deep, sinking despair, or jolt you into a euphoric state where your brain literally can’t compute the consequences of your actions. Some people experience depressive and manic symptoms at the same time—darkness, distorted thoughts and fatigue followed by restlessness, racing thoughts and irritability. It can feel so overwhelming. However, this doesn’t mean you&rsqu...
Source: Psych Central - March 22, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Margarita Tartakovsky, M.S. Tags: Bipolar Disorders General Psychotherapy Self-Help Sleep Stress Treatment being healthy with bipolar Bipolar Disorder bipolar disorder books bipolar disorder treatment Depressive Episode hope and bipolar disorder managing bipola Source Type: news

Help for Those with Alzheimer ’ s or Related Dementia
According to the Alzheimer’s Association, approximately 5.5 million Americans are now living with the disease, and it is estimated that 16 million people will be living with Alzheimer’s by the year 2050. While deaths from heart disease have decreased by 14% since 2000, deaths from Alzheimer’s disease have increased by 89%. It is also interesting to note that 35% of caregivers (family and friends) of Alzheimer’s or other dementia patients report that their own health has declined compared to 19% of caregivers of older people with no dementia. Clearly, we have a crisis on our hands — not just fo...
Source: Psych Central - March 19, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Janet Singer Tags: Aging Alzheimer's Disabilities Memory and Perception Neuroscience Alzheimer's disease Dementia Memory Loss Source Type: news

10 Good and 10 Bad Things About Procrastination
“Don’t put off until tomorrow what you can do today.” – Benjamin Franklin “There’s nothing to match curling up with a good book when there’s a repair job to be done around the house.” – Joe Ryan Everyone procrastinates. Some, in fact, are proficient at it. While I used to count myself in that category, I’ve made a conscious effort to change my ways in recent years and I must say I’ve been quite successful in the endeavor. Still, the urge to put off what must be done occasionally plagues me. So, I found the research on what’s good and what’s bad a...
Source: Psych Central - March 18, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Suzanne Kane Tags: Anxiety General Habits Happiness Motivation and Inspiration Self-Help Habit Change overwhelm Procrastination Source Type: news

How MDMA May Help with the Pain of PTSD
PTSD affects everyone from soldiers, children, to someone recovering from a natural disaster or sexual assault. The memories of the tortured experience torments their mind, sometimes replaying over and over again as they relive the experience. But what if there was a drug that could help them feel in touch with the world again? A drug that, if used in a controlled environment, could bring them back to reality with a fresh set of eyes? MDMA might be the answer for PTSD. What is PTSD? PTSD is a psychological condition that is triggered by a traumatic event. The person may suffer from nightmares or flashbacks, causing severe ...
Source: Psych Central - March 17, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Ayanna McClintic Tags: Medications Miscellaneous Drugs Neuroscience Psychology PTSD Trauma Treatment ecstasy MDMD Posttraumatic Stress Disorder psychoactive drug Serotonin Source Type: news

True Freedom Anxiety and Expectations
With freedom comes anxiety, according to psychoanalyst Erich Fromm in his book Escape from Freedom (1941). He believed we don’t know what to do with freedom once we get it and find new controls and structures to reduce our freedom. Those with long prison histories often return to prison, unable to create structure and consistency outside of prison. Addicts will tell you that getting clean is hard, but staying clean is even harder. We all have, at some point, tried to implement change in our lives, but found it difficult to break our habitual unhealthy patterns of thinking and behaving. Why? It’s our ego’...
Source: Psych Central - March 16, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Sloane Fabricius, LMFT Tags: Anxiety General Habits Happiness Mindfulness Personality Relationships & Love Self-Esteem Authenticity Avoidance Coping Skills Eckhart Tolle Ego expectations Guilt Perfectionism Present Moment Resilience Self Acceptance Source Type: news

Book Review: The Heart of Trauma
Betrayal, painful losses, devastating natural disasters, acts of terrorism, and mass shootings can all cast a physiological residue on those left in their wake. A neuroscientific footprint that extends far beyond the experiences that caused it, but into all aspects of our lives, trauma can jeopardize our ability to experience the very relationships that can help heal it. In The Heart of Trauma: Healing the Embodied Brian in the Context of Relationships, Bonne Badenoch demonstrates how the safe sanctuaries of warm, loving relationships can help heal trauma, and how we can create them. It has been said that success...
Source: Psych Central - March 10, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Claire Nana Tags: Book Reviews PTSD Stress Trauma Treatment books on relationships embodied brain heart of trauma Source Type: news

Book Review: Out Of The Madhouse
Michael Maitland suffered from clinical depression, anxiety, and anorexia so severe that it landed him in the emergency room with a collapsed lung. In his new book, Out Of The Madhouse: An Insider’s Guide To Managing Depression and Anxiety, which he co-wrote with his father, Michael takes us inside his journey – through journal entries – from suicidal to recovery. “I can’t really believe how I managed to get this bad. At university (2007-2010), I slowly started to notice I didn’t feel right. I began staying in more, not seeing people, and struggling with how I felt about myself. As my se...
Source: Psych Central - March 9, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Claire Nana Tags: Anorexia Anxiety Book Reviews Depression Treatment managing anxiety Managing Depression out of the madhouse Source Type: news

Book Review: Parenting the Addicted Teen
While parents play a critical role in a teen’s recovery from addiction, the cycle of addiction itself often disempowers the entire family in such a way that recovery and reconnection become almost impossible. In her new book, Parenting the Addicted Teen: A 5-Step Foundational Program, Barbara Krovitz-Neren contends that in reconnecting and learning to be present for their families, parents may hold the key to their teen’s recovery. “The lack of support for parents in the addiction and mental health field during, and even more so, after treatment astounds me,” writes Krovitz-Neren. When children with...
Source: Psych Central - March 7, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Claire Nana Tags: Addictions Book Reviews Children and Teens Family Parenting Self-Help Substance Abuse addiction in teens Parenting the Addicted Teen teenager addiction Source Type: news

Book Review: Mindful Eating
How long does it take you to eat lunch? 10 minutes? 15 minutes? Have you ever found yourself sitting at your desk or in front of the TV, realizing that you have no recollection of what you’ve eaten? If so, you’re not alone. We live in a busy world, where fast is expected. This impacts us in all areas, including the way we eat. Mindless eating does not necessarily imply a disorder needing psychiatric assistance. It is a habit that many of us employ when we’re simply not paying attention. In Mindful Eating, Jan Chozen Bays, MD shares how to have a better relationship with food through mindful eating. S...
Source: Psych Central - March 6, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tina Arnoldi Tags: Binge Eating Book Reviews Bulimia Diet & Nutrition Eating Disorders Healthy Living Mindfulness Self-Help Weight Loss books about eating mindful eating Source Type: news

Healthy Ways to Cope with PTSD
Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) has a tremendous impact on a person’s life. The symptoms affect relationships, moods, and the ability to live a normal and effective life. When not dealt with properly, PTSD symptoms can lead to unhealthy ways of coping, such as drug or alcohol use. But when direct action is taken to improve things, a trauma survivor can put themselves in a position of power. And they can make healthy decisions to manage PTSD and improve their quality of life. Recovery Is a Process Knowing and understanding that recovery is a time-consuming process will help you feel more in control. It takes tim...
Source: Psych Central - March 1, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Darren DeYoung Tags: Addictions Medications PTSD Self-Help Trauma Treatment anhedonia Coping Skills Personal Growth Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Quality Of Life Traumatic Experience Source Type: news

5 Mistakes to Never Make with an Abuser
Abuse is about having power over someone. Abusers typically want to feel superior, to control and dominate. To them, communication is not about understanding. It’s a win-lose game. They use verbal abuse and/or violence to accomplish this. They’re frequently self-centered, impatient, unreasonable, insensitive, unforgiving, lack empathy, and are often jealous, suspicious, and withholding. Their moods can shift from fun-loving and romantic to sullen and angry. Some punish with anger, others with silence — or both. It’s often “their way or the highway.” They can be bullies. Typically, abuse...
Source: Psych Central - February 27, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Darlene Lancer, JD, MFT Tags: Abuse Borderline Personality Codependence Divorce Men's Issues Narcissism PTSD Relationships & Love Trauma Women's Issues bullying Communication controlling behavior Domestic abuse Domestic Violence domination Emotional Abu Source Type: news

Complex Trauma: Dissociation, Fragmentation, and Self Understanding
For those of us working in the field of complex trauma, one of the most exciting events of 2017 was the release of Healing the Fragmented Selves of Trauma Survivors by Dr. Janina Fisher. The book is a wonderful summary and synthesis of the current state of knowledge in trauma research enlivened with wisdom, insight and deep compassion for the victims of abuse. Dr. Fisher draws together neurobiological research, psychological theory, and a productive, if sometimes painful, process of trial and error in which dozens of committed therapists sought out better ways of helping survivors of trauma. Unfortunately, many people suf...
Source: Psych Central - February 26, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Fabiana Franco, Ph.D. Tags: Abuse Caregivers Children and Teens Dissociation Dissociative Motivation and Inspiration Neuroscience Parenting Personality Psychology Psychotherapy Self-Esteem Trauma Treatment Alienation C-PTSD Child Abuse child neglect Source Type: news

Searching for Self
“I used to spend hours when I was a kid just looking in the mirror, trying to figure out if I was handsome or not. It just depended on the day. If someone told me I was handsome, then I was handsome, and if someone told me I was ugly, then I believed that. I hardly ever look in the mirror anymore though, not if I can help it. It’s just too stressful.” – Jesse in In Treatment When Dane de Haan (as Jesse) appears for his last session in the HBO series “In Treatment”, it’s a shock both for the audience and for his therapist. He arrives with Angelo, his adoptive father — a m...
Source: Psych Central - February 23, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Amanda Robins, MSW, PhD Tags: Borderline Personality Children and Teens Memory and Perception Narcissism Psychology Self-Esteem Child Development chronic emptiness Identity identity formation integrated identity Personality Disorder Self Awareness Source Type: news

Moms with ADHD Reveal Lessons They ’ ve Learned in Handling Parenting Challenges
You’re a mom who has ADHD, and you’re in the thick of mothering. Maybe you’re in the thick of toddlerhood, besieged by big tantrums and bleary-eyed after one-too-many sleepless nights. Maybe you’re in the thick of adolescence, trying to traverse schedules and emotional roller coasters. Maybe you have several kids, and find yourself frustrated and stressed out over all the logistics. Maybe none of the above describes your situation. But you still feel utterly inadequate and unsure and panicked that you’re parenting all wrong. You’re not alone. Terry Matlen, an ADHD coach, author and mom t...
Source: Psych Central - February 19, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Margarita Tartakovsky, M.S. Tags: Attention Deficit Disorder Disorders General Parenting Personal Stories Self-Help Women's Issues ADHD and parenting Adhd Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder ADHD gifts ADHD tips creative solutions Creativity kids with ADHD Source Type: news

Treatment of Hoarding-Induced Trauma and Perpetration
The American Psychiatric Association’s Diagnostic Standards Manual, Edition V (2013) reports that between 2 and 6% of the general population have a hoarding disorder. Once considered a type of obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), hoarding is now regarded as a serious clinical condition co-morbid with diagnoses of depression, social phobia, generalized anxiety disorders, attention deficit disorder, and sometimes psychosis given the delusional levels of denial that hoarders often present (Frost, Stekelee, Tolin, 2011). Hoarders engage in excessive acquisition of items, whether those items have real world value or not,...
Source: Psych Central - February 15, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Graeme Daniels, MFT Tags: Addictions Anxiety Caregivers Children and Teens Essays Family Grief and Loss Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder Personality Psychodynamic Psychology Psychotherapy PTSD Trauma Treatment Abuse Anxiety Disorder bullying Comorb Source Type: news

Codependency: The Helping Problem
Codependency is a behavior, not a biological illness. It can, however, run in families. By perpetuating the same type of behavior through several generations, dysfunctional relationships can emerge. Codependency can often stem from taking care of a close friend or family member with a substance abuse or chronic mental health issue. While the impulse to take care of another may be a virtuous and helpful decision, it may also arise from a need to control. Codependency, or as some call it, “relationship addiction”, occurs when the care-taker needs to control his or her own anxiety through another person. There is...
Source: Psych Central - February 14, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Rebecca Lee Tags: Abuse Addictions Codependence Narcissism Relationships & Love Self-Esteem Stress Caretaking Codependency Couples Dating love addiction Relationship Addiction Source Type: news

Book Review: Insane Consequences
I have read Insane Consequences: How the Mental Health Industry Fails the Mentally Ill a couple of times and am still contemplating it. It also inspired me to research further into how we treat the seriously mentally ill in America. In the book, author DJ Jaffe takes on what he calls the “mental health industry,” and I think that is a fair characterization. He is not the only writer to use the phrase, and he confronts that industry with a voice that reminds me of a prosecuting attorney on a mission. Jaffe became involved in the mental health system in the 1980s when his wife’s 18 year old sister, Lynn, ca...
Source: Psych Central - February 14, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Stan Rockwell, PsyD Tags: Book Reviews Caregivers Disabilities Policy and Advocacy Psychiatry Psychology Schizophrenia Treatment DJ jaffe mental health policy Mental Illness mental illness violence serious mental illness Source Type: news

Book Review: Still Alice
Still Alice is a novel, not a work of nonfiction. Yet it probably offers one of the most accurate and gripping accounts of the experience of early-onset Alzheimer’s disease ever written. At first, Lisa Genova, a Harvard PhD in neuroscience, self-published her book. Her story resonated, and Still Alice took off, selling so many copies that it was bought by the prestigious publisher, Simon & Schuster. Over time, Genova would go on to win multiple awards for her work, and Still Alice would be made into a major motion picture. The Alice Howland we meet at the outset of the book is an esteemed professor of cognitive p...
Source: Psych Central - February 11, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Bella DePaulo Tags: Aging Alzheimer's Book Reviews Disorders Alzheimer's disease books on alzheimers early-onset Alzheimer's still alice Source Type: news

Book Review: A Parent ’ s Guide to Teen Addiction
It’s true in this country that we do have a war on drugs. But for many parents, that war is waging in their own home with their own teenagers. According to Laurence Westreich, MD, who is an addiction expert, father, and author of A Parent’s Guide to Teen Addiction: Professional Advice on Signs, Symptoms, What to Say, and How to Help, defeating an enemy that is larger and more powerful than us will require unconventional tactics. The first step is to know who the enemy is. “Always remember that substance abuse – NOT your teenager – is the enemy,” writes Westreich. What teen...
Source: Psych Central - February 8, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Claire Nana Tags: Addictions Book Reviews Caregivers Children and Teens Family Parenting Self-Help Substance Abuse child addiction get help for addiction parenting guide Teen Addiction teenager addiction Source Type: news

Book Review: The DBT Solution for Emotional Eating
Do you eat because you are hungry? While our automatic response may be “yes, of course,” many of us, in fact, eat due to stress or to deal with other unwanted emotions. The truth is, the choice to eat is not always about physical hunger. Perhaps the biggest challenge with a food addiction is that it is relatively acceptable when compared with other substance addictions. It is possible to be an emotional eater without anyone ever knowing about it. It does not impact your ability to drive a car, and likely will not result in financial ruin. Coworkers probably won’t notice because they, too, are grabbing don...
Source: Psych Central - February 5, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tina Arnoldi Tags: Addictions Binge Eating Book Reviews Bulimia DBT Eating Disorders Mindfulness Self-Help Stress eating and DBT eating better eating mindfulness Emotional Eating Source Type: news

Book Review: Everyday Mindfulness for OCD
Despite the fact that many make light of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) by poking fun at minor compulsions or obsessions, OCD is a very serious illness. For those who have it, it can be debilitating and disruptive, upsetting life in very serious and insurmountable ways. Everyday Mindfulness for OCD: Tips, Tricks, and Skills for Living Joyfully is for people who experience OCD at any level. Those who are newly diagnosed may benefit first from therapy before taking on this added tool. The book is also for professionals who treat patients with OCD, as well as for friends and family members of those diagnosed. T...
Source: Psych Central - February 2, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Dave Schultz Tags: Book Reviews Cognitive-Behavioral Habits Mindfulness Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder Psychology Psychotherapy Self-Help Treatment help for ocd mindfulness for ocd treatment for ocd Source Type: news

Book Review: Being Ana
“What if I let go of it? What part of me will die?  Why can I not let go of it for anything? What part of me does this disorder define?  Who will I be without it? What will I be?  Where will I be?” These words are just a snippet of the thoughts captured in Shani Raviv’s journal, years into her anorexia. This journal entry captures the questions that readers may experience while reading her memoir. They also aptly depict the internal struggle that Raviv felt over the course of her illness. Raviv’s memoir, Being Ana: A Memoir of Anorexia Nervosa chronicles her journey into and out ...
Source: Psych Central - February 2, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Caroline Comeaux Lee Tags: Book Reviews Disorders Family Substance Abuse anorexia book anorexia nervosa book memoir about anorexia Source Type: news

Book Review: It ’ s Not What You ’ re Eating, It ’ s What ’ s Eating You
We live in a weight-obsessed world. Not only are we exposed to a constant barrage of images of the “perfect body,” but when it comes to attaining it we tend to focus on all the wrong things. We cut our carbohydrate intake, follow any exercise program that promises quick results, and even resort to fasting if we have to – all to attain the body that promises happiness. But, according to Shari Brady, a licensed professional counselor who specializes in eating disorders and is herself recovered from anorexia, achieving freedom from eating disorders starts with stopping the focus on food as the answer to life...
Source: Psych Central - February 2, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Claire Nana Tags: Anorexia Binge Eating Book Reviews Bulimia Diet & Nutrition Disorders Eating Disorders Parenting Self-Help Treatment Weight Loss Carbohydrate Intake Losing Weight Source Type: news

Do I Have ADHD?
“Do I have ADHD?” It’s a question traditionally asked of a person’s family physician, since that’s typically the only healthcare professional with whom most people have an existing relationship. But in the past few decades, the question of whether or not a person has attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) has been posed to the Internet. And the Internet has responded. Psych Central was one of the first mental health websites to offer an online ADHD quiz to test to see if a person might qualify for a diagnosis of attention deficit disorder, back in the late 1990s. We developed our quiz...
Source: Psych Central - February 1, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: John M. Grohol, Psy.D. Tags: Attention Deficit Disorder Disorders Self-Help ADHD test Do I have ADHD how do I know if I have ADHD Symptoms Of Adhd what is ADHD Source Type: news

3 Pervasive, Persistent Myths about Seasonal Affective Disorder
Our society tends to dismiss seasonal affective disorder (SAD). We minimize it. We misunderstand it. Oh, you just don’t like winter. And who could blame you? Winter is tough on everyone. Oh, SAD is like the winter blues, right? You get grumpy or moody because you hate the freezing cold. You’re just in a funk. It happens to a lot of people. It’s totally normal. How can you feel depressed when the air is so crisp and it’s a winter wonderland out there? We incorporate SAD into our vocabulary, flippantly using it in conversation. “Similar to someone saying “I can’t make up my mind, it...
Source: Psych Central - January 31, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Margarita Tartakovsky, M.S. Tags: Depression Disorders General Seasonal Affective Disorder Stigma Light therapy Mental Health Stigma phototherapy SAD summer depression summertime depression winter depression wintertime depression Source Type: news

How Genetic Testing Saved My Life from Debilitating Clinical Depression
The psychologist’s qualifications are proudly displayed in frames on his wall: a doctorate in clinical psychology, board certifications in clinical psychology and clinical neuropsychology. Maybe this means he can help me. I need an expert on the human mind to help me figure out why mine cannot cooperate, why consciousness has become so unbearable for me.   I am sitting on the couch in his office. He sits in his desk chair, awaiting my gaze to meet his. When I do, he delivers his first question: “Have you been considering suicide?” I am at the brink of desperation, and I figure I must be totally ho...
Source: Psych Central - January 27, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Kristen Davis Tags: Antidepressants Depression Genetics Medications Mood Stabilizers Neuroscience Personal Stories Self-Esteem Stigma Suicide Treatment Blame Clinical Depression Compassion Disease Model Dopamine Genetic Research genetic test Source Type: news

Book Review: It ’ s Not Always Depression
Depression is thought to be one of the most common psychological ailments. When clinical social worker Hilary Jacobs Hendel wrote an op-ed in the New York Times titled, “It’s Not Always Depression,” it was the most emailed article for 48 hours, and stayed in the top ten shared articles for more than a week. Clearly, Hendel had struck a chord. In her new book, It’s Not Always Depression: Working the Change Triangle to Listen to the Body, Discover Core Emotions, and Connect to Your Authentic Self, Hendel presents what we commonly label depression as a loss of the authentic self; a loss that not o...
Source: Psych Central - January 25, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Claire Nana Tags: Book Reviews Depression General Happiness Psychodynamic Psychology Self-Help books about depression depression books emotional suffering Source Type: news

C-PTSD and Eating Disorders
As a relatively new and still poorly recognized concept, few people come to therapy identifying as suffering from Complex Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (C-PTSD). As a rule, a diagnosis of C-PTSD comes only after the process of self-discovery in therapy has begun. When people suffering from C-PTSD are referred to a therapist, or decide to seek help for themselves, it is usually because they are seeking help for one of its symptoms, including dissociative episodes, problems forming relationships, and alcohol or substance abuse. One of the more common issues that leads to the discovery of C-PTSD is the presence of an eating ...
Source: Psych Central - January 19, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Fabiana Franco, Ph.D. Tags: Addictions Anorexia Binge Eating Bulimia Eating Disorders Loneliness Psychology PTSD Trauma Treatment affect regulation Bingeing Body Image C-PTSD Child Abuse child neglect Childhood Trauma complex posttraumatic stress di Source Type: news

I ’m Sick — Here ’s How NOT to Respond.
Friends, listen. I have cancer.  It’s a potentially terminal type, but it looks like I’ll just have to take a couple pills every day for the rest of my life and be a little careful about the choices I make.  I want you to know that this means a lot will change, and you’ll likely see some impact.  Sometimes I’ll need to stay in bed.  Sometimes I won’t have much of an appetite.  Sometimes I may not be healthy enough to go out with you, or have the energy to do the things I want to do.  Sometimes I’ll cancel our plans, because I made them when I felt ok, but th...
Source: Psych Central - January 18, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Morgan Meredith Tags: Depression Personal Stories Stigma Stigmatization support Source Type: news

Marriage and Mania: Disparate Depictions of Bipolar Disorder in Mainstream Romance Novels
When characters with mental illness appear in popular fiction, it is typically because the work itself focuses on the mental illness. However, there is a small contingent of fictional projects that have characters with mental illness that do not make that illness the central plot. These books follow the typical narrative arc and literary conventions of their genre and include conflicts unrelated to mental illness; psychiatric disorder is featured but defines neither the character nor the book.   Authors writing about mental illness, however small or large a part of the plot, can raise public awareness and understandin...
Source: Psych Central - January 16, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Kathryn Lawson, PhD Tags: Bipolar Essays Policy and Advocacy Psychology Women's Issues Bipolar Disorder Compassion Empathy genre fiction mania Manic Episode romance novels Stigma Stigmatization Source Type: news

10 Tips for a New Year and a New You
Starting off the New Year right is a common goal. Somewhere during the first month or so, however, if we believe what we read or hear in the media, most of us abandon our resolutions or decide we need to take a break. Either they were too ambitious, impractical, too many to reasonably accomplish, or some other real or imagined reason for quitting. What may be a far more realistic ambition, though, is to stick with overarching goals that allow room for incremental improvement — and a feeling of accomplishment. Here are 10 tips for a New Year and a new you. Figure out what you’re good at. Have you been told often...
Source: Psych Central - January 11, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Suzanne Kane Tags: Anxiety Habits Holiday Coping Psychology Self-Help Habit Change New Year's resolution Personal Growth Source Type: news

Denial: The Primary Roadblock to Addiction Recovery
Getting a loved one to go to drug and alcohol rehab isn’t always easy. Some people may not be ready to admit that they have a problem, let alone spend 30 to 90 days in a rehab center. Denial is one of the main roadblocks that can keep a person from enrolling in addiction treatment and moving forward with their life.1 So what does this look like daily? How can we help our loved ones overcome their denial and accept the help they need to get better? Addicted and In Denial As a person on the outside, it may be difficult for you to understand how your loved one can deny their addiction and the problems it causes, especia...
Source: Psych Central - January 11, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Kelsey Brown Tags: Addictions Alcoholism Caregivers Codependence Family Substance Abuse Denial Drug Abuse Empowerment recovery Substance Use Source Type: news

5 Red Flags and Blind Spots in Dating a Narcissist
People are drawn to narcissists because they can be charming and charismatic. In fact, one study showed that their likable veneer was only penetrable after seven meetings. I’ve had a number of clients who claimed that the courtship with their narcissistic spouse was wonderful, and that abuse only began following the wedding. However, with greater insight, these clients admitted that there were signs that they’d overlooked. Blind Spots When Dating a Narcissist There are unconscious explanations why you might attracted to a narcissist. Here are some reasons why you might not recognize a narcissist: Sexual attra...
Source: Psych Central - January 8, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Darlene Lancer, JD, MFT Tags: Abuse Codependence Domestic Violence General Narcissism Relationships & Love Self-Esteem Trauma Dating Lust Narcissistic Abuse Narcissistic Personality Disorder narcissistic supply seduction Sexual Attraction Source Type: news

A Vital Part of Successfully Managing Bipolar Disorder
Bipolar disorder can feel like a roller coaster in the dark. You don’t know when the turns or drops are coming. You don’t know when you’ll be flipped upside-down. And once you do, it’s too late. You’re in a manic episode, doing things you’ll regret. You’re in a depressive episode, too exhausted to get out of bed. You feel like you’re being whipped around by an erratic condition, and you have zero control. You’re simply along for the ride. Which is why self-awareness is so vital. Self-awareness is essential to successfully managing bipolar disorder—and not feeling ...
Source: Psych Central - January 3, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Margarita Tartakovsky, M.S. Tags: Bipolar Disorders General Healthy Living Self-Help Stress Bipolar Disorder bipolar signs and symptoms Depressive Episode Hypomanic Episode managing bipolar disorder Mood Chart Mood Disorder Self Awareness treating bipolar disor Source Type: news

5 Early Warning Signs that You Are Dealing with a Narcissist
1. Love Bombing/Mirroring Oh my god. This is it! This is what you’ve been waiting for! So much in common it’s uncanny. Amazing sexual chemistry. Lots of attention, interaction, and an immediate connection. The stuff dreams are made of, right? Wrong. The narcissist is an expert at this part. They know that anyone likes to feel special, and their tendency to seek out and court those who are possibly somewhat emotionally vulnerable or overly forgiving or insecure makes this even easier for them. The affection is laid on thick… they want the target to feel there is an intense connection so that they will le...
Source: Psych Central - January 2, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Jessie Monreal, CADC Tags: Abuse Codependence Narcissism Personality Relationships & Love Self-Esteem Self-Help Emotional Manipulation Gaslighting Narcissistic Personality Disorder NPD Source Type: news

Signs of Gaslighting and the Cost
Gaslighting is a malicious form of mental and emotional abuse, designed to plant seeds of self-doubt and alter your perception of reality. Like all abuse, it based on the need for power, control, or concealment. Some people occasionally lie or use denial to avoid taking responsibility. They may forget or remember conversations and events differently than you, or they may have no recollection due to a blackout if they were drinking. These situations are sometimes called gaslighting, but the term actually refers to a deliberate pattern of manipulation calculated to make the victim doubt his or her own perceptions or sanity, ...
Source: Psych Central - January 1, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Darlene Lancer, JD, MFT Tags: Abuse Anger Codependence Divorce Domestic Violence Narcissism Personality Relationships & Love Gaslighting Narcissistic Personality Disorder NPD Source Type: news

Book Review: The Diagnostic System
While it’s true that many illnesses are foreign to the average person, many of the core symptoms of mental illness are familiar to virtually everyone. “Not only does the public have a reasonable sense about what the symptoms of mental illness feel like, it also has some intuitive grasp about what causes them,” writes Jason Schnittker. In his new book, The Diagnostic System: Why The Classification Of Psychiatric Disorders Is Necessary, Difficult, And Never Settled, Schnittker explores the evolution of the manual we use to understand mental illness – the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual. Schnittker e...
Source: Psych Central - December 30, 2017 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Claire Nana Tags: Book Reviews Disorders Dual Diagnosis General Medications Policy and Advocacy Professional Psychiatry Psychology Psychotherapy Treatment diagnosis system diagnostic system mental diagnosis Mental Disorders Psychiatric Disorde Source Type: news

Book Review: Mastering the Addicted Brain
I have worked in the substance use disorder field for about forty years. It can be a contentious field at times, with varying factions proclaiming that their way for recovery is the only way. Some go the denial-busting, “you must admit your an addict” route. Others focus more on the individual, seeking approaches to recovery that may work for them, whether that is harm-reduction, complete abstinence,  a life time of support group meetings, or something else. Walter Ling, author of Mastering the Addicted Brain: Building a Sane and Meaningful Life to Stay Clean is a flexible pragmatist. He is interested...
Source: Psych Central - December 25, 2017 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Stan Rockwell, PsyD Tags: Addictions Book Reviews Self-Help Substance Abuse Treatment Source Type: news