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5 Pieces of Damaging Advice for Treating Depression
There’s plenty of advice on treating depression. There are thousands of books, blog posts and magazine articles. Everyone seems to have an opinion. Try this herb or vitamin. Avoid sugar. Be grateful. Be more grateful. You just need some fresh air. Go to therapy. Don’t go to therapy—it’s a waste of time and money. Of course, some advice is sincerely spot-on. Some advice seems helpful, but misses the mark for people struggling with clinical depression. And some of it is just plain bad. Which is why we asked psychologists who specialize in depression to share the damaging advice they’ve come acr...
Source: Psych Central - November 23, 2017 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Margarita Tartakovsky, M.S. Tags: Depression Disorders Family General Psychotherapy Relationships & Love Self-Help behavioral activation therapy Clinical Depression depression advice Depression Treatment giving advice Intensive short-term dynamic psychotherapy lo Source Type: news

Navigating Graduate School with a Mental Illness
Psychologist Deborah Serani, Psy.D, was working with a young man who was struggling with a severe bout of social anxiety and chronic depression during his first trimester of grad school. Interacting with his classmates and giving presentations were excruciating. He considered dropping out. This is understandable. Grad school is hard enough. When you have a mental illness, it can feel impossible. Thankfully, it’s not. Below, three psychologists shared their suggestions for success. Learn about your mental illness. Working with a therapist can help you better understand your condition and yourself. What’s also he...
Source: Psych Central - November 16, 2017 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Margarita Tartakovsky, M.S. Tags: Disorders General Self-Help Stress Students grad students Graduate School Graduate Students Mental Health Mental Illness Self Care self-compassion success Source Type: news

The Controversy in Treating Partners of Sex Addicts
In “From Victimhood to Victorhood” (published in the May/June 2015 issue of The Therapist), Alex Katehakis writes that a “major shift has occurred in treating partners of sex addicts”. The shift she describes is towards the Relational Trauma (RT) Model, in which practitioners emphasize that partners’ relational bonds are damaged by betrayal, as precipitated by the discovery of sexual acting out — not a historical and ongoing pattern of destructive or self-defeating behavior by non-acting out partners, as implied by the so-called co-addict model, previously espoused by writers like Stepha...
Source: Psych Central - November 15, 2017 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Graeme Daniels, MFT Tags: Addictions Psychotherapy PTSD Relationships & Love Sexuality Substance Abuse Trauma Addiction Recovery co-addict model co-addiction Codependency Enabling Hypervigilance Impulsive Behavior Infidelity love addiction lying r Source Type: news

The Worst Advice for Alleviating Anxiety —And What Actually Helps
Anxiety is a common emotion. Everyone experiences it. Which is why everyone assumes they know how to deal with it. Which means that when someone is struggling with anxiety—excessive anxiety or worries that won’t go away—they may get an assortment of advice. But this advice may not be helpful. In fact, it might even amplify their anxiety. We asked clinicians who specialize in anxiety to share the worst kinds of advice for anxiety—which you’ll find below, along with what actually does help. Look on the bright side. When you’re anxious and riddled with worries, well-meaning friends and fami...
Source: Psych Central - November 14, 2017 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Margarita Tartakovsky, M.S. Tags: Anxiety Disorders Family General Relationships & Love Self-Help anxiety advice Anxiety Disorder anxiety issues anxiety struggles anxiety-provoking situations Excessive Anxiety Fears Worries Source Type: news

How EMDR Therapy Heals Trauma and Addiction
Life experiences, either negative or positive, have a significant impact on our thoughts, beliefs, and behaviors. Adverse life experiences such as abuse, neglect, violence, or emotional distress may have serious consequences later in life, such as mental illness or addiction. In treating individuals who suffer from addiction, it is important to address any co-occurring trauma, PTSD, or related symptoms within the setting of a drug and alcohol rehab facility because, in most instances, these traumatic events or experiences play a role in the person’s addictive behaviors. Therefore, the addiction cannot be fully overco...
Source: Psych Central - November 13, 2017 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Kelsey Brown Tags: Abuse Addictions PTSD Substance Abuse Trauma Treatment Addiction Recovery EMDR Eye Movement Desensitization And Reprocessing Source Type: news

Exploring the History & Treatment of PTSD: An Interview with Dr. Paula P. Schnurr
As we celebrate Veterans Day (and Remembrance Day in Canada) and honoring military veterans, many of us think back to World War I but also many other wars throughout history. I recalled the 1980s, when Iran was engaged in an almost decade-long war with Iraq, and millions were killed or injured on both sides. In the West, the older generations may recall World War II and the Vietnam War, while the younger ones remember the more recent wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. We think of the millions who have fought, who have come back with injuries, and those who died serving their countries. But the numbers we rarely think about: How...
Source: Psych Central - November 11, 2017 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Arash Emamzadeh Tags: Interview Medications PTSD Trauma Treatment Combat Trauma Posttraumatic Stress Disorder PSTD Traumatic Experiences veterans Veterans day Source Type: news

The Benefits of Alternative Therapies
This article will take a look at two additional therapy practices that have been widely used by the U.S. and abroad. Specifically designed for trauma, Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) works when a therapist leads a patient through a series of lateral eye movements while the patient focuses on traumatic memories. The goal is to reprocess these memories in an adaptive way — eliminating emotional distress and reducing physiological arousal.  Francine Shapiro, PhD, discovered the effects of EMDR by understanding “dual awareness”. When engaging in bilateral stimulation with memory, th...
Source: Psych Central - November 7, 2017 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Rebecca Lee Tags: Addictions Anxiety Cognitive-Behavioral Depression Eating Disorders Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder Psychology Psychotherapy PTSD Trauma Treatment Cbt Cognitive Behavioral Therapy EMDR Eye Movement Desensitization And Reprocessin Source Type: news

Growing Up with a Psychotic Mother
I was ten when my mother had her first psychotic break. It was May. I was looking forward to lazy summer days at the pool, an art camp, a stack of Babysitters Club books, and daydreaming about my first crush, a boy with a splay of freckles and a mop of dark hair. Instead, I was forced to grow up too soon. This meant wearing deodorant and shaving my arm pits. It also meant seeing my mother in a state of complete psychosis, one in which she thought maybe she had killed the postman or the neighbor girl. “I didn’t. Mean. Tokillthepostman.” Her words were all wrong, strung together in a series of hiccups a...
Source: Psych Central - November 6, 2017 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Leslie A. Lindsay Tags: Bipolar Depression Essays Family General Personal Stories Psychology Bipolar Disorder delusions hallucinations Hospitalization involuntary hospitalization Manic Depression Manic Episode Psychosis psychotic mania Source Type: news

Murmurings of a Mad Man: One Man ’ s Mental Health Journey through Creativity
If one has ever been in a psychiatric hospital they are more than aware of the nemesis demon known as ‘boredom’. If one has never been locked up, I don’t believe that a person can really relate. Despite the various groups, listening to the stereo, talking to fellow patients, meals and the most precious visiting hours, one cannot escape the overwhelming dullness that comes to haunt from time to time. Might I make a suggestion that worked for me? Creativity comes from the Creator; you see the similarity of duplicated letters. I believe that every single human being on planet Earth possesses some form of art...
Source: Psych Central - November 4, 2017 Category: Psychiatry Authors: John Kaniecki Tags: Bipolar Creativity Personal Stories Treatment creative outlet Hospitalization Inpatient Treatment Success Stories writing Source Type: news

Addiction and the “ Why Can ’ t They Stop? ” Enigma
Why can’t they stop? This is perhaps the most elusive question posed when it comes to addiction. The answer is just as elusive — fleeting, incomprehensible, and illusory, like a ghost amidst shadows in the night. When we ask the question, we are baffled as to why those addicted to particular substances or behaviors continue to use or engage — regardless of the negative physical, psychological, and social effects. We cannot seem to intricately understand why some people decide to walk right off the cantilever of life — falling into a seemingly inescapable abyss. The question is definitely not an easy...
Source: Psych Central - November 3, 2017 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Wycliff Matanda, MA Tags: Addictions Alcoholism Binge Eating Eating Disorders Grief and Loss Health Insurance Loneliness Psychology Psychotherapy Substance Abuse Treatment Addiction Recovery Alcohol Abuse Coping Skills Self Medication Source Type: news

7 Ways Family Members Re-victimize Sexual Abuse Survivors
Twenty years ago when I first disclosed to my family that I had been sexually abused by my brother as a child, I never would have guessed it would mark the beginning of a long, confusing struggle that would leave me feeling misunderstood, dismissed and even punished for choosing to address my abuse and its effects. The response from my family did not start out this way. Initially, my mother said the words I needed to hear: she believed me, she was pained for both her children, and she was sorry. My brother acknowledged the truth and even apologized. But as I continued to heal and explore the abuse further, my family membe...
Source: Psych Central - November 2, 2017 Category: Psychiatry Authors: MIranda Pacchiana, MSW Tags: Abuse Dreams Family Personal Stories PTSD Self-Esteem Sleep Trauma Child Sex Abuse Denial invalidation Molestation revictimization Sexual Abuse Trauma History Traumatic Childhood Source Type: news

How to Cope with Emotional Body Issues: Bloat, Belly Fat and More
“You are more than your thoughts, your body, or your feelings. You are a swirling vortex of limitless potential who is here to shake things up and create something new that the universe has never seen.” – Richard Bartlett It’s always tough to look in the mirror and dislike what you see. Whether you’re unhappy with how you look because of unsightly and uncomfortable bloat, belly fat that just won’t go away no matter how much you exercise, flabby arms, cellulite on your legs, a nose that’s too long, wide or misshapen, Rosacea, acne, breasts too small or too large or any other emotion...
Source: Psych Central - November 1, 2017 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Suzanne Kane Tags: Addictions Diet & Nutrition Eating Disorders Healthy Living Self-Esteem belly fat bloat Body Acceptance Body Dissatisfaction Body Dysmorphia dieting Source Type: news

Ketamine Infusions: They Didn ’t Help Me But They Could Help You
Ketamine infusions are one of the latest treatments available for treatment resistant depression. There are many hospitals and research centers offering free or fee for service treatments in order to gather data to support FDA approval as well as insurance approval. My personal experience involves having ketamine infusions at one of the best psychiatric and research-based hospitals in the country. They are collecting every bit of data involving what happens to the patient prior to each treatment, during the infusion as well as post-treatment. I always felt in good hands and felt grateful to be receiving the treatment at a...
Source: Psych Central - October 31, 2017 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Risa Sugarman Tags: Depression Medications Psychiatry Treatment Depressive Episode experimental treatment ketamine Major Depressive Disorder Mood Disorder Treatment Resistant Depression Source Type: news

Is It True: What Doesn ’t Kill You Makes You Stronger?
“That which does not kill us makes us stronger.” – Friedrich Nietzsche In a therapy session, a client made the oft used statement that he had come to believe was true. I questioned his perception as I wondered whether he needed to go through the traumas of his youth to get to the place he was at present. He looked at me, puzzled and said that it had taught him to be more compassionate and empathetic. As much as we might want to use deductive reasoning to understand and, in some cases, validate an outcome, do we, at times, seek out challenges to make what happened to us acceptable? Consider the life of a...
Source: Psych Central - October 28, 2017 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Edie Weinstein, MSW, LSW Tags: Grief and Loss Memory and Perception Personal Stories PTSD Trauma Coping Skills Personal Growth Resilience strength Source Type: news

Halloween and the Anxious Child: 7 Tips to Reduce Stress
Here comes Halloween. Grocery stores, big box stores, even the local hardware store, are festooned with pumpkins, life sized figures of skeletons and witches and graveyards. It’s all in fun, right? Right. But not for the anxious child. An anxious child already seems to have nerve endings too close to the surface. Generally nervous about new experiences and the unfamiliar, Halloween presents an additional challenge. For some anxious children, Halloween is the monster under the bed writ huge! Things that go “bump in the night” are not at all entertaining. What’s a parent to do? If you have a child und...
Source: Psych Central - October 24, 2017 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Marie Hartwell-Walker, Ed.D. Tags: Anxiety Children and Teens Family Parenting anxiety. worry Anxious Children Child safety Halloween Safety Plan Source Type: news

Book Review: The Body Remembers, Volume Two
Years ago, a friend of mine told me about a case that still haunted him. It involved a little girl who had been sexually abused whose parents felt she should tell all on the witness stand so that she could recover. When her testimony began, she started screaming and could not stop. Often people come to therapy thinking they must relive the trauma in order to come to grips with it, and want to begin telling the story in detail almost as soon as they sit down. As Babette Rothschild points out in The Body Remembers, Volume Two, when clients do that, they can become overwhelmed and re-traumatized and u...
Source: Psych Central - October 24, 2017 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Stan Rockwell, PsyD Tags: Abuse Book Reviews Domestic Violence Psychotherapy PTSD Trauma Treatment Source Type: news

Book Review: Heal Your Mind, Heal Your Life
Occasional negative thoughts are a common feature of the human experience. While they can sometimes be justified, purposeful, and helpful in identifying pain and avoiding dangerous situations, they can also be irrational, keeping us trapped in a downward spiral of fear, avoidance, and eventually depression and anxiety. To change how we feel, says Corinne Coe in her new book, Heal Your Mind, Heal Your Life, we have to start with how we think. “Based on my clinical experience in treating people with mental illness, the key to overcoming psychological conditions such as depression and anxiety is to treat at the cog...
Source: Psych Central - October 11, 2017 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Claire Nana Tags: Anxiety Book Reviews Depression General Happiness Healthy Living Memory and Perception Mindfulness Self-Help Source Type: news

I ’ ve Been Seeing a Therapist for Years, So Why Am I Not Getting Better?
The answer: We need to address what’s happening inside the office as well as stigma. During the creation of the documentary Going Sane I interviewed Cindy Bulik. She is perhaps the most important researcher on anorexia today. She lives between UNC where she is a distinguished Professor of Eating Disorders and Sweden where she is a professor at the Karolinska Institute. Her current research is exploring genetic influences on anorexia and by the end of our interview she asked if my entire family would be willing to give a sample of blood for the study. She is not the single-minded professor oblivious to social customs...
Source: Psych Central - October 10, 2017 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Josh Sabey Tags: Disabilities Disorders Editorials Essays Medications Motivation and Inspiration Policy and Advocacy Psychology Psychotherapy Suicide Treatment Child Development child therapy Clinical Outcome evidence-based practices evidence Source Type: news

ADHD and Adults: Innovative Tools to Help You Get Things Done and Thrive
Today, we tend to think of technology as the enemy. After all, it steals our attention and makes it harder to focus. And when you have ADHD, it’s hard enough to sustain your concentration. It’s hard enough not to get distracted every few minutes. But adults with ADHD can actually use technology to their advantage. The key is to find what works for you. Sometimes, adults with ADHD don’t employ strategies that work for them individually because they force themselves to do things the way people without ADHD do. Many compare themselves to others and feel shame for needing different tools. Many also assume tha...
Source: Psych Central - October 9, 2017 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Margarita Tartakovsky, M.S. Tags: Attention Deficit Disorder Creativity Disorders Motivation and Inspiration Self-Help Stress Technology Work Issues Adhd ADHD and technology ADHD shortcuts ADHD strategies ADHD tips ADHD tools Efficiency getting things done Source Type: news

ADHD and Adults: Systems, Strategies and Shortcuts that Foster Success
For individuals with ADHD, the foundation for success is accepting your ADHD. This includes accepting that your brain is wired differently—not defectively, said Roberto Olivardia, Ph.D, a clinical instructor of psychology at Harvard Medical School and clinical psychologist who specializes in ADHD. “The truth is, adults with ADHD are creative, driven, intuitive, resourceful and are capable of great success,” said Natalia van Rikxoort, MSW, a social worker, therapeutic arts facilitator and life coach who specializes in ADHD and helps her clients use their strengths to overcome challenges and discover t...
Source: Psych Central - October 7, 2017 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Margarita Tartakovsky, M.S. Tags: Attention Deficit Disorder Creativity Disorders General Happiness Motivation and Inspiration Self-Help Work Issues Adhd Adults With Adhd Boredom getting things done organization Productivity success Success Strategies Source Type: news

Book Review: Blinded by Hope
The words, “You’ve suffered no hardship,” ring in Meg McGuire’s ears as she watches her forty-three year old son receive a sentence to four years in prison. It is then that she realizes there are some things a mother’s love simply cannot overcome, and mental illness is one of them. In her riveting memoir, Blinded by Hope: My Journey Through My Son’s Bipolar Illness and Addiction, McGuire tells the story of her son Ryan who battles bipolar, addiction and incarceration. Yet on a much larger level, McGuire exposes the messy and often heartbreaking reality of mental illness. In the...
Source: Psych Central - October 1, 2017 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Claire Nana Tags: Addictions Bipolar Book Reviews Dual Diagnosis Family Parenting Personal Stories Substance Abuse Bipolar Disorder Depression skateboarding Source Type: news

Book Review: Hunger
Roxane Gay is the brilliant author of the New York Times bestseller, Bad Feminist. She holds a prestigious position as a contributing opinion writer for the New York Times. She’s a novelist, a short-story writer, a professor, and a voice that untold numbers of devoted fans clamor to hear. She comes from a close, loving family of thin, stylish, and accomplished Haitian immigrants. She is also “super morbidly obese,” an actual official category that includes people who are three or four hundred pounds overweight. Her new book Hunger is her riveting memoir of life as a fat person. “No matter what ...
Source: Psych Central - September 30, 2017 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Bella DePaulo Tags: Abuse Book Reviews Eating Disorders LGBTQ PTSD Trauma being fat fat memoir Source Type: news

Book Review: This Close to Happy
In the category of memoirs about depression, there are some distinguished contributions. They include, for example, Kay Redfield Jamison’s An Unquiet Mind, William Styron’s Darkness Visible, and Susanna Kaysen’s Girl, Interrupted. Daphne Merkin knows these books well, but as someone who has dealt with serious depression her entire life, she finds them lacking. “It seems to me that these characterizations tend to bracket the episodes of breakdown or incapacitating depression within unimpeachable demonstrations of the writer’s otherwise hyperfunctioning existence,” writes Merkin. With This...
Source: Psych Central - September 30, 2017 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Bella DePaulo Tags: Antidepressants Book Reviews Depression Finding Happiness this close to happy Source Type: news

At Your Service: Another Way of Quieting Anxiety
The Bully Within and Without A young man described his anxiety as being like a gang of bullies surrounding and taunting him with invectives such as, “You’re going to fail anyway, so why bother trying?” “Nothing is ever going to work for you.” “What if everything falls apart?” These inner demons echoed some of what he came to believe when he was in middle school — a period which seems to be the bane of the existence for many teens. It tends to be a point in their development when they cross an invisible line into their own personal hell. In his case there were actua...
Source: Psych Central - September 28, 2017 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Edie Weinstein, MSW, LSW Tags: Anxiety General Happiness Psychotherapy Relaxation and Meditation Self-Esteem Self-Help Source Type: news

How I Eliminated Chronic Stress from My Life
“The greatest weapon against stress is our ability to choose one thought over another.” – William James I wasn’t always filled with chronic stress, although some might say (as my psychotherapist informed me) that my childhood was particularly stressful, if not quite approaching toxic stress. What I’ve learned in the years since undergoing therapy is that my mother likely suffered from depression as she carried me in her womb, thus, potentially setting the stage for what later became my own depression, heightened fear and anxiety, hypersensitivity and feelings of inadequacy, hopelessness, even ...
Source: Psych Central - September 27, 2017 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Suzanne Kane Tags: Anxiety General Grief and Loss Happiness Mindfulness Personal Stories Relaxation and Meditation Self-Help Stress Trauma Treatment Bad Habits Bereavement Chronic Stress Fear Feelings Of Guilt forming new habits grieving Source Type: news

Coping with the Emotional Impact of Orthopedic Surgery
Snap, snap, crackle, pop. That was the sound of my life changing in an instant during a summer stroll. I fell on slightly uneven pavement and broke three bones in my ankle and severely dislocated it, leading to a surgery and months of recovery. An orthopedic injury is typically a traumatic event. The recovery can elicit many emotions. As a psychotherapist, I was surprised not much has been written on coping with the psychological impact of such an injury and the following recovery. By allowing emotions to arise without judgment, we allow them to move through us. We can also take committed action to make positive changes as...
Source: Psych Central - September 18, 2017 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Kirsten Levin Belzer, LCSW, CHT Tags: Anxiety Chronic Pain Grief and Loss Personal Stories Relaxation and Meditation Self-Esteem Trauma Treatment Blame Coping Skills Disappointment Healing Health injury Surgery surgical recovery Vulnerability Source Type: news

Self-Stigma and Mental Health
I’ve been asked twice to talk about my personal experience dealing with depression, anxiety and the use of genetic testing for mental health treatment. I became aware of this new test during a medication management appointment. My practitioner, a psychiatric advanced practice nurse, is an expert with psychopharmacology, and very knowledgeable about the latest treatments for depression. After trial and error with many medications, we discussed pinpointing the best antidepressant for me, through genetic testing. My interviews were featured on “Innovations”, a TV series on the Discovery Channel (watch here),...
Source: Psych Central - September 16, 2017 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Vince G. Sparks Tags: Anxiety Depression Genetics Medications Motivation and Inspiration Personal Stories Self-Esteem Treatment Inheritance Mental Health self-compassion Stereotype Stigma Stigmatization Source Type: news

The Unique Features of Complex PTSD
“If we could somehow end child abuse and neglect, the eight hundred pages of DSM (and the need for the easier explanations such as DSM-IV Made Easy: The Clinician’s Guide to Diagnosis) would be shrunk to a pamphlet in two generations.” – John Briere The term Complex Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (C-PTSD) was first used in 1992. It originates in the observation that many of the symptoms exhibited by sufferers of PTSD are also found in those who experienced prolonged periods of abuse or neglect as children, including flashbacks, nightmares, insomnia and feelings of fear, often unrelated to any presen...
Source: Psych Central - September 15, 2017 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Fabiana Franco, Ph.D. Tags: PTSD Trauma Treatment C-PTSD Child Abuse childhood neglect complex posttraumatic stress disorder complex trauma Traumatic Experience Source Type: news

The First Time You Go to the ER with Suicidal Thoughts
You are 19 years old, on your computer at home, and you have been depressed for weeks, maybe even months. It has gotten really bad lately, and you are talking to your best friend online. You have been really laying it all down about how depressed you have been and how all you want to do is sleep, you wish you could stop existing, and you wish everything could just end. Suddenly, you hear a knock on the door of your apartment and it startles you. You have been isolating yourself for days, so this is a surprise. When you look out of the peep-hole, you are bewildered to see a male police officer standing outside the door. Sha...
Source: Psych Central - September 14, 2017 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Caitlin Gearsbeck Tags: Children and Teens Depression Personal Stories Suicide Antidepressant Hospitalization Mood Disorder Psychiatric Emergency Room suicidal gestures Suicidal Thoughts Source Type: news

How to Support a Family Member Struggling with Anxiety
Anxiety is a novel concept in society. Millions of people all over the world struggle with symptoms related to anxiety every day. This common ailment is characterized by uneasiness, uncertainty, obsessive thinking, palpitations, and panic. I can be abrupt and overwhelming, resulting in a feeling of lacking control. However you can support a family member struggling with anxiety. In my entire career as a counselor, I have come across different individuals from diverse backgrounds who tried all means of medication, therapy, meditation, acupuncture, etc. Different treatment options work differently fo...
Source: Psych Central - September 12, 2017 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Manpreet Lehal, LPCS Tags: Anxiety Family Psychology Psychotherapy Self-Help Trauma anxious thoughts Entering Therapy family support Stress worry Source Type: news

When Ruminating Becomes a Problem
Everyone ruminates. We especially ruminate when we’re stressed out. Maybe you’re ruminating about an upcoming test—you have to score an A to keep your scholarship. Maybe you’re ruminating about an upcoming presentation because you want to impress your boss. Maybe you’re ruminating about an upcoming date and the many ways it could go. Maybe you’re ruminating about a bad performance review. Maybe you’re ruminating about an injury that’s really been bothering you. “We are evolutionarily wired to obsess,” according to psychiatrist Britton Arey, M.D. We are wired to se...
Source: Psych Central - September 9, 2017 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Margarita Tartakovsky, M.S. Tags: Anorexia Anxiety Binge Eating Bulimia Depression Disorders Eating Disorders General Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder Panic Disorder Psychology Stress Treatment Anxiety Disorders Distressing Thoughts Mindfulness Negative Thinki Source Type: news

The Flawed Mental Healthcare Industry
I’ve spent the bulk of my life living with depression and anxiety. This means that I’ve spent most of my life in and out of doctor’s offices, with different counselor’s, telling my history to different professionals, and seeking out different treatment methods for myself. Sometimes, and unfortunately quite often, things can go awry when you are trying to get quality treatment for yourself. I started my journey with depression and anxiety treatment when I was just 14 years old. My first experience with medication was when a primary care physician prescribed an antidepressant to me. It wasn’t th...
Source: Psych Central - September 8, 2017 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Caitlin Gearsbeck Tags: Depression Personal Stories Psychiatry Psychology Psychotherapy Stress Treatment Mental Illness Stigma new therapist peer to peer support Stigmatization therapeutic alliance Therapeutic Relationship therapeutic rupture Source Type: news

If You Or Someone You Love Is Hiding Depression — Almost Perfectly
This article quotes from Winnicott’s work on the ego: “The False Self is represented by the whole organization of the polite and mannered social attitude…“. He wrote that the false self was created as a defense against a not “good enough” mother.  Helene Deutsch wrote about a similar syndrome, the “as if” personality. Dr. Terrance Real wrote about covert depression in men in 1998, in his well-accepted book, “I Don’t Want To Talk About It.” He states, “Women rate high in internalizing, men in externalizing. Internalizing h...
Source: Psych Central - September 7, 2017 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Dr. Margaret Rutherford Tags: Depression Relationships & Love Dating deception Depressive Episode hidden depression Major Depressive Disorder Marriage Mood Disorder secrete Suicide Source Type: news

Using the Five Senses for Anxiety Relief
Anxiety is a disease that bites many. Anxiety doesn’t discriminate against age, sex, religion, race, or any other related demographics. It affects people differently and manifests in different ways. It can affect our thoughts, emotions, and even physical health if we let it get out of control. Everyone might deal with fright or worry from time to time, but take it up another notch and anxiety will override any of those milder forms. Anxiety is nothing to be afraid of because it can be mastered with the right tools. The following is a list of tricks on how to use your five senses to calm and overcome your anxiety. Pe...
Source: Psych Central - September 6, 2017 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Amy Hunt Tags: Anxiety General Happiness Health Insurance Herbs & Supplements Self-Esteem anxious thoughts calming Relaxation Sensory Perception worry Source Type: news

How to Use Media to Start a Parent-Teen Conversation About Mental Health
Using TV Shows and Social Media to Initiate Conversations About Mental Health Mental health is a tough topic to tackle with teenagers, especially when they are often defensive, distant, or just not interested. Starting an open, ongoing dialogue with your teen about mental health issues just may be their saving grace. Watching television shows and checking out social media content together are great segues into conversations with your teen about depression, anxiety, self-harm, and other mental health conditions. TV Shows Hanging out with your teen and watching TV is a great way to initiate a conversation about mental health...
Source: Psych Central - September 5, 2017 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Desiree Patton Tags: Children and Teens Depression Motivation and Inspiration Parenting Psychology Self-Help Students Suicide Adolescence Coping Skills Failure Movies Netflix Rejection Self Harm Self Injury Sex social media Teen Angst Tee Source Type: news

Book Review: Addiction Treatment
Spanning across all socioeconomic statuses, races, cultures and ages, addiction is one of the largest and most insidious problems our society faces today. And yet, for the medical doctors who are often tasked with treating addiction, identifying and treating it is not always a straight forward process. In his new book, Addiction Treatment, Dr. Michael Weaver, a specialist in substance abuse disorders, provides a comprehensive review of addiction, dual diagnosis, pharmaceutical treatment and clinical advice about how to work with an addict. “People are embarrassed to admit to using drugs partly because they worry...
Source: Psych Central - August 31, 2017 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Claire Nana Tags: Addictions Alcoholism Book Reviews Medications Psychiatry Substance Abuse Treatment Source Type: news

Surprising Insights About Anxiety
Everyone struggles with anxiety from time to time. Some of us have a closer relationship with it than others. But even though anxiety is universal, there are still plenty of misconceptions about how it functions and what helps to treat it. Below anxiety experts reveal the truths about anxiety—many insights which might surprise you. The skills we use for everything else in life are utterly ineffective for anxiety. According to Debra Kissen, PhD., M.H.S.A, a psychologist and clinical director of Light On Anxiety Treatment Center in Chicago, Ill., let’s say you have a flat tire. Naturally, you would do whatever yo...
Source: Psych Central - August 31, 2017 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Margarita Tartakovsky, M.S. Tags: Anxiety Cognitive-Behavioral Disorders General Healthy Living Psychotherapy Self-Help Stress Treatment Anxiety Disorders anxiety facts anxiety myths anxiety treatment Cbt Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Exposure Therapy face y Source Type: news

Book Review: Welcome to the Jungle
Imagine that you just found out you had bipolar disorder. How might you feel? An unexpected diagnosis often throws us for a loop. As we incorporate this new information about ourselves, we might experience fear, confusion and even denial about what our diagnosis means for our lives. But perhaps most of all, we may find ourselves asking the question: now what? Luckily, for those diagnosed with bipolar disorder, that is the question Hilary Smith sets out to answer in her newest edition of Welcome to the Jungle with a new subtitle, Facing Bipolar Without Freaking Out. In 2010, Smith’s blunt, insightful an...
Source: Psych Central - August 30, 2017 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Julia Patt Tags: Bipolar Book Reviews Disorders Mindfulness Self-Help Source Type: news

A Few Metaphors to Better Understand Depression
Depression is a difficult illness to understand. It’s hard to understand for the people suffering from it, but it’s downright impossible to know everything that a person who deals with depression on a daily basis goes through if you have never experienced it personally. For this reason, I have come up with a few real-life examples to help those who may not fully understand what depression is or how it functions. Of course, this will be the simplistic version. Depression is an extremely complex disease. As a person with depression myself, I have learned that it is very difficult to understand even for those who ...
Source: Psych Central - August 30, 2017 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Caitlin Gearsbeck Tags: Antidepressants Depression General Happiness Personal Stories Self-Esteem Bipolar Disorder Depressed Mood Depressive Episode Mental Illness Stigma Mood Disorder Source Type: news

Dealing with Borderline Personality Disorder
Those with borderline personality disorder (BPD) suffer from a pervasive fear of abandonment and are often triggered into feeling put down or mistreated. They defend against feelings of abandonment, with rage and anger, and become misunderstood when they’re longing for love. In the heat of the moment, they can send the angry text. They can look like a toddler that gets angry, when they protest as a bid for love. It is important to look at what is behind the actual behavior of a borderline person, rather than react. Most of their behavior is a way to communicate how they feel, but it comes out the wrong way. The indiv...
Source: Psych Central - August 26, 2017 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Nancy Carbone Tags: Borderline Personality Psychology Relationships & Love Treatment Abandonment Borderline Personality Disorder bpd Coping Skills Unstable Relationships Source Type: news

How Can a Shy Adult Get Dates Without Using Online Dating?
Many shy adults feel like there aren’t any options when to meet someone special without using online dating sites. After all, it’s hard to introduce yourself to a stranger when your palms start sweating and your chest tightens up. When the symptoms of shyness or social anxiety kick in, the only thing we want to do is disappear. Q: What did the shy pebble say? A: I wish I was a little boulder It doesn’t have to be that way though. Even though you may not be an instant Romeo, building your confidence with small steps will improve your love life. Here are some ways to train yourself that I’ve found he...
Source: Psych Central - August 24, 2017 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Eddy Baller Tags: Anxiety Depression Happiness Loneliness Online Dating Personal Stories Relationships & Love dates Heartache Introversion meeting new people Shyness Social Anxiety social media Source Type: news

Back to School Blues: 9 Ways to Help Your Tween Go Back to School with Ease
It’s almost that time again…the transition to a new school year. This can be a time of joy and excitement for some and it can also be a time of dread, panic and worry for many parents and students alike. Tweens are especially vulnerable given this stage of development. They are typically moving up to middle school/junior high and facing new social and academic challenges. If you’re hoping to help ease your tween back into the idea of going to school and also help him or her find more enjoyment out of the entire experience, than you will find that there are specific things parents can do. Here are some gr...
Source: Psych Central - August 22, 2017 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Julie K. Jones, Ph.D., LPC Tags: Anxiety Caregivers Children and Teens Parenting School Issues Self-Help Sleep Students back to school bullying Child Development Life Changes Peer pressure school anxiety School Bully Source Type: news

How to Start Making Plans When You ’re Recovering from Depression
“You can never plan the future by the past.” – Edmund Burke I know a little bit about being depressed, having worked hard together with my psychotherapist to overcome the debilitating and frightening mental health condition of depression when I was a young woman. Not only did I have a history of persistent sadness, having failed to effectively deal with the loss of my father when I was 13, I also accumulated losses and failures for the following 15 years to the point where I continually felt bad about myself. I found it hard to plan anything, other than surrendering to spontaneous pursuits, often accompan...
Source: Psych Central - August 19, 2017 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Suzanne Kane Tags: Bipolar Depression General Grief and Loss Self-Help Coping Skills Depression Recovery Depressive Episode Hobbies Positive Attitude Socializing Source Type: news

Portrayals of Eating Disorders in the Media: To the Bone
I’d like to talk to you about To the Bone, a movie which was released on Netflix this July. To the Bone deals with eating disorders (“EDs”) and has caused quite a stir across social media ever since its trailer was released. Though I won’t go into much detail in this article, note that there will be a few spoilers ahead. You should also note that To the Bone contains potential triggers — as do the heated responses to it on the social media. So check in with yourself regularly, as I ended up needing to do, if you decide to watch the film and participate in those debates afterwards. To the Bone ...
Source: Psych Central - August 18, 2017 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Arash Emamzadeh Tags: Addictions Anorexia Binge Eating Bulimia Children and Teens Eating Disorders Healthy Living Treatment Food Addiction Inaccurate Portrayals media Movies Netlfix Personal Growth recovery To the Bone Source Type: news

What to Do about New School Year Anxieties
Here it comes! School is reopening in a week or two. Are you and your children ready? Transitions are hard for most people but particularly for young people. It’s normal for children and teens to be a bit anxious about starting a new school year. It’s usual for kids to be full of questions. It’s also normal for parents to be anxious about their children’s anxiety. You may have anxieties based on your childhood experiences in school or worries about what’s ahead for your child. You can do much to soothe everyone’s anxieties with some thoughtful preparation. Master your own anxieties: Sepa...
Source: Psych Central - August 17, 2017 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Marie Hartwell-Walker, Ed.D. Tags: Anxiety Children and Teens Family General Motivation and Inspiration Parenting School Issues Sleep Stress Students back to school bullying Child Development Childhood Anxiety Peer pressure school anxiety Teaching Source Type: news

Plan for a Healthy Retirement
My husband and I are smack in the middle of the baby boomer generation, which means we are now watching many of our peers navigate the next, often long-awaited phase in their lives – retirement. What first comes to mind when most of us hear the word retirement? For me, it has always been “not working anymore,” and “having enough money to live on.” Indeed, when most people refer to planning their retirement, they are talking about getting their funds in order — figuring how much money they will need in the years to come — and if it is in fact feasible for them to stop working when t...
Source: Psych Central - August 16, 2017 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Janet Singer Tags: Aging Creativity Depression Diet & Nutrition Happiness Healthy Living Loneliness Personal Stories Seniors Exercise retiree Retirement savings Source Type: news

Understanding the Connection Between Going Back to School and Adolescent Anxiety
As summer winds down and returning to school becomes an unavoidable reality, many teenagers are experiencing a rush of varied emotions. Some teens enjoy school and are eager to trade their dull summer jobs for daily intellectual enrichment. Others find school intolerable and wish that the steamy summer months would carry on forever. A third set sees the first day of school as a landmark of dread and anxiety and spend most of August worrying about whether they’ll get along with their new teachers, whether they’ll be able to keep their grades up, and whether they’ll be able to continue navigating the at tim...
Source: Psych Central - August 15, 2017 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Mehri Moore, M.D. Tags: Anxiety Children and Teens General Motivation and Inspiration Parenting Psychology School Issues Self-Help Stress Students Adolescence back to school bullying Communication making friends Peer pressure school anxiety scho Source Type: news

Healing through the Lens: Using Photography to Shift Perspective and Increase Self Awareness
It is nearly a decade ago that I first picked up a camera, that I saw for the first time my world view through a fresh perspective. I noticed the environment that surrounded me in ways that previously had gone unnoticed. The more I explored photography the deeper my connection to nature and the outside world. Previously I had become disconnected, had lost motivation, and didn’t have a strong sense of direction. Having emigrated from England to Australia as mother of two children, I had lost my sense of self, my identity, began to suffer from anxiety and depression as I sought to find my purpose once my children star...
Source: Psych Central - August 9, 2017 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Marianne Ellis Tags: Anxiety Creativity Depression Divorce Mindfulness Parenting Personal Stories Personality Self-Help Stress Technology Coping Skills Creative Expression Emotional Expression loss Perspective Taking photography Positive Atti Source Type: news

Can Art Therapy Help Heal the Pain of PTSD?
Art therapy has experienced tremendous growth over the past two decades, not only advancing treatment options but also advancing into different populations and treatment settings. In particular, art therapists have been working with a very special and unique population — the military. For over 15 years, post-9/11 military service members and veterans have been coming home after serving sometimes multiple tours to Iraq and Afghanistan. Many have sustained physical and psychological combat injuries and require extensive care. While medical advancements have made it possible to survive catastrophic injuries, the realit...
Source: Psych Central - August 7, 2017 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tricia Winklosky, MS-ATR Tags: Creativity Psychology Psychotherapy PTSD Stress Trauma art Art Therapy drama Music Neuroplasticity Poetry Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Traumatic Brain Injury veterans War Veteran Source Type: news

5 Common Myths about Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy
Whether you’ve been to therapy or not, you’ve probably heard about cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT). It’s a popular type of therapy that many, many therapists use to help their clients treat everything from severe anxiety to debilitating depression. But even though CBT is widespread, it’s still highly misunderstood—even by the professionals who practice it. Numerous myths still abound. Below, two psychologists who specialize in CBT share the facts behind the most common misconceptions. Myth: CBT is a rigid, one-size-fits-all approach where a clinician applies a specific technique to a specif...
Source: Psych Central - August 6, 2017 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Margarita Tartakovsky, M.S. Tags: Cognitive-Behavioral Disorders General Psychology Psychotherapy Treatment Anxiety Anxiety Disorders Cbt CBT myths CBT psychologist Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Depression distorted thoughts Mood Disorders Negative Thoughts Source Type: news