Covid is evolving 'to become better at spreading in the air'
The Alpha strain is 18 times more transmissible through the air compared to the original strain that originated in China, researchers at the University of Maryland said. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - September 17, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

One of the region's largest employers implements $15 minimum wage
One of the largest private-sector employers in the state has joined with other Greater Baltimore institutions in implementing a $15 an hour minimum wage. The University of Maryland Medical System announced Friday that it would raise its minimum wage to $15 per hour for its more than 29,000 employees. The change, which takes effect with the pay period beginning Sept. 12, will result in a pay raise for about 1,500 people or roughly 5% of the health s ystem's workforce. The new minimum wage applies… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - September 10, 2021 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Jessica Iannetta Source Type: news

‘Better to Stay Ahead of It.’ Why the White House COVID-19 Strategy Now Involves Vaccine Booster Shots
By now, many public health experts, and the public for that matter, have accepted that vaccinated people may need another dose of whichever COVID-19 shot they received in order to better protect against new variants of COVID-19. And on Aug. 18, the White House endorsed a third dose for those who received either of the two-dose Pfizer-BioNTech or Moderna vaccines. People who received the single-shot Johnson & Johnson/Janssen vaccine may also need an additional dose, but the relevant studies are still ongoing. For now, the government plans on rolling out Pfizer and Moderna booster doses the week of Sept. 20, beginning wi...
Source: TIME: Health - August 18, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

How UM Capital Region Health is changing up care in Prince George ’s County
The newly opened University of Maryland Capital Region Medical Center in Largo marks the health system's latest step in improving health in Prince George's County. Part of UM Capital ’s changeUP movement, the $543 million hospital aims to address regional health disparities by expanding community access to high-quality care. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - August 18, 2021 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Jim Molis — Contributor Source Type: news

How UM Capital Region Health is changing up care in Prince George ’s County
The newly opened University of Maryland Capital Region Medical Center in Largo marks the health system's latest step in improving health in Prince George's County. Part of UM Capital ’s changeUP movement, the $543 million hospital aims to address regional health disparities by expanding community access to high-quality care. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - August 18, 2021 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Jim Molis — Contributor Source Type: news

UMD Develops a DASH-Plus community-based hypertension management program for older adults
(University of Maryland) The University of Maryland was awarded funding to develop, test, and deliver an integrated hypertension management program for older adults. The program takes the existing DASH (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension) diet and tailors it to those aged 55 and older through a virtual education program this summer, with an in-person program coming soon. The DASH-Plus intervention incorporates diet, simple chair exercises, access to fresh fruits and vegetables, and blood pressure self-monitoring. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 22, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

UMD collaborates to improve pig muscle growth, implications for sustainability and health
(University of Maryland) The University of Maryland received collaborative funding to enhance efficiency of pork production through improved pig muscle growth. Little is known about how the benefits of early life nutrition can be passed from mother to child, and improved muscle growth means a healthier animal, less feed and waste, and a more sustainable pork industry. This work also has future applications beyond the pork industry to optimize human performance and treat wounded service members. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 20, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

New high-tech portal launched to speed hearing loss innovations
(University of Maryland School of Medicine) Researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM) launched a new online tool that could more quickly advance medical discoveries to reverse progressive hearing loss. The tool enables easy access to genetic and other molecular data from hundreds of technical research studies involving hearing function and the ear. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 19, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

University of Maryland engineers 3D printed a soft robotic hand that can play Nintendo
(University of Maryland) A team of researchers from the University of Maryland has 3D printed a soft robotic hand that is agile enough to play Nintendo's Super Mario Bros. - and win! (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 16, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Monthly child tax credit payments are one of the best forms of government spending, economist says
University of Maryland economist Melissa Kearney told CNBC that Biden's federal child tax credit policy is one of the best forms of... (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - July 15, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Study: Hospitals not   adequately prepared for next pandemic
(University of Maryland School of Medicine) As the COVID-19 pandemic wanes in the U.S., a new study from the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM) and University of Maryland Medical Center (UMMC) finds that hospitals nationwide may not be adequately prepared for the next pandemic. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - July 7, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

UM Upper Chesapeake Health CEO to retire after 26 years
University of Maryland Upper Chesapeake Health CEO Lyle Sheldon will retire later this year after 34 years with the health system, including the last 26 in the top job. Lyle Sheldon, who has been with Upper Chesapeake since 1987 and has served as CEO since 1995, will step down in December, the health system announced Tuesday afternoon. The University of Maryland Medical System is currently in the process of putting together an executive search committee to find S heldon's successor and plans to make… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - July 6, 2021 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Jessica Iannetta Source Type: news

UM Upper Chesapeake Health CEO to retire after 26 years
University of Maryland Upper Chesapeake Health CEO Lyle Sheldon will retire later this year after 34 years with the health system, including the last 26 in the top job. Lyle Sheldon, who has been with Upper Chesapeake since 1987 and has served as CEO since 1995, will step down in December, the health system announced Tuesday afternoon. The University of Maryland Medical System is currently in the process of putting together an executive search committee to find S heldon's successor and plans to make… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - July 6, 2021 Category: American Health Authors: Jessica Iannetta Source Type: news

NIH Avant Garde Award for out-of-box, innovative concept to cure HIV and treat addiction
(University of Maryland School of Medicine) University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM) Professor of Diagnostic Radiology& Nuclear Medicine, Linda Chang, MD, MS, received the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) 2021 Avant Garde Award (DP1) for HIV/AIDS and Substance Use Disorder Research -- a National Institutes of Health (NIH) Director's Pioneer Award. This prestigious award supports researchers with exceptional creativity, who propose high-impact research with the potential to be transformative to the field. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 6, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How the Delta Variant Affects Whether You Should Wear a Mask or Not
As infections involving the new Delta variant of the COVID-19 virus continue to increase around the world, including in the U.S., health experts are yet again revisiting advice about who should wear masks and when. On June 28, the Los Angeles County public health department advised all people, including those who are vaccinated, to wear masks in most indoor public settings, based on the fact that nearly half of the virus from cases in the county that were genetically sequenced now belong to the Delta variant. The variant, first identified in India, is far more contagious than previous strains of SARS-CoV-2, and could cause...
Source: TIME: Health - July 1, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

University of Maryland Children ’s Hospital debuts new 16-bed psychiatric unit in downtown Baltimore
The opening of the new 16-bed hospital unit dedicated to pediatric psychiatry comes as the local and national need for mental health care, especially among young people, has spiked in recent years. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - June 30, 2021 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Morgan Eichensehr Source Type: news

UMD introduces new CRISPR 3.0 system for highly efficient gene activation in plants
(University of Maryland) Yiping Qi at the University of Maryland (UMD) introduced a new and improved CRISPR 3.0 system in plants, focusing on gene activation. This third generation system focuses on multiplexed gene activation that can boost the function of multiple genes simultaneously. This system boasts four to six times the activation capacity of current state-of-the-art CRISPR technology, demonstrating high accuracy and efficiency in up to seven genes at once. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 24, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Recycling of the eye's light sensors is faulty in progressive blindness of older adults
(University of Maryland School of Medicine) With the National Eye Institute reporting that about 11 million older adults in the U.S. endure a condition that leads to progressive blindness, known as age-related macular degeneration, University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM) researchers are starting to understand what goes wrong in the disease, in order to develop new therapies to treat it. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 23, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

US beekeepers continue to report high colony loss rates, no clear improvement
(University of Maryland) US beekeepers lost 45.5% of their managed honey bee colonies from April 2020 to April 2021, according to preliminary results of the 15th annual nationwide survey conducted by the University of Maryland-led nonprofit Bee Informed Partnership (BIP). These losses mark the second highest loss rate the survey has recorded since it began in 2006. The survey results highlight the continuing high rates of honey bee colony turnover. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 23, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Genetic cause of neurodevelopmental disorder discovered
(University of Maryland School of Medicine) University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM) researchers identified a new gene that may be linked to certain neurodevelopmental disorders and intellectual disabilities. The researchers believe that finding genes involved in certain types of developmental disorders, provide an important first step in determining the cause of these disorders and ultimately in developing potential therapies for treating them. The paper was recently published in the American Journal of Human Genetics. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 21, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

UMSOM researchers work to improve use of genetic risk scores in diverse populations
(University of Maryland School of Medicine) Researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM) have received a $5 million federal grant to pool genomic information from existing and new datasets - predominantly in African and African American populations -- in order to calculate the risk of developing specific diseases. They will use sophisticated modeling and genetic datasets to calculate the risk, known as a polygenic risk score, with an emphasis on studying people from different ancestries. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 16, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Researchers develop more reliable rapid tests for COVID-19
(University of Maryland School of Medicine) Researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM) have developed two rapid diagnostic tests for COVID-19 that are nearly as accurate as the gold-standard test currently used in laboratories. Unlike the gold standard test, which extracts RNA and uses it to amplify the DNA of the virus, these new tests can detect the presence of the virus in as little as five minutes using different methods. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 15, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Study links COVID-19 public health efforts to dramatic drop in COPD hospitalizations
(University of Maryland Medical Center) Public health measures designed to reduce the spread of the COVID-19 virus may have fostered a substantial side benefit: A 53 percent drop in hospital admissions for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), likely due to a drop in circulating seasonal respiratory viruses such as influenza. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 14, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Study shows how rudeness leads to anchoring, including in medical diagnoses
(University of Maryland) Research forthcoming in the Journal of Applied Psychology looks at how experiencing rudeness amplifies anchoring bias including in doctors' decision-making. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 10, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Nearly 1 in 5 patients who die from unexplained sudden cardiac death have suspicious gene
(University of Maryland School of Medicine) Researchers from the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM) and their colleagues found that nearly 20 percent of patients with unexplained sudden cardiac death - most of whom were under age 50 - carried rare genetic variants. These variants likely raised their risk of sudden cardiac death. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 9, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Artificial intelligence agreement to advance Army modernization efforts
(U.S. Army Research Laboratory) The US Army plans to cooperate in artificial intelligence research with teams led by the University of Maryland, College Park and in partnership with the University of Maryland, Baltimore County. The cooperative agreement brings together a collaborative of nearly 30 diverse experts in engineering, robotics, computer science, operations research, modeling and simulation, and cybersecurity. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 2, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Professor Rosemary Jagus recognized for efforts to increase diversity in marine sciences
(University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science) University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science (UMCES) Professor Rosemary Jagus has been recognized for two decades of efforts to increase the diversity of researchers working in the marine sciences. UMCES President Peter Goodwin gave the annual President's Award for Excellence in Application of Science to her for inspiring and training young scientists from under-served communities to pursue careers in science through programs at the Institute of Marine and Environmental Technology in Baltimore. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 1, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Barbershop offers coronavirus shots, in addition to cuts and shaves. Some see it as a national model.
'Why not go where people already have trust?' Black business leaders, University of Maryland and Biden White House hope to recruit barbers to replicate Hyattsville effort nationwide. (Source: Washington Post: To Your Health)
Source: Washington Post: To Your Health - May 30, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Lena H. Sun Source Type: news

A new national model? Barbershop offer coronavirus shots in addition to cuts and shaves.
Black community leaders, University of Maryland, reach out to barbers, stylists, to emulate the Hyattsville, Md. model. (Source: Washington Post: To Your Health)
Source: Washington Post: To Your Health - May 30, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Lena H. Sun Source Type: news

A new national model? Barbershop offers coronavirus shots in addition to cuts and shaves.
Black community leaders, University of Maryland, reach out to barbers, stylists, to emulate the Hyattsville, Md. model. (Source: Washington Post: To Your Health)
Source: Washington Post: To Your Health - May 30, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Lena H. Sun Source Type: news

Exoskeleton-assisted walking may improve bowel function in people with spinal cord injury
(Kessler Foundation) " Our results support the idea that walking may have a beneficial effect on bowel function, " said Dr. Gorman at the University of Maryland. Subjects in the exoskeletal-assisted walking program saw some improvement in bowel function compared to a control group. " We saw a notable reduction in bowel evacuation time, with 24 percent of participants reporting an improved experience, " said Dr. Forrest at Kessler Foundation. " Also, participants' stools trended toward better consistency, supporting our hypothesis that this intervention may improve several measures of bowel function...
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 28, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Global study finds each city has unique microbiome fingerprint of bacteria
(University of Maryland School of Medicine) Each city has its own unique microbiome, a " fingerprint " of viruses and bacteria that uniquely identify it, according to a new study from an international consortium of researchers that included a team from the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM). The international project, which sequenced and analyzed samples collected from public transit systems and hospitals in 60 cities around the world, was published today in the journal Cell. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - May 26, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

UMD collaborates across disciplines to characterize the economics and value of pollination
(University of Maryland) The University of Maryland (UMD) co-published a paper to examine pollinators from both an economic and ecological perspective, providing much needed insight into the complexities of valuing pollination. This recent collaboration highlights the importance of characterizing the economic value of pollination services, including that of managed and wild pollinators, both for the sustainability of honey bee markets and the protection of overall ecosystem health. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 20, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

UMD awarded funds to head off tick-borne infection before it begins
(University of Maryland) The University of Maryland (UMD) received funding from the Steven& Alexandra Cohen Foundation to develop novel therapeutic strategies to stop infection from Lyme disease pathogens before it begins. Unlike traditional antibiotics that attack the pathogen directly and put it on the defensive, UMD is exploring antimicrobials that would interfere with the pathogen on a biomolecular level to inhibit it from causing an infection in the first place. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - May 13, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Research reveals negative effects of hotel app adoption on customer spending
(University of Maryland) A study from the University of Maryland shows higher app adoption among hotel chains could be linked to lower spending among lower-level loyalty customers, who are more likely to use apps to get the best deals. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 13, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New study suggests pregnant women hospitalized for COVID-19 do not face increased risk of death
(University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston) Pregnant women who are hospitalized with COVID-19 and viral pneumonia are less likely than non-pregnant women to die from these infections, according to a new study by researchers with The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) and the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM). (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - May 11, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Pregnant women hospitalized for COVID-19 infection do not face increased risk of death
(University of Maryland School of Medicine) Pregnant women who develop severe COVID-19 infections that require hospitalization for pneumonia and other complications may not be more likely to die from these infections than non-pregnant women. In fact, they may have significantly lower death rates than their non-pregnant counterparts. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 11, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Pfizer-BioNTech Has Requested Full Approval of Their COVID-19 Vaccine From the FDA
Pfizer-BioNTech announced on May 7 that they have requested that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) start the process of fully approving their COVID-19 vaccine. The companies will continue to supply the agency with additional data on vaccination safety and effectiveness on a rolling basis over coming weeks. The FDA issued an emergency use authorization for the shot in December, based on short-term data on safety and efficacy. Now, the companies have the required six-month data on the vaccine to support a biologics license application, which the FDA will review over the next several weeks before making a decision. ...
Source: TIME: Health - May 7, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

UMD researchers study metabolism and liver function in embryonic chickens and hatchlings
(University of Maryland) University of Maryland is improving poultry production and welfare. During their first week, chickens undergo a metabolic switch from the fat-rich diet embryos grow in to a high carbohydrate diet. This is a natural transition in chicks, whereas a high fat diet in humans leads to metabolic consequences such as fatty liver disease and diabetes. Researchers hope to gain insights into how the liver works to help prevent metabolic disease in animals and humans. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 6, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Doctors overestimate risk leading to over-diagnosis, overtreatment, study finds
(University of Maryland School of Medicine) Primary care practitioners often over-estimate the likelihood of a patient having a medical condition based on reported symptoms and laboratory test results. Such overestimations can lead to overdiagnosis and overtreatment, according to a recent study conducted by researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM) published in JAMA Internal Medicine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 28, 2021 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

UMD studies mangrove genetic diversity in Africa to conserve centers of biodiversity
(University of Maryland) In collaboration with the Vrije Universiteit Brussel, a University of Maryland (UMD) researcher co-published a large-scale study examining the genetic diversity of mangroves over more than 1,800 miles of coastline in the Western Indian Ocean, including Eastern Africa and several islands. This work showcases how oceanic currents create both connectivity and barriers between mangrove populations, with important implications for how to protect these ecosystems. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 27, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Wavering on getting the Covid-19 vaccine? Justin Tucker may just give you the kick you need
Only weeks ago, demand for the Covid-19 vaccine was soaring, with an appointment a hot commodity. But with people who desperately wanted the shot successfully getting vaccinated, Maryland officials are turning their attention to those who might need a little persuasion. University of Maryland Medical System is teaming with popular Ravens kicker Justin Tucker in a new public service announcement urging the public to get vaccinated. Tucker, also a popular pitchman for homegrown Royal Farms' chicken,… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - April 23, 2021 Category: American Health Authors: Joanna Sullivan Source Type: news

University of Maryland and Mid-Atlantic Quantum Alliance launch quantum business incubator
(University of Maryland) The incubator seeks to launch and grow new startups and to connect quantum businesses with mentors, existing companies, funding and infrastructure--all to create or advance quantum-based technologies (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 23, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

UMD sows the seeds of conscious living, wins the LAGI International Design Challenge
(University of Maryland) University of Maryland (UMD) was named one of ten winners worldwide for their stunning self-sustaining eco-restoration base, Ripple. As winners of the LAGI International Design Challenge, the team will build Ripple this summer on the Fly Ranch in the Nevada desert, part of the Burning Man Project. Ripple will be a flexible space to regenerate native plant diversity and ecological wisdom, paying equal homage to the land and the indigenous tribes who once lived there. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 22, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How long does protection from COVID-19 vaccines last?
While the current COVID-19 vaccines will likely last for at least about a year, they probably won't offer lifelong protection, as with measles shots, said Dr. Kathleen Neuzil, a vaccine expert at the University of Maryland. (Source: The Economic Times)
Source: The Economic Times - April 22, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

NSF award to help understand ocean ecology where Chesapeake Bay and Atlantic meet
(University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science) The National Science Foundation has awarded $1 million to a team of researchers at the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science to study how the nutrient plume of the nation's largest estuary, the Chesapeake Bay, changes over the course of the year and what those changes mean for food webs and nutrient cycles in the coastal Atlantic Ocean (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 16, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Trillions of ‘Brood X’ Cicadas Are About to Emerge Across the U.S. to Sing, Mate and Die. Here’s What to Expect
This coming May, millions of people around the United States will have front-row seats to an extraordinary entomological event: Trillions of Brood X cicadas across 15 states will emerge almost synchronously after having spent the last 17 years underground. The males will take up elevated positions, each buzzing as loud as a lawnmower to attract females. After mating, the adult cicadas will die off en masse just about as quickly as they arrived—likely sometime in late June or July—while their offspring tunnel underground, not to emerge until 2038, when the dance will begin anew. Annual, or “dog day,”...
Source: TIME: Science - April 14, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Rebecca Katzman Tags: Uncategorized animals Environment News Source Type: news

Researchers map brain regions responsible for intoxicating effects of alcohol
(University of Maryland School of Medicine) The slurred speech, poor coordination, and sedative effects of drinking too much alcohol may actually be caused by the breakdown of alcohol products produced in the brain, not in the liver as scientists currently think. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 14, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Psychedelic experience may not be required for psilocybin's antidepressant-like benefits
(University of Maryland School of Medicine) University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM) researchers have shown that psilocybin--the active chemical in " magic mushrooms " -- still works its antidepressant-like actions, at least in mice, even when the psychedelic experience is blocked. The new findings suggest that psychedelic drugs work in multiple ways in the brain and it may be possible to deliver the fast-acting antidepressant therapeutic benefit without requiring daylong guided therapy sessions. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 13, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Road salts and other human sources are threatening world's freshwater supplies
(University of Maryland) When winter storms threaten to make travel dangerous, people often turn to salt to melt snow and ice. Road salt is an important tool for safety, but a new study in Biogeochemistry led by Sujay Kaushal of the University of Maryland warns that introducing salt into the environment--for de-icing roads, fertilizing farmland or other purposes--releases toxic chemical cocktails that create a serious and growing global threat to our freshwater supply and human health. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 12, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news