University of Maryland School of Medicine receives grant to develop vaccine

(University of Maryland School of Medicine) University of Maryland School of Medicine researchers will develop a vaccine against Shigella and Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

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Odile Launay, Augustin G. W. Ndiaye, Valentino Conti, Pierre Loulergue, Antonella Silvia Scir é, Anais Maugard Landre, Pietro Ferruzzi, Naouel Nedjaai, Lena Dorothee Schütte, Joachim Auerbach, Elisa Marchetti, Allan Saul, Laura B. Martin, Audino Podda
Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
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Source: Human Vaccines and Immunotherapeutics - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Source Type: research
Abstract Catalyzing and sustaining momentum for long-term research investments can be a challenge, especially for enteric pathogens like ETEC andShigella that are most threatening to the health of children in low-resource areas, and whose vaccines would not be for global use. The 2018 Vaccines Against Shigella and ETEC (VASE) Conference included a workshop focused on building the capacity of scientists to communicate about their own research and advocate for additional attention and funding for enteric disease and vaccines research. Workshop presenters shared best practices and examples of advocacy, communications...
Source: Vaccine - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Vaccine Source Type: research
Abstract The mortality and morbidity burden estimation of diarrheal diseases (DD), and Shigella and Enterotoxigenic E. Coli (ETEC) varies among different studies and by the models used for producing these estimates. Understanding the real burden of these important pathogens will guide public health and policy makers to prioritize resources for accelerating interventions against these enteric infections. In addition, long term effects, in the form of growth faltering, cognitive impairment and decreased school performance are important aspects of burden that has not been well captured. Efforts to incorporate these e...
Source: Vaccine - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Vaccine Source Type: research
Abstract In the absence of good animal models, Controlled Human Infection Models (CHIMs) are useful to assess efficacy of new vaccine candidates against Enterotoxic Escherichia coli (ETEC), as well as other preventive or therapeutic interventions. At the 2018 Vaccines Against Shigella and ETEC (VASE) conference, a workshop was held to further review and discuss new challenge model developments and key issues related to further model standardization. During the workshop, invited speakers briefly summarized for attendees recent developments and main agenda issues before workshop participants were divided into four g...
Source: Vaccine - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Vaccine Source Type: research
Abstract Thanks to the modern sequencing era, the extent to which infectious disease imposes selective pressures on the worldwide human population is being revealed. This is aiding our understanding of the underlying immunological and host mechanistic defenses against these pathogens, as well as potentially assisting in the development of vaccines and therapeutics to control them. As a consequence, the workshop "How genomics can be used to understand host susceptibility to enteric infection, aiding in the development of vaccines and immunotherapeutic interventions" at the VASE 2018 meeting, aimed to disc...
Source: Vaccine - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Vaccine Source Type: research
Abstract Shigellosis, a major cause of diarrhea worldwide, exhibits high morbidity and mortality in children. Specificity of Shigella immunity is determined by the structure of the main protective O-antigen polysaccharide component incorporated into the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) molecule. Endotoxicity, however, precludes LPS clinical use. Thus, there is still no vaccine against the most prevalent shigellosis species (serotype S. flexneri 2a), despite ongoing efforts focused on inducing serotype-specific immunity. As LPS is highly heterogenous, we hypothesized that more homogenous pools of LPS might be less toxic. W...
Source: Vaccine - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Vaccine Source Type: research
We present a new OMV-based product, obtained from genetically modified Shigella flexneri 2a with a non-polar deletion in tolR and heat-inactivated (HT-ΔtolR). The S. flexneri ΔtolR strain lead to a higher release of vesicles, more than 8-times when compared to the yield obtained from chemically inactivated wild type strain. S. flexneri mutant strain appeared to be more sensitive to different chemical compounds, including antibiotics, bile salts or human complement and it was also less virulent in both in vitro and in vivo assays. The mutation produced some changes in the LPS O-chain and protein expression. S. f...
Source: Vaccine - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Vaccine Source Type: research
Min Jung Kim, Young-hye Moon, Heejoo Kim, Semi Rho, Young Kee Shin, Manki Song, Richard Walker, Cecil Czerkinsky, Dong Wook Kim, Jae-Ouk Kim
Source: Frontiers in Microbiology - Category: Microbiology Source Type: research
(University of Guelph) A U of G Prof. has discovered a novel approach to developing a first-ever vaccine for three common pathogens that cause traveller's diarrhea and kill more than 100,000 children living in developing countries each year. The vaccine yokes together proteins from pathogenic E.coli with sugars from Shigella and Camplyobacter jejuni -- three bugs that are major causes of bacterial diarrhea globally. Currently no licensed vaccines exist against any of these pathogens.
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news
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