Poor air quality linked to poor sperm quality

Effect of rising PM2.5 on sperm morphology might mean significantly more couples with infertility Related items fromOnMedica Infertility Clues to why air pollution raises risk of heart disease Create more ‘no idling’ zones to curb air pollution, councils urged Kidney failure linked to air pollution, study finds Climate change poses major threat to health
Source: OnMedica Latest News - Category: UK Health Source Type: news

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Conclusion: Heat stimulation by M-RF treatment induced upregulation of UCP1 and FGF21 expression in serum and/or WATs, which was correlated with reduced total body and WAT weight gain in DIO mice. PMID: 30275865 [PubMed]
Source: Evidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine - Category: Complementary Medicine Tags: Evid Based Complement Alternat Med Source Type: research
Lots of infertility clinics call themselves infertility clinics because they treat infertile patients, and this makes a lot of sense. After all, cancer specialists treat cancer, and cardiologists treat patients with heart disease, so this is quite reasonable.One the other hand, a lot of infertile patients object to this . They say that these are pro-fertility clinics, because they are helping patients to have a baby . Since they promote fertility, why do they continue to use such a negative name ? Why not call them fertility clinics or pro-fertility clinics – wouldn’t this be much more positive and hopeful...
Source: Dr.Malpani's Blog - Category: Reproduction Medicine Source Type: blogs
Most mainstream doctors believe that polycystic ovary syndrome, PCOS, is a disease. PCOS is, after all, associated with markedly increased risk for type 2 diabetes, hypertension, endometrial cancer, and heart disease, in addition to outward signs that include excessive facial and body hair, tendency to being overweight or obese, irregular menstrual cycles, infertility. A crisis of self esteem commonly and understandably results. Mainstream doctors tell you to not worry because they have plenty of prescription drugs to “treat” it, not to mention various hormones, fertility procedures, and gastric bypass. PCOS is...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: News & Updates acne facial change facial hair gluten-free grain-free grains Inflammation pcos polycystic ovary testosterone undoctored Weight Loss wheat belly Source Type: blogs
OBJECTIVES: Blood stasis is an important pathophysiologic concept in Traditional East Asian Medicine. It has been considered to be a pathogenic factor in chronic and incurable conditions such as pain, infertility, cancer, coronary heart disease, and others...
Source: SafetyLit - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news
Follow me on Twitter @mallikamarshall When I was about 10 years old, my mother had me take a puff on an unfiltered Camel cigarette in an effort to discourage me from smoking in the future. Well, needless to say, it worked. After coughing and sputtering for what seemed like hours, I have never touched another cigarette. While I am in no way suggesting that parents follow in my mother’s footsteps (in fact I would strongly discourage it), as a pediatrician and parent myself I want to ensure that children and teens never take that first puff. But in fact, the majority of smokers in the US begin smoking in their youth. Ac...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health Heart Health Lung disease Prevention Smoking cessation Source Type: blogs
Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is the most common endocrinopathy in adult women (1). It can't be cured, but thanks to many years of fruitful research and intensive investigation, multiple modalities to help manage the condition throughout a woman's lifetime have emerged. Those of us who have been in practice for more than a decade or two have likely had the experience of managing mothers and daughters with the condition. Many of us have supported our PCOS patients through an adolescence complicated by acne and hair growth, an early adulthood complicated by infertility and irregular menses, and late reproductive age compl...
Source: Fertility and Sterility - Category: Reproduction Medicine Authors: Tags: Reflections Source Type: research
Men who have low sperm counts are at a 20 percent greater risk of developing illnesses like diabetes and heart disease, according to an Italian study linking infertility to metabolic syndrome symptoms.
Source: the Mail online | Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Survival rates and life expectancies for patients with congenital heart disease (CHD) have dramatically increased, and these patients are now reaching reproductive age. As they reproduce, questions pertaining to recurrent risk of disease and the impact on incidence rates have emerged. Recurrence rates for CHD have been estimated at 3% to 5%, although, due to the complex genetics underlying CHD, this range may represent an underestimation of the true risk. Debate still exists on whether the impact of recurrence of disease has been reflected in incidence rates. Although incidence rates have undoubtedly increased, the mechani...
Source: Cardiology in Review - Category: Cardiology Tags: Review Articles Source Type: research
UCLA researchers have made new inroads into understanding germ cell tumors, a diverse and rare group of cancers that begin in germ cells — the cells that develop into sperm and eggs. The researchers developed a protocol to recreate germ cell tumor cells from stem cells and used the new model to study the genetics of the cancer.Their findings could point the way toward new drugs to treat germ cell tumors, which account for around 3 percent of all cases of childhood and adolescent cancer.The study, published in Stem Cell Research, was led by Amander Clark, a UCLA professor of molecular cell and developmental biology an...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news
(University of California - San Diego) Women who have polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), a common hormone condition that contributes to infertility and metabolic problems, such as diabetes and heart disease, tend to have less diverse gut bacteria than women who do not have the condition, according to researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine, in collaboration with colleagues at Poznan University of Medical Sciences in Poland and San Diego State University.
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news
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