Lowering pH inside cells may put the brakes on cancer growth
(H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center& Research Institute) A new study focusing on the environment inside cancer cells may lead to new targeted treatment strategies. Moffitt Cancer Center researchers, in collaboration with colleagues from the University of Maryland and the Institute for Research in Biomedicine Barcelona, suggest that lowering the pH inside cancer cells to make it more acidic can slow down the growth and spread of the disease, and possibly provide new options for treatment. Their results were published in Nature Communications. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 16, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

UMD researcher helps to crack the genetic code for wheat for the first time
(University of Maryland) The University of Maryland as part of the International Wheat Genome Sequencing Consortium published findings in Science detailing the full wheat genome, the world's most widely cultivated crop. A companion paper is available in the same issue with UMD and the John Innes Centre, using this sequence to examine gene expression in wheat, specifically relating to heat, drought, and disease. This paves the way for wheat varieties adapted to climate, enhancing yields, nutrition, and sustainability. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 16, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

‘You Have a New Identity.’ Patients Share What It’s Like to Recover From a Face Transplant
After having more than 20 surgeries over four years, Katie Stubblefield finally has a new face. In May of last year, doctors at the Cleveland Clinic helped the then 21-year-old become the world’s 40th face transplant recipient, and the youngest in U.S. history. Today, Stubblefield, whose story was first told in National Geographic’s September cover story, is recovering well — and adjusting to the novel life, identity and reality that come with her new appearance. “I’m starting over in a lot of ways,” Stubblefield says through her parents, Robb and Alesia. (Her speech is still recovering ...
Source: TIME: Health - August 15, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized healthytime medicine onetime Source Type: news

Prince George's health system names new CEO
Sherry Perkins has been named president and CEO of University of Maryland Capital Region Health, which is building the new medical center near Largo Town Center in Prince George's County. Perkins, who has a doctorate in nursing, has served as executive vice president and chief operating officer of the system since 2016 and the appointment is effective immediately. The system was formed and rebranded in September 2017 when the long-troubled Dimensions Healthcare System was merged in to the University… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - August 10, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Douglas Fruehling Source Type: news

Prince George's health system names new CEO
Sherry Perkins has been named president and CEO of University of Maryland Capital Region Health, which is building the new medical center near Largo Town Center in Prince George's County. Perkins, who has a doctorate in nursing, has served as executive vice president and chief operating officer of the system since 2016 and the appointment is effective immediately. The system was formed and rebranded in September 2017 when the long-troubled Dimensions Healthcare System was merged in to the University… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - August 10, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Douglas Fruehling Source Type: news

Healing of Apical Periodontitis after Nonsurgical Root Canal Treatment: The Role of Statin Intake
Journal of Endodontics DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.joen.2018.06.013Highlights•In this longitudinal clinical study, healing of preoperative apical periodontitis was evaluated in patients on statins and control patients.•The study controlled for the following confounding variables: age, sex, length of time to evaluation, statin agent, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease.•A multivariate analysis showed a significant association between healing and the intake of statins (P 
Source: Dental Technology Blog - August 9, 2018 Category: Dentistry Source Type: news

First FDA-approved study of focused ultrasound to open blood-brain barrier
(University of Maryland Medical Center) In the first such clinical trial in the United States, physician-scientists with the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM) are investigating the use of MRI-guided focused ultrasound to open the blood-brain barrier. The trial will be conducted with patients undergoing brain cancer surgery at the University of Maryland Medical Center (UMMC). (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 9, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Electric car batteries souped-up with fluorinated electrolytes for longer-range driving
(University of Maryland) Researchers at the University of Maryland (UMD), the U.S. Army Research Laboratory (ARL), and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) have figured out how to increase a rechargeable battery's capacity by using aggressive electrodes and then stabilizing these potentially dangerous electrode materials with a highly-fluorinated electrolyte. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 16, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

UMBC researchers develop nanoparticles to reduce internal bleeding caused by blast trauma
(University of Maryland Baltimore County) Currently, there are no treatments available to address internal bleeding in the field but early intervention is key or survival and better outcomes. UMBC researchers and collaborators investigated the role of nanoparticles they developed to stop internal bleeding on the damage inflicted by blast trauma. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 13, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

International collaboration finds land plant genes in ancient aquatic alga
(University of Maryland) An international team, which included three University of Maryland researchers, sequenced and analyzed the genome of Chara braunii, a freshwater green alga closely related to land plants. By comparing Chara's genome to multiple land plant genomes, the team was able to identify many important genes that originated in a common ancestor shared by Chara and land plants. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 12, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Vaginal microbiome may influence stress levels of offspring
(University of Maryland School of Medicine) Exposing newborn mice to vaginal microbes from stressed female mice may transfer the effects of stress to the newborns, according to a new study by researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine. These changes resemble those seen specifically in the male offspring of moms that were stressed during pregnancy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 9, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Scientists identify mechanism that may explain why males are more at risk than females for neurodevelopmental disorders
(University of Maryland School of Medicine) Researchers have recently begun to realize that biological sex plays a key role in disease risk. Sex plays a role in hypertension, diabetes, arthritis -- and in many neurological and psychiatric disorders. Depression and anxiety affect females more, while neurodevelopmental disorders, including autism spectrum disorders, early onset schizophrenia, and attention deficit hyperactivity, affect more males. Males are also more sensitive to prenatal insults, such as gestational stress, maternal infection and drug exposure. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 3, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Summer dead zones in Chesapeake Bay breaking up earlier
(University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science) A new study shows that dead zones in the lower Chesapeake Bay are beginning to break up earlier in the fall, which may be an indication that efforts to reduce nutrient pollution to the Bay are beginning to make an impact. Scientists from the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science found that dead zones in the lower part of the Chesapeake Bay are getting smaller in the late summer thanks to a late-season replenishment of oxygen, a natural response to decreasing nutrient pollution. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 27, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Johns Hopkins, University of Maryland named state's best children's hospitals
Johns Hopkins Children's Center is the best pediatric hospital in the state, and one of the top 10 in the country, according to new rankings from U.S. News& World Report. The annual Best Children’s Hospitals rankings are intended to help families of children with complex and rare conditions find the best medical care. The rankings highlight the top 50 hospital centers in 10 pediatric specialties: cancer, cardiology and heart surgery, diabetes and endocrinology, g astroenterology and gastrointestinal… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - June 26, 2018 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Morgan Eichensehr Source Type: news

Johns Hopkins, University of Maryland named state's best children's hospitals
Johns Hopkins Children's Center is the best pediatric hospital in the state, and one of the top 10 in the country, according to new rankings from U.S. News& World Report. The annual Best Children’s Hospitals rankings are intended to help families of children with complex and rare conditions find the best medical care. The rankings highlight the top 50 hospital centers in 10 pediatric specialties: cancer, cardiology and heart surgery, diabetes and endocrinology, g astroenterology and gastrointestinal… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - June 26, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Morgan Eichensehr Source Type: news

Employment Opportunities Around the Region
Did you know that NNLM MAR shares employment opportunities for librarians and other information professionals in New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, and some of our neighboring states? You can keep up with current employment opportunities by subscribing to our Weekly Postings. Below are some opportunities that are currently available, separated by state. Pennsylvania Associate Dean for Collections, Research, and Scholarly Communications, Penn State University Libraries, University Park, PA Associate Dean for Learning, Undergraduate Services and Commonwealth Campus Libraries, Penn State University Libraries, Univ...
Source: NN/LM Middle Atlantic Region Blog - June 25, 2018 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Hannah Sinemus Tags: Employment In the Region Source Type: news

Weekly Postings
See something of interest? Please share our postings with colleagues in your institutions! Spotlight The MAReport: the Spring 2018 issue of the MAReport newsletter is now available! This quarter, Michelle Burda talks about the broad potential uses for one of NNLM’s favorite publications in her article, “Five Ideas for Program Planning Using NIH MedlinePlus, the Magazine“. The University of Pittsburgh Health Sciences Library System (HSLS) invites applications for the position of Health Programming Coordinator for the Middle Atlantic Region of the National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NNLM MAR). Applic...
Source: NN/LM Middle Atlantic Region Blog - June 22, 2018 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Hannah Sinemus Tags: Weekly Postings Source Type: news

UMBC researchers report novel method to quickly make therapeutic proteins from human blood
(University of Maryland Baltimore County) A new paper in Scientific Reports looks at how to extract cellular protein synthesis machinery from human blood, and, by adding recombinant DNA to the extract, to produce therapeutic proteins within two hours. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 22, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

UMd. grad advances medical alert system startup with new tech
There have been many a product over the years aimed at getting help to seniors who suffered a fall. But when Erich Meissner ’s grandmother had a fall of her own, her device didn’t work for her — because she wasn’t wearing it, a problem the University of Maryland alum found to be widespread. So he’s tackling the problem with a different approach, eliminating the need to wear anything. Symbiont Health’s Wi-F i mesh network technology, licensed from the university, is built to determine… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - June 19, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Sara Gilgore Source Type: news

Chesapeake Bay: Larger-than-average summer 'dead zone' forecast for 2018 after wet spring
(University of Michigan) Ecologists from the University of Michigan and the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science are forecasting a larger-than-average Chesapeake Bay 'dead zone' in 2018, due to increased rainfall in the watershed this spring. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 18, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

A new Life Alert? UMd. grad advances medical alert system startup with new tech.
“Help, I’ve fallen and I can’t get up!” We all know the catchphrase from the 1980s Life Alert TV commercials, which gained as much recognition over decades as the issue it was intended to solve: getting help to seniors who fall. But when Erich Meissner’s grandmother had a fall of her own , that device didn’t work for her — because she wasn’t wearing it, a problem the University of Maryland alum found to be widespread. So he’s tackling it with a different approach, eliminating the… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - June 13, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Sara Gilgore Source Type: news

A new way to measure energy in microscopic machines
(National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)) In work at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the University of Maryland in College Park, researchers have devised and demonstrated a new way to measure free energy. By using microscopy to track and analyze the fluctuating motion or configuration of single molecules or other small objects, the new method can be applied to a greater variety of microscopic and nanoscopic systems than previous techniques. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 8, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

UMSOM researchers find that silent carriers of malaria are unlikely to develop the disease
(University of Maryland School of Medicine) In regions where malaria illness is widespread, it is common to find many individuals who are infected with malaria parasites (Plasmodium falciparum), but without symptoms. New research conducted by the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM) shows that treating these silent malaria cases could help stop the spread of malaria to others. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 7, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Decision to approve Arundel Medical Center cardiac program appealed — again
The multi-year battle over whether Anne Arundel Medical Center will get to host the state ’s newest open heart surgery program continues, as University of Maryland Capital Health Region has appealed a recent court decision on the matter. A Prince George’s County Circuit Court judge gave the Annapolis hospital legal clearance for the cardiac program on May 22. The decision came after Anne Arundel Medical Center (AAMC) had fought two other nearby hospitals, University of Maryland’s Baltimore… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - June 7, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Morgan Eichensehr Source Type: news

Decision to approve Arundel Medical Center cardiac program appealed — again
The multi-year battle over whether Anne Arundel Medical Center will get to host the state ’s newest open heart surgery program continues, as University of Maryland Capital Health Region has appealed a recent court decision on the matter. A Prince George’s County Circuit Court judge gave the Annapolis hospital legal clearance for the cardiac program on May 22. The decision came after Anne Arundel Medical Center (AAMC) had fought two other nearby hospitals, University of Maryland’s Baltimore… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - June 7, 2018 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Morgan Eichensehr Source Type: news

New research identifies how blind cavefish lose their eyes
(University of Maryland) Blind cavefish (Astyanax mexicanus) lose critical eye tissues within a few days after their eyes begin to develop. According to a new study, this loss of eye tissues happens through epigenetic silencing of eye-related genes. The researchers identified roles for more than two dozen genes that are shared by humans--most of which have been implicated in various human eye disorders. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 6, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Facility Expertise Matters for Mesothelioma Surgery
Patients having aggressive surgery for pleural mesothelioma at high-volume facilities experience fewer complications, shorter hospital stays and lower 30-day readmission rates than those treated at low-volume centers. Overall survival rates were higher and 90-day mortality rates were lower at the high-volume facilities, according to a study published in the June issue of Lung Cancer. The new study, based on data from the National Cancer Database (NCDB), is the largest to compare facility volume with post-surgery outcome for pleural mesothelioma. “In general, going to a high-volume center for oncology care makes sens...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - May 30, 2018 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Matt Mauney Source Type: news

Having an abortion does not lead to depression
This study's findings, published in JAMA Psychiatry, suggest those policies are misguided. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 30, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

UMD food scientist guides students towards revelatory findings in women's health
(University of Maryland) In an effort to sustain and educate the next generation of food safety experts in the United States, Dr. Bob Buchanan of the University of Maryland has served as a scientific mentor to a pair of academically accelerated high school students who are challenging the current food avoidance recommendations for pregnant women as established by the CDC and ACOG. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 25, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Robert Jarvik: An Innovator with Heart
Robert Jarvik, MD, remembers Dec. 2, 1982, as vividly as if it were last week. He was 36 at the time and a device he designed, the Jarvik 7 artificial heart, was about to be implanted into a human patient for the first time. That patient, a retired dentist named Barney Clark, had been at the University of Utah Hospital in Salt Lake City for about a week, and his medical team, lead by William DeVries, MD, planned to put off the surgery just a little while longer in hopes of getting Clark as strong as possible for the operation. But Clark wasn't getting stronger. Robert Jarvik, MD, will receive the MDEA Lifetime Ac...
Source: MDDI - May 17, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Amanda Pedersen Tags: MD & M East (New York) Cardiovascular Design Source Type: news

Emissions of a Banned Ozone-Eating Chemical Are Rising Again and Scientists Don ’t Know Why
(WASHINGTON) — Something strange is happening with a now-banned chemical that eats away at Earth’s protective ozone layer: Scientists say there’s more of it — not less — going into the atmosphere and they don’t know where it is coming from. When a hole in the ozone formed over Antarctica, countries around the world in 1987 agreed to phase out several types of ozone-depleting chemicals called chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs). Production was banned, emissions fell and the hole slowly shrank. But starting in 2013, emissions of the second most common kind started rising, according to a study in We...
Source: TIME: Science - May 16, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Seth Borenstein / AP Tags: Uncategorized Environment onetime Source Type: news

New research: Some gut bacteria may protect against intestinal infection
(University of Maryland School of Medicine) Scientists have for the first time found evidence that a microbe in the human gut is associated with protection from typhoid fever infection. If the research is borne out, it could offer an exciting new way to reduce intestinal infections. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - May 8, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Study discovers new molecular mechanism likely involved in cancer metastasis
(University of Maryland Baltimore County) Scientists knew the PDK1 signaling pathway was active in metastasizing cancer cells, but no one knew why. New research has found for the first time that the PDK1 pathway regulates the formation of a three-protein core complex that facilitates purine biosynthesis. Further work aims to map all the protein complexes and signaling pathways they regulate in cancer cells, which would open doors to new ways of disrupting or even preventing metastasis. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - May 7, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Psychiatric Diagnosis Common in Medicaid-Insured Children
FRIDAY, May 4, 2018 -- About 20 percent of Medicaid-insured children receive a psychiatric diagnosis by age 8 years, according to a study published online April 30 in JAMA Pediatrics. Dinci Pennap, M.P.H., from the University of Maryland in... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - May 4, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Expert disease detective unravels mysterious illness that killed famed 12th century sultan
(University of Maryland School of Medicine) Saladin may not be well known in the West, but even 800 years after his death, he remains famous in the Middle East. During his illustrious life, he successfully led armies against the invading Crusaders and conquered several kingdoms. But his death remains a mystery. Now an expert disease detective has a new theory about what may have killed him. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - May 4, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Treat HTLV-1 virus or risk it spreading widely, doctor who discovered it warns
Robert Gallo says prevalence in Indigenous communities is ‘extraordinary’ and if he lived in Australia he would be testedSign up to receive the top stories in Australia every day at noonOne of the world ’s most eminent scientists says Australia needs to speed up testing andtreatment for the lethal human immune virus, HTLV-1, or risk it spreading more widely, and admits he and others could have done more up to now.Dr Robert Gallo from the University of Maryland school of medicine said: “If I was in Australia and this virus was around, it’s not going to stay only in the Aboriginal community, and...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 4, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Lorena Allam Indigenous affairs editor Tags: HTLV-1 virus Indigenous Australians Science Society Australia news Source Type: news

UMD researcher discovers mechanisms and epigenetic markers with implications for diseases ranging from cancers to infertility
(University of Maryland) A UMD researcher uncovered new mechanisms that dictate the development of germline stem cells. Mechanisms were found to be associated with genes responsible for cancers and viral infections among other major diseases. Markers used to identify male germ cells were discovered, exploring how environmental factors or epigenetics affect these cells and providing significant insight into treatments for male infertility. Findings set the stage for chickens as a more prominent model organism for stem cell research. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 30, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

For Cancer Centers, Proton Therapy ’ s Promise Is Undercut by Lagging Demand
Hospitals and private investors keep pumping vast sums of money into an advanced type of radiology whose effectiveness, in many cases, has not yet been shown to justify its price. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - April 27, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: JAY HANCOCK Tags: Health Insurance and Managed Care Prostate Cancer Radiation Particle Accelerators Law and Legislation Emanuel, Ezekiel J Food and Drug Administration Georgetown University University of Maryland Medical Center Memorial Sloan-Kettering Ca Source Type: news

Honoree: University of Maryland Capital Region Medical Center
Health care in Prince George ’s County is slated to get a major upgrade with the long-awaited groundbreaking for the University of Maryland Capital Region Medical Center. In January 2017, the Prince George’s County Revenue Authority and Retail Properties of America Inc. sold around 26 acres of Largo land to Dimension Healt h Corp. on behalf of the University of Maryland Medical Center.  When UMMS assumed ownership of Dimensions in September it assumed control of the site and moved quickly to… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - April 27, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Joseph Coombs Source Type: news

As Younger Men's Smoking Rises, So Does Their Stroke Risk
THURSDAY, April 19, 2018 -- Men under 50 who smoke cigarettes are increasing their risk for a stroke, researchers warn. And the more they smoke, the greater their stroke risk, reported the University of Maryland investigators. The bottom line:... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - April 19, 2018 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Army research rejuvenates older zinc batteries
(U.S. Army Research Laboratory) Army scientists, with a team of researchers from the University of Maryland and the National Institute of Standards and Technology, have created a water-based zinc battery that is simultaneously powerful, rechargeable and intrinsically safe. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 17, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

University of Maryland Laurel Regional Hospital seeks OK for $50 million upgrade
The University of Maryland Laurel Regional Hospital is seeking approval from state regulators to invest $50 million to upgrade its aging medical facilities. A filing with the Maryland Health Care Commission details plans to convert the hospital and construct a replacement freestanding medical facility, to be called UM Laurel Medical Center. A free-standing medical facility offers fewer medical services, including less inpatient care, than a full-servi ce hospital. The new one in Laurel would offer… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - April 16, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Morgan Eichensehr Source Type: news

You Asked: What Is Inflammation, And Why Should I Care About It?
Your body can heal itself, which is pretty miraculous when you sit back and think about it. If you suffer a cut or infection—or if a disease, allergen or virus finds its way into you—your immune system reacts by sending specialized white blood cells to the affected area. These white blood cells can repair damage, stop the spread of infection or illness and in some cases eradicate the intruder. This whole response is called inflammation. “Inflammation is an activation of cells and cell-derived components that have the job of fighting invasions, and in some cases just sponging up or clearing out damaged cel...
Source: TIME: Health - April 11, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Markham Heid Tags: Uncategorized healthytime medicine Source Type: news

UCLA scientists discover that cells contain mitochondria specialized to build fats
Mitochondria, known to most people as the “powerhouses of the cell,” have been recognized for decades as the cellular organelle where sugars and fats are oxidized to generate energy. Now, new research by UCLA scientists has found that not all mitochondria fit this definition. Within each cell a group of specialized mitochondria can be f ound attached to fat droplets. Rather than burn fat to create energy, these specialized mitochondria are responsible for providing the energy to build and store fat molecules.“This is really a whole new view of mitochondria and what they can do,” said lead author Dr....
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - April 6, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

New CDC Director Named
Dr. Robert Redfield has been named the new director for the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) by Secretary of Health and Human Services Alex Azar. The position does not require Senate confirmation. The announcement came on March 21, 2018, a couple of months after former CDC Director Brenda Fitzgerald resigned from the position because of her myriad conflicts of interest arising from her failure to divest from investments in tobacco and healthcare companies. Redfield, a virologist and professor at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, has an extensive background in HIV/AIDS research. He manages...
Source: Public Policy Reports - April 2, 2018 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

UMD researcher uncovers protein used to outsmart the human immune system
(University of Maryland) A UMD researcher has uncovered a mechanism by which the bacteria that causes Lyme disease fights innate immune responses, and observed a never-before-seen phenomena demonstrating the bacteria can spring back in the body weeks later. Understanding this bacteria, one of only a few pathogens that can actually persist in the body for long periods of time, has major implications for treatment of tick-borne diseases like Lyme disease, an increasingly chronic and prevalent public health issue. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 2, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

New study finds world’s largest desert, the Sahara, has grown by 10 percent since 1920
The Sahara Desert has expanded by about 10 percent since 1920, according to a new study by National Science Foundation (NSF)-funded scientists at the University of Maryland (UMD). The research is the first to assess century-scale changes to the boundaries of the world's largest desert. It suggests that other deserts could be expanding as well. The study is published today in the Journal of Climate. "The trends in Africa of hot summers getting hotter and rainy seasons ... More at https://www.nsf.gov/news/news_summ.jsp?cntn_id=244804&WT.mc_id=USNSF_51&WT.mc_ev=click This is an NSF News item. (Source: NSF News)
Source: NSF News - March 29, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: news

UMD Researchers explore how personality affects gamified diabetes self-management
(University of Maryland) Researchers at the University of Maryland designed and tested an app for self-managing diabetes for insight into how personality differences might explain why mobile health apps help some patients more than others. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 29, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Largest-ever genetic study of stroke provides new insight into the disease
(University of Maryland School of Medicine) An international research group studying 520,000 people from around the world has identified 22 new genetic risk factors for stroke, tripling the number of gene regions known to affect stroke risk. These results provide new clues on stroke mechanisms and could help scientists identify drug targets for treatment. The work is the largest genetic study on stroke ever. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 28, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news