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Robert Jarvik: An Innovator with Heart
Robert Jarvik, MD, remembers Dec. 2, 1982, as vividly as if it were last week. He was 36 at the time and a device he designed, the Jarvik 7 artificial heart, was about to be implanted into a human patient for the first time. That patient, a retired dentist named Barney Clark, had been at the University of Utah Hospital in Salt Lake City for about a week, and his medical team, lead by William DeVries, MD, planned to put off the surgery just a little while longer in hopes of getting Clark as strong as possible for the operation. But Clark wasn't getting stronger. Robert Jarvik, MD, will receive the MDEA Lifetime Ac...
Source: MDDI - May 17, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Amanda Pedersen Tags: MD & M East (New York) Cardiovascular Design Source Type: news

Emissions of a Banned Ozone-Eating Chemical Are Rising Again and Scientists Don ’t Know Why
(WASHINGTON) — Something strange is happening with a now-banned chemical that eats away at Earth’s protective ozone layer: Scientists say there’s more of it — not less — going into the atmosphere and they don’t know where it is coming from. When a hole in the ozone formed over Antarctica, countries around the world in 1987 agreed to phase out several types of ozone-depleting chemicals called chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs). Production was banned, emissions fell and the hole slowly shrank. But starting in 2013, emissions of the second most common kind started rising, according to a study in We...
Source: TIME: Science - May 16, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Seth Borenstein / AP Tags: Uncategorized Environment onetime Source Type: news

New research: Some gut bacteria may protect against intestinal infection
(University of Maryland School of Medicine) Scientists have for the first time found evidence that a microbe in the human gut is associated with protection from typhoid fever infection. If the research is borne out, it could offer an exciting new way to reduce intestinal infections. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - May 8, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Study discovers new molecular mechanism likely involved in cancer metastasis
(University of Maryland Baltimore County) Scientists knew the PDK1 signaling pathway was active in metastasizing cancer cells, but no one knew why. New research has found for the first time that the PDK1 pathway regulates the formation of a three-protein core complex that facilitates purine biosynthesis. Further work aims to map all the protein complexes and signaling pathways they regulate in cancer cells, which would open doors to new ways of disrupting or even preventing metastasis. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - May 7, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Psychiatric Diagnosis Common in Medicaid-Insured Children
FRIDAY, May 4, 2018 -- About 20 percent of Medicaid-insured children receive a psychiatric diagnosis by age 8 years, according to a study published online April 30 in JAMA Pediatrics. Dinci Pennap, M.P.H., from the University of Maryland in... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - May 4, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Expert disease detective unravels mysterious illness that killed famed 12th century sultan
(University of Maryland School of Medicine) Saladin may not be well known in the West, but even 800 years after his death, he remains famous in the Middle East. During his illustrious life, he successfully led armies against the invading Crusaders and conquered several kingdoms. But his death remains a mystery. Now an expert disease detective has a new theory about what may have killed him. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - May 4, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Treat HTLV-1 virus or risk it spreading widely, doctor who discovered it warns
Robert Gallo says prevalence in Indigenous communities is ‘extraordinary’ and if he lived in Australia he would be testedSign up to receive the top stories in Australia every day at noonOne of the world ’s most eminent scientists says Australia needs to speed up testing andtreatment for the lethal human immune virus, HTLV-1, or risk it spreading more widely, and admits he and others could have done more up to now.Dr Robert Gallo from the University of Maryland school of medicine said: “If I was in Australia and this virus was around, it’s not going to stay only in the Aboriginal community, and...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 4, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Lorena Allam Indigenous affairs editor Tags: HTLV-1 virus Indigenous Australians Science Society Australia news Source Type: news

UMD researcher discovers mechanisms and epigenetic markers with implications for diseases ranging from cancers to infertility
(University of Maryland) A UMD researcher uncovered new mechanisms that dictate the development of germline stem cells. Mechanisms were found to be associated with genes responsible for cancers and viral infections among other major diseases. Markers used to identify male germ cells were discovered, exploring how environmental factors or epigenetics affect these cells and providing significant insight into treatments for male infertility. Findings set the stage for chickens as a more prominent model organism for stem cell research. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 30, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

For Cancer Centers, Proton Therapy ’ s Promise Is Undercut by Lagging Demand
Hospitals and private investors keep pumping vast sums of money into an advanced type of radiology whose effectiveness, in many cases, has not yet been shown to justify its price. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - April 27, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: JAY HANCOCK Tags: Health Insurance and Managed Care Prostate Cancer Radiation Particle Accelerators Law and Legislation Emanuel, Ezekiel J Food and Drug Administration Georgetown University University of Maryland Medical Center Memorial Sloan-Kettering Ca Source Type: news

Honoree: University of Maryland Capital Region Medical Center
Health care in Prince George ’s County is slated to get a major upgrade with the long-awaited groundbreaking for the University of Maryland Capital Region Medical Center. In January 2017, the Prince George’s County Revenue Authority and Retail Properties of America Inc. sold around 26 acres of Largo land to Dimension Healt h Corp. on behalf of the University of Maryland Medical Center.  When UMMS assumed ownership of Dimensions in September it assumed control of the site and moved quickly to… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - April 27, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Joseph Coombs Source Type: news

As Younger Men's Smoking Rises, So Does Their Stroke Risk
THURSDAY, April 19, 2018 -- Men under 50 who smoke cigarettes are increasing their risk for a stroke, researchers warn. And the more they smoke, the greater their stroke risk, reported the University of Maryland investigators. The bottom line:... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - April 19, 2018 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Army research rejuvenates older zinc batteries
(U.S. Army Research Laboratory) Army scientists, with a team of researchers from the University of Maryland and the National Institute of Standards and Technology, have created a water-based zinc battery that is simultaneously powerful, rechargeable and intrinsically safe. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 17, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

University of Maryland Laurel Regional Hospital seeks OK for $50 million upgrade
The University of Maryland Laurel Regional Hospital is seeking approval from state regulators to invest $50 million to upgrade its aging medical facilities. A filing with the Maryland Health Care Commission details plans to convert the hospital and construct a replacement freestanding medical facility, to be called UM Laurel Medical Center. A free-standing medical facility offers fewer medical services, including less inpatient care, than a full-servi ce hospital. The new one in Laurel would offer… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - April 16, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Morgan Eichensehr Source Type: news

You Asked: What Is Inflammation, And Why Should I Care About It?
Your body can heal itself, which is pretty miraculous when you sit back and think about it. If you suffer a cut or infection—or if a disease, allergen or virus finds its way into you—your immune system reacts by sending specialized white blood cells to the affected area. These white blood cells can repair damage, stop the spread of infection or illness and in some cases eradicate the intruder. This whole response is called inflammation. “Inflammation is an activation of cells and cell-derived components that have the job of fighting invasions, and in some cases just sponging up or clearing out damaged cel...
Source: TIME: Health - April 11, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Markham Heid Tags: Uncategorized healthytime medicine Source Type: news

UCLA scientists discover that cells contain mitochondria specialized to build fats
Mitochondria, known to most people as the “powerhouses of the cell,” have been recognized for decades as the cellular organelle where sugars and fats are oxidized to generate energy. Now, new research by UCLA scientists has found that not all mitochondria fit this definition. Within each cell a group of specialized mitochondria can be f ound attached to fat droplets. Rather than burn fat to create energy, these specialized mitochondria are responsible for providing the energy to build and store fat molecules.“This is really a whole new view of mitochondria and what they can do,” said lead author Dr....
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - April 6, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

New CDC Director Named
Dr. Robert Redfield has been named the new director for the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) by Secretary of Health and Human Services Alex Azar. The position does not require Senate confirmation. The announcement came on March 21, 2018, a couple of months after former CDC Director Brenda Fitzgerald resigned from the position because of her myriad conflicts of interest arising from her failure to divest from investments in tobacco and healthcare companies. Redfield, a virologist and professor at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, has an extensive background in HIV/AIDS research. He manages...
Source: Public Policy Reports - April 2, 2018 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

UMD researcher uncovers protein used to outsmart the human immune system
(University of Maryland) A UMD researcher has uncovered a mechanism by which the bacteria that causes Lyme disease fights innate immune responses, and observed a never-before-seen phenomena demonstrating the bacteria can spring back in the body weeks later. Understanding this bacteria, one of only a few pathogens that can actually persist in the body for long periods of time, has major implications for treatment of tick-borne diseases like Lyme disease, an increasingly chronic and prevalent public health issue. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 2, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

New study finds world’s largest desert, the Sahara, has grown by 10 percent since 1920
The Sahara Desert has expanded by about 10 percent since 1920, according to a new study by National Science Foundation (NSF)-funded scientists at the University of Maryland (UMD). The research is the first to assess century-scale changes to the boundaries of the world's largest desert. It suggests that other deserts could be expanding as well. The study is published today in the Journal of Climate. "The trends in Africa of hot summers getting hotter and rainy seasons ... More at https://www.nsf.gov/news/news_summ.jsp?cntn_id=244804&WT.mc_id=USNSF_51&WT.mc_ev=click This is an NSF News item. (Source: NSF News)
Source: NSF News - March 29, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: news

UMD Researchers explore how personality affects gamified diabetes self-management
(University of Maryland) Researchers at the University of Maryland designed and tested an app for self-managing diabetes for insight into how personality differences might explain why mobile health apps help some patients more than others. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 29, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Largest-ever genetic study of stroke provides new insight into the disease
(University of Maryland School of Medicine) An international research group studying 520,000 people from around the world has identified 22 new genetic risk factors for stroke, tripling the number of gene regions known to affect stroke risk. These results provide new clues on stroke mechanisms and could help scientists identify drug targets for treatment. The work is the largest genetic study on stroke ever. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 28, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Sad In The Spring? Allergy-Mood Link Is Real
(CNN) — You know spring has sprung when hundreds of people daily turn to Twitter to vent about their itchy eyes, dripping nose and uncontrollable sneezing and coughing. Seasonal allergies, which affect about 36 million Americans, aren’t just an annoyance; many doctors agree that there is a real connection between allergies and mood. “‘Cranky’ is really the best word for it,” said Katie Ingram, 30, of Alexandria, Virginia, a triathlete who has seasonal allergies. “I take a lot of medication for it, and that makes me sleepy. And I can’t do a lot of the things that I like to do ...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - March 23, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health Allergies Local TV Source Type: news

AIDS Researcher Robert Redfield Is the New CDC Director. Here ’s Why the Pick Is Controversial
The Trump administration has tapped HIV researcher Dr. Robert Redfield to be the new leader of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Redfield will be replacing Dr. Brenda Fitzgerald, who stepped down from CDC director after Politico reported that she had bought shares in a tobacco company after accepting the position. Redfield will not require Senate confirmation. However, reactions to his selection have been mixed. Before joining the CDC, Redfield was a professor at the University of Maryland School of Medicine and the co-founder of the university’s Institute of Human Virology. Over his career, ...
Source: TIME: Health - March 22, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alexandra Sifferlin Tags: Uncategorized CDC CDC Director Dr. Robert Redfield healthytime public health Scientific misconduct Source Type: news

University of Maryland School of Medicine experts lead trial on avian flu vaccine
(University of Maryland School of Medicine) Vaccine experts at the University of Maryland School of Medicine have begun multiple clinical trials of vaccines designed to protect against H7N9, an avian influenza virus that was first reported in humans in 2013 in China. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 22, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

AIDS Researcher Robert R. Redfield Named to Lead the C.D.C.
Dr. Redfield, a Baltimore AIDS researcher and advocate for medication-assisted therapies to treat addiction, will take over the public health agency. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - March 21, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: SHEILA KAPLAN Tags: Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome United States Politics and Government Medicine and Health Centers for Disease Control and Prevention University of Maryland Fitzgerald, Brenda C (1946- ) Redfield, Robert R Trump, Donald J Baltimore (Md) Source Type: news

Here are the changes UMMC Midtown is making after 'patient dumping' incident, federal citation
University of Maryland Medical Center Midtown detailed its corrective action plans in reports filed with federal regulators. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - March 21, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Morgan Eichensehr Source Type: news

Reports: AIDS researcher is front runner to lead CDC
A renowned HIV and AIDS researcher is the front runner to lead the Atlanta-based Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, according to several media reports. Robert Redfield of the University of Maryland has emerged as the top choice to replace Brenda Fitzgerald, who resigned from the post in late January, Politico reports. "The Trump administration is aiming to announce its pick to lead CDC within the coming weeks," Politico says. Read the full story here. Redfield is currently overseeing… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - March 20, 2018 Category: Biotechnology Authors: David Allison Source Type: news

With big data, researchers identify new targets for lung disease treatments
(University of Maryland School of Medicine) Every year, approximately 12 million adults in the US are diagnosed with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, and 120,000 die from it. For people with COPD, Haemophilus influenzae, a bacterium, can be particularly dangerous. Now, researchers have unraveled how the bacterium adapts quickly, which may open new avenues for therapy for COPD and other diseases such as ear infections or pneumonia. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - March 19, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

AIDS Researcher Top Candidate to Lead the C.D.C.
The administration is vetting Dr. Robert Redfield, a founder of the University of Maryland ’ s Institute of Human Virology, for C.D.C. chief. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - March 17, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: SHEILA KAPLAN Tags: Dr. Robert Redfield Appointments and Executive Changes Centers for Disease Control and Prevention University of Maryland Source Type: news

Top candidate to lead CDC is an HIV/AIDS researcher
The top candidate to head the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is a longtime AIDS researcher who is well-respected for his clinical work but once took controversial positions on HIV testing. He has no apparent experience running a governmental public health agency. Robert Redfield, a professor of medicine at the University of Maryland School of […]Related:5 interesting findings about U.S. abortions from a new report on the current scienceFDA moves ahead with ‘historic’ plan to reduce nicotine in cigarettesFAQ: Are my frozen embryos safe? Everything you need to know about the freezer malfun...
Source: Washington Post: To Your Health - March 17, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

11 Things Nutritionists Eat at the Airport —and 4 They Avoid
This article originally appeared on Health.com (Source: TIME: Health)
Source: TIME: Health - March 13, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health.com Tags: Uncategorized Diet/Nutrition healthytime onetime Source Type: news

CAPCE Elects New Officers to Board of Directors
DALLAS—At the annual meeting of the Commission on Accreditation for Pre-Hospital Continuing Education Board of Directors (CAPCE), held February 28, 2018 in Dallas, Texas, new officers of the Board of Directors were elected. Please join us in congratulating our new officers: Andy Gienapp: Chair Andy Gienapp is the current EMS Manager for the Wyoming Office of Emergency Medical Services. A paramedic with over 28 years of emergency medical services experience, Andy has functioned in a variety of clinical and out-of-hospital settings. As the Wyoming EMS Manager, Andy is an active member of the National Association of Sta...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - March 8, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: CAPCE Tags: Training Industry News Source Type: news

Got the message? Your brainwaves will tell
(KU Leuven) The new technique was developed by Professor Tom Francart and his colleagues at KU Leuven, Belgium, in collaboration with the University of Maryland. It will allow for a more accurate diagnosis of patients who cannot actively participate in a speech understanding test because they're too young, for instance, or because they're in a coma. In the longer term, the method also holds potential for the development of smart hearing devices. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 8, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New study finds less research being published by female radiologists
(University of Maryland School of Medicine) A new study has found that although radiology research by women has increased significantly over the past five decades, the rate of this increase has leveled off since 2000. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 8, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Logo recognition associated with kids' choice of international junk foods
(University of Maryland) Young children in six low- and middle-income countries prefer junk foods over traditional and home cooked meals, according to a new University of Maryland School of Public Health study. Researchers investigated the links between marketing and media exposure and the preference for fast food in Brazil, China, India, Nigeria, Pakistan, and Russia. Kids who easily identified the logos of international brands were more likely to request and prefer the processed foods of low nutrition. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 6, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New technology may protect troops from blast-induced brain injury
(University of Maryland School of Medicine) Researchers have developed a new military vehicle shock absorbing device that may protect troops from traumatic brain injury after a land mine blast. Over the past 18 years of conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan, more than 250,000 troops have suffered such injuries. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 26, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

The Journal of Emergency Medical Services Announce the 2018 John P. Pryor, MD/ Street Medicine Society Award
CHARLOTTE, NC –  Benjamin J. Lawner, DO, MS, EMT-P, FACEP, has been awarded the 2018 John P. Pryor, MD/Street Medicine Society Award at the EMS Today conference in Charlotte, NC. Dr. Benjamin J. Lawner is recognized as an emergency medicine advocate focusing on clinical and educational excellence. Dr. Lawner is currently the Medical Director of Prehospital Services for Allegheny General Hospital in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. His academic and operational responsibilities include oversight for EMS agencies, a critical care transport program, and graduate medical education in emergency medical services. D...
Source: JEMS Administration and Leadership - February 21, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: Industry News Administration and Leadership EMS Today Source Type: news

The Journal of Emergency Medical Services Announce the 2018 John P. Pryor, MD/ Street Medicine Society Award
CHARLOTTE, NC –  Benjamin J. Lawner, DO, MS, EMT-P, FACEP, has been awarded the 2018 John P. Pryor, MD/Street Medicine Society Award at the EMS Today conference in Charlotte, NC. Dr. Benjamin J. Lawner is recognized as an emergency medicine advocate focusing on clinical and educational excellence. Dr. Lawner is currently the Medical Director of Prehospital Services for Allegheny General Hospital in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. His academic and operational responsibilities include oversight for EMS agencies, a critical care transport program, and graduate medical education in emergency medical services. D...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - February 21, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: Industry News Administration and Leadership EMS Today Source Type: news

First child vaccinated with typhoid conjugate vaccine in Africa
(University of Maryland School of Medicine) Today the University of Maryland School of Medicine's (UMSOM) Center for Vaccine Development (CVD) is proud to be part of vaccine history in Africa. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - February 21, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Father's stress changes brain development in children
Researchers from the University of Maryland found stress changes the father's sperm, which can then alter the brain development of the child. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - February 16, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

No, the Flu Shot Will Not Make You Spread the Flu
(WASHINGTON) — Getting the flu shot won’t make you spread the disease more, doesn’t weaken your immune system but it does offer some protection from getting infected, despite misleading claims on social media. A post on a site called thewilddoc claimed that being vaccinated does more harm than good, citing a January peer-reviewed study. But one of the main authors of that study called the post “untrue” and “misleading,” not accurately interpreting the study. In January, Dr. Donald Milton and a team of researchers at the University of Maryland published a study in the journal Procee...
Source: TIME: Health - February 16, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Seth Borenstein / AP Tags: Uncategorized APH flu healthytime onetime Source Type: news

New research: Increased stress on fathers leads to brain development changes in offspring
(University of Maryland School of Medicine) New research in mice has found that a father's stress affects the brain development of his offspring. This stress changes the father's sperm, which can then alter the brain development of the child. This new research provides a much better understanding of the key role that fathers play in the brain development of offspring. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 16, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Urgent care clinic to replace Ryan's Daughter at Belvedere Square
A walk-in urgent care clinic will soon open in a space once occupied by the Irish restaurant Ryan's Daughter Irish Pub& Restaurant at Belvedere Square. ChoiceOne Urgent Care inked a deal to lease the 6,000-square-foot building at 600 E. Belvedere Ave. in the north Baltimore development. The clinic will be open this summer and operate seven days a week from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. in a partnership with the nearby University of Maryland St. Joseph Medical Center. Ryan's Daughter closed its doors Jan. 21… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines - February 13, 2018 Category: Health Management Authors: Melody Simmons Source Type: news

Weekly Postings
See something of interest? Please share our postings with colleagues in your institutions! Spotlight NNLM is offering stipends of up to $500 to support travel and lodging for the Health Information for Public Librarians Symposium at the MLA Annual meeting in Atlanta, GA. First come, first serve! Learn more about eligibility and instructions on how to apply. Member Highlights: Central Library of Rochester & Monroe County, Rochester, NY – Learn about the ongoing outreach efforts of Central Library as they strive to eliminate resource barriers in their community. Is your organization working on a similar project? Te...
Source: NN/LM Middle Atlantic Region Blog - February 9, 2018 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Hannah Sinemus Tags: Weekly Postings Source Type: news

Device collects, analyzes how breath transmits flu virus
New research shows the deadly flu virus spreads more easily than previously thought. Researchers at the University of Maryland have created a one-of-a-kind device that collects virus samples from your breath. Using that data, they then track how the flu is transmitted from person to person. Dr. Tara Narula reports. (Source: Health News: CBSNews.com)
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - February 8, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Researchers develop breakthrough technique to combat cancer drug resistance
(University of Maryland) The ability for cancer cells to develop resistance to chemotherapy drugs -- known as multi-drug resistance -- remains a leading cause for tumor recurrence and cancer metastasis, but recent findings offer hope that oncologists could one day direct cancer cells to 'turn off' their resistance capabilities. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 8, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Does Wearing a Surgical Mask Prevent the Flu?
This article originally appeared on Health.com (Source: TIME: Health)
Source: TIME: Health - January 26, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Michael Gollust / Health.com Tags: Uncategorized healthytime onetime public health Source Type: news

Tiny particles have outsized impact on storm clouds and precipitation
(University of Maryland) Tiny airborne particles from urban and industrial air pollution, wildfires and other sources can have a stronger influence on powerful storms than scientists previously predicted, according to a new study co-authored by University of Maryland researchers. The findings suggest that ultrafine aerosols, which are smaller than one-thousandth the width of a human hair, can intensify storms, increase the size of clouds and cause more rain to fall. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 26, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Humans get in the way of mammal movement
(University of Maryland) A new study, co-authored by biologists at the University of Maryland, describes the extent to which highly modified landscapes impede the movement of 57 land-based mammal species from around the world. On average, these mammals cover about a third to half of the distance they would otherwise travel in wild, unmodified landscapes. An international team of more than 100 co-authors published its findings in the Jan. 26, 2018, issue of the journal Science. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 25, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Quarantine: Experts warn the live flu virus is infectious in the air around sick people – it can spread through breathing (no sneezing required)
(Natural News) Covering your mouth when coughing and sneezing may actually do little to stop the flu. Simply breathing out is more than enough for people with influenza to spread the disease. This is what a research team from the University of Maryland uncovered in their alarming study, recently published in the Proceedings of the... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - January 24, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news