On Mental Health Stigma
One thing I shared with my wife Rachel about a year into our relationship was the time I suffered a nervous breakdown in graduate school. It would be an important moment in any relationship because I shared the time in my life when I was most vulnerable and at my weakest point. Did I technically suffer a nervous breakdown? I’m not sure, all I remember is the turning point came when I drove home late one night, collapsed on my kitchen floor and started crying uncontrollably. Up to that point, I had developed a quasi-schizophrenic outlook on life and could no longer bear the weight of the world-view I constructed. In p...
Source: Psych Central - November 29, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Gregory Duncan Tags: Borderline Personality Personal Stories Stigma Suicide Antidepressants Borderline Personality Disorder college Delusions Life Transition Nervous Breakdown Paranoia Psychosis Shame Stigmatization Source Type: news

This Under-Utilized Drug Is Actually Critical for Treatment-Resistant Depression
Many people with clinical depression have tried an array of medication and still feel sick. Maybe they’ve tried different selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) or selective norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs). Maybe they’ve taken these antidepressants along with an antipsychotic (a common strategy to boost effectiveness). Either way, the lack of improvement can make individuals feel even more hopeless and fear the darkness will never lift. If this sounds all-too familiar, you’re definitely not alone. In fact, up to 30 percent of people with depression don’t respond to the first few ...
Source: Psych Central - November 27, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Margarita Tartakovsky, M.S. Tags: Antidepressants Depression Disorders ECT General Medications Treatment Atypical Depression difficult to treat depression Managing Depression MAOIs medication for depression Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitors Severe Depression Treatin Source Type: news

Remembering Loved Ones Lost to Suicide: Give Yourself Permission to Heal
My sister, Amber, died by suicide on New Year’s Eve 2013. I’d last seen her just a few days prior at Christmas. She seemed “off” — depressed and over-apologetic — but certainly no one expected that she was suicidal.  She’d been struggling with depression and substance use, but had also gotten help and was working to get her life back together. In fact, she’d been a patient in my facility just six months prior. As a counselor and as her brother, I had so many questions. How could I have missed the signs? Did I fail her? Did I let her down? In the immediate aftermath, I fe...
Source: Psych Central - November 23, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Marlon Rollins Tags: Depression Grief and Loss Personal Stories Stigma Suicide Trauma International Survivors of Suicide Loss Day Source Type: news

Intimacy Without Intoxication: Is Sober Sex Better?
The sun is streaming through the curtains of a room that you have never seen before. You squint and rub your bloodshot eyes, as your hand reaches out to feel the prone body of the snoring person who a few hours earlier was a stranger. You notice your own naked body and wonder how the two of you spent the interceding time. You look at the floor next to the bed and see your clothes, strewn across the carpet, wine bottles and glasses, a few joints, and a line of cocaine on the dresser across the room. You slide out of bed, gather your belongings, hightail it to the bathroom and quickly get yourself street ready. Wondering ho...
Source: Psych Central - November 22, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Edie Weinstein, MSW, LSW Tags: Addictions Sexuality Substance Abuse Drug Abuse Rape Sexual Assault Sober Support Sobriety Trauma Source Type: news

Why Getting Off My Mental Health Meds Was a Bad Idea
I created this artwork while smack-dab in a low mental health place over the jummer. My anxiety was causing my hand to no-joke shake with the paint brush in it, yet I felt so sure: everything I was going through was material and it would take me somewhere. (p.s. Is it obvious that I’d just seen the newest Aladdin movie?) Well, it happened again. I feel like life for me over the past decade has basically been this: me scurrying around scooping up my marbles, then losing them again. Scoop em up, lose em again. Scoop, lose, scoop, lose. The particular Marble Scattering that just occurred, though, I mostly did to myself....
Source: Psych Central - October 22, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tricia Arthur Tags: Anti-anxiety Attention Deficit Disorder Medications Personal Stories Adhd Adult Attention Deficit Medication Compliance Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors Source Type: news

Is a Gray Rock Strategy Advisable?
One strategy for dealing with a narcissist or sociopath is to act like a “gray rock,” meaning that you become uninteresting and unresponsive. You don’t feed their needs for drama or attention. You don’t show emotion, say anything interesting, or disclose any personal information. Nor do you ask questions or participate in conversations, except for brief factual replies. Limit your answers to a few syllables, a nod, or say “maybe” or “I don’t know.” Additionally, you may have to make yourself plain and unattractive, so your partner gains no pleasure in showing you off or...
Source: Psych Central - October 18, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Darlene Lancer, JD, MFT Tags: Abuse Codependence Communication Narcissism Relationships & Love Coping Strategies Domestic Violence gray rock grey rock Narcissistic Personality Disorder Source Type: news

What I Do When Anxiety Infects My Favorite Relaxation Tool   
I was on my belly, my cheeks snug against the massage table’s doughnut pillow, my muscles getting nudged this way and that, when the gal doing the magic asked this question.  Jean was short, shorter than me even. Round cheeks and a stocky build, conservative shoes and black clothes. Maybe fifty years old. Just minutes earlier, when I arrived at the quaint, creaky little massage studio desperate for relief both from my two toddler children and a bad case of winter cabin fever, she greeted me with a soft smile that made me want to curl up inside it and stay.  But once the massage started, I was distressed to ...
Source: Psych Central - October 15, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tricia Arthur Tags: Anxiety Mindfulness Personal Stories Massage negative energy Relaxation Stress Reduction Source Type: news

10 Tips for Gauging the Quality of an Inpatient Rehab Program, from an Expert in the Field
When you’re suffering from a drug or alcohol addiction and/or another serious mental health condition, quality inpatient treatment is often critical to recovery. But finding quality inpatient treatment isn’t always easy in an industry that has at times been prone to scams. A case in point: a recent story on NPR described how some addiction treatment clinics are claiming that nutritional IV infusions (or “NAD infusions”) can cure cravings and addiction. The news is the latest in a string of reports in recent years revealing how some rehab facilities have preyed on and profited from individuals’...
Source: Psych Central - October 2, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Rami Sleiman Tags: Addictions Substance Abuse Addiction Treatment Source Type: news

Can You Recover from Dissociative Identity Disorder?
We used to refer to Dissociative Identity Disorder (DID) as multiple personalities or Multiple Personality Disorder (MPD). The creation of multiple identities occurs often in response to extreme abuse in childhood. Individuals who have developed different identities have described the experience as a way to escape the abuse.  Recently, an Australian judge made a landmark ruling allowing six of Jeni Haynes’s personalities to testify against her father for the horrific abuse she suffered as a child. In response to the extreme and persistent abuse, the woman created 2,500 different personalities to survive.1 The ru...
Source: Psych Central - September 30, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Fabiana Franco, Ph.D. Tags: Dissociative disorders Personality Trauma Dissociative Identity Disorder Multiple Personality Disorder Source Type: news

Can Narcissism Be Healthy? Does It Differ from Self-Love?
“To love oneself is the beginning of a lifelong romance,” wrote Oscar Wilde. Known for his wit and irony, was Wilde referring to narcissism or real self-love? There is a difference. His use of the word “romance” suggests the former. That’s a key to differentiate the two concepts.  In contrast to genuine love, romantic love is filtered by illusion and idealization. In the romantic phase of relationships, intense feelings are predominantly based on projection and physical pleasure. All is rosy, because we don’t really know the other person or see his or her flaws. In Wilde’s nov...
Source: Psych Central - September 24, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Darlene Lancer, JD, MFT Tags: Codependence Narcissism Boundaries Ego Empathy Self Love Self Worth Self-Esteem Shame Source Type: news

3 Stages of Healing from a Toxic Relationship with Your Mother  
“You were my home, Mother. I had no home but you.” – Janet Fitch Healing is a journey, not a single strike of willpower. In this article, you’ll learn about three stages of healing so that you can gain clarity about where you are and what you still need to work on in order to complete your journey.  Healing is a path we must travel to live joyful lives aligned with our values — lives of our choice. There’s no quick fix. Rather, it requires commitment, courage, patience, and determination. But where does the journey begin? At the moment, you may feel like you’re on a shaky...
Source: Psych Central - September 18, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Irina Bengtson, PhD Tags: Bullying Family Narcissism Trauma Boundaries Codependence Narcissistic Personality Disorder toxic mother toxic relationship Source Type: news

Controlling Screen Time for Children with ADHD
Parents are often concerned about their child’s screen time and report difficulty enforcing limits. Screen time includes time with all screens including social media, online gaming, and watching videos. Enforcing limits on screen time can be particularly challenging for children who have Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) due to difficulties with self-monitoring and inattention. As a child therapist, parents often tell me that their child grabs their phone out of their purse, asks to use their tablet constantly, and cries when denied. This leads to parents often giving in to such requests, which only enc...
Source: Psych Central - September 11, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Mercedes Pratt, M.A. Tags: Attention Deficit Disorder Parenting Social Networking Source Type: news

What Is It Really Like to Stay at a Psychiatric Hospital?
Most of us have very specific, vivid ideas about what staying in a psychiatric hospital looks like. These ideas have likely been shaped by Hollywood or sensationalist news stories. Because how often do we hear about someone’s real-life stay at a psychiatric facility? If going to therapy is rarely talked about, the conversations surrounding psychiatric hospitals are virtually non-existent. So we tend to imagine wild, worst-case scenarios. To provide a more accurate picture, we asked several individuals who’ve been hospitalized to share what it was like for them. Of course, every person’s experience is diff...
Source: Psych Central - September 6, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Margarita Tartakovsky, M.S. Tags: Disorders General Stress Suicide Treatment Bipolar Disorder hope Hospitalization Inspiration Manic Episodes Psychiatric Hospital suicidal Source Type: news

Vitamins for Depression
In trying to cope with the debilitating symptoms of depression, people often turn to vitamins, supplements, herbs, or home remedies first. And it’s no wonder — such efforts to alleviate symptoms are often far less expensive and easier to obtain. For some, it may be a part of their rationalization that their depression “isn’t all that bad,” if it can be treated with vitamins and supplements. Many people find relief in taking vitamins and supplements for depression. It is also one of the most well-researched topics, so we know what the science has to say about the efficacy of such treatments. Bu...
Source: Psych Central - September 3, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: John M. Grohol, Psy.D. Tags: Depression Diet & Nutrition General Medications Miscellaneous Drugs supplements for depression vitamins for depression Source Type: news

What Parents Can Do When Their Child Is Anxious
This article may assist you in helping your child with anxiety.  Consider Treatment Options Anxiety disorders tend to persist without treatment. A psychotherapist or a psychiatrist can determine if your child has an anxiety disorder and what type of treatment is needed. Psychotherapy is an effective method for treating childhood anxiety disorders. In fact, psychotherapy is a first line treatment for anxiety disorders. Family interventions that focus on changing parent behavior have been shown to be effective in treating childhood anxiety disorders even when the child is not receptive to treatment. In general, psychoth...
Source: Psych Central - August 14, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Matthew A. Carlson, Psy.D., ABPP Tags: Anxiety Children and Teens Parenting Psychology School Issues Adolescence anxious thoughts Avoidance Child Development Childhood Anxiety Coping Strategies education Exposure Therapy Family therapy Learning Source Type: news

Mother Teresa with a Blackbelt: An Interview with a Thriver Whose Own Trauma Helps Others Heal
Although I have not met Theresa Byrne face to face yet (my intention is certainly to do so), I feel a kinship with this conscious communicator whose musings inspire her readers, listeners, students and clients. If memory serves, we found each other through another site for which we both write called The Good Men Project. When I got to know her better, I was impressed with her ability to weave a story with a take home treasure in the form of the message. She earned a degree in Communication Studies (with concentrations in Psychology, Social Work, and Business/Marketing). This enables her to see beneath the su...
Source: Psych Central - August 5, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Edie Weinstein, MSW, LSW Tags: Bullying Interview PTSD Trauma Compassion Resilience Source Type: news

Fighting the Loneliness
I haven’t always had to fight loneliness and isolation. When I was younger I loved going out to listen to live music. Dancing was a fun way for me to interact with others. I enjoyed being social and was always looking for a place to meet friends at a bar or show. All of that has changed since my diagnosis of schizoaffective disorder.  Fighting loneliness has become part of my new normal. Isolating myself because of my mental illness can easily lead to loneliness and depression in my life now. One Saturday evening a few years ago I decided to count how many beers I had consumed in a 24 hour period. I counted 19. ...
Source: Psych Central - August 2, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Jason Jepson Tags: Antidepressants Antipsychotics Atypical Antipsychotics Personal Stories Schizoaffective Disorder Schizophrenia Combat Veteran Loneliness Mood Disorder Music Therapy Psychosis Seasonal Affective Disorder Social Isolation Suicidal Source Type: news

Could Your Pessimistic Personality, Deep-Seated Insecurity, or Sinking Energy Actually Be a Treatable Disorder?
You’re intensely insecure and self-conscious, so much so it feels like one of your prime attributes. You’d describe yourself as a true-blue pessimist or cynic. You don’t really get excited about anything. You have a hard time connecting with others. And you find yourself constantly exhausted and drained. Because it’s been this way for so long—decades maybe, you’ve lost count—you just assume it’s you. You assume this is who and how you are. This must be your personality. This is just your way of life. However, these supposed traits and tendencies might actually be a diagnosabl...
Source: Psych Central - August 1, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Margarita Tartakovsky, M.S. Tags: Depression Disorders General Personality Psychotherapy Self-Help Treatment Chronic Depression Dysthymia PDD persistent depressive disorder Source Type: news

Hopeful Research into Cannabis Treatment for Cannabis Dependency
Whether you believe you’re addicted to cannabis, or severely dependent on it, if you’re trying to reduce consumption and have been unable to do so with behavioral therapy alone, there may be some hopeful news. Researchers at the University of Sydney have found promising results from their study of a cannabinoid agonist medication that targets brain receptors in reducing cannabis relapse rates. The study, which was published in the JAMA Internal Medicine noted that cannabis is the most widely-used psychoactive substance worldwide, with some 10% of Australians saying they’ve consumed it in the last year. Ab...
Source: Psych Central - July 31, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Suzanne Kane Tags: Addictions Interview Medications Substance Abuse cannabis Marijuana Nabiximols THC Source Type: news

Eating Disorders You ’ ve Probably Never Heard Of
American culture seems obsessed with dieting. According to the Centers for Disease Control, almost 70% of Americans over the age of 20 are overweight, including 35% that are considered obese. In kids and teens, it’s 17%. Meanwhile, the cultural ideal is to be fit, thin, and trim. The quest for body perfection has created a U.S. weight loss industry that was estimated to be worth $68.2 billion in 2017. In 2018, the fitness industry topped $30 billion. While 45 million Americans go on a diet every year and 54 million Americans paid for gym memberships last year, the sad reality is that most diets fail and most pe...
Source: Psych Central - July 24, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Marie Hartwell-Walker, Ed.D. Tags: Eating Disorders Exercise Healthy Living Avoidant Restrictive Food Intake Disorder Disordered Eating food aversion Muscle Dysmorphia Orthorexia unhealthy dieting Source Type: news

Marijuana Legalization: Misgivings and Hopes
Marijuana legalization is in motion: step by step, state by state. Counting Washington, where I live, twelve states have already passed recreational marijuana legislation. At least seven more states, including New York and Minnesota, both traditionally liberal states, are slated for similar legalization in 2019.  While stopping the weed train is unlikely (there are profits to be made in this new frontier), ensuring that its brakes and safety protocols are in working order is imperative. Protections for our most vulnerable populations — adolescents, young adults, and people with mental illness issues — ough...
Source: Psych Central - July 18, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Trisha Ready, PhD Tags: Addictions Medications Professional Stigma Substance Abuse Effects Of Cannabis Legalizing Marijuana Psychosis Stigmatization Substance Use THC Source Type: news

Trauma After Abuse
Codependency robs us of a self and self-love. We’ve learned to conceal who we really are because we grew up pleasing, rebelling against, or withdrawing from dysfunctional parents. That sets us up for trauma. As adults, even if we’re successful in some areas, our emotional life isn’t easy. Looking for security and love, most of us struggle to get into or out of relationships. We may remain in unhappy or abusive relationships or try to make painful ones work. Many of us would be content just to find a reprieve from ongoing anxiety or depression. After the Breakup However, ending a relationship isn’t t...
Source: Psych Central - July 10, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Darlene Lancer, JD, MFT Tags: Abuse Codependence Domestic Violence PTSD Trauma Violence & Aggression Abusive Relationship Estrangement Guilt no contact Traumatic Experience Source Type: news

What to Do If You ’ re Feeling Anxious Right Now
You have a big presentation. You’re taking an important exam for your license. You’re defending your master’s thesis. You need to talk to your best friend about something that’s been bothering you. You need to talk to your boss. Or you’re about to do something else that’s making you nervous. Either way, whatever the activity, task, or situation, the anxiety feels like it’s coursing through your veins. It feels big and overpowering and dramatic. And all you want is for it to go away. Understandably. Because anxiety is very uncomfortable. And who likes to feel uncomfortable? Accordin...
Source: Psych Central - June 26, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Margarita Tartakovsky, M.S. Tags: Anxiety Career Disorders General Self-Help Stress Work Issues Achievement Anticipatory Anxiety anxiety tips Cbt Courage Managing Stress navigating anxiety self-compassion Stress Relief Source Type: news

The Most Effective Therapies for Treating Bipolar Disorder
You’ve been diagnosed with bipolar disorder, or maybe your loved one has. And you’re wondering, what’s the best treatment? What actually works? What the heck do I do? Because bipolar disorder is a chronic, complex condition, managing it can feel overwhelming and downright confusing. But thankfully there are effective, research-based treatments that really work. Medication is the mainstay of treatment. However, the best way to treat bipolar disorder is with a comprehensive approach, which includes “ongoing psychosocial interventions to help maintain health and to respond to breakthrough symptoms whe...
Source: Psych Central - May 24, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Margarita Tartakovsky, M.S. Tags: Bipolar Disorders General Psychotherapy Self-Help Treatment Bipolar Disorder bipolar disorder treatment Cbt IPSRT managing bipolar disorder opposite action Source Type: news

Book Review: Birth of a New Brain: Healing from Postpartum Bipolar Disorder
“I was caught in a whirl of racing, obsessive thoughts, which is how many people describe their bouts of mania. Instead of noticing my baby girl’s sweet scent or feeling her rose-petal soft skin, all I could think was, I must write this idea down, and this, and this…,” writes Dyane Harwood. In her new book, Birth of a New Brain: Healing from Postpartum Bipolar Disorder, Harwood offers an unfiltered, unedited and heart-wrenching journey through postpartum bipolar disorder and reminds us all that, even in the seemingly worst circumstances, hope can remain. Harwood’s story begins in the delivery...
Source: Psych Central - May 20, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Claire Nana Tags: Bipolar Book Reviews Disorders Family General Medications Memory and Perception Motivation and Inspiration Personal Stories Postpartum Depression Psychological Assessment Psychology Stigma Stress Suicide Treatment Women's I Source Type: news

Book Review: Differently Wired: Raising an Exceptional Child
A trip down a bookstore aisle will reveal that there are as many different approaches to parenting as there are books to choose from. For every approach, there is an expert and a book to go along with it. In this modern age, there is probably a blog, too. The common theme between all these books is a problem to fix, a habit to address, or an issue to figure out. Then there is Differently Wired: Raising an Exceptional Child in a Conventional World, a book as differently wired as the children it refers to. While it will be on the same shelf as a book about dealing with a “problem child,” Differently Wired isn&rsq...
Source: Psych Central - May 15, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Bethany Duarte Tags: Autism / Asperger's Book Reviews Caregivers Children and Teens Disabilities Disorders Family General Motivation and Inspiration Parenting Pediatrics for Parents Personal Stories Psychology School Issues Self-Help Stress Stu Source Type: news

Book Review: Healing Relational Trauma  with Attachment-Focused Interventions
For a young child, traumatic experiences can lead to a pattern of mistrust, anticipation of further trauma, avoidance, and difficulty relating to others. Their development can be compromised. Their sense of self can become fractured, and their lives become merely an expression of their trauma. Helping children like this requires a deeply sensitive clinical approach that begins with the children’s relationships. “When children develop patterns of survival that involve them relying on themselves, not others, they do so out of a profound mistrust that others will meet their needs and will do what is best for them,...
Source: Psych Central - May 11, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Claire Nana Tags: Abuse Book Reviews Caregivers Children and Teens Communication Disorders Domestic Violence Family General Memory and Perception Parenting Psychology Psychotherapy Relationships & Love Self-Esteem Trauma Treatment books ab Source Type: news

The Importance of Healthy Living in the Treatment of Complex-PTSD
Treatment for complex post-traumatic stress disorder (C-PTSD) happens on many levels. In order to heal emotionally and mentally, we need to support the physical body as well. Research has found extensive comorbidity for C-PTSD and major depressive disorder (MDD) (95% lifetime, 50% current), as well as anxiety disorders.1 In addition to the higher prevalence of depression and anxiety, depressed patients with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) tend to experience more severe symptoms.2 Addressing Anxiety and Depression as Part of Treatment for C-PTSD We now know that our physical bodies are interconnected with the function...
Source: Psych Central - May 8, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Fabiana Franco, Ph.D. Tags: Abuse PTSD Source Type: news

Why Narcissists Act the Way They Do
Narcissists can be charming, charismatic, seductive, exciting, and engaging. They can also act entitled, exploitative, arrogant, aggressive, cold, competitive, selfish, obnoxious, cruel, and vindictive. You can fall in love with their charming side and be destroyed by their dark side. It can be baffling, but it all makes sense when you understand what drives them. That awareness protects you from their games, lies, and manipulation. Narcissists have an impaired or undeveloped self. They think and function differently from other people. They behave as they do because of the way their brain is wired, whether due to nature or...
Source: Psych Central - May 5, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Darlene Lancer, JD, MFT Tags: Narcissism Personality Narcissistic Personality Disorder Selfishness Source Type: news

Book Review: Healing a Community
When something as devastating as a mass shooting occurs, it is hard to know where to begin the process of healing. With so many people affected on such a mass scale, there is chaos, uncertainty, confusion — even for mental health providers. “Despite their best intentions, most clinicians are not adequately trained to work with people suffering from complicated grief and complex trauma, the psychological phenomena that often result from these tragedies,” writes Melissa Glaser. In her new book, Healing a Community: Lessons for Recovery after a Large-Scale Trauma, Glaser, who coordinated the Newtown Recovery...
Source: Psych Central - April 9, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Claire Nana Tags: Book Reviews Children and Teens Disorders Family General Grief and Loss Memory and Perception Psychological Assessment Psychology Psychotherapy PTSD Trauma Treatment Violence & Aggression books on mass shootings books on mass Source Type: news

C-PTSD and Relationships
Complex Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (C-PTSD) is a term that researchers developed to explain the pathology that results from ongoing and prolonged exposure to trauma.1 Individuals suffering from complex trauma present different symptomatology in comparison to those with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). This is because, in addition to the typical symptoms of PTSD, individuals with C-PTSD may also develop mood and behavioral disorders. They can develop physical health conditions as a result of chronic stress. Substance abuse is also high among survivors of abuse. (Substance abuse may offer a mechanism for control...
Source: Psych Central - April 2, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Fabiana Franco, Ph.D. Tags: Abuse PTSD Relationships & Love Child Abuse Childhood Trauma Emotional Regulation Interpersonal Relationship Neglect Source Type: news

How to Really Support a Loved One Who ’s Struggling with Their Mental Illness
You know your friend is struggling with depression or anxiety or some other mental health issue, but you don’t know what to say. You feel like anything you think about saying just sounds stupid and patronizing. You also aren’t sure what to do. After all, you don’t want to intrude. You don’t want to be pushy, or bulldoze over their privacy. Or you already feel overwhelmed by something difficult in your own life. Still you want to help. You just wonder, How? Psychotherapist Colleen Mullen, Psy.D, LMFT, noted that many of us worry that we’ll just make the other person more upset or uncomfortable ...
Source: Psych Central - March 31, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Margarita Tartakovsky, M.S. Tags: Caregivers Disabilities Disorders Family General Relationships & Love Self-Help Anxiety Bipolar Disorder Compassion Depression Empathy Friends loved ones Mental Health mental health struggles Mental Illness support Source Type: news

Book Review: The Inflamed Mind: A Radical New Approach to Depression
Through discoveries in immunology, we know that inflammation has an impact on physical illness. What remains unclear is how inflammation influences thoughts and behaviors — a question that intersects the fields of immunology, neuroscience, psychology, and psychiatry. In The Inflamed Mind: A Radical New Approach to Depression, Edward Bullmore explores how inflammatory changes could impact the way the brain works, resulting in symptoms of depression as a result of the inflammation. Bullmore is certainly knowledgeable about this area. A psychiatrist with expertise in neuroscience who is in the development stages of anti...
Source: Psych Central - March 30, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tina Arnoldi Tags: Antidepressants Book Reviews Depression Disorders General Medications Neuroscience Psychological Assessment Psychology Self-Help Stigma Treatment books about depression Cognition Depression Treatment Edward Bullmore Inflamm Source Type: news

My Life with Bipolar Affective Disorder
I made a film on the weekend. The idea had come to me as I was walking to work on Friday morning. The others wouldn’t be back until Monday, so it was something to do to pass the time. It was going to be a film about being alone in the empty house, and about myself, about them. It used to be like that every night — where I used to live — in a neighborhood so poor, in an apartment so small with a horrible smell that did not disappear, an apartment without hot water, or heating. There, in that life, there was nothing; there was me at the kitchen table staring blankly at the wall, there was silence, isolation...
Source: Psych Central - March 27, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Jeannie Tags: Bipolar Personal Stories Source Type: news

How to Leave a Narcissist or Abuser
Once in love with a narcissist, it’s not easy to leave. Despite the abuse and your unhappiness, you may be ambivalent about leaving because you still love your partner, have young children, lack resources, and/or enjoy lifestyle benefits. You may want to leave, but feel stuck, and don’t understand why. Outsiders often question why you stay, or urge you to, “Just leave.” Those words can feel humiliating because you also think you should. Why It’s Hard to Leave When we fall in love, it’s natural to become attached and form a romantic bond. Narcissists, especially, can be exceedingly charmi...
Source: Psych Central - March 25, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Darlene Lancer, JD, MFT Tags: Abuse Bullying Codependence Domestic Violence Narcissism Relationships & Love Self-Esteem Self-Help Women's Issues Emotional Abuse Narcissistic Abuse Narcissistic Personality Disorder trauma bonding traumatic relationship Source Type: news

Book Review: Transformation in Troubled Times
“The willingness to bear with our wounds opens our eyes and potentially our hearts to what is going on around us. A wounded planet is also potentially a healing planet,” write Chris Robertson and Sarah Van Gogh. Their new book, Transformation in Troubled Times: Re-Vision’s Soulful Approach to Therapeutic Work is an invitation to reconsider the opportunity that every wounding offers — to once again restore our faith in the process of healing. Much of the work of the therapist is to sense the possibility that exists in the connection between the ego and the soul. The authors explain, “Each thera...
Source: Psych Central - March 23, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Claire Nana Tags: Book Reviews Communication Disorders General Grief and Loss Memory and Perception Psychology Psychotherapy Spirituality Trauma Treatment books about the client-therapist relationship books about therapy conscious pain Re-Visi Source Type: news

Book Review: Feeling Better:  Beat Depression & Improve Your Relationships
There are many ways we can try to feel better. We can try to improve the way we think. We can try to make more money. Have more stability. Get a better job. But all of these things, say Cindy Goodman Stulberg and Richard Frey, are red herrings. “We want to let you in on a little secret,” they write. “Your relationships hold the key to your happiness.” In their new book, Feeling Better: Beat Depression and Improve Your Relationships with Interpersonal Psychotherapy, Stulberg and Frey offer a step-by-step guide to improve your relationships by setting and achieving goals, articulating feelings, and ma...
Source: Psych Central - March 22, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Claire Nana Tags: Book Reviews Depression Disorders General Happiness Memory and Perception Motivation and Inspiration Psychology Psychotherapy Relationships & Love Self-Help Treatment assertive Beat Depression and Improve Your Relationships boo Source Type: news

Book Review: Borderline Bodies:  Affect Regulation Theory for Personality Disorders
“The body,” says Clara Mucci, “is the essential go-between in the relationship between the self and other.” In personality disorders, this relationship between the self and the other is especially troubled. However, this “other” can be the body itself. Mucci describes psychosomatic disorders as an outcome of the “problematic junction between mind and body.” The body can also act as an imprinting device in which earlier generations transmit their trauma onto us. In her new book, Borderline Bodies: Affect Regulation Theory for Personality Disorders, Mucci places the body at the...
Source: Psych Central - March 21, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Claire Nana Tags: Book Reviews Disorders Family General Genetics Memory and Perception Parenting Personality Psychology Psychotherapy Relationships & Love Trauma Treatment Affect Regulation Theory for Personality Disorders Body books on somati Source Type: news

Resting in the Space of Discomfort: A Mindful Approach to Depression
Suffering is a shared human experience that can be viewed integral part of life. Our suffering can range from mild to severe and can take the form of physical or mental and emotional pain. Whatever the form of our discomfort, we can agree that “suffering of the mind” is one of the biggest concerns of our time. The severity of mental health issues is on the rise, particularly the number of individuals experiencing depression. According to the World Health Organization (2017) over 300 million people are estimated to suffer from depression, equivalent to 4.4% of the world’s population. The Causes...
Source: Psych Central - March 18, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Jules De Vitto Tags: Depression Habits Mindfulness Self-Help Source Type: news

Book Review: Bodyfulness: Somatic Practices for Presence
I didn’t know how very much I needed this book until I opened it — one of the biggest gifts for a reader, and for a person who seeks understanding. That word bodyfulness is instantly recognizable as a side-stepping of mindfulness, but you’re wrong if you think it intends a substitution of body for mind. As you would expect from a book published by Shambhala, it embraces a much more comprehensive understanding of the lived experience. The book includes lessons on how to be centered within yourself in a moment-to-moment way and how to find and hold on to yourself when the winds are buffeting. A very intere...
Source: Psych Central - March 16, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Lori Handelman, PhD Tags: Book Reviews Disorders General Happiness Memory and Perception Mindfulness Motivation and Inspiration Psychology Relaxation and Meditation Self-Esteem Self-Help bodily authority Bodyfulness books about meditation books about se Source Type: news

Book Review: The Unexpected Joy of Being Sober
“The first time I got drunk, I’d felt like I finally unzipped my wrong skin and slipped into a slinky new one, “writes Catherine Gray. In her new book, The Unexpected Joy Of Being Sober, Gray describes her journey from fake friends, hungover mornings, and failed moderation attempts to finally finding her way to sobriety and the many joys that come with it. Yet early on Gray is unconvinced. She writes, “Don’t get me wrong. I didn’t want to not drink. My day did not look like that. But I didn’t want to drink either. The world in sobriety is much brighter, louder, rawer, and scarier t...
Source: Psych Central - March 11, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Claire Nana Tags: Addictions Alcoholism Book Reviews Disorders General Happiness Memory and Perception Mindfulness Motivation and Inspiration Neuroscience Personal Stories Psychology Psychotherapy Self-Esteem Self-Help Treatment addiction co Source Type: news

Book Review: Living Light:  The Art of Using Light for Health & Happiness
While it’s hard not to notice the brilliant display of colors set off by a sunset over the water, we seldom consider the biological, or even psychological, benefits of light. “It is my belief that good quality light in our daily lives is far more important than we might think,” writes Karl Ryberg. In his new book, Living Light: The Art of Using Light For Health And Happiness, Ryberg brings us his life’s work — studying the obvious and not so obvious ways in which light affects us and how we can use light in our lives not only function better, but feel better. Light, we know, plays an important...
Source: Psych Central - March 10, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Claire Nana Tags: Book Reviews Disorders General Habits Psychology Seasonal Affective Disorder Self-Help Treatment artificial light Light therapy Living Light natural light Ryberg SAD Source Type: news

Book Review: Breakdown:  A Clinician ’ s Experience in a  Broken System
There is no such thing as a perfect system and in the case of the mentally ill, nothing could be truer. The mentally ill face an uphill battle to secure appropriate services, avoid being caught up in the criminal justice system, and most of all, steer clear of the revolving door that has become our mental health system. Lynn Nanos, a mobile emergency psychiatric clinician, believes it is time for a change. Her new book, Breakdown: A Clinicians Experience in a Broken System of Emergency Psychiatry, reads like a clarion call to all involved in mental health care in this country. Drawing on her rich experience, Nanos highligh...
Source: Psych Central - March 7, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Claire Nana Tags: Book Reviews Disorders Ethics & Morality General Health Insurance Medications Policy and Advocacy Psychiatry Psychological Assessment Psychology Psychotherapy Schizophrenia Treatment Violence & Aggression books on mental illnes Source Type: news

Book Review: Mental Illness Is an Asshole: And Other Observations
“In a world where friends are assholes, parents are assholes, even adorable, little three-year-olds are assholes, there is no reason that psychological disorders get a pass,” writes Gabe Howard. Howard, who hosts The Psych Central Show podcast and writes for Psych Central on the topics of bipolar and mental illness, is known for his fun, entertaining and eminently useful observations about mental illness. He writes, “Bipolar, clinical depression, schizophrenia and the like have no respect for the people whose lives they impact.” In his new book, Mental Illness Is an Asshole – And Other Observa...
Source: Psych Central - March 7, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Claire Nana Tags: Anxiety Bipolar Book Reviews Depression Disorders General Habits Happiness Healthy Living Memory and Perception Motivation and Inspiration Panic Disorder Personal Stories Psychology Schizophrenia Self-Esteem Self-Help Sti Source Type: news

The Connection Between Physical and Mental Health
Many of us seriously underrate how strongly our body affects our state-of-mind. We don’t realize how strongly poor diet, lack of sleep, and too little exercise can affect our emotional and mental health. Better Nutrition Can Alleviate Depression and Anxiety Over the past decade, interest in how diet affects mental health has grown considerably. Large studies have found that habitual consumption of an unhealthy diet (defined as high in processed foods) is associated with increased risk of depression, anxiety, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children and adolescents.1 A study employing a “d...
Source: Psych Central - March 3, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Fabiana Franco, Ph.D. Tags: Anxiety Depression Exercise General Habits Healthy Living Sleep Source Type: news

Do Men and Women Experience Bipolar Disorder Differently?
Bipolar disorder affects men and women in equal numbers, and the symptoms are essentially identical. But some key differences do exist—differences that might be due to biological factors, and social ones, too. For starters, research has consistently shown that women have higher rates of bipolar II disorder, “which typically presents as a chronic depressive disorder with periods of hypomania,” according to Candida Fink, MD, a board-certified child, adolescent and adult psychiatrist with a private practice in Westchester, N.Y. There’s a misconception that bipolar II disorder is less severe than bipola...
Source: Psych Central - March 2, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Margarita Tartakovsky, M.S. Tags: Bipolar Disorders Gender General Men's Issues Women's Issues Bipolar Disorder bipolar disorder and pregnancy bipolar I Bipolar Ii Gender Differences men and bipolar disorder menopause and bipolar disorder menstruation and bipolar Source Type: news

Narcissists and Abusers Use This to Target Empaths
Projection is a defense mechanism commonly used by abusers, including people with narcissistic or borderline personality disorder and addicts. Basically, they say, “It’s not me, it’s you!” When we project, we’re defending ourselves against unconscious impulses or traits, either positive or negative, that we’ve denied in ourselves. Instead we attribute them to others. Our thoughts or feelings about someone or something are too uncomfortable to acknowledge. In our mind we believe that the thought or emotion originates from that other person or thing. We might imagine “She hates me,&r...
Source: Psych Central - February 18, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Darlene Lancer, JD, MFT Tags: Abuse Anger Codependence Narcissism Personality Boundaries Defense Mechanisms emotional maturity externalization projection Shame Source Type: news

What Psychotic Episodes Really Look and Feel Like
When we hear someone is psychotic, we automatically think of psychopaths and cold-blooded criminals. We automatically think “Oh wow, they’re really crazy!” And we automatically think of plenty of other myths and misconceptions that only further the stigma surrounding psychosis. In other words, the reality is that we get psychosis very wrong. For starters, psychosis consists of hallucinations and/or delusions. “You can have one or both at the same time,” said Devon MacDermott, Ph.D, a psychologist who previously worked in psychiatric hospitals and outpatient centers, treating individuals experi...
Source: Psych Central - February 17, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Margarita Tartakovsky, M.S. Tags: Disorders General Schizophrenia Stigma Hallucinations Hearing Voices Psychosis Psychotic Episode serious mental illness Source Type: news

Book Review: Eating Disorders: The Journey to Recovery Workbook, 2nd Ed.
There is no such thing as a life free of distress. And yet in the distress — by learning to move through it, find strengths that help us cope, and most importantly, not avoid it — we often find the path to growth. This path, from finding escape from the distress of life to finding growth in it, is also the journey that underlies the recovery from an eating disorder. “People with eating disorders, like all people, flourish when they feel a sense of agency,” write authors Laura J. Goodman and Mona Villapiano. In their new book, Eating Disorders: The Journey to Recovery Workbook, 2nd Ed., Laura J. Good...
Source: Psych Central - February 13, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Claire Nana Tags: Addictions Anorexia Binge Eating Book Reviews Bulimia Diet & Nutrition Disorders Eating Disorders General Habits Healthy Living Psychology Self-Esteem Self-Help Trauma Treatment Weight Loss books on how to recover from an Source Type: news

Book Review: EMDR Therapy & Somatic Psychology
Many therapists and trainees will be familiar with the terms “somatic psychology” and “EMDR therapy,” and there have been many authors who have tried to write a book that encapsulates both of these topics succinctly, but in my opinion, none have succeeded in quite the same way as Arielle Schwartz and Barb Maiberger with their new book, EMDR Therapy and Somatic Psychology: Interventions to Enhance Embodiment in Trauma Treatment. EMDR Therapy and Somatic Psychology is a wonderful resource for both therapists-in-training and practicing therapists. The first part of the book is devoted to providing foun...
Source: Psych Central - February 9, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Caroline Comeaux Lee Tags: Book Reviews Disorders General Memory and Perception Mindfulness Neuroscience Psychological Assessment Psychology Psychotherapy Relaxation and Meditation Stress Trauma Treatment cultural sensitivity EMDR EMDR Therapy and Soma Source Type: news