Log in to search using one of your social media accounts:

 

FDA Approves Monthly Injection for Opioid Addiction Treatment

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. health officials on Thursday approved the first injectable form of the leading medication to treat patients recovering from addiction to heroin, prescription painkillers and other opioids. The Food and Drug Administration approved once-a-month Sublocade for adults with opioid use disorder who are already stabilized on addiction medication. The monthly injection has the potential to reduce dangerous relapses that occur when patients stop taking the currently available daily medication. But that benefit has not yet been shown in studies and the new drug comes with a hefty price: $1,580 per monthly dose. The older version of the drug, Suboxone, costs $100 a month The approval comes amid the deadliest drug epidemic in U.S. history and a longstanding gap in medication-based treatment for patients recovering from addiction to opioids, including painkillers like OxyContin and illegal narcotics like heroin and fentanyl. More than 64,000 Americans died from drug overdoses last year, most involving opioids. Drugmaker Indivior already sells the injection's key ingredient, buprenorphine, in medicated strips that dissolve under the tongue. Patients take the daily medication to control withdrawal symptoms like nausea, muscle aches and pain. When dosed appropriately the drug also reduces the euphoric effects of other opioids, discouraging abuse. The new injection has potential to reduce abuse and diversion of buprenorphine, which is itself an opioid sometimes so...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Tags: Patient Care News Source Type: news

Related Links:

On December 5, 2017, the Senate Appropriations Subcommittee on Labor, Health and Human Services, Education, and Related Agencies held a hearing to discuss the opioid epidemic and the possible role that Congress could play in the prevention, treatment, and recovery. Senator Roy Blunt, the Subcommittee Chairman, opened the hearing by discussing the fact that overdose related deaths outnumber the deaths at the peak of the AIDS/HIV epidemic. Overdose deaths have also overtaken automobile accident fatalities to become the number one cause of accidental death in the United States. Senator Blunt also spoke about the three propos...
Source: Policy and Medicine - Category: American Health Authors: Source Type: blogs
See something of interest? Please share our postings with colleagues in your institutions! Spotlight The National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NNLM) is pleased to announce a partnership with the NIH All of Us Research Program (All of Us), part of the Precision Medicine Initiative. Through this collaboration, NNLM’s Regional Medical Libraries and National Offices will focus on improving consumer access to high quality health information in communities throughout the U.S., specifically, by working with public libraries. Check out the Fall 2017 issue of the MAReport! This quarter, Lydia Collins discusses “Rai...
Source: NN/LM Middle Atlantic Region Blog - Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Tags: Weekly Postings Source Type: news
DISCUSSION: Positive findings from the proposed work would lead to improved, standardized opioid risk screening practices among victims of traumatic injury. The ultimate goal of this and future work is to reduce the likelihood of opioid misuse, addiction, and related complications, such as overdose and death. Trial registration Clinicaltrials.gov registration number: NCT02861976. Date of registration: Feb 9, 2016. PMID: 29198186 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Addiction Science and Clinical Practice - Category: Addiction Authors: Tags: Addict Sci Clin Pract Source Type: research
More than 90 Americans die every day after  overdosing on opioids. The misuse of and addiction to opioids—including prescription pain relievers, heroin, and fentanyl—is a public health epidemic in the U.S. Combatting the opioid crisis requires sustained efforts from researchers, health professionals, and community members to impleme nt evidence-based prevention and treatment strategies and to evaluate the effectiveness of new approaches.
Source: NCCAM Featured Content - Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Source Type: news
I have blogged about the opioid crisis which is enveloping the entire country (see: Pharmaceutical Companies and PBMs Helped to Create Our Opioid Crisis). The Sackler family, owners ofPurdue Pharma, have been much in the news with assertions by some media that the company, when marketingOxyContin, conspired to downplay its addictive qualities (see: THE SECRETIVE FAMILY MAKING BILLIONS FROM THE OPIOID CRISIS; The Family That Built an Empire of Pain). It should therefore not come as a surprise that some governmental bodies such as Detroit/Wayne County are suing drug manufacturers for having caused the cha...
Source: Lab Soft News - Category: Laboratory Medicine Authors: Tags: Medical Consumerism Medical Ethics Medicolegal Issues Source Type: blogs
CHICAGO (AP) — The first U.S. study to compare two treatments for opioid addiction finds a monthly shot works as well as a daily drug to prevent relapse. The shot requires days of detox first and that proved to be a stumbling block for many. For those who made it past that hurdle, the shot Vivitrol worked about the same as an older treatment, Suboxone. Both drugs had high relapse rates and there were overdoses, including fatal ones, in the experiment in 570 adults. The study , published Tuesday in the journal Lancet, is the first to compare the two drugs in the United States, where an opioid addiction epidemic has do...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Tags: Patient Care News Source Type: news
The widespread U.S. opioid &overdose crisis is an ever-increasing tragic concern for everyone: writhing victims, family members being fain to see their relatives suffer or die, doctors prescribing opioid pain-killers what they thought before as safe, and regulators imposed to handle a tough situation. Addiction. It’s painful to even read about the skyrocketing numbers of people suffering, thus we decided to map how digital health could help tackle the opioid crisis. Why is it so difficult to deal with the opioid crisis? Once you become addicted, it sticks with you for a long time, if not for life, just as a ...
Source: The Medical Futurist - Category: Information Technology Authors: Tags: Bioethics Mobile Health Virtual Reality in Medicine AI artificial intelligence data data analytics drugs future gc3 Innovation opioid opioid crisis pharma technology wearables Source Type: blogs
AbstractPurpose of ReviewClinicians in every setting have been charged with relief of pain as part of their mission as providers. Pain relief has been listed as one of the drivers of patient satisfaction and, in many settings, of reimbursement. Manyhealth care practitioners equate aggressive pain relief with administration of narcotic analgesia. Given the scourge ofnarcotic addiction, and evidence that many patients started on narcotic analgesics in the emergency setting will still betaking narcotics one year later, and may die from narcotic addiction or overdose, the possibility of providing pain reliefwithout the use of ...
Source: Current Emergency and Hospital Medicine Reports - Category: Emergency Medicine Source Type: research
Publication date: November 2017 Source:Journal of Integrative Medicine, Volume 15, Issue 6 Author(s): Arthur Yin Fan, David W. Miller, Bonnie Bolash, Matthew Bauer, John McDonald, Sarah Faggert, Hongjian He, Yong Ming Li, Amy Matecki, Lindy Camardella, Mel Hopper Koppelman, Jennifer A.M. Stone, Lindsay Meade, John Pang The United States (U.S.) is facing a national opioid epidemic, and medical systems are in need of non-pharmacologic strategies that can be employed to decrease the public's opioid dependence. Acupuncture has emerged as a powerful, evidence-based, safe, cost-effective, and available treatment modality suitab...
Source: Journal of Integrative Medicine - Category: Complementary Medicine Source Type: research
The United States is experiencing a serious epidemic of opioid-related drug addiction that includes a 200% increase in the number of opioid-related overdose deaths from 2000 to 2014. In 2015, there were 52  404 drug overdose deaths in the United States with 33 091 (63.1%) involving an opioid. An important contributor to this epidemic is semisynthetic prescription opioid pain medications (eg, oxycodone and hydrocodone) that are frequently used for nonmedical purposes and are implicated in many opio id overdose deaths.
Source: JAMA - Category: General Medicine Source Type: research
More News: Addiction | Emergency Medicine | Epidemics | Epidemiology | Fentanyl | Food and Drug Administration (FDA) | Insurance | Overdose | Oxycodone | OxyContin | Pain | Study | Suboxone | Substance Abuse | Training | Universities & Medical Training