Poor air quality linked to poor sperm quality

Effect of rising PM2.5 on sperm morphology might mean significantly more couples with infertility Related items fromOnMedica Infertility Clues to why air pollution raises risk of heart disease Create more ‘no idling’ zones to curb air pollution, councils urged Kidney failure linked to air pollution, study finds Climate change poses major threat to health
Source: OnMedica Latest News - Category: UK Health Source Type: news

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Muffin tops, man boobs, and bagel bumps: These are among the varied and perverse ways that the hormonal distortions inflicted on unwitting humans who consume the seeds of grasses, i.e., grains, show themselves. In our modern world filled with thousands of processed foods, there are plenty of landmines for health. Gummy bears and gumdrops will rot teeth, for instance. Indulge in a handful of dried prunes and you’ll have to schedule a substantial portion of your day on the toilet due to bowel irritants. But only wheat and grains are associated with a wide swath of health problems that range from autoimmune disease to m...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: News & Updates grain-free gynecomastia man boobs man breasts testosterone undoctored wheat belly Source Type: blogs
In this report, we summarize the meeting, highlighting developments made during the meeting.
Source: BMC Proceedings - Category: Biomedical Science Source Type: research
It continues to happen: I run into people who say to me “I follow the Wheat Belly lifestyle. I eat gluten-free!” When I ask them what that means, they tell me that they only eat gluten-free bread, pasta, pizza, cookies, etc. I’m not entirely sure why this misinterpretation of the Wheat Belly message is so common. Let’s talk about this important distinction, as being gluten-free can be an absolute health and weight disaster, unlike the magnificent health and weight loss we enjoy on the Wheat Belly lifestyle when done right. It’s perfectly fine to be gluten-free, i.e., avoiding wheat, rye, and b...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: News & Updates autoimmune blood sugar gluten gluten-free grain grain-free grains Weight Loss wheat belly Source Type: blogs
Conclusions: Our data suggest that fibro-fatty infiltration of right ventricle may contribute to CPVT in CGL4 patients. Thick muscularis mucosa and large nerves in esophagus likely contributed to dysphagia and dysmotility. Lack of spermatids suggests infertility in the affected males. PMID: 30476128 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism - Category: Endocrinology Authors: Tags: J Clin Endocrinol Metab Source Type: research
Conclusion: Heat stimulation by M-RF treatment induced upregulation of UCP1 and FGF21 expression in serum and/or WATs, which was correlated with reduced total body and WAT weight gain in DIO mice. PMID: 30275865 [PubMed]
Source: Evidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine - Category: Complementary Medicine Tags: Evid Based Complement Alternat Med Source Type: research
Lots of infertility clinics call themselves infertility clinics because they treat infertile patients, and this makes a lot of sense. After all, cancer specialists treat cancer, and cardiologists treat patients with heart disease, so this is quite reasonable.One the other hand, a lot of infertile patients object to this . They say that these are pro-fertility clinics, because they are helping patients to have a baby . Since they promote fertility, why do they continue to use such a negative name ? Why not call them fertility clinics or pro-fertility clinics – wouldn’t this be much more positive and hopeful...
Source: Dr.Malpani's Blog - Category: Reproduction Medicine Source Type: blogs
Most mainstream doctors believe that polycystic ovary syndrome, PCOS, is a disease. PCOS is, after all, associated with markedly increased risk for type 2 diabetes, hypertension, endometrial cancer, and heart disease, in addition to outward signs that include excessive facial and body hair, tendency to being overweight or obese, irregular menstrual cycles, infertility. A crisis of self esteem commonly and understandably results. Mainstream doctors tell you to not worry because they have plenty of prescription drugs to “treat” it, not to mention various hormones, fertility procedures, and gastric bypass. PCOS is...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: News & Updates acne facial change facial hair gluten-free grain-free grains Inflammation pcos polycystic ovary testosterone undoctored Weight Loss wheat belly Source Type: blogs
OBJECTIVES: Blood stasis is an important pathophysiologic concept in Traditional East Asian Medicine. It has been considered to be a pathogenic factor in chronic and incurable conditions such as pain, infertility, cancer, coronary heart disease, and others...
Source: SafetyLit - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news
Follow me on Twitter @mallikamarshall When I was about 10 years old, my mother had me take a puff on an unfiltered Camel cigarette in an effort to discourage me from smoking in the future. Well, needless to say, it worked. After coughing and sputtering for what seemed like hours, I have never touched another cigarette. While I am in no way suggesting that parents follow in my mother’s footsteps (in fact I would strongly discourage it), as a pediatrician and parent myself I want to ensure that children and teens never take that first puff. But in fact, the majority of smokers in the US begin smoking in their youth. Ac...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health Heart Health Lung disease Prevention Smoking cessation Source Type: blogs
Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is the most common endocrinopathy in adult women (1). It can't be cured, but thanks to many years of fruitful research and intensive investigation, multiple modalities to help manage the condition throughout a woman's lifetime have emerged. Those of us who have been in practice for more than a decade or two have likely had the experience of managing mothers and daughters with the condition. Many of us have supported our PCOS patients through an adolescence complicated by acne and hair growth, an early adulthood complicated by infertility and irregular menses, and late reproductive age compl...
Source: Fertility and Sterility - Category: Reproduction Medicine Authors: Tags: Reflections Source Type: research
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