Book Review: Borderline Bodies:  Affect Regulation Theory for Personality Disorders
“The body,” says Clara Mucci, “is the essential go-between in the relationship between the self and other.” In personality disorders, this relationship between the self and the other is especially troubled. However, this “other” can be the body itself. Mucci describes psychosomatic disorders as an outcome of the “problematic junction between mind and body.” The body can also act as an imprinting device in which earlier generations transmit their trauma onto us. In her new book, Borderline Bodies: Affect Regulation Theory for Personality Disorders, Mucci places the body at the...
Source: Psych Central - March 21, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Claire Nana Tags: Book Reviews Disorders Family General Genetics Memory and Perception Parenting Personality Psychology Psychotherapy Relationships & Love Trauma Treatment Affect Regulation Theory for Personality Disorders Body books on somati Source Type: news

Resting in the Space of Discomfort: A Mindful Approach to Depression
Suffering is a shared human experience that can be viewed integral part of life. Our suffering can range from mild to severe and can take the form of physical or mental and emotional pain. Whatever the form of our discomfort, we can agree that “suffering of the mind” is one of the biggest concerns of our time. The severity of mental health issues is on the rise, particularly the number of individuals experiencing depression. According to the World Health Organization (2017) over 300 million people are estimated to suffer from depression, equivalent to 4.4% of the world’s population. The Causes...
Source: Psych Central - March 18, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Jules De Vitto Tags: Depression Habits Mindfulness Self-Help Source Type: news

Book Review: Bodyfulness: Somatic Practices for Presence
I didn’t know how very much I needed this book until I opened it — one of the biggest gifts for a reader, and for a person who seeks understanding. That word bodyfulness is instantly recognizable as a side-stepping of mindfulness, but you’re wrong if you think it intends a substitution of body for mind. As you would expect from a book published by Shambhala, it embraces a much more comprehensive understanding of the lived experience. The book includes lessons on how to be centered within yourself in a moment-to-moment way and how to find and hold on to yourself when the winds are buffeting. A very intere...
Source: Psych Central - March 16, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Lori Handelman, PhD Tags: Book Reviews Disorders General Happiness Memory and Perception Mindfulness Motivation and Inspiration Psychology Relaxation and Meditation Self-Esteem Self-Help bodily authority Bodyfulness books about meditation books about se Source Type: news

Book Review: The Unexpected Joy of Being Sober
“The first time I got drunk, I’d felt like I finally unzipped my wrong skin and slipped into a slinky new one, “writes Catherine Gray. In her new book, The Unexpected Joy Of Being Sober, Gray describes her journey from fake friends, hungover mornings, and failed moderation attempts to finally finding her way to sobriety and the many joys that come with it. Yet early on Gray is unconvinced. She writes, “Don’t get me wrong. I didn’t want to not drink. My day did not look like that. But I didn’t want to drink either. The world in sobriety is much brighter, louder, rawer, and scarier t...
Source: Psych Central - March 11, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Claire Nana Tags: Addictions Alcoholism Book Reviews Disorders General Happiness Memory and Perception Mindfulness Motivation and Inspiration Neuroscience Personal Stories Psychology Psychotherapy Self-Esteem Self-Help Treatment addiction co Source Type: news

Book Review: Living Light:  The Art of Using Light for Health & Happiness
While it’s hard not to notice the brilliant display of colors set off by a sunset over the water, we seldom consider the biological, or even psychological, benefits of light. “It is my belief that good quality light in our daily lives is far more important than we might think,” writes Karl Ryberg. In his new book, Living Light: The Art of Using Light For Health And Happiness, Ryberg brings us his life’s work — studying the obvious and not so obvious ways in which light affects us and how we can use light in our lives not only function better, but feel better. Light, we know, plays an important...
Source: Psych Central - March 10, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Claire Nana Tags: Book Reviews Disorders General Habits Psychology Seasonal Affective Disorder Self-Help Treatment artificial light Light therapy Living Light natural light Ryberg SAD Source Type: news

Book Review: Breakdown:  A Clinician ’ s Experience in a  Broken System
There is no such thing as a perfect system and in the case of the mentally ill, nothing could be truer. The mentally ill face an uphill battle to secure appropriate services, avoid being caught up in the criminal justice system, and most of all, steer clear of the revolving door that has become our mental health system. Lynn Nanos, a mobile emergency psychiatric clinician, believes it is time for a change. Her new book, Breakdown: A Clinicians Experience in a Broken System of Emergency Psychiatry, reads like a clarion call to all involved in mental health care in this country. Drawing on her rich experience, Nanos highligh...
Source: Psych Central - March 7, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Claire Nana Tags: Book Reviews Disorders Ethics & Morality General Health Insurance Medications Policy and Advocacy Psychiatry Psychological Assessment Psychology Psychotherapy Schizophrenia Treatment Violence & Aggression books on mental illnes Source Type: news

Book Review: Mental Illness Is an Asshole: And Other Observations
“In a world where friends are assholes, parents are assholes, even adorable, little three-year-olds are assholes, there is no reason that psychological disorders get a pass,” writes Gabe Howard. Howard, who hosts The Psych Central Show podcast and writes for Psych Central on the topics of bipolar and mental illness, is known for his fun, entertaining and eminently useful observations about mental illness. He writes, “Bipolar, clinical depression, schizophrenia and the like have no respect for the people whose lives they impact.” In his new book, Mental Illness Is an Asshole – And Other Observa...
Source: Psych Central - March 7, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Claire Nana Tags: Anxiety Bipolar Book Reviews Depression Disorders General Habits Happiness Healthy Living Memory and Perception Motivation and Inspiration Panic Disorder Personal Stories Psychology Schizophrenia Self-Esteem Self-Help Sti Source Type: news

The Connection Between Physical and Mental Health
Many of us seriously underrate how strongly our body affects our state-of-mind. We don’t realize how strongly poor diet, lack of sleep, and too little exercise can affect our emotional and mental health. Better Nutrition Can Alleviate Depression and Anxiety Over the past decade, interest in how diet affects mental health has grown considerably. Large studies have found that habitual consumption of an unhealthy diet (defined as high in processed foods) is associated with increased risk of depression, anxiety, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children and adolescents.1 A study employing a “d...
Source: Psych Central - March 3, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Fabiana Franco, Ph.D. Tags: Anxiety Depression Exercise General Habits Healthy Living Sleep Source Type: news

Do Men and Women Experience Bipolar Disorder Differently?
Bipolar disorder affects men and women in equal numbers, and the symptoms are essentially identical. But some key differences do exist—differences that might be due to biological factors, and social ones, too. For starters, research has consistently shown that women have higher rates of bipolar II disorder, “which typically presents as a chronic depressive disorder with periods of hypomania,” according to Candida Fink, MD, a board-certified child, adolescent and adult psychiatrist with a private practice in Westchester, N.Y. There’s a misconception that bipolar II disorder is less severe than bipola...
Source: Psych Central - March 2, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Margarita Tartakovsky, M.S. Tags: Bipolar Disorders Gender General Men's Issues Women's Issues Bipolar Disorder bipolar disorder and pregnancy bipolar I Bipolar Ii Gender Differences men and bipolar disorder menopause and bipolar disorder menstruation and bipolar Source Type: news

Narcissists and Abusers Use This to Target Empaths
Projection is a defense mechanism commonly used by abusers, including people with narcissistic or borderline personality disorder and addicts. Basically, they say, “It’s not me, it’s you!” When we project, we’re defending ourselves against unconscious impulses or traits, either positive or negative, that we’ve denied in ourselves. Instead we attribute them to others. Our thoughts or feelings about someone or something are too uncomfortable to acknowledge. In our mind we believe that the thought or emotion originates from that other person or thing. We might imagine “She hates me,&r...
Source: Psych Central - February 18, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Darlene Lancer, JD, MFT Tags: Abuse Anger Codependence Narcissism Personality Boundaries Defense Mechanisms emotional maturity externalization projection Shame Source Type: news

What Psychotic Episodes Really Look and Feel Like
When we hear someone is psychotic, we automatically think of psychopaths and cold-blooded criminals. We automatically think “Oh wow, they’re really crazy!” And we automatically think of plenty of other myths and misconceptions that only further the stigma surrounding psychosis. In other words, the reality is that we get psychosis very wrong. For starters, psychosis consists of hallucinations and/or delusions. “You can have one or both at the same time,” said Devon MacDermott, Ph.D, a psychologist who previously worked in psychiatric hospitals and outpatient centers, treating individuals experi...
Source: Psych Central - February 17, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Margarita Tartakovsky, M.S. Tags: Disorders General Schizophrenia Stigma Hallucinations Hearing Voices Psychosis Psychotic Episode serious mental illness Source Type: news

Book Review: Eating Disorders: The Journey to Recovery Workbook, 2nd Ed.
There is no such thing as a life free of distress. And yet in the distress — by learning to move through it, find strengths that help us cope, and most importantly, not avoid it — we often find the path to growth. This path, from finding escape from the distress of life to finding growth in it, is also the journey that underlies the recovery from an eating disorder. “People with eating disorders, like all people, flourish when they feel a sense of agency,” write authors Laura J. Goodman and Mona Villapiano. In their new book, Eating Disorders: The Journey to Recovery Workbook, 2nd Ed., Laura J. Good...
Source: Psych Central - February 13, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Claire Nana Tags: Addictions Anorexia Binge Eating Book Reviews Bulimia Diet & Nutrition Disorders Eating Disorders General Habits Healthy Living Psychology Self-Esteem Self-Help Trauma Treatment Weight Loss books on how to recover from an Source Type: news

Book Review: EMDR Therapy & Somatic Psychology
Many therapists and trainees will be familiar with the terms “somatic psychology” and “EMDR therapy,” and there have been many authors who have tried to write a book that encapsulates both of these topics succinctly, but in my opinion, none have succeeded in quite the same way as Arielle Schwartz and Barb Maiberger with their new book, EMDR Therapy and Somatic Psychology: Interventions to Enhance Embodiment in Trauma Treatment. EMDR Therapy and Somatic Psychology is a wonderful resource for both therapists-in-training and practicing therapists. The first part of the book is devoted to providing foun...
Source: Psych Central - February 9, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Caroline Comeaux Lee Tags: Book Reviews Disorders General Memory and Perception Mindfulness Neuroscience Psychological Assessment Psychology Psychotherapy Relaxation and Meditation Stress Trauma Treatment cultural sensitivity EMDR EMDR Therapy and Soma Source Type: news

What Everyone Needs to Know About Bipolar Disorder
Nine years ago, Julie Kraft’s doctor uttered the words, “you have bipolar II disorder.” Immediately, images of unhinged film characters, sensationalist tabloid headlines and shocking news stories flooded her mind. All these things are now associated with me, she thought. Kraft felt embarrassed, ashamed, sad—and afraid. “I was fearful of being judged, backed away from, viewed as unsafe, unpredictable, unstable, an unreliable friend, an irresponsible mom, a moody wife, a woman of weak character, and the list goes on and on.” It’s an understandable reaction because even though bipolar...
Source: Psych Central - February 5, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Margarita Tartakovsky, M.S. Tags: Bipolar Disorders Stigma Bipolar Disorder bipolar disorder myths bipolar disorder stereotypes bipolar I Bipolar Ii Cyclothymia Hypomania Mental Health Stigma Mood Disorders Source Type: news

Book Review: Clinical Applications of the Polyvagal Theory
Clinical Applications of the Polyvagal Theory is another work in the Norton series on interpersonal neurobiology. I have come to believe that at least three theories are indispensable in learning and understanding how and why we behave the way we do — attribution theory, attachment theory, and our underlying physiology of safety, called the polyvagal theory. The polyvagal theory was developed by Stephen Porges and presented to the Society for Psychophysiological Research in 1994. The theory takes into account how our autonomic nervous system is constantly working to keep us safe. Very simply, the components are our ...
Source: Psych Central - February 4, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Stan Rockwell, PsyD Tags: Anxiety Book Reviews Disorders General Memory and Perception Mindfulness Neuroscience Panic Disorder Personal Stories Psychological Assessment Psychology Psychotherapy PTSD Relationships & Love Relaxation and Meditation Traum Source Type: news

Book Review: Understanding the Brain
Making a cup of coffee and remembering to turn off the coffeemaker. Driving to the grocery store and not getting lost. Remembering anniversaries, birthdays, and where you were supposed to meet your friend for lunch. All of these activities require the seamless workings of the brain, and while we often take them for granted, there are even more activities that go undetected within the brain every single day. In his new book, Understanding the Brain: From Cells to Behavior to Cognition, which is an updated version of his earlier book, Dowling offers a comprehensive look at how the brain functions — from how vision occu...
Source: Psych Central - February 2, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Claire Nana Tags: Book Reviews Disorders General Genetics Habits Intelligence Memory and Perception Neuroscience Psychiatry Psychology Treatment Brain Function cortisol Dowling Emotions Long Term Memory neuromodulators Neurons Neurotrans Source Type: news

Book Review: Simply Human:  Reflections on the Life We Share
In his new book, Simply Human: Reflections on the Life We Share, Alan Bodnar takes us inside the lives of people with mental illness, providing the keen insight and discernment of a clinical psychologist to show that their stories are all part of a much larger human experience. Bodnar explains, “I wanted to convey some of the fear, confusion, and betrayal that these people were feeling, and, in some small way, give voice to the distress that policymakers seemed to be ignoring.” Here, Bodnar is referring to the stigma that so often encompasses people who have mental illness, a stigma that perpetuates society&rsq...
Source: Psych Central - February 1, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Claire Nana Tags: Book Reviews Disorders Ethics & Morality General Happiness Memory and Perception Motivation and Inspiration Personal Stories Psychology Psychotherapy Stigma Treatment Bodnar Empathy Humanity Mental Illness Prejudice Simpl Source Type: news

Escape from Trauma: Dissociation and Development of Identity
Dissociation may be thought of simply as disconnection or disruption. In terms of posttraumatic stress disorder, we talk about dissociation as a disruption in four different areas of functioning: identity, memory, consciousness, self-awareness, and awareness of surroundings. In understanding the human response to trauma, it is thought that dissociation is a central defense mechanism because it provides a method of escape 1. When physical escape is impossible, dissociation provides a type of mental escape. Those who experience dissociation may notice lapses in memory of certain time periods or events. Personal information ...
Source: Psych Central - January 24, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Fabiana Franco, Ph.D. Tags: Dissociative disorders PTSD Trauma compartmentalization Depersonalization Dissociation Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Traumatic Experience Source Type: news

Benzos, Opioids and Z-Drugs: Deadly Combos
With all the news media accounts and reports from governmental health organizations about the opioid epidemic, including the 70,237 drug overdose deaths in 2017, a newly emerging threat is gaining attention: use and misuse of benzodiazepines, opioid drugs and Z-drugs. Specifically, combining these three drugs can create a deadly combination that snuffs out lives. Benzodiazepine Overdose Deaths on the Rise Benzodiazepines, a class of sedative narcotic drugs including Xanax and Valium used to treat anxiety, insomnia and other disorders and classified as Schedule IV under the Controlled Substances Act by the Drug Enforcement ...
Source: Psych Central - January 23, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Suzanne Kane Tags: Addictions Substance Abuse Suicide Source Type: news

OCD and Emetophobia
The fear of vomiting, or emetophobia, affects people of all ages. It is often seen in childhood and if left untreated, can become debilitating. It is also known to develop during adulthood, perhaps after an associated experience such as a severe stomach illness or episode of vomiting. The consequences of vomit phobia can be extreme, leading to such things as school refusal, social isolation, and job loss. Emetophobia can also take away any joy in life, hindering travel and leisure activities, romantic relationships, and even pregnancy (afraid of morning sickness). To be clear, emetophobia is not just being afraid of throwi...
Source: Psych Central - January 15, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Janet Singer Tags: Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder emetophobia Nausea Ocd Vomiting Source Type: news

What Is a Covert Narcissist?
A covert narcissist is just as much a narcissist as your typical extroverted narcissist. Some narcissists emphasize one personality trait more than others. One person with outgoing personality might always show off and need to be the center of attention, while another narcissist might be a vindictive bully, an entitled playboy, an imperious authoritarian, or an exacting know-it-all, as articulated by Madonna, “Listen, everyone is entitled to my opinion.” Some public figures and celebrities exemplify extroverted narcissists — people who are, grandiose and crave attention. Radio host and psychologist Dr. We...
Source: Psych Central - January 14, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Darlene Lancer, JD, MFT Tags: Bullying Narcissism Personality Source Type: news

Book Review: Dancing on the Tightrope
We all face challenges in life, and more often than not, we feel they are unique to our lives and unlike other peoples’ challenges. However, according to Beth Kurland, PhD, the challenges of being human are more common than we might believe. She writes, “There are five core evolutionary challenges that we all face as human beings that can take us away from living our lives most fully.” In her new book, Dancing on the Tightrope: Transcending the Habits of Your Mind & Awakening to Your Fullest Life, Kurland shows us that it is in understanding these challenges, and the habits they are characterized by, ...
Source: Psych Central - January 6, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Claire Nana Tags: Anxiety Book Reviews Disorders General Happiness Memory and Perception Mindfulness Motivation and Inspiration Personality Psychology Self-Help Stress Acceptance And Commitment Therapy beth kurland Dancing on the Tightrope Source Type: news

Book Review: Struggle Well: Thriving in the Aftermath of Trauma
Like me, you’ve probably seen people crumble and fail to recover from trauma (big or small) and you’ve also probably seen others who come through their experiences with clearer eyes, stronger spirits, straighter backs, and deeper wells of empathy and compassion. Perhaps they are even able to use their experiences in profoundly creative ways. The Japanese concept of kintsugi treats breakage and repair as part of the history of an object rather than something to disguise. People can be proud of their scars, and some even transform them into memoir or service, or embellish them literally with tattoos and other ap...
Source: Psych Central - January 3, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Lori Handelman, PhD Tags: Book Reviews Disorders General Memory and Perception Personal Stories Psychology PTSD Self-Help Trauma Treatment combat Falke Goldberg Struggle Well Therapy veteran Source Type: news

ADHD and Work: 9 Tips for Thriving at the Office
Adults with ADHD are all-too aware of their shortcomings at work and regularly bash themselves for their inconsistent productivity and sinking motivation. But there are many things you can do to thrive at the office. For starters, it’s important to recognize that all workers struggle. “It would be a mistake to assume that non-ADHD or neurotypical workers do not struggle with some of the very same ebbs and flows of productivity, focus, and prioritization difficulties,” said Aaron D. Smith, MS, LMSW, ACC, a certified ADHD coach who helps individuals with ADHD and executive functioning challenges to bridge t...
Source: Psych Central - January 1, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Margarita Tartakovsky, M.S. Tags: Attention Deficit Disorder Career Disorders General Motivation and Inspiration Self-Help Work Issues ADHD and productivity ADHD and work ADHD challenges ADHD self-help ADHD tips Source Type: news

Book Review: Somebody I Used to Know
Most adults are familiar with the topic of Alzheimer’s disease, but how many of us have had the opportunity to sit down with someone with Alzheimer’s and learn about their personal experience with the disease? Wendy Mitchell set about changing the narrative around Alzheimer’s with her memoir, Somebody I Used to Know. At fifty-eight, she was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease. She was working full-time and mothering her two twenty-something daughters, and as soon as she got the diagnosis, she began documenting her experiences with the disease through a blog called “Which Me Am I Today?” ...
Source: Psych Central - December 28, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Caroline Comeaux Lee Tags: Alzheimer's Book Reviews Creativity Disorders Family General Grief and Loss Memory and Perception Motivation and Inspiration Personal Stories Treatment Alzheimer's disease Experience life-changing Memoir Somebody I Used to Kn Source Type: news

Book Review: The Disordered Mind
“Self-awareness leads us to question who we are and why we exist,” writes Eric R. Kandel. Seeking answers to questions like this is what makes us human, but how do we explain how our consciousness arises from the physical matter that is our brain? In his new groundbreaking book, The Disordered Mind: What Unusual Brains Tell Us About Ourselves, acclaimed neuroscientist Eric R. Kandel looks not at the brain in function, but rather conditions such as schizophrenia, depression, post-traumatic stress disorder, Parkinson’s and addiction to help us uncover what it means to be human. While disruptions of brain fu...
Source: Psych Central - December 27, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Claire Nana Tags: Antipsychotics Autism / Asperger's Bipolar Book Reviews Creativity Disorders General Medications Neuroscience Psychology Schizophrenia Stigma Stress Treatment Amygdala Bipolar Disorder cortisol Hippocampus Kandel The Source Type: news

Book Review: Neurobiology for Clinical Social Work, 2nd Ed.
While social workers have long espoused the importance of relationships and their impact on our psychological functioning, truly understanding those relationships requires understanding the brain as a social organ. As Louis Cozolino, one of the nation’s leading authorities on neuroscience, says, “Each generation of mental health practitioners needs to be taught that although we look like separate beings, we are connected in deep and profound ways we are still coming to understand.” In their latest edition of Neurobiology for Clinical Social Work: Theory and Practice, Janet R. Shapiro and Jeffrey S. Appleg...
Source: Psych Central - December 23, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Claire Nana Tags: Book Reviews Disorders General Neuroscience Personality Psychological Assessment Psychology Psychotherapy Trauma Treatment epigenetics Neurobiology Neurobiology For Clinical Social Work Physiology Source Type: news

Book Review: Let Go of Emotional Overeating & Love Your Food
It is not news that America is currently facing an unprecedented obesity epidemic, and one that would quickly have us learning to say no more often, resist the temptation to give in to our favorite foods and have better self-control over our eating patterns. However, contends Arlene B. Englander, this approach is as much of a problem as the epidemic itself. Diets are restrictive and often allow no room for error or introspection. And when people blame themselves for having a “bad” week, they create negative emotions which then often lead to compulsive overeating as a way to ease the pain. Englander likens this ...
Source: Psych Central - December 18, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Claire Nana Tags: Addictions Binge Eating Book Reviews Diet & Nutrition Disorders Eating Disorders Exercise General Habits Happiness Healthy Living Mindfulness Motivation and Inspiration Psychology Self-Esteem Self-Help Stigma Treatment Source Type: news

Signs a Narcissist Is Playing Games and Why
To narcissists, relationships are transactional, like buying and selling. The goal is to get what you want at the lowest price. It’s a self-centered, business mindset. Emotions don’t intrude. In relationships, narcissists focus on their goal. For a male narcissist, that’s usually sex or to have a beautiful woman at his side. A female narcissist may be looking for material gifts, sex, acts of service, and/or an extravagant courtship. It’s important to understand a narcissist’s mind. They see relationships as a means to get what they want, without concern for the feelings of the other person. Th...
Source: Psych Central - December 17, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Darlene Lancer, JD, MFT Tags: Abuse Divorce Narcissism Personality Source Type: news

Laugh in the Face of Anxiety
Anxiety occasionally visits us all. When we give an important presentation, take a test, go on a first date or walk down a dark alley our minds and bodies naturally respond by going on high alert and attuning to the potential dangers and risks of these endeavors. A healthy amount of anxiety prevents us from falling victim to those dangers and risks. Choosing not to go down that dark alley could be a life-saving response. But an excessive amount of anxiety can increase our risk of suffering negative consequences. The millions of people who suffer from social anxiety disorder, panic disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder...
Source: Psych Central - December 9, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Nichole Force, M.A. Tags: Anxiety Creativity Amygdala Humor Laughter Neuroscience Source Type: news

Depression in Men: It Looks Different Than You Might Think
There is a big emphasis in our society on men being strong and tough. They should be able to handle anything and shouldn’t struggle with emotions and feelings. They just tough it out and power through. The only problem with that is, it isn’t true. Men can’t just power through anything and the belief that you should be able to is putting you in a bad situation. When it comes to depression women are more likely to be diagnosed, but does that mean that men don’t struggle with it too?  It’s true that depression is more prevalent in women, however, that doesn’t mean t...
Source: Psych Central - December 7, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Julie K. Jones, Ph.D., LPC Tags: Bipolar Depression Men's Issues Stigma Stress Gender Differences Source Type: news

Beware of the Dark Triad
Think of the Dark Triad of narcissism, psychopathy, and Machiavellianism as the Bermuda Triangle — it’s perilous to come near it! The traits of all three often overlap and create personality profiles that are damaging and toxic, especially when it comes to intimate relationships, where we let our guard down. One woman was the subject of identity fraud at a time when she was very in love with her boyfriend who lived with her in her apartment. Her bank accounts and credit cards had been compromised. She was speaking regularly with the FBI and suffered extreme anxiety and emotionally stress. The authorities were u...
Source: Psych Central - December 5, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Darlene Lancer, JD, MFT Tags: Abuse Narcissism Personality Dark Triad Machiavellianism Manipulation Source Type: news

When You ’ re Struggling with Self-Loathing in Bipolar Disorder
Many people with bipolar disorder struggle with self-loathing. Maybe the self-loathing starts as the depressive phase does with all sorts of awful thoughts about yourself. Because that’s how depression works: It outright lies, and inflicts pain. You can’t do anything right. You’re an abject failure. You’re also stupid. And worthless, and no one will ever really love you for you. You are not attractive or thin or strong enough. You are weak, and you are an embarrassment. Maybe it happens after a manic or hypomanic episode, because you feel terrible about what you did or said during th...
Source: Psych Central - December 2, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Margarita Tartakovsky, M.S. Tags: Bipolar Disorders General Self-Esteem Self-Help Autoimmune Disease Bipolar Disorder Mood Disorder Negative Thoughts Self Hatred Self Loathing Source Type: news

Is Cold and Dark Weather a Trigger for Heavy Drinking?
There is a commonly held belief that winter conditions — that are characterized by extreme cold and low sunlight — are connected to heavy drinking. Whenever we think of countries in Northern Europe we instantly think of sub-zero temperatures, dark clouds and polar landscapes. We also imagine its inhabitants tucked in a bar drinking their sorrows away. What creates this image is the perception that strong spirits and binge drinking are a staple of many Northern countries. However, scientific and factual evidence shows a more nuanced picture. Statistical Verdict The argument that countries with a colder climate e...
Source: Psych Central - November 29, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Claudiu Revnic Tags: Addictions Substance Abuse alcohol use Alcoholism heavy drinking Holiday Blues Holiday Season Public Health Winter Source Type: news

New Research on Gambling Use Disorder
“Gambling: The sure way of getting nothing from something.” – Wilson Mizner Who doesn’t enjoy a game of chance now and then? Trying your luck on an inexpensive lottery ticket can seem innocent enough, and might even net you considerable return. Spurred on by the lure of winning the big jackpot through television, radio, Internet, newspaper and other media ads may even prompt you to spend more than you intended. And it’s not just lottery tickets that people become hooked on but other forms of gambling as well: horse racing, slot machines, card games, sports betting. It should come as no surpris...
Source: Psych Central - November 28, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Suzanne Kane Tags: Addictions Substance Abuse Source Type: news

More Anxiety Experts Reveal What They Really Want Everyone to Know About Anxiety
For something so common, anxiety is still massively misunderstood. There are myths and misconceptions about everything from what anxiety disorders look and feel like to what actually helps to treat these illnesses and navigate anxiety. Which is why we asked several anxiety experts to clear things up. Below, you’ll find their illuminating insights. Living with an anxiety disorder can be exceptionally difficult. Many people minimize and trivialize anxiety disorders. For instance, how often have you said or heard someone say “I’m sooo OCD about my desk!” or “I’m really OCD about using hand ...
Source: Psych Central - November 27, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Margarita Tartakovsky, M.S. Tags: Anxiety Cognitive-Behavioral Disorders General Psychotherapy Self-Help Stress Treatment Anxiety Disorder Treatment Anxiety Disorders Cbt exposure and response prevention therapy GAD Ocd Source Type: news

Reasons Family Members Side with Sexual Abusers
Living with the emotional effects of sexual abuse is painful enough. Unfortunately, many survivors open up about their abuse only to find that their family members’ reactions toward them are just as painful — if not more so — than the original trauma. It may shock some people to learn that family members often choose to side with sexual abuse perpetrators and against their victims, especially if the abuse was committed within the family. I regularly hear from sexual abuse survivors who tell me the myriad ways their families scold and reject them in the aftermath of disclosure, all while favoring their abu...
Source: Psych Central - November 24, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: MIranda Pacchiana, MSW Tags: Abuse Domestic Violence PTSD Trauma Source Type: news

How to Spot a Narcissist
Narcissists can be beguiling and charismatic. In fact, one study showed that their likable veneer was only penetrable after seven meetings. But you don’t want to fall in love with one. Over time you can end up feeling ignored, uncared about, and unimportant. Typically, a narcissist’s criticism, demands, and emotional unavailability increase, while your confidence and self-esteem decrease. You’ll try harder, but despite pleas and efforts, the narcissist appears to lack consideration for your feelings and needs. Narcissistic Personality Disorder Narcissistic personality disorder (NPD) occurs in men tha...
Source: Psych Central - November 23, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Darlene Lancer, JD, MFT Tags: Abuse Narcissism Personality Trauma Narcissistic Personality Disorder narcissistic supply Selfishness Source Type: news

Eating Disorders and the Brain
Eating disorders are biologically based brain illnesses influenced by environmental and psychological factors. Environmental risk factors for developing an eating disorder include weight and appearance pressures, media messaging, and weight bullying. Biological factors include dieting/food exposure, genetics, neurochemistry, neurobiology, and hormones (notably estrogen). Psychological factors include stress, life transitions, identity, trauma, anxiety, depression, and substance use. While risk factors predispose certain individuals to eating disorders, precipitating factors such as significantly altering how one eats or s...
Source: Psych Central - November 21, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Jillian Lampert, Ph.D., M.P.H., R.D., L.D., F.A.E.D. Tags: Anorexia Binge Eating Bulimia Bullying Children and Teens Eating Disorders Neuroscience Psychology Women's Issues Body Dysmorphia Body Image bulimia. food addiction Source Type: news

Tips for Social Anxiety Sufferers
Do you usually feel apprehensive around others due to fear of possible embarrassment? Do you develop sweaty palms, shaky legs or feel you have butterflies in your stomach when called up to speak before an audience? Do you feel others are constantly scrutinizing your every move with a view that’s critical of you? If so, you are not alone. You have lots of company. In the United States alone, about 40 million American adults suffer from various forms of anxiety disorders, with over 15 million adults suffering from social anxiety, according to the Anxiety and Depression Association of America (ADAA). The problem affects...
Source: Psych Central - November 11, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Irving Schattner, LCSW Tags: Agoraphobia Anxiety General Social Phobia anxious thoughts Loneliness making friends Social Anxiety Source Type: news

What Bipolar II Disorder Really Looks & Feels Like
Bipolar II disorder is a less severe version of bipolar I disorder. That’s likely an assumption you’ve already come across. Maybe you read it in an article. Maybe you heard it from someone else, maybe even a mental health professional. Author Julie Kraft has heard bipolar II called “bipolar light” and “diet bipolar.” This is a common belief, because mania is a defining feature of bipolar I disorder. And mania has devastating consequences. Empty bank accounts. Soaring debt. Lost jobs. Broken relationships. Divorce. Car accidents and injuries. But bipolar II isn’t less severe than b...
Source: Psych Central - November 10, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Margarita Tartakovsky, M.S. Tags: Bipolar Disorders General Personal Stories Self-Help Stigma Treatment being healthy with bipolar Bipolar 2 Bipolar II disorder Depression Hypomania Hypomanic Episode Major Depressive Episode managing bipolar II disorder Source Type: news

Surprising Research on Cannabis
Much of what we think we know about cannabis may soon change as a result of new research that uncovers some surprising facts. Indeed, the topic, which can be emotionally charged, is the focus of intense scientific study. Is cannabis good for you? Is it addictive? What long-term harms can use cause? The answers to these questions are multi-layered and not always clear-cut, which is why cannabis research continues with even more urgency. FACTS ON CANNABIS ADDICTION AND DEPENDENCE Current estimates are that one in 10 cannabis users will develop cannabis addiction or dependence. The potency of the delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol ...
Source: Psych Central - November 9, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Suzanne Kane Tags: Addictions Habits Healthy Living Memory and Perception Miscellaneous Drugs Neuroscience Substance Abuse Source Type: news

What Helps Individuals with Bipolar II Disorder Successfully Manage Their Illness
For the first three decades of Julie Kraft’s life, every day was a struggle. “From the minute I woke up to the moment my head hit the pillow each night, my mind would spin with worries and fears—most of them irrational—about the past, present and the future,” Kraft said. “I was anxious over every aspect of normal daily life—showering, driving, shopping, paying bills, answering the phone, school drop-offs, birthday parties. There was rarely a waking moment when my mind was quiet.” Outside of her home, Kraft did her best to hide these struggles, which only exhausted and frustra...
Source: Psych Central - November 7, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Margarita Tartakovsky, M.S. Tags: Bipolar Disorders General Self-Help Treatment Bipolar II disorder Bipolar II disorder treatment managing bipolar II disorder Source Type: news

Depression Hotline Numbers
Depression isn’t just feeling down or sad for a few days in a row. Major depressive disorder is when a person feels like there is no hope, their mood is filled with sadness and emptiness, and there’s nothing anyone can do to help them. Major depression is a serious mental disorder — one that causes a person distress in every area of their life (school, work, relationships, friends, etc.). You can reach out and call someone today on a depression hotline number. These free national hotlines are available to anyone who calls, at any time during the day (24/7), 365 days a year. You do not have to be suicidal ...
Source: Psych Central - November 6, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: John M. Grohol, Psy.D. Tags: Depression Disorders Self-Help crisis helpline crisis hotline depression helpline depression hotline Depressive Disorder help for depression Major Depressive Disorder Source Type: news

Book Review: Owning Bipolar
The subtitle of Michael Pipich’s new book, Owning Bipolar: How Patients and Families Can Take Control of Bipolar Disorder, should be enough for those with bipolar disorder and their family members to want to pick up this book and embrace it. Bipolar disorder takes away a person’s feeling of self-control and this book gives hope that control can be taken back. People who are bipolar will appreciate that Pipich understands how it feels to the patient. He tries to remove the stigma of having bipolar, explaining that it is NOT the patient’s fault. This alone makes the book worth reading. He then provides a t...
Source: Psych Central - November 5, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Book Reviews Tags: Bipolar Book Reviews Disorders Family General Genetics Medications Motivation and Inspiration Psychiatry Psychological Assessment Psychology Stigma Treatment accepting bipolar disorder bipolar disorder stigma Michael Pipich Source Type: news

The Worst, Most Persistent Myths about OCD
This is what most people think obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) looks like: washing your hands excessively because you’re a germaphobe. Sometimes, people think it’s also needing to have a neat, orderly home, and checking to see if you locked the door way too many times. And while some of this is true for some people with OCD, it misses the majority of individuals with the illness. As psychologist Martin Hsia, Psy.D, said, “OCD takes many different forms that don’t get written about.” The Many, Many Forms of OCD “To paraphrase Tolstoy, in Anna Karenina, famously speaking abou...
Source: Psych Central - November 2, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Margarita Tartakovsky, M.S. Tags: Disorders General Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder Self-Help Stigma Treatment Compulsions Intrusive Thoughts Obsessions Ocd OCD facts OCD myths Unwanted Thoughts what OCD feels like what OCD looks like Source Type: news

Childhood Abuse, Complex Trauma and Epigenetics
Epigenetics refers to the study of a natural phenomenon and to the phenomenon itself. Epigenetics is the study of the mechanisms that turn on and off the expression of our genes without altering the DNA sequence. Epigenetics is also used to refer to the changes in expression of our genes. Factors such as age, nutritional habits, psychological stress, physical activity, working habits and substance abuse can trigger changes in gene expression (Alegría-Torres, 2011). These changes in gene expression, epigenetics, happen all the time in the natural world. For example, two identical twins, born with the exact same DNA s...
Source: Psych Central - October 30, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Fabiana Franco, Ph.D. Tags: Abuse Children and Teens Genetics Neuroscience PTSD Trauma Child Abuse child neglect Childhood Trauma epigenetics gene expression Transgenerational trauma Source Type: news

Depersonalization: A Strange Mental Illness Captured in Films, Music & Celebrity Confessions
For many in the world, depersonalization isn’t really a familiar word. Sometimes, it is used to refer to the act of removing human characteristics or individuality from someone or something. Almost no one you meet on the street would be able to tell you what depersonalization means in the psychiatric sense of the word. Depersonalization (DP) is a dissociative disorder whereby a person experiences a distortion in how they experience their self. A person going through DP may feel disconnected from themselves and often report that they feel like watching a movie of oneself. It’s a bewildering experience that can l...
Source: Psych Central - October 27, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Swamy G Tags: Creativity Dissociative disorders Essays Personal Stories Depersonalization Derealization Dissociation film media Mental Illness Music Source Type: news

Book Review: Little Panic:  Dispatches from an Anxious Life
“Everyone is ahead of me; I’m always trying to catch up, but I never do. I’m always the littlest and the last to understand. I picture their brains with long legs racing down the block, but my brain has little-kid legs, too short to keep up,” writes Amanda Stern. In her vivid memoir, Little Panic: Dispatches from an Anxious Life, Stern offers a poignant account of a life full of anxiety and yet teeming with strength, raw honesty, and the enduring desire to feel safe. Early on, Amanda recognizes that she, unlike other children, does not feel safe. She writes, “One day, I’ll have to live o...
Source: Psych Central - October 25, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Claire Nana Tags: Anxiety Book Reviews Disorders General Memory and Perception Motivation and Inspiration Personal Stories Psychology Relationships & Love A Memoir Honesty Little Panic Source Type: news

Love Bombing as a Narcissistic Attachment Style
Getting hit by a love bomb feels glorious! The lavish attention and affection seems to answer our prayers. We’ve found Mr. or Ms. Right — our soul mate; unsuspecting that we’ve been targeted by a narcissist. The bomber abruptly changes colors and loses interest, and our dream comes crashing down. The rejection is excruciating, especially at the height of romance. It’s a traumatic shock to our heart. We feel duped, betrayed, and abandoned. We’re confused and try to make sense of the nightmare that was once a dream. What we thought was real was in fact a mirage. We search for answers, doubt and ...
Source: Psych Central - October 23, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Darlene Lancer, JD, MFT Tags: Abuse Codependence Narcissism Relationships & Love Attachment Style controlling behavior Emotional Abuse Emotional Intimacy Idealization and Devaluation love bombing Manipulation Narcissistic Personality Disorder narcissistic suppl Source Type: news