Solar evaporator offers a fresh route to fresh water
(University of Maryland) Researchers at the University of Maryland's A. James Clark School of Engineering have demonstrated a successful prototype of one critical component for affordable small-scale desalination: an inexpensive solar evaporator, made of wood. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 16, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

AGS honors Dr. Nicole brandt for training future geriatrics leaders in pharmacy & beyond
(American Geriatrics Society) The American Geriatrics Society today announced that Nicole Brandt, PharmD, MBA, BCGP, BCPP, FASCP, of the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy will be honored with the 2019 Dennis W. Jahnigen Award celebrating work to train health professionals in the care we all need as we age. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 16, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Climate change could undermine children's education and development in the tropics
(National Socio-Environmental Synthesis Center) A new study by a University of Maryland researcher published in the April 15, 2019, issue of the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences concludes that exposure to extreme heat and precipitation in prenatal and early childhood years in countries of the global tropics could make it harder for children to attain secondary school education, even for better-off households. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 15, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Kaiser Permanente named in Baltimore mayor's book-sale scandal
Oakland-based Kaiser Permanente is among hospitals, healthcare providers and other organizations reported April 1 by the Baltimore Sun to have purchased thousands of copies of the Baltimore mayor's self-published books in a growing scandal that threatens her future in office. Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan has asked for a criminal investigation into book sales totaling about $800,000. What began as a query into Mayor Catherine Pugh’s $500,000 in book sales to the University of Maryland Medical System… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - April 11, 2019 Category: American Health Authors: Hannah Norman Source Type: news

Kaiser Permanente named in Baltimore mayor's book-sale scandal
Oakland-based Kaiser Permanente is among hospitals, healthcare providers and other organizations reported April 1 by the Baltimore Sun to have purchased thousands of copies of the Baltimore mayor's self-published books in a growing scandal that threatens her future in office. Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan has asked for a criminal investigation into book sales totaling about $800,000. What began as a query into Mayor Catherine Pugh’s $500,000 in book sales to the University of Maryland Medical System… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - April 11, 2019 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Hannah Norman Source Type: news

Kaiser Permanente named in Baltimore mayor's book-sale scandal
Oakland-based Kaiser Permanente is among hospitals, healthcare providers and other organizations reported April 1 by the Baltimore Sun to have purchased thousands of copies of the Baltimore mayor's self-published books in a growing scandal that threatens her future in office. Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan has asked for a criminal investigation into book sales totaling about $800,000. What began as a query into Mayor Catherine Pugh’s $500,000 in book sales to the University of Maryland Medical System… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - April 11, 2019 Category: American Health Authors: Hannah Norman Source Type: news

Kaiser Permanente named in Baltimore mayor's book-sale scandal
Oakland-based Kaiser Permanente is among hospitals, healthcare providers and other organizations reported April 1 by the Baltimore Sun to have purchased thousands of copies of the Baltimore mayor's self-published books in a growing scandal that threatens her future in office. Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan has asked for a criminal investigation into book sales totaling about $800,000. What began as a query into Mayor Catherine Pugh’s $500,000 in book sales to the University of Maryland Medical System… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - April 11, 2019 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Hannah Norman Source Type: news

Long-lived bats could hold secrets to mammal longevity
(University of Maryland) University of Maryland researchers analyzed an evolutionary tree reconstructed from the DNA of a majority of known bat species and found four bat lineages that exhibit extreme longevity. They also identified, for the first time, two life history features that predict extended life spans in bats. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 10, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Odds of Hay Fever Up With Very Early, Late Spring Onset
THURSDAY, April 4, 2019 -- Very early onset and late onset of spring are associated with increased odds of hay fever, according to a study published online March 28 in PLOS ONE. Amir Sapkota, Ph.D., from the University of Maryland in College Park,... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - April 4, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

UMD Institute for Genome Sciences awarded $17.5 million for infectious disease research
(University of Maryland School of Medicine) The Institute for Genome Sciences (IGS) at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM) was awarded $17.5 million from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) to fund the IGS Genome Center for Infectious Diseases (GCID) for another five years. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 4, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Opioid epidemic is increasing rates of some infectious diseases
(NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases) The US faces a public health crisis as the opioid epidemic fuels growing rates of certain infectious diseases, including HIV/AIDS, hepatitis, heart infections, and skin and soft tissue infections. Infectious disease and substance use disorder professionals must work together to stem this public health threat, according to an article co-authored by officials from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases and the Institute of Human Virology at the University of Maryland School of Medicine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 3, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Mesothelioma Tissue Bank Identifies Survival Factors
This study was on the exploration of risk factors affecting mortality.” The Lancet Respiratory Medicine published the findings early in 2019. Factors Associated with Longer Survival Age under 45 years when diagnosed Female gender Peritoneal mesothelioma subtype Epithelioid histology subtype Treatment including surgery and chemotherapy Stage 1 at time of diagnosis “The identification of these factors could help patients at risk for therapy failure who may benefit from novel interventions, or avoiding treatments that are not effective, or with high mortality risk,” the re...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - April 2, 2019 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Daniel King Source Type: news

Hay Fever On The Rise Due To Climate Change
BOSTON (CBS) — If you suffer from hay fever, climate change is doing you no favors. A new study from the University of Maryland finds changes in the timing of spring is linked to more allergies across the U.S. Researchers surveyed more than 300,000 people and found that in areas of the country where spring starts earlier than normal, there was a 14 percent rise in hay fever. They found similar results in areas where spring starts later than usual. Plants are highly dependent on temperature and even a small change in when a tree flowers can have a significant impact on how many people will suffer from hay fever each y...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - April 1, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Boston News Health Healthwatch Seen On WBZ-TV Syndicated Local Allergies Climate Change Dr. Mallika Marshall Source Type: news

Mayor Pugh takes leave of absence; Hogan calls for investigation into book deal
Mayor Catherine Pugh is taking a leave of absence, effective midnight, saying she needs to focus on her health. The leave comes amid an ongoing scandal over a controversial children's book deal with the University of Maryland Medical System and several health insurers and Gov. Larry Hogan's call for an investigation into her book sales. City Council President Bernard C. “Jack” Young will replace Pugh during her absence as required by the city's charter. "Mayor Catherine E. Pugh has been battling… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - April 1, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Melody Simmons Source Type: news

Mayor Pugh takes leave of absence; Hogan calls for investigation into book deal
Mayor Catherine Pugh is taking a leave of absence, effective midnight, saying she needs to focus on her health. The leave comes amid an ongoing scandal over a controversial children's book deal with the University of Maryland Medical System and several health insurers and Gov. Larry Hogan's call for an investigation into her book sales. City Council President Bernard C. “Jack” Young will replace Pugh during her absence as required by the city's charter. "Mayor Catherine E. Pugh has been battling… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - April 1, 2019 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Melody Simmons Source Type: news

New study measures UV-filters in seawater and corals from Hawaii
(University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science) Scientists have completed the first comprehensive assessment of UV-filters in surface seawater, sediment, and coral tissue from multiple coral reefs around the island of Oahu, Hawaii. UV-filters are active ingredients in sunscreens, but are also added to many other products, including textile, plastics, and paint to prevent photo degradation. The UV-filters oxybenzone and octinoxate have received attention by policy makers regarding their potential impact on corals. The research will help provide a baseline for future risk assessments. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 1, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Pugh calls $500K 'Healthy Holly' book deal 'an incredible mistake'
Mayor Catherine Pugh apologized Thursday during her first public remarks about a controversial children's book deal with the University of Maryland Medical System that has rocked city hall. The mayor admitted she did not have a written contract for the deal, which totaled $500,000. She called the book deal a mistake and read a carefully worded statement about the publication of the books. "In hindsight, this arrangement with the University of Maryland was an incredible mistake," sh e said. "I apologize… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - March 29, 2019 Category: American Health Authors: Melody Simmons Source Type: news

Changes in onset of spring linked to more allergies across the US
(University of Maryland) Human-induced climate change is disrupting nature's calendar, including when plants bloom and the spring season starts, and new research from the University of School of Public Health suggests we're increasingly paying the price for it in the form of seasonal allergies. The study, based on over 300,000 respondents between 2002 and 2013, shows that hay fever allergies increase when the timing of spring 'greenup' changes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 28, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Allergic reactions play role in sexual behavior development in unborn males/females
(University of Maryland School of Medicine) Researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine and colleagues at Ohio State University have discovered that allergic reactions trigger changes in brain behavior development in unborn males and females. This latest brain development discovery will ultimately help researchers better understand how neurological conditions can differ between men and women. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 28, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Researchers discover a critical receptor involved in response to antidepressants like ketamine
(University of Maryland School of Medicine) Effective treatment of clinical depression remains a major mental health issue, with roughly 30 percent of patients who do not respond to any of the available treatments. Researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM) have discovered a crucial receptor called mGlu2 that is critical to the mechanism of fast-acting antidepressants such as ketamine when used to treat depression. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 28, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

3D printed tissues may keep athletes in action
(Rice University) Bioscientists at Rice and the University of Maryland with the Center for Engineering Complex Tissues learn to 3D-print scaffolds that may help heal osteochondral injuries of the sort suffered by many athletes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 28, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

UMD-Led researchers' wood-based technology creates electricity from heat
(University of Maryland) A University of Maryland-led research team has developed a flexible, wood-based membrane that someday could turn body heat into electricity. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 25, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

How the University of Maryland Medical System can work to repair its brand
"Lots of major brands have weathered some kind of crisis and have been able to recover. The public moves on pretty quickly. And soon enough, there will be some new crisis on people's minds." (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - March 22, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Morgan Eichensehr Source Type: news

UMMS CEO Chrencik asked to take leave of absence amid board controversy
University of Maryland Medical System's board has asked system CEO Robert Chrencik to take a temporary leave of absence, starting Monday. UMMS Chairman Stephen Burch made the announcement Thursday afternoon, as reports continue to surface on business deals that some UMMS board members have with the nonprofit system which have raised concerns about conflicts of interest and improper dealing. Chrencik has served as UMMS' CEO since 2 008. He helped oversee the finances of the system since its creation… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - March 22, 2019 Category: American Health Authors: Morgan Eichensehr Source Type: news

A defiant Pugh: 'I understand how it may look to some'
Mayor Catherine Pugh on Thursday vowed to keep writing children's books in a defensive and detailed statement amid an ongoing controversy over a $500,000 book deal she struck with the University of Maryland Medical System. "I plan to keep working to improve the health of children in our city, and I will keep writing – with this experience in mind," Pugh said in the statement released by her office a day after she told The Sun the crisis amounted to a "witch hunt." Pugh also outlined four actions… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - March 21, 2019 Category: American Health Authors: Melody Simmons Source Type: news

A defiant Pugh: 'I understand how it may look to some'
Mayor Catherine Pugh on Thursday vowed to keep writing children's books in a defensive and detailed statement amid an ongoing controversy over a $500,000 book deal she struck with the University of Maryland Medical System. "I plan to keep working to improve the health of children in our city, and I will keep writing – with this experience in mind," Pugh said in the statement released by her office a day after she told The Sun the crisis amounted to a "witch hunt." Pugh also outlined four actions… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - March 21, 2019 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Melody Simmons Source Type: news

Discovery may lead to precision-based strategy for triple negative breast cancer
(Indiana University) A researcher in the Vera Bradley Foundation Center for Breast Cancer Research at the Indiana University School of Medicine, working in collaboration with researchers from the University of Maryland, recently reported several important findings related to triple negative breast cancer and its future treatment in the journal Nature Nanotechnology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - March 21, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Bacteria and immunity in cervix may be key to predicting premature births
(University of Maryland School of Medicine) Spontaneous preterm birth (sPTB), defined as birth before 37 weeks of gestation, and the related complications, are the largest contributors to infant death in the United States and worldwide, according to the World Health Organization. Researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM) have discovered that bacteria and innate immune factors in a woman's birth canal and cervix may increase the risk of spontaneous preterm birth or provide protection against such births. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 21, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

UMMS board member defends engineering contract with health system
A University of Maryland Medical System board member is pushing back against concerns that his company was improperly awarded a contract from the hospital system. James A. Soltesz, CEO of Soltesz Cos., is one of four board members that were asked to take a leave of absence on Tuesday as UMMS investigates concerns about deals worth hundreds of thousands of dollars that some of its board members have with the nonprofit system. In a statement released Wednes day morning, Soltesz said the engineering… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - March 20, 2019 Category: American Health Authors: Jessica Iannetta Source Type: news

2 UMMS board members resign, 4 asked to take leave amid concerns about business contracts
Two University of Maryland Medical System board members have resigned and four more have been asked to take a leave of absence after concerns were raised about their business relationships with the hospital system. John W. Dillon of Dillon Consulting and Robert L. Pevenstein, a tech entrepreneur and president of consulting firm Princeville Partners, have both resigned from the board. Chairman Stephen A. Burch has also asked four members that currently have business deals with the system to take… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - March 20, 2019 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Jessica Iannetta Source Type: news

UMd. School of Nursing, CCBC launch dual admission agreement
The University of Maryland School of Nursing and the Community College of Baltimore County have launched a new program that will allow nursing students to get their degrees faster and less expensively. Under a new dual admission agreement, CCBC will become the 13th community college in the state where students can begin taking classes in University of Maryland's bachelor of science in nursing program while still working toward their associate degree in nursing at CCBC. The arrangement will save… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - March 19, 2019 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Jessica Iannetta Source Type: news

Tracking turtles with telemetry
(University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science) A new model has been created that can forecast the location of Eastern Pacific leatherback turtles along the coast of Central and South America in an effort to decrease bycatch mortality of this critically endangered and ecologically important species. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 14, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Hoth Therapeutics Enters into Commercial Licensing Agreement with University of Maryland, Baltimore and Isoprene Pharmaceuticals Inc.
Hoth secures exclusive rights to develop and commercialize therapeutic compounds for dermatological treatments Lead compounds show potent in vivo anti-cancer activity Lead compounds show promise in vitro for treating dermatology conditions Good or... Biopharmaceuticals, Dermatology, Licensing Hoth Therapeutics, Isoprene Pharmaceuticals (Source: HSMN NewsFeed)
Source: HSMN NewsFeed - March 13, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Mesothelioma Treatment Combines Proton and Photodynamic Therapy
Intraoperative photodynamic therapy combined with novel proton radiation improved survival time significantly for recent patients with advanced-stage pleural mesothelioma. The study — the first to measure the impact of this combination — involved 10 consecutive patients treated at the University of Pennsylvania’s Abramson Cancer Center. The treatment regimen resulted in a 90 percent, two-year disease control rate and an impressive 30.3-month median overall survival from the time of diagnosis. All 10 patients were diagnosed before treatment began with stage 3 or stage 4 disease, which typically results in ...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - March 12, 2019 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Matt Mauney Source Type: news

Researchers unveil progress and challenges in introducing typhoid conjugate vaccine in Africa/Asia
(University of Maryland School of Medicine) Each year there are nearly 11 million cases of typhoid, a disease that is spread through contaminated food, drink and water. Researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine are leading an international consortium that is studying the impact of a typhoid conjugate vaccine (TCV) in an effort to accelerate introduction of the vaccine in countries in sub-Saharan Africa and Asia where there is a high burden of typhoid. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - March 8, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Scientists find worms that recently evolved the ability to regrow a complete head
(University of Maryland) New study reveals regeneration of amputated body parts is not always an ancient trait and scientists might need to rethink the way they compare animals with regenerative abilities. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 6, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Menstrual cycle phase influences cocaine craving
(Elsevier) Menstrual cycle may influence addiction risk in women, according to a new study in Biological Psychiatry by researchers at the National Institute on Drug Abuse and University of Maryland School of Medicine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 5, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

University of Maryland Medical Center seeks state approval for new $194M cancer center
Local car dealer Leonard Stoler and his wife, Roslyn, have already gifted $25 million toward the expansion project — the largest philanthropic donation in the center's 195-year history. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - February 27, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Morgan Eichensehr Source Type: news

Targeting Certain Lymph Nodes Could Change Mesothelioma Treatment
Thoracic surgeon Dr. Joseph Friedberg at the University of Maryland School of Medicine has identified previously underutilized lymph nodes that could change the way pleural mesothelioma is diagnosed, staged and treated. Friedberg is the head of the Division of Thoracic surgery at Maryland and director of the Mesothelioma and Thoracic Oncology Treatment and Research Center. The findings are based upon the posterior intercostal lymph nodes — a part of the lymphatic system between the ribs near the spine — in 56 mesothelioma patients who were part of a recent clinical trial. Friedberg detailed the groundbreaking f...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - February 26, 2019 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Matt Mauney Source Type: news

Study outlines targeted treatment option for aggressive breast cancer
(University of Maryland) New findings outline a targeted therapeutic strategy to treat triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) -- a potential first for the particularly aggressive form of breast cancer. As demonstrated in the group's paper published today in Nature Nanotechnology, the proposed strategy centers on nanotechnology-based precision-targeting of a gene known as POLR2A. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - February 25, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

NLM Launches Medicine on Screen
Widely-appreciated research resource available ahead of February 28 public lecture by the University of Maryland ’s Oliver Gaycken, “Fantastic Voyages Through the Historical Audio-Visual Collections at the National Library of Medicine” (Source: NLM General Announcements)
Source: NLM General Announcements - February 21, 2019 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

EMS Today 2019: Prince George's County (MD) Chief Barksdale Welcomes Crowd
At EMS Today’s Opening Ceremonies on Wednesday, Prince George’s C.y (MD) Chief Benjamin Barksdale welcomed the crowd. More: Photos from Day 1 of EMS Today | A.J. Heightman: 'We Are Complete Responders' “I am honored to bring you greetings and welcome from County Executive Angela D. Alsobrooks and the nearly one million residents of Prince George’s County, home to the nation’s largest and busiest combined career and volunteer fire/EMS department. “Prince George’s County is also home to the University of Maryland at College Park; NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center; A...
Source: JEMS Operations - February 20, 2019 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Operations EMS Today Source Type: news

Climate of North American cities will shift hundreds of miles in one generation
(University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science) In one generation, the climate experienced in many North American cities is projected to change to that of locations hundreds of miles away -- or to a new climate unlike any found in North America today. A new study and interactive web application aim to help the public understand how climate change will impact the lives of people who live in urban areas of the United States and Canada. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 12, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Genome scientists develop novel approaches to studying widespread form of malaria
(University of Maryland School of Medicine) Scientists at the Institute of Genome Sciences (IGS) at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM) have developed a novel way with genome sequences to study and better understand transmission, treat and ultimately eradicate Plasmodium vivax, the most widespread form of malaria. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - February 8, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

UMMC, fire department look to eliminate unnecessary ER visits with mobile care pilot in West Baltimore
The University of Maryland Medical Center wants to cut down the number of West Baltimore patients visiting emergency rooms, starting with a pilot program that seeks to give residents better access to care and could save the hospital and city hundreds of thousands of dollars annually. A pair of mobile health pilot initiatives launched last year, funded by a two-year, $4 million grant from the state's Health Services Cost Review Commission. UMMC is working with Baltimore's City Fire Department, city… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines - February 5, 2019 Category: Health Management Authors: Morgan Eichensehr Source Type: news

Shooting Places University of Maryland Medical Center on Lockdown
BALTIMORE (AP) — A Baltimore hospital went on lockdown Monday after a 24-year-old employee was critically wounded by a gunman near an ambulance bay at the University of Maryland Medical Center. Lt. Col. Kevin Jones of the Baltimore Police Department said the shooter was arrested with a loaded pistol a few blocks away from the hospital. He said the gunman knows the victim — shot in the face and buttocks — but details about a motive were not immediately available. Police later said 26-year old Jamar Haughton of Baltimore is charged with attempted murder, assault, reckless endangerment, and several firearm-r...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - February 5, 2019 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: News Source Type: news

Earth ’s North Pole Shifts About 34 Miles Per Year, Report Finds
(WASHINGTON) — True north isn’t quite where it used to be. Earth’s north magnetic pole has been drifting so fast in the last few decades that scientists that past estimates are no longer accurate enough for precise navigation. On Monday, they released an update of where true north really was, nearly a year ahead of schedule. The magnetic north pole is wandering about 34 miles (55 kilometers) a year. It crossed the international date line in 2017, and is leaving the Canadian Arctic on its way to Siberia. The constant shift is a problem for compasses in smartphones and some consumer electronics. Airplanes a...
Source: TIME: Science - February 4, 2019 Category: Science Authors: SETH BORENSTEIN / AP Tags: Uncategorized onetime space Source Type: news

UMD study finds exercise benefits brains, changes blood flow in older adults
(University of Maryland) Exercise training alters brain blood flow and improves cognitive performance in older adults, though not in the way you might think. A new study published by University of Maryland School of Public Health researchers in the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease showed that exercise was associated with improved brain function in a group of adults diagnosed with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and a decrease in the blood flow in key brain regions. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 31, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How Kindling Catches Flame: U-MD Transforming Undergrad Biology Education
At lunchtime, during a busy fall-semester day at the University of Maryland, College Park (UMD), a conference room is soon filled with research and teaching faculty, laboratory instructors, postdoctoral scholars, graduate students, and education specialists. The diverse group gathers in the Biosciences Research Building on a regular basis to focus on one thing: improving students' conceptual understanding of host–pathogen interactions. Find out more here.       (Source: Eye on Education)
Source: Eye on Education - January 24, 2019 Category: Biology Authors: BioScience Source Type: news

New 3D nanoprinting strategy opens door to revolution in medicine, robotics
(University of Maryland) Engineers at the University of Maryland (UMD) have created the first 3D-printed fluid circuit element so tiny that 10 could rest on the width of a human hair. The diode ensures fluids move in only a single direction -- a critical feature for products like implantable devices that release therapies directly into the body. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 23, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news