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Treatment of Hoarding-Induced Trauma and Perpetration
The American Psychiatric Association’s Diagnostic Standards Manual, Edition V (2013) reports that between 2 and 6% of the general population have a hoarding disorder. Once considered a type of obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), hoarding is now regarded as a serious clinical condition co-morbid with diagnoses of depression, social phobia, generalized anxiety disorders, attention deficit disorder, and sometimes psychosis given the delusional levels of denial that hoarders often present (Frost, Stekelee, Tolin, 2011). Hoarders engage in excessive acquisition of items, whether those items have real world value or not,...
Source: Psych Central - February 15, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Graeme Daniels, MFT Tags: Addictions Anxiety Caregivers Children and Teens Essays Family Grief and Loss Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder Personality Psychodynamic Psychology Psychotherapy PTSD Trauma Treatment Abuse Anxiety Disorder bullying Comorb Source Type: news

Codependency: The Helping Problem
Codependency is a behavior, not a biological illness. It can, however, run in families. By perpetuating the same type of behavior through several generations, dysfunctional relationships can emerge. Codependency can often stem from taking care of a close friend or family member with a substance abuse or chronic mental health issue. While the impulse to take care of another may be a virtuous and helpful decision, it may also arise from a need to control. Codependency, or as some call it, “relationship addiction”, occurs when the care-taker needs to control his or her own anxiety through another person. There is...
Source: Psych Central - February 14, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Rebecca Lee Tags: Abuse Addictions Codependence Narcissism Relationships & Love Self-Esteem Stress Caretaking Codependency Couples Dating love addiction Relationship Addiction Source Type: news

Book Review: Insane Consequences
I have read Insane Consequences: How the Mental Health Industry Fails the Mentally Ill a couple of times and am still contemplating it. It also inspired me to research further into how we treat the seriously mentally ill in America. In the book, author DJ Jaffe takes on what he calls the “mental health industry,” and I think that is a fair characterization. He is not the only writer to use the phrase, and he confronts that industry with a voice that reminds me of a prosecuting attorney on a mission. Jaffe became involved in the mental health system in the 1980s when his wife’s 18 year old sister, Lynn, ca...
Source: Psych Central - February 14, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Stan Rockwell, PsyD Tags: Book Reviews Caregivers Disabilities Policy and Advocacy Psychiatry Psychology Schizophrenia Treatment DJ jaffe mental health policy Mental Illness mental illness violence serious mental illness Source Type: news

Book Review: Still Alice
Still Alice is a novel, not a work of nonfiction. Yet it probably offers one of the most accurate and gripping accounts of the experience of early-onset Alzheimer’s disease ever written. At first, Lisa Genova, a Harvard PhD in neuroscience, self-published her book. Her story resonated, and Still Alice took off, selling so many copies that it was bought by the prestigious publisher, Simon & Schuster. Over time, Genova would go on to win multiple awards for her work, and Still Alice would be made into a major motion picture. The Alice Howland we meet at the outset of the book is an esteemed professor of cognitive p...
Source: Psych Central - February 11, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Bella DePaulo Tags: Aging Alzheimer's Book Reviews Disorders Alzheimer's disease books on alzheimers early-onset Alzheimer's still alice Source Type: news

Book Review: A Parent ’ s Guide to Teen Addiction
It’s true in this country that we do have a war on drugs. But for many parents, that war is waging in their own home with their own teenagers. According to Laurence Westreich, MD, who is an addiction expert, father, and author of A Parent’s Guide to Teen Addiction: Professional Advice on Signs, Symptoms, What to Say, and How to Help, defeating an enemy that is larger and more powerful than us will require unconventional tactics. The first step is to know who the enemy is. “Always remember that substance abuse – NOT your teenager – is the enemy,” writes Westreich. What teen...
Source: Psych Central - February 8, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Claire Nana Tags: Addictions Book Reviews Caregivers Children and Teens Family Parenting Self-Help Substance Abuse child addiction get help for addiction parenting guide Teen Addiction teenager addiction Source Type: news

Book Review: The DBT Solution for Emotional Eating
Do you eat because you are hungry? While our automatic response may be “yes, of course,” many of us, in fact, eat due to stress or to deal with other unwanted emotions. The truth is, the choice to eat is not always about physical hunger. Perhaps the biggest challenge with a food addiction is that it is relatively acceptable when compared with other substance addictions. It is possible to be an emotional eater without anyone ever knowing about it. It does not impact your ability to drive a car, and likely will not result in financial ruin. Coworkers probably won’t notice because they, too, are grabbing don...
Source: Psych Central - February 5, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tina Arnoldi Tags: Addictions Binge Eating Book Reviews Bulimia DBT Eating Disorders Mindfulness Self-Help Stress eating and DBT eating better eating mindfulness Emotional Eating Source Type: news

Book Review: Everyday Mindfulness for OCD
Despite the fact that many make light of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) by poking fun at minor compulsions or obsessions, OCD is a very serious illness. For those who have it, it can be debilitating and disruptive, upsetting life in very serious and insurmountable ways. Everyday Mindfulness for OCD: Tips, Tricks, and Skills for Living Joyfully is for people who experience OCD at any level. Those who are newly diagnosed may benefit first from therapy before taking on this added tool. The book is also for professionals who treat patients with OCD, as well as for friends and family members of those diagnosed. T...
Source: Psych Central - February 2, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Dave Schultz Tags: Book Reviews Cognitive-Behavioral Habits Mindfulness Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder Psychology Psychotherapy Self-Help Treatment help for ocd mindfulness for ocd treatment for ocd Source Type: news

Book Review: Being Ana
“What if I let go of it? What part of me will die?  Why can I not let go of it for anything? What part of me does this disorder define?  Who will I be without it? What will I be?  Where will I be?” These words are just a snippet of the thoughts captured in Shani Raviv’s journal, years into her anorexia. This journal entry captures the questions that readers may experience while reading her memoir. They also aptly depict the internal struggle that Raviv felt over the course of her illness. Raviv’s memoir, Being Ana: A Memoir of Anorexia Nervosa chronicles her journey into and out ...
Source: Psych Central - February 2, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Caroline Comeaux Lee Tags: Book Reviews Disorders Family Substance Abuse anorexia book anorexia nervosa book memoir about anorexia Source Type: news

Book Review: It ’ s Not What You ’ re Eating, It ’ s What ’ s Eating You
We live in a weight-obsessed world. Not only are we exposed to a constant barrage of images of the “perfect body,” but when it comes to attaining it we tend to focus on all the wrong things. We cut our carbohydrate intake, follow any exercise program that promises quick results, and even resort to fasting if we have to – all to attain the body that promises happiness. But, according to Shari Brady, a licensed professional counselor who specializes in eating disorders and is herself recovered from anorexia, achieving freedom from eating disorders starts with stopping the focus on food as the answer to life...
Source: Psych Central - February 2, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Claire Nana Tags: Anorexia Binge Eating Book Reviews Bulimia Diet & Nutrition Disorders Eating Disorders Parenting Self-Help Treatment Weight Loss Carbohydrate Intake Losing Weight Source Type: news

Do I Have ADHD?
“Do I have ADHD?” It’s a question traditionally asked of a person’s family physician, since that’s typically the only healthcare professional with whom most people have an existing relationship. But in the past few decades, the question of whether or not a person has attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) has been posed to the Internet. And the Internet has responded. Psych Central was one of the first mental health websites to offer an online ADHD quiz to test to see if a person might qualify for a diagnosis of attention deficit disorder, back in the late 1990s. We developed our quiz...
Source: Psych Central - February 1, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: John M. Grohol, Psy.D. Tags: Attention Deficit Disorder Disorders Self-Help ADHD test Do I have ADHD how do I know if I have ADHD Symptoms Of Adhd what is ADHD Source Type: news

3 Pervasive, Persistent Myths about Seasonal Affective Disorder
Our society tends to dismiss seasonal affective disorder (SAD). We minimize it. We misunderstand it. Oh, you just don’t like winter. And who could blame you? Winter is tough on everyone. Oh, SAD is like the winter blues, right? You get grumpy or moody because you hate the freezing cold. You’re just in a funk. It happens to a lot of people. It’s totally normal. How can you feel depressed when the air is so crisp and it’s a winter wonderland out there? We incorporate SAD into our vocabulary, flippantly using it in conversation. “Similar to someone saying “I can’t make up my mind, it...
Source: Psych Central - January 31, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Margarita Tartakovsky, M.S. Tags: Depression Disorders General Seasonal Affective Disorder Stigma Light therapy Mental Health Stigma phototherapy SAD summer depression summertime depression winter depression wintertime depression Source Type: news

How Genetic Testing Saved My Life from Debilitating Clinical Depression
The psychologist’s qualifications are proudly displayed in frames on his wall: a doctorate in clinical psychology, board certifications in clinical psychology and clinical neuropsychology. Maybe this means he can help me. I need an expert on the human mind to help me figure out why mine cannot cooperate, why consciousness has become so unbearable for me.   I am sitting on the couch in his office. He sits in his desk chair, awaiting my gaze to meet his. When I do, he delivers his first question: “Have you been considering suicide?” I am at the brink of desperation, and I figure I must be totally ho...
Source: Psych Central - January 27, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Kristen Davis Tags: Antidepressants Depression Genetics Medications Mood Stabilizers Neuroscience Personal Stories Self-Esteem Stigma Suicide Treatment Blame Clinical Depression Compassion Disease Model Dopamine Genetic Research genetic test Source Type: news

Book Review: It ’ s Not Always Depression
Depression is thought to be one of the most common psychological ailments. When clinical social worker Hilary Jacobs Hendel wrote an op-ed in the New York Times titled, “It’s Not Always Depression,” it was the most emailed article for 48 hours, and stayed in the top ten shared articles for more than a week. Clearly, Hendel had struck a chord. In her new book, It’s Not Always Depression: Working the Change Triangle to Listen to the Body, Discover Core Emotions, and Connect to Your Authentic Self, Hendel presents what we commonly label depression as a loss of the authentic self; a loss that not o...
Source: Psych Central - January 25, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Claire Nana Tags: Book Reviews Depression General Happiness Psychodynamic Psychology Self-Help books about depression depression books emotional suffering Source Type: news

C-PTSD and Eating Disorders
As a relatively new and still poorly recognized concept, few people come to therapy identifying as suffering from Complex Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (C-PTSD). As a rule, a diagnosis of C-PTSD comes only after the process of self-discovery in therapy has begun. When people suffering from C-PTSD are referred to a therapist, or decide to seek help for themselves, it is usually because they are seeking help for one of its symptoms, including dissociative episodes, problems forming relationships, and alcohol or substance abuse. One of the more common issues that leads to the discovery of C-PTSD is the presence of an eating ...
Source: Psych Central - January 19, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Fabiana Franco, Ph.D. Tags: Addictions Anorexia Binge Eating Bulimia Eating Disorders Loneliness Psychology PTSD Trauma Treatment affect regulation Bingeing Body Image C-PTSD Child Abuse child neglect Childhood Trauma complex posttraumatic stress di Source Type: news

I ’m Sick — Here ’s How NOT to Respond.
Friends, listen. I have cancer.  It’s a potentially terminal type, but it looks like I’ll just have to take a couple pills every day for the rest of my life and be a little careful about the choices I make.  I want you to know that this means a lot will change, and you’ll likely see some impact.  Sometimes I’ll need to stay in bed.  Sometimes I won’t have much of an appetite.  Sometimes I may not be healthy enough to go out with you, or have the energy to do the things I want to do.  Sometimes I’ll cancel our plans, because I made them when I felt ok, but th...
Source: Psych Central - January 18, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Morgan Meredith Tags: Depression Personal Stories Stigma Stigmatization support Source Type: news

Marriage and Mania: Disparate Depictions of Bipolar Disorder in Mainstream Romance Novels
When characters with mental illness appear in popular fiction, it is typically because the work itself focuses on the mental illness. However, there is a small contingent of fictional projects that have characters with mental illness that do not make that illness the central plot. These books follow the typical narrative arc and literary conventions of their genre and include conflicts unrelated to mental illness; psychiatric disorder is featured but defines neither the character nor the book.   Authors writing about mental illness, however small or large a part of the plot, can raise public awareness and understandin...
Source: Psych Central - January 16, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Kathryn Lawson, PhD Tags: Bipolar Essays Policy and Advocacy Psychology Women's Issues Bipolar Disorder Compassion Empathy genre fiction mania Manic Episode romance novels Stigma Stigmatization Source Type: news

10 Tips for a New Year and a New You
Starting off the New Year right is a common goal. Somewhere during the first month or so, however, if we believe what we read or hear in the media, most of us abandon our resolutions or decide we need to take a break. Either they were too ambitious, impractical, too many to reasonably accomplish, or some other real or imagined reason for quitting. What may be a far more realistic ambition, though, is to stick with overarching goals that allow room for incremental improvement — and a feeling of accomplishment. Here are 10 tips for a New Year and a new you. Figure out what you’re good at. Have you been told often...
Source: Psych Central - January 11, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Suzanne Kane Tags: Anxiety Habits Holiday Coping Psychology Self-Help Habit Change New Year's resolution Personal Growth Source Type: news

Denial: The Primary Roadblock to Addiction Recovery
Getting a loved one to go to drug and alcohol rehab isn’t always easy. Some people may not be ready to admit that they have a problem, let alone spend 30 to 90 days in a rehab center. Denial is one of the main roadblocks that can keep a person from enrolling in addiction treatment and moving forward with their life.1 So what does this look like daily? How can we help our loved ones overcome their denial and accept the help they need to get better? Addicted and In Denial As a person on the outside, it may be difficult for you to understand how your loved one can deny their addiction and the problems it causes, especia...
Source: Psych Central - January 11, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Kelsey Brown Tags: Addictions Alcoholism Caregivers Codependence Family Substance Abuse Denial Drug Abuse Empowerment recovery Substance Use Source Type: news

5 Red Flags and Blind Spots in Dating a Narcissist
People are drawn to narcissists because they can be charming and charismatic. In fact, one study showed that their likable veneer was only penetrable after seven meetings. I’ve had a number of clients who claimed that the courtship with their narcissistic spouse was wonderful, and that abuse only began following the wedding. However, with greater insight, these clients admitted that there were signs that they’d overlooked. Blind Spots When Dating a Narcissist There are unconscious explanations why you might attracted to a narcissist. Here are some reasons why you might not recognize a narcissist: Sexual attra...
Source: Psych Central - January 8, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Darlene Lancer, JD, MFT Tags: Abuse Codependence Domestic Violence General Narcissism Relationships & Love Self-Esteem Trauma Dating Lust Narcissistic Abuse Narcissistic Personality Disorder narcissistic supply seduction Sexual Attraction Source Type: news

A Vital Part of Successfully Managing Bipolar Disorder
Bipolar disorder can feel like a roller coaster in the dark. You don’t know when the turns or drops are coming. You don’t know when you’ll be flipped upside-down. And once you do, it’s too late. You’re in a manic episode, doing things you’ll regret. You’re in a depressive episode, too exhausted to get out of bed. You feel like you’re being whipped around by an erratic condition, and you have zero control. You’re simply along for the ride. Which is why self-awareness is so vital. Self-awareness is essential to successfully managing bipolar disorder—and not feeling ...
Source: Psych Central - January 3, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Margarita Tartakovsky, M.S. Tags: Bipolar Disorders General Healthy Living Self-Help Stress Bipolar Disorder bipolar signs and symptoms Depressive Episode Hypomanic Episode managing bipolar disorder Mood Chart Mood Disorder Self Awareness treating bipolar disor Source Type: news

5 Early Warning Signs that You Are Dealing with a Narcissist
1. Love Bombing/Mirroring Oh my god. This is it! This is what you’ve been waiting for! So much in common it’s uncanny. Amazing sexual chemistry. Lots of attention, interaction, and an immediate connection. The stuff dreams are made of, right? Wrong. The narcissist is an expert at this part. They know that anyone likes to feel special, and their tendency to seek out and court those who are possibly somewhat emotionally vulnerable or overly forgiving or insecure makes this even easier for them. The affection is laid on thick… they want the target to feel there is an intense connection so that they will le...
Source: Psych Central - January 2, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Jessie Monreal, CADC Tags: Abuse Codependence Narcissism Personality Relationships & Love Self-Esteem Self-Help Emotional Manipulation Gaslighting Narcissistic Personality Disorder NPD Source Type: news

Signs of Gaslighting and the Cost
Gaslighting is a malicious form of mental and emotional abuse, designed to plant seeds of self-doubt and alter your perception of reality. Like all abuse, it based on the need for power, control, or concealment. Some people occasionally lie or use denial to avoid taking responsibility. They may forget or remember conversations and events differently than you, or they may have no recollection due to a blackout if they were drinking. These situations are sometimes called gaslighting, but the term actually refers to a deliberate pattern of manipulation calculated to make the victim doubt his or her own perceptions or sanity, ...
Source: Psych Central - January 1, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Darlene Lancer, JD, MFT Tags: Abuse Anger Codependence Divorce Domestic Violence Narcissism Personality Relationships & Love Gaslighting Narcissistic Personality Disorder NPD Source Type: news

Book Review: The Diagnostic System
While it’s true that many illnesses are foreign to the average person, many of the core symptoms of mental illness are familiar to virtually everyone. “Not only does the public have a reasonable sense about what the symptoms of mental illness feel like, it also has some intuitive grasp about what causes them,” writes Jason Schnittker. In his new book, The Diagnostic System: Why The Classification Of Psychiatric Disorders Is Necessary, Difficult, And Never Settled, Schnittker explores the evolution of the manual we use to understand mental illness – the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual. Schnittker e...
Source: Psych Central - December 30, 2017 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Claire Nana Tags: Book Reviews Disorders Dual Diagnosis General Medications Policy and Advocacy Professional Psychiatry Psychology Psychotherapy Treatment diagnosis system diagnostic system mental diagnosis Mental Disorders Psychiatric Disorde Source Type: news

Book Review: Mastering the Addicted Brain
I have worked in the substance use disorder field for about forty years. It can be a contentious field at times, with varying factions proclaiming that their way for recovery is the only way. Some go the denial-busting, “you must admit your an addict” route. Others focus more on the individual, seeking approaches to recovery that may work for them, whether that is harm-reduction, complete abstinence,  a life time of support group meetings, or something else. Walter Ling, author of Mastering the Addicted Brain: Building a Sane and Meaningful Life to Stay Clean is a flexible pragmatist. He is interested...
Source: Psych Central - December 25, 2017 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Stan Rockwell, PsyD Tags: Addictions Book Reviews Self-Help Substance Abuse Treatment Source Type: news

When You ’re Deeply Ashamed of Your Anxiety
You feel deeply ashamed of your anxiety. You are embarrassed and mortified and hope that no one ever finds out—maybe not even your friends, maybe not even your spouse. After all, who gets nervous and shaky at the grocery store? Who feels panicked over giving a presentation at work? Who gets terrified of germs or their loved one’s safety every single time they walk out the door? You assume it’s just you. You assume there’s something really wrong with you, something inherently wrong with you. You are flawed. And because you believe you should be able to control your anxiety—and you can’t&m...
Source: Psych Central - December 24, 2017 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Margarita Tartakovsky, M.S. Tags: Agoraphobia Anxiety Disorders Self-Esteem Self-Help Stress Anxiety Disorder Avoidance Excessive Anxiety feeling ashamed panic Self Doubt self-compassion self-kindness Source Type: news

How I Came to Suffer with Anxiety
Many of you might be thinking, “How is his story of battling with anxiety going to raise me up from the despair of a most incapacitating condition which has cut into the very core of my mundane existence.”   To those skeptics out there, I want you to know that I understand what many of you are going through, just trying to get a handle on your racing and/or obsessive thoughts that have led you to a very dark and seemingly hopeless place in your life. Having said this, my hope is that you will read about my own battles with anxiety and how I’ve come out the other end. An examination into my own upbrin...
Source: Psych Central - December 22, 2017 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Irving Schattner, LCSW Tags: Anxiety Cognitive-Behavioral Genetics Loneliness Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder Personal Stories Relaxation and Meditation Self-Esteem Therapists Spill anxious thoughts worry Source Type: news

How to Overcome Stage Fright in Almost Any Situation
“A little bit of stage fright, then I’m ready.” – Faith Hill Fear of speaking before an audience plagues many of us. It certainly held me captive for a few years in my early business career. Yet, whether standing on stage to deliver an extemporaneous speech or before your boss and co-workers when you give a presentation, or in front of assembled family members or friends, the ability to get past stage fright is a useful skill to master. Here are some suggestions on how to overcome it. Know the material. It’s never going to benefit you to get in front of an audience and wing it. No matter how c...
Source: Psych Central - December 20, 2017 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Suzanne Kane Tags: Anxiety Self-Help Stress anxious thoughts Fear jitter performance anxiety Public Speaking stage fright worry Source Type: news

What is Dissociation & Multiple Personality Disorder?
Dissociation is a mental process, which produces a lack of connection in a person’s thoughts, memories, feelings, actions, or sense of identity. During the period of time when a person is dissociating, certain information is not associated with other information as it normally would be. For example, during a traumatic experience, a person may dissociate the memory of the place and circumstances of the trauma from his ongoing memory, resulting in a temporary mental escape from the fear and pain of the trauma and, in some cases, a memory gap surrounding the experience. Because this process can produce changes in memory...
Source: Psych Central - December 17, 2017 Category: Psychiatry Authors: John M. Grohol, Psy.D. Tags: Disorders Dissociation Dissociative General Personality Source Type: news

Depressed and Worried About Finances? How to Become More Financially Savvy
No one starts off in life wanting to worry about money. In fact, most of us dream of achieving wonderful things, including the ability to buy what we want, when we want it. It’s only after a series of disappointments — some call them hard knocks — that we come to the realization that money only goes so far. If we fail to learn the lessons of budgeting and saving, we’re destined to keep running into financial problems. This can lead to many a sleepless night, accompanied by worry and depression about finances. Finding a path from what I’ll call financial illiteracy to being more financially sav...
Source: Psych Central - December 16, 2017 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Suzanne Kane Tags: Anxiety Depression Money and Financial finances Financial Burdens money problems spending Source Type: news

I ’m OK (sort of): The Unpredictability of OCD
When people ask me how I’m doing, I say that I’m doing ok. And sometimes I really am. The problem is that when you’re someone like me, someone who lives with Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD), you’re basically ok until suddenly you’re not. Let me explain. OCD is unpredictable. It’s that schoolyard bully that sneaks up behind you to pull your pigtails just when you found a spot in the shade to sit and read your book peacefully. It’s the unpredictable storm, the one that you think has passed, only to be followed by scattered thunderstorms an hour later. It’s the questions of...
Source: Psych Central - December 14, 2017 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Rebecca Cushman Tags: Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder Personal Stories Psychology Students Treatment college coping obsessions. compulsions Ocd support worry Source Type: news

How NOT to Argue with Your Kids About Marijuana
Excerpted from A Parent’s Guide to Teen Addiction: Professional Advice on Signs, Symptoms, What to Say, and How to Help (Skyhorse Publishing) by Laurence M. Westreich, M.D. Marijuana, the illegal drug most commonly used by teenagers, is widely accepted as harmless, but is it? Its effects range from the trivial — silliness, bloodshot eyes, etc. — all the way to catastrophic — paranoia, depression, and more. Many teenagers and parents don’t realize that although not as potent, it’s a hallucinogen similar to LSD and Ecstasy. Marijuana and the other hallucinogens can cause serious problems f...
Source: Psych Central - December 11, 2017 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Laurence M. Westreich, M.D. Tags: Addictions Children and Teens Parenting Substance Abuse cannabis Communication Marijuana marijuana abuse recovery Teen Addiction Teen Substance Abuse Source Type: news

ADHD and Adults: How to Use Your Strengths to Succeed
ADHD coach Aaron D. Smith regularly works with clients who believe something is inherently wrong with them. After all, for years, they’ve been criticized, ridiculed and reprimanded—maybe by their parents or teachers or other authority figures, he said. For years, clinicians and doctors have hyper-focused on the problems of ADHD. They viewed ADHD from a deficit-based model, versus seeing positive traits or strengths. People with ADHD feel like ‘they are the problem’ not their behaviors.” They feel inadequate. They feel shame and self-doubt. This is especially true for people who were diagnosed ...
Source: Psych Central - December 10, 2017 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Margarita Tartakovsky, M.S. Tags: Attention Deficit Disorder Creativity Disorders General Motivation and Inspiration Self-Esteem Self-Help Stress Students Work Issues Adhd ADHD and success harnessing strengths School Source Type: news

Book Review: The Conscious Caregiver
Caregiving has received increased attention in recent years, and with good reason. With a reported 10,000 people turning 65 each day, there are more seniors who are living longer, often with frailties and illness. While the number of assisted, nursing, and independent living facilities may be increasing to meet the demand, many seniors prefer to and are able to stay longer in their homes or other residences. But this often eventually requires some level of caregiving and can place increased stress on the caregivers. Not everyone is so fortunate to have a family member, neighbor, or friend who can commit to serving in a car...
Source: Psych Central - December 7, 2017 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Dave Schultz Tags: Aging Alzheimer's Book Reviews Caregivers Family Mindfulness Parkinson's Self-Help Seniors caregiver stress caregiving help coping as a caregiver volunteer caregiving Source Type: news

Book Review: The Ethics of Caring
Caring is a universal force that compels healers all of kinds, from therapists to bodyworkers. Yet, as much as we are all drawn to the desire to help, really helping someone depends not just on desire, but on truly understanding the ethics of caring. In her new book, The Ethics of Caring: Finding Professional Right Relationship with Clients for Practicing Professionals, Students, Teachers & Mentors, Kylea Taylor illuminates just what is necessary to offer an authentic relationship where genuine transformation can occur, and to utilize the tremendous power of shared energy — felt in transference and counter-transf...
Source: Psych Central - December 5, 2017 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Claire Nana Tags: Book Reviews Professional Psychology Psychotherapy PTSD Trauma Treatment ethical principles ethics of caring mentor relationship practicing ethics Therapeutic Relationship Source Type: news

Book Review: Another Kind of Madness
“There are times that I wish I had cancer.” It is difficult to imagine that anyone would wish for cancer. But through the eyes of someone diagnosed with a mental illness, this statement may make more sense. The cultural perception that cancer is a “real” illness and mental health challenges are weaknesses or character flaws is just one example of why efforts to reduce stigma are needed. In Another Kind of Madness, Stephen Hinshaw shares his story of growing up with the unexplained absences of his father. It wasn’t until his father shared information about his bipolar diagnosis while Hinshaw wa...
Source: Psych Central - November 30, 2017 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tina Arnoldi Tags: Book Reviews Disorders Family General Personal Stories another kind of madness Memoir Mental Illness Stigma Source Type: news

Book Review: Tough-To-Treat Anxiety
Anxiety is one of the most common problems people face today, and yet, it is often complicated with other co-existing conditions, such as obsessive compulsive disorder, autism, and depression. Comorbidity can make treatment challenging, even for clinicians who specialize in anxiety. In her new book, Tough-To-Treat Anxiety: Hidden Problems & Effective Solutions For Your Clients, licensed clinical psychologist Margaret Wehrenberg breaks down anxiety into its most common presentations, offering a host of treatment methods that work in the moment, and resist remission for years to come. “Unremitting anxiety may be on...
Source: Psych Central - November 30, 2017 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Claire Nana Tags: Anxiety Book Reviews Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder Treatment anxiety treatment difficult anxiety overwhelming anxiety tough to treat anxiety Source Type: news

10 Ways to Survive (and Thrive) as a Military Spouse with Anxiety
This article will help you wrangle this beast and start to tame it. 1. Make connections early. Try to find friends in the area. This can be in person with people in your spouse’s unit or in the Family-Readiness Group (FRG) as well as online. There are many online groups that are for spouses all over the world and specific to certain bases. Join a few and see who you meet. I’ve seen a lot of posts that basically say, “Hey I just moved to Fort such-and-such and I’m looking to find some new friends. Here’s a little about me…” After being a spouse for a while, the concept of having to...
Source: Psych Central - November 29, 2017 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Stephanie L. Taylor Tags: Anxiety Family Self-Help Stress Women's Issues Military Families moving often new in town Perfectionism Source Type: news

An Open Letter to Any Child Who Lost a Parent to Suicide
You will spend countless hours, days, and years asking why. Why you weren’t enough of a reason for them to stay and fight. Why they were able to end things knowing it would so badly hurt their children and family. Why they chose to abandon their pain… and drop it square into your hands. Why your love wasn’t able to tether them in their storm. Why they didn’t do something, anything, else to save them from their demons. There will be times that you feel you will drown in all of the unanswered questions. You will face judgment. Your loss will be trivialized by people who make cruel, blanket statements...
Source: Psych Central - November 28, 2017 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Jessie Monreal, CADC Tags: Depression Editorials Essays Family Motivation and Inspiration Parenting Psychology Suicide Coping With Grief Death Of A Parent grieving loss Orphans Source Type: news

C-PTSD and Interpersonal Relationships
As I have discussed in other articles, Complex Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (C-PTSD) is a unique condition that is the result of suffering a series of traumatic incidents over a long period of time at the hands of someone the victim has a dependent relationship with, usually a parent or other primary caregiver. C-PTSD shares many features of the better known PTSD (Post Traumatic Stress Disorder) which is the result of a small number of impersonal traumas, such as car accidents. However, it also has many unique features, which give it a dual nature, in some ways more similar to some personality disorders, or other disorde...
Source: Psych Central - November 26, 2017 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Fabiana Franco, Ph.D. Tags: Abuse Anxiety Depression Dissociation Personality Psychology Psychotherapy PTSD Relationships & Love C-PTSD complex post-traumatic stress disorder complex trauma Dating Intimacy Marriage Traumatic Experience Source Type: news

6 Questions You MUST Ask Before Checking into Rehab: An Interview with VH1 Addiction Counselor Bob Forrest
The gentleman on the other end of the telephone line has seen the best and worst of humanity and has soared and stumbled, struggled and survived. He emerged from the throes of addiction to claim a new identity; Rehab Bob. According to his website, “Bob Forrest lived a drug-fueled life in the L.A. indie rock scene of the ’80s and ’90s as the frontman for Thelonious Monster. He was known as one of the worst junkies in Hollywood at the time. But after 24 stints in rehab, he finally got sober in 1996. Since then he has dedicated his life to becoming a drug counselor who specializes in reaching the u...
Source: Psych Central - November 24, 2017 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Edie Weinstein, MSW, LSW Tags: Addictions Interview Substance Abuse Treatment Addiction Recovery Alcoholism Celebrity Rehab Drug rehabilitation opiate addiction opioid crisis Source Type: news

5 Pieces of Damaging Advice for Treating Depression
There’s plenty of advice on treating depression. There are thousands of books, blog posts and magazine articles. Everyone seems to have an opinion. Try this herb or vitamin. Avoid sugar. Be grateful. Be more grateful. You just need some fresh air. Go to therapy. Don’t go to therapy—it’s a waste of time and money. Of course, some advice is sincerely spot-on. Some advice seems helpful, but misses the mark for people struggling with clinical depression. And some of it is just plain bad. Which is why we asked psychologists who specialize in depression to share the damaging advice they’ve come acr...
Source: Psych Central - November 23, 2017 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Margarita Tartakovsky, M.S. Tags: Depression Disorders Family General Psychotherapy Relationships & Love Self-Help behavioral activation therapy Clinical Depression depression advice Depression Treatment giving advice Intensive short-term dynamic psychotherapy lo Source Type: news

Navigating Graduate School with a Mental Illness
Psychologist Deborah Serani, Psy.D, was working with a young man who was struggling with a severe bout of social anxiety and chronic depression during his first trimester of grad school. Interacting with his classmates and giving presentations were excruciating. He considered dropping out. This is understandable. Grad school is hard enough. When you have a mental illness, it can feel impossible. Thankfully, it’s not. Below, three psychologists shared their suggestions for success. Learn about your mental illness. Working with a therapist can help you better understand your condition and yourself. What’s also he...
Source: Psych Central - November 16, 2017 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Margarita Tartakovsky, M.S. Tags: Disorders General Self-Help Stress Students grad students Graduate School Graduate Students Mental Health Mental Illness Self Care self-compassion success Source Type: news

The Controversy in Treating Partners of Sex Addicts
In “From Victimhood to Victorhood” (published in the May/June 2015 issue of The Therapist), Alex Katehakis writes that a “major shift has occurred in treating partners of sex addicts”. The shift she describes is towards the Relational Trauma (RT) Model, in which practitioners emphasize that partners’ relational bonds are damaged by betrayal, as precipitated by the discovery of sexual acting out — not a historical and ongoing pattern of destructive or self-defeating behavior by non-acting out partners, as implied by the so-called co-addict model, previously espoused by writers like Stepha...
Source: Psych Central - November 15, 2017 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Graeme Daniels, MFT Tags: Addictions Psychotherapy PTSD Relationships & Love Sexuality Substance Abuse Trauma Addiction Recovery co-addict model co-addiction Codependency Enabling Hypervigilance Impulsive Behavior Infidelity love addiction lying r Source Type: news

The Worst Advice for Alleviating Anxiety —And What Actually Helps
Anxiety is a common emotion. Everyone experiences it. Which is why everyone assumes they know how to deal with it. Which means that when someone is struggling with anxiety—excessive anxiety or worries that won’t go away—they may get an assortment of advice. But this advice may not be helpful. In fact, it might even amplify their anxiety. We asked clinicians who specialize in anxiety to share the worst kinds of advice for anxiety—which you’ll find below, along with what actually does help. Look on the bright side. When you’re anxious and riddled with worries, well-meaning friends and fami...
Source: Psych Central - November 14, 2017 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Margarita Tartakovsky, M.S. Tags: Anxiety Disorders Family General Relationships & Love Self-Help anxiety advice Anxiety Disorder anxiety issues anxiety struggles anxiety-provoking situations Excessive Anxiety Fears Worries Source Type: news

How EMDR Therapy Heals Trauma and Addiction
Life experiences, either negative or positive, have a significant impact on our thoughts, beliefs, and behaviors. Adverse life experiences such as abuse, neglect, violence, or emotional distress may have serious consequences later in life, such as mental illness or addiction. In treating individuals who suffer from addiction, it is important to address any co-occurring trauma, PTSD, or related symptoms within the setting of a drug and alcohol rehab facility because, in most instances, these traumatic events or experiences play a role in the person’s addictive behaviors. Therefore, the addiction cannot be fully overco...
Source: Psych Central - November 13, 2017 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Kelsey Brown Tags: Abuse Addictions PTSD Substance Abuse Trauma Treatment Addiction Recovery EMDR Eye Movement Desensitization And Reprocessing Source Type: news

Exploring the History & Treatment of PTSD: An Interview with Dr. Paula P. Schnurr
As we celebrate Veterans Day (and Remembrance Day in Canada) and honoring military veterans, many of us think back to World War I but also many other wars throughout history. I recalled the 1980s, when Iran was engaged in an almost decade-long war with Iraq, and millions were killed or injured on both sides. In the West, the older generations may recall World War II and the Vietnam War, while the younger ones remember the more recent wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. We think of the millions who have fought, who have come back with injuries, and those who died serving their countries. But the numbers we rarely think about: How...
Source: Psych Central - November 11, 2017 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Arash Emamzadeh Tags: Interview Medications PTSD Trauma Treatment Combat Trauma Posttraumatic Stress Disorder PSTD Traumatic Experiences veterans Veterans day Source Type: news

The Benefits of Alternative Therapies
This article will take a look at two additional therapy practices that have been widely used by the U.S. and abroad. Specifically designed for trauma, Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) works when a therapist leads a patient through a series of lateral eye movements while the patient focuses on traumatic memories. The goal is to reprocess these memories in an adaptive way — eliminating emotional distress and reducing physiological arousal.  Francine Shapiro, PhD, discovered the effects of EMDR by understanding “dual awareness”. When engaging in bilateral stimulation with memory, th...
Source: Psych Central - November 7, 2017 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Rebecca Lee Tags: Addictions Anxiety Cognitive-Behavioral Depression Eating Disorders Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder Psychology Psychotherapy PTSD Trauma Treatment Cbt Cognitive Behavioral Therapy EMDR Eye Movement Desensitization And Reprocessin Source Type: news

Growing Up with a Psychotic Mother
I was ten when my mother had her first psychotic break. It was May. I was looking forward to lazy summer days at the pool, an art camp, a stack of Babysitters Club books, and daydreaming about my first crush, a boy with a splay of freckles and a mop of dark hair. Instead, I was forced to grow up too soon. This meant wearing deodorant and shaving my arm pits. It also meant seeing my mother in a state of complete psychosis, one in which she thought maybe she had killed the postman or the neighbor girl. “I didn’t. Mean. Tokillthepostman.” Her words were all wrong, strung together in a series of hiccups a...
Source: Psych Central - November 6, 2017 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Leslie A. Lindsay Tags: Bipolar Depression Essays Family General Personal Stories Psychology Bipolar Disorder delusions hallucinations Hospitalization involuntary hospitalization Manic Depression Manic Episode Psychosis psychotic mania Source Type: news

Murmurings of a Mad Man: One Man ’ s Mental Health Journey through Creativity
If one has ever been in a psychiatric hospital they are more than aware of the nemesis demon known as ‘boredom’. If one has never been locked up, I don’t believe that a person can really relate. Despite the various groups, listening to the stereo, talking to fellow patients, meals and the most precious visiting hours, one cannot escape the overwhelming dullness that comes to haunt from time to time. Might I make a suggestion that worked for me? Creativity comes from the Creator; you see the similarity of duplicated letters. I believe that every single human being on planet Earth possesses some form of art...
Source: Psych Central - November 4, 2017 Category: Psychiatry Authors: John Kaniecki Tags: Bipolar Creativity Personal Stories Treatment creative outlet Hospitalization Inpatient Treatment Success Stories writing Source Type: news

Addiction and the “ Why Can ’ t They Stop? ” Enigma
Why can’t they stop? This is perhaps the most elusive question posed when it comes to addiction. The answer is just as elusive — fleeting, incomprehensible, and illusory, like a ghost amidst shadows in the night. When we ask the question, we are baffled as to why those addicted to particular substances or behaviors continue to use or engage — regardless of the negative physical, psychological, and social effects. We cannot seem to intricately understand why some people decide to walk right off the cantilever of life — falling into a seemingly inescapable abyss. The question is definitely not an easy...
Source: Psych Central - November 3, 2017 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Wycliff Matanda, MA Tags: Addictions Alcoholism Binge Eating Eating Disorders Grief and Loss Health Insurance Loneliness Psychology Psychotherapy Substance Abuse Treatment Addiction Recovery Alcohol Abuse Coping Skills Self Medication Source Type: news