Minimally invasive repair of a pseudomeningocele caused by a sheared intrathecal catheter following implantation of a drug delivery system.

Conclusion: Minimally invasive approach to the spine is demonstrated as a safe and effective alternative in this case of retained catheter induced cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak. PMID: 29285413 [PubMed]
Source: Surgical Neurology International - Category: Neurosurgery Tags: Surg Neurol Int Source Type: research

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Pocket-size ultrasound devices that cost 50 times less than the machines in hospitals (and connect to your phone). Virtual reality that speeds healing in rehab. Artificial intelligence that’s better than medical experts at spotting lung tumors. These are just some of the innovations now transforming medicine at a remarkable pace. No one can predict the future, but it can at least be glimpsed in the dozen inventions and concepts below. Like the people behind them, they stand at the vanguard of health care. Neither exhaustive nor exclusive, the list is, rather, representative of the recasting of public health and medic...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized HealthSummit19 technology Source Type: news
In conclusion, in the absence of obesity, visceral adipose tissue possesses a pronounced anti-inflammatory phenotype during aging which is further enhanced by exercise. Methods of Inducing Cellular Damage are Rarely Relevant to Aging, and the Details Matter https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2019/08/methods-of-inducing-cellular-damage-are-rarely-relevant-to-aging-and-the-details-matter/ One of the major challenges in aging research is determining whether or not models of cellular or organismal damage and its consequences are in any way relevant to the natural processes of aging. One can hit a brick with...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
We examined 9293 individuals from the Copenhagen General Population Study using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy measurements of total cholesterol, free- and esterified cholesterol, triglycerides, phospholipids, and particle concentration. Fourteen subclasses of decreasing size and their lipid constituents were analysed: six subclasses were very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL), one intermediate-density lipoprotein (IDL), three low-density lipoprotein (LDL), and four subclasses were high-density lipoprotein (HDL). Remnant lipoproteins were VLDL and IDL combined. Mean nonfasting cholesterol concentration was 72...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
It’s only been seven years since scientists first learned how to precisely and reliably splice the human genome using a tool called CRISPR, making it possible to think about snipping out disease-causing mutations and actually cure, once and for all, genetic diseases ranging from sickle cell anemia to certain types of cancer and even blindness. Doctors are plunging ahead in search of ways to use the relatively new technology to start treating patients. In China last November, scientist Jiankui He stunned—and dismayed—the genetic community when he announced he had already used CRISPR, which many believe sti...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized crispr Genetics Source Type: news
In conclusion, with study of the frailty syndrome still in its infancy, frailty analysis remains a major challenge. It is a challenge that needs to be overcome in order to shed light on the multiple mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of this syndrome. Although several mechanisms contribute to frailty, immune system alteration seems to play a central role: this syndrome is characterized by increased levels of pro-inflammatory markers and the resulting pro-inflammatory status can have negative effects on various organs. Future studies should aim to better clarify the immune system alteration in frailty, and seek to esta...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
This study elucidates the potential to use mitochondria from different donors (PAMM) to treat UVR stress and possibly other types of damage or metabolic malfunctions in cells, resulting in not only in-vitro but also ex-vivo applications. Gene Therapy in Mice Alters the Balance of Macrophage Phenotypes to Slow Atherosclerosis Progression https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2019/07/gene-therapy-in-mice-alters-the-balance-of-macrophage-phenotypes-to-slow-atherosclerosis-progression/ Atherosclerosis causes a sizable fraction of all deaths in our species. It is the generation of fatty deposits in blood vessel...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
In this study, we identify a link between members of the genus Veillonella and exercise performance. We observed an increase in Veillonella relative abundance in marathon runners postmarathon and isolated a strain of Veillonella atypica from stool samples. Inoculation of this strain into mice significantly increased exhaustive treadmill run time. Veillonella utilize lactate as their sole carbon source, which prompted us to perform a shotgun metagenomic analysis in a cohort of elite athletes, finding that every gene in a major pathway metabolizing lactate to propionate is at higher relative abundance postexercise. Us...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
In the minutes after block 4 of the nuclear power plant in Chernobyl exploded, no one knew that they are experiencing a disaster that never happened anywhere before on planet Earth. The public health, environmental, and even the socio-political consequences were disastrous and we can still experience the negative impacts. That’s why we posed the question of what public health authorities, as well as individuals, can do to mitigate the consequences of radiation exposure, and what digital technologies are available for radiation detection. In this respect, after our investigations, it even turned out that it would be b...
Source: The Medical Futurist - Category: Information Technology Authors: Tags: Future of Medicine Space Medicine astronautics chernobyl disaster fiction Health Healthcare Innovation mars nuclear power plant public health radiation radiation exposure radiation protection technology Source Type: blogs
A Midwestern grocery chain, Hy-Vee, is taking an unusual—and highly controversial—approach to reducing health care costs. Before employees in certain cities can undergo knee replacement, they first must visit a stem cell provider. Hy-Vee has contracted with one of the U.S.’ leading stem cell companies—Regenexx, based in Des Moines, Iowa—that claims injections of concentrated bone marrow or platelets can help patients avoid expensive joint surgery. Regenexx has persuaded over 100 employers to include its services in their health insurance plans. In a marketing booklet, Regenexx, whose injection...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Healthcare medicine Source Type: news
​BY JENNIFER TUONG; IVAN KHARCHENKO; JEAN LUC AGARD; &AHMED RAZIUDDIN, MDA 65-year-old man who had HIV well-controlled with highly active antiretroviral therapy, hypertension, sciatica, and restless leg syndrome presented to the emergency department with left leg pain. He also had had chemotherapy and radiation for anal cancer. The patient said the pain had started 45 minutes earlier when he was sitting on the toilet.He described the pain as sore in quality and 10/10 on the pain scale. He reported that it had started in his lower back and radiated to his left leg. He said he had had no trauma or weakness to the regio...
Source: The Case Files - Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: research
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