Researchers identify healthcare data defects, create software for easier defect detection
(University of Maryland Baltimore County) Researchers at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC) have developed a method to investigate the quality of healthcare data using a systematic approach, which is based on creating a taxonomy for data defects thorough literature review and examination of data. Using that taxonomy, the researchers developed software that automatically detects data defects effectively and efficiently. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 29, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Researchers develop experimental rapid COVID-19 test using nanoparticle technique
(University of Maryland School of Medicine) Scientists from the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM) developed an experimental diagnostic test for COVID-19 that can visually detect the presence of the virus in 10 minutes. It uses a simple assay containing plasmonic gold nanoparticles to detect a color change when the virus is present. The test does not require the use of any advanced laboratory techniques, such as those commonly used to amplify DNA, for analysis. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 29, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Researchers find no benefit for treatment used to avoid surgery for abdominal aortic aneurysm
(University of Maryland School of Medicine) A new landmark study by researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM) found that patients with a vascular condition, called abdominal aortic aneurysm, received no benefits from taking a common antibiotic drug to reduce inflammation. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 26, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How the darter got stripes: Expanding a sexual selection theory explains animal patterns
(University of Maryland Baltimore County) Samuel Hulse at UMBC and colleagues have shown for the first time that there is a strong correlation between the complex patterns on male darters and their highly-variable environments. The findings support and expand upon sensory drive theory, which states that the environment influences which sexual signals, like visual patterns, are selected for. Previous sensory drive research looked at simple signals (e.g. colors), but Hulse used Fourier analysis to greatly expand that work. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 22, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Quarantine fatigue has well and truly set in – and that could spell trouble | Arwa Mahdawi
In some US states, bars are already packed again and you can even get your nails done. Will lockdown boredom lead to a dreaded second wave?Coronavirus is officially cancelled: the US is bored of it, so it is over. That is what it feels like, anyway. In Wisconsin,bars are packed; Texas hasreopened restaurants; and Mississippi and Louisiana arereopening their casinos. People in Georgia can get their nails done. In New York, where I live, strict lockdown restrictions are still in place, but people are growing lax. The weather was beautiful over the weekend and the streets were full of people drinkingtakeout cocktails with fri...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 20, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Arwa Mahdawi Tags: Coronavirus outbreak Infectious diseases Medical research Microbiology Science World news US news Source Type: news

UMD researchers seek to reduce food waste and establish the science of food date labeling
(University of Maryland) Minimizing food waste is top of mind right now during the COVID-19 pandemic. However, the lack of regulation and general understanding of food date labels leads to billions of dollars per year in food waste in the US alone. Researchers at the University of Maryland have come together with the goal of clarifying the lack of science behind food date labels, highlighting the need for interdisciplinary research in their new publication in Food Control. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 14, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

T. rex's long legs were made for marathon walking
(University of Maryland) A new study by the University of Maryland's Thomas Holtz and his colleagues suggests that long legs evolved among the biggest dinosaurs to help them conserve energy as they ambled along searching for prey, rather than for speed as previously assumed. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 13, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Abiomed buys Maryland medical device startup
Publicly traded medical device company Abiomed Inc. has acquired a health technology startup that spun out of the University of Maryland, Baltimore. Abiomed (NASDAQ: ABMD) announced late last week that it has acquired Breethe Inc., a Maryland company that makes a kind of artificial lung, based on technology that was spun out of UMB in 2014. Breethe will operate as a subsidiary of Abiomed, according to an Abiomed spokesperson. All Breethe emplo yees are expected to keep their current positions and… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - May 5, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Morgan Eichensehr Source Type: news

Mesothelioma Drug Combination Continues to Show Promise
Pharmaceutical giant Bristol Myers Squibb continues to tout its immunotherapy combination of Opdivo and Yervoy for first-line treatment of patients with pleural mesothelioma cancer. Bristol Myers Squibb recently announced that overall survival “significantly improved” when the combination was measured against standard chemotherapy in a randomized, phase III clinical trial of previously untreated mesothelioma patients. Its announcement was based on a pre-specific interim analysis conducted by the Data Monitoring Committee, a clinical study organization independent of Bristol Myers Squibb. The study is being cond...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - May 4, 2020 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Fran Mannino Source Type: news

Infectious disease modeling study casts doubt on impact of Justinianic plague
(University of Maryland) Many historians have claimed the Justinianic Plague (c. 541-750 CE) killed half of the population of Byzantine (Eastern Roman) Empire. New historical research and mathematical modeling challenge the death rate and severity of this first plague pandemic, named for Emperor Justinian I. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 1, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Are You Experiencing COVID-19 “Caution Fatigue”? Here’s What It Is, and How to Fight It
As lockdowns drag on and on in many U.S. states, there are worrying signs that people’s resolve to continue social distancing is flagging. An illicit house party in Chicago made headlines this week, as did photos of crowded beaches in Southern California and packed parks in New York City. Anonymized cell-phone data tracked by the University of Maryland also shows more and more people are making non-work-related trips outside as quarantines drag on, and a TIME data analysis found that some states are experiencing new surges in coronavirus cases after initial declines. Jacqueline Gollan, an associate professor of psyc...
Source: TIME: Health - April 30, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

Controversial smartphone app tracking people exposed to coronavirus
A new poll by the University of Maryland and Washington Post reveals that most Americans will not use smartphone apps to trace who has been exposed to COVID-19. These types of apps are already up and running in Israel. But as Elizabeth Palmer reports, they have caused huge controversy. (Source: Health News: CBSNews.com)
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - April 30, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Don't Let The COVID Pandemic Rob You of Your Sleep
Financial struggles, loss of control, or worries about loved ones can affect peoples' quality and duration of nightly sleep, said sleep psychologist Emerson Wickwire, an associate professor of psychiatry and medicine at the University of Maryland School of Medicine. (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - April 29, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Marie Ba to Lead Ouagadougou Partnership Coordination Unit
April 24, 2020Marie Ba is the new director of theOuagadougou Partnership Coordination Unit.The Ouagadougou Partnership is a coalition of nine francophone West African countries—Benin, Burkina Faso, Côte d’Ivoire, Guinea, Mali, Mauritania, Niger, Senegal, and Togo—that are working together to expand family planning in the region.“She is the right leader to guide the coordination unit through 2020 and beyond.”Ba has been a member of the coordination unit for more than three years, starting as the regional program manager for advocacy and external relations and then moving into the deputy d...
Source: IntraHealth International - April 24, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: mnathe Tags: Benin Burkina Faso C ôte d’Ivoire Guinea Mali Mauritania Niger Senegal Togo Ouagadougou Partnership Coordination Unit Family Planning & Reproductive Health Leadership and Governance Advocacy Source Type: news

University of Maryland funds cross-campus, joint medicine & AI research
(University of Maryland) New joint program funds collaborative medicine and artificial intelligence research to solve big health care challenges. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 22, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

High-performance electrolyte solves battery puzzle
(University of Maryland) Lithium ion batteries have already become an integral part of our everyday life. However, our energy-hungry society demands longer life, faster charging, and lighter batteries for a variety of applications from electric vehicles to portable electronics, including lightening the load a soldier carries as numerous electronics become adopted by the Army. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 21, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

UM School of Medicine launches new large scale COVID-19 testing initiative
(University of Maryland School of Medicine) The University of Maryland School of Medicine announced the launch of a large-scale COVID-19 Testing Initiative that will significantly expand testing capability over the coming weeks, enabled by new funding of $2.5 million from the State of Maryland. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 10, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

How do mantis shrimp find their way home?
(University of Maryland Baltimore County) New research in Current Biology indicates mantis shrimp use path integration to find their way back to their burrows after leaving to seek food or mates. That means they can track their distance and direction from their starting point. A series of creative experiments revealed that to do that, they rely on a hierarchy of cues from the sun, polarized light patterns, and their internal senses. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 9, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Wearing surgical masks in public could help slow COVID-19 pandemic's advance
(University of Maryland) Surgical masks may help prevent infected people from making others sick with seasonal viruses, including coronaviruses, according to new research.In laboratory experiments, the masks significantly reduced the amounts of various airborne viruses coming from infected patients, measured using the breath-capturing 'Gesundheit II machine' developed by Dr. Don Milton, professor in the University of Maryland School of Public Health and a senior author of the study published April 3 in the journal Nature Medicine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 3, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Researchers map mechanism to explain role of gene mutations in kidney disease
(University of Maryland School of Medicine) Researchers from the Center for Precision Disease Modeling at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM) have uncovered a mechanism that appears to explain how certain genetic mutations give rise to a rare genetic kidney disorder called nephrotic syndrome. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 3, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Researchers use climate to predict spread of COVID-19
Researchers at the Institute of Human Virology (IHV) at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM) and the Global Virus Network (GVN) predict that the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) will follow a seasonal pattern similar to other respiratory viruses like seasonal flu. They base this on weather modeling data in countries where the virus has taken hold and spread within the community. In a new paper published on the open-data site SSRN, the researchers found that all cities experiencing significant… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - March 27, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Deborah Kotz Source Type: news

Dr. Joseph Wright
Editor's note: Selection of and interviews with our 2020 Minority Business Leader Awards honorees took place in early 2020, prior to the coronavirus pandemic. Their answers may not reflect the current state of business. Our 2020 awards program has been rescheduled. University of Maryland Capital Region Health is slated to deliver the region’s newest hospital in 2021, but Dr. Joseph Wright is doing his best to keep most people from seeing the inside. The UM Capital Region Health interim president… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - March 27, 2020 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Caitlin Burke Source Type: news

Kids & COVID-19 website provides resources for pediatric healthcare providers and families
(University of Maryland School of Medicine) The Kids& COVID-19 site brings together resources for practices, parents, and other caregivers. The site has protocols, top research papers and other important resources. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 26, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Anxious about COVID-19? Stress can have lasting impacts on sperm and future offspring
(University of Maryland School of Medicine) Prolonged fear and anxiety brought on by major stressors, like the coronavirus pandemic, can not only take a toll on a person's mental health, but may also have a lasting impact on a man's sperm composition that could affect his future offspring. That is the finding of a provocative new study published in the journal Nature Communications by researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - March 23, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Trump ’s State of Emergency Is an Admission of Failure by the U.S. Government
President Donald Trump’s declaration of a national emergency is designed to speed federal support to parts of America that are struggling to prepare for a coming surge of COVID-19 cases, unlocking $50 billion in aid, giving hospitals and doctors more freedom to handle a potential tsunami of sick patients and scrambling to make tests available. In a Rose Garden press conference Friday, Trump presented the emergency measures as proof that, “No nation is more prepared or more equipped to face down this crisis.” But for epidemiologists, medical experts and current and former U.S. public health officials, the ...
Source: TIME: Health - March 13, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: W.J. Hennigan Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

Is Our Academic System Ready for a New Coronavirus Normal?
Credit: Pîxabay.By Esther Ngumbi and Brian LovettILLINOIS, United States, Mar 11 2020 (IPS) Institutions of higher education have a responsibility to lead by example and to provide current, high-quality information to the people and communities that support them. This responsibility is no clearer than during a public health and information crisis like the one presented by this novel coronavirus. State and local governments in particular should be able to rely on Universities for guidance on protective evidence-based precautionary measures, whether it’s cancelling events, closing schools or formulating public he...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - March 11, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Esther Ngumbi and Brian Lovett Tags: Education Featured Global Headlines Health TerraViva United Nations Coronavirus Source Type: news

Hit With COVID-19, ‘Grand Princess’ Cruise Ship Headed to California Port
(SAN FRANCISCO) — A cruise ship hit by the new coronavirus is headed to the port of Oakland, California, the captain told passengers, though they were destined to stay aboard the ship for at least another day. Grand Princess Capt. John Smith, in a recording provided by passenger Laurie Miller of San Jose, told guests the ship will dock in Oakland. Princess Cruises says it’s expected to arrive on Monday. The ship is carrying more than 3,500 people from 54 countries. “An agreement has been reached to bring our ship into the port of Oakland,” he told passengers Saturday night. “After docking, we ...
Source: TIME: Health - March 8, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: DAISY NGUYEN and JANIE HAR / AP Tags: Uncategorized California COVID-19 onetime Source Type: news

21 People Onboard Grand Princess Cruise Ship Test Positive For Coronavirus
(SAN FRANCISCO) — Twenty-one people aboard a mammoth cruise ship off the California coast tested positive for the new coronavirus, including 19 crew members, Vice President Mike Pence announced Friday, amid evidence the vessel was the breeding ground for a deadly cluster of at least 10 cases during its previous voyage. Federal officials have been working with the state and “we have developed a plan to bring the ship to a non-commercial port,” Pence said. “All passengers and crew will be tested for the virus. Those that will need to be quarantined will be quarantined. Those who will require medical h...
Source: TIME: Health - March 7, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: OLGA R. RODRIGUEZ / AP Tags: Uncategorized California COVID-19 health onetime Source Type: news

One species to four: New analysis documents new bird diversity in the Pacific
(University of Maryland Baltimore County) New findings from UMBC researchers and colleagues suggest several island bird populations in the Pacific that were previously designated as a single species actually comprise up to four distinct species. The results upend understanding of the islands' robin populations, which have been used as a textbook example of evolution since the 1940s. The new findings have important implications for conservation, as some of the newly-designated species live only on a few isolated islands. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 6, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Coronavirus Postpones Mesothelioma Symposium
The Mesothelioma Applied Research Foundation has postponed its annual International Symposium on Malignant Mesothelioma next month because of the COVID-19 virus, commonly known as the novel coronavirus. The event is the largest gathering of the mesothelioma community each year. It was scheduled for April 6-7 in San Antonio, Texas. Officials with the Mesothelioma Applied Research Foundation announced the postponement Wednesday but has not yet rescheduled. Each year, the symposium brings together patients, caregivers, advocates, attorneys, financial consultants, doctors and nurses from various disciplines. The goal is to edu...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - March 5, 2020 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Matt Mauney Source Type: news

Researchers to study COVID-19-related discrimination against Chinese Americans
(University of Maryland Baltimore County) Researchers from the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC) and University of Maryland, College Park (UMD) just received a Rapid Response Research (RAPID) grant from the National Science Foundation to examine intensified discrimination that Chinese-American families are facing in the United States with the current COVID-19 outbreak. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - March 5, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

A Coronavirus Guide for Older Adults (And Their Family Advocates)
It’s hard enough getting old, what with all of the creeping ailments—diabetes, COPD, dementia, heart disease—that come along with age. Now add a novel coronavirus to the mix. There are more than 91,000 COVID-19 cases and 3,100 deaths as of writing, but the virus doesn’t hit all demographics equally hard—and seniors are the most vulnerable. A late February study in the Journal of the American Medical Association showed that children 10 and under accounted for just 1% of all COVID-19 cases, for example, while adults in the 30-79 age groups represented a whopping 87%. The World Health Organizatio...
Source: TIME: Health - March 4, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

Adding MRI-targeted biopsy leads to more reliable diagnosis of aggressive prostate cancer
(University of Maryland Medical Center) Using a combination of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to target and sample suspicious prostate tissue along with a standard prostate biopsy is significantly more likely to detect the most aggressive prostate cancers than standard biopsy alone. This finding, published today in the New England Journal of Medicine, could allow a higher percentage of prostate cancer patients to avoid unnecessary treatment for slow-growing prostate cancers that are not likely to spread. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - March 4, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

The 'Monday effect' is real -- and it's impacting your amazon package delivery
(Lehigh University) The " Monday Effect " is real - and it's impacting your Amazon package delivery. So says Lehigh University researcher Oliver Yao, a professor of decision and technology analytics at Lehigh University. He and colleagues at University of Maryland and University of California, San Diego, have found that the " Monday Effect " - that letdown of returning to work after a weekend, known to impact finance, productivity and psychology - also negatively affects supply chains. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 2, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Researchers develop gene catalog comprising community of microbes in vaginal microbio
(University of Maryland School of Medicine) University of Maryland School of Medicine's (UMSOM) Institute for Genome Sciences (IGS) researchers have created the first catalogue of genes that comprise the community of microbes, which inhabit the human vagina. The catalogue, called human vaginal non-redundant gene catalog (VIRGO), was recently released as a public resource that can be used by researchers to facilitate a more in-depth understanding of the role of vaginal microorganisms in women's health and to potentially develop future treatments. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - February 26, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Treatment to reset immune cells markedly improves TBI symptoms
(University of Maryland School of Medicine) Researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM) found that targeting overactive immune cells in the brain with an experimental drug could limit brain cell loss and reverse cognitive and motor difficulties caused by traumatic brain injury (TBI). The findings, published Monday in the Journal of Neuroscience, suggest a potential new treatment for TBI and possibly other brain injuries. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 25, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Mesothelioma Clinical Trial Involves Immunotherapy Before Surgery
Three of the country’s leading cancer centers have opened a collaborative clinical trial that potentially could change surgical treatment of mesothelioma. Researchers will measure the safety and efficacy of using two different immunotherapy drug regimens — Opdivo (nivolumab) and Yervoy (ipilimumab) — beginning 42 days before surgery. The hope is that at least one will make surgical resection more effective. Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins University, MD Anderson Cancer Center at the University of Texas and Greenebaum Cancer Center at the University of Maryland are working together to enroll a...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - February 24, 2020 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Matt Mauney Source Type: news

Gene Therapy for Mesothelioma Has ‘Real Potential’
Gene therapy is moving closer to becoming part of standard-of-care treatment for pleural mesothelioma, according to the latest multicenter clinical trial. The phase III trial, known as the INFINITE clinical research study, is designed to evaluate the intrapleural delivery of an investigational drug — a type of gene therapy — in combination with celecoxib and gemcitabine, anti-inflammatory and chemotherapy drugs, respectively. Researchers hope to stop, or at least slow, the growth of mesothelioma tumor cells with the combination therapy. “This is a very interesting concept,” oncologist Dr. Bernardo G...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - February 17, 2020 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Matt Mauney Source Type: news

Mesothelioma Gene Therapy Trial Shows ‘Real Potential’
Gene therapy is moving closer to becoming part of standard-of-care treatment for pleural mesothelioma, according to the latest multicenter clinical trial. The phase III trial, known as the INFINITE clinical research study, is designed to evaluate the intrapleural delivery of an investigational drug — a type of gene therapy — in combination with celecoxib and gemcitabine, anti-inflammatory and chemotherapy drugs, respectively. Researchers hope to stop, or at least slow, the growth of mesothelioma tumor cells with the combination therapy. “This is a very interesting concept,” oncologist Dr. Bernardo G...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - February 17, 2020 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Matt Mauney Source Type: news

Tourniquet Saved Life Of Baltimore Police Officer Shot Yesterday, Says Dr. Thomas Scalea Physician-In-Chief At Maryland Shock Trauma Center
One of two police officers shot while trying to arrest a former state corrections officer yesterday in Baltimore was saved by the use of a tourniquet, said Dr. Thomas Scalea, Physician-in-Chief at R. Adams Cowley Shock Trauma Center of the University of Maryland. (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - February 14, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Robert Glatter, MD, Contributor Source Type: news

The curious case of the disappearing snakes
(Michigan State University) A Michigan State University- and University of Maryland-led study featured on the cover of this week's Science magazine should sound alarm bells regarding the " biodiversity crisis " or the loss of wildlife around the world. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 13, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

DIY tools TalkBox and SenseBox help people with disabilities to communicate
(University of Maryland Baltimore County) Researchers at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC) have developed do-it-yourself (DIY) assistive technology prototypes that are revolutionizing how people with disabilities can access tools that will help them interact with the world. The tools are effective in different cultural contexts and were developed in close consultation with people with disabilities. A future step is to scale up use of the tools in education, healthcare, and other settings. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 11, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Orthopedic Surgery/Limb Lengthening and Reconstruction Research Fellowship
The Limb Lengthening and Reconstruction Research Fellowship began at Kernan Hospital (University of Maryland) in 1989 and moved to Sinai Hospital of Baltimore in 2001 when the Rubin Institute for Advanced Orthopedics was built. The program has trained over 100 clinical and research fellows since its inception.   (Source: Orthogate - Latest News)
Source: Orthogate - Latest News - February 4, 2020 Category: Orthopaedics Tags: Featured Job Opportunities News Source Type: news

Meet the Brilliant Minds Behind the First ICD
Mirowski: From WWII to Sinai Hospital The story of how Mieczyslaw "Michel" Mirowski ended up in America where he conceived the idea of an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) is almost as incredible as the invention itself, if not more so. Mirowski was born in Warsaw, Poland in 1924. He grew up among the large Jewish population of Warsaw at that time, but when the Nazis invaded Poland in 1939, 15-year-old Mirowski left his family and fled to Russia with a friend. He would be the only member of his family to survive World War II, according to a 2010Â&nb...
Source: MDDI - February 3, 2020 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Amanda Pedersen Tags: Implants Source Type: news

Coalition to study impact of sea-level rise, climate change on bays and estuaries
(University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science) The University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science (UMCES) has been awarded a $500,000 grant by the National Science Foundation (NSF) to lead a coalition of scientists from around the country to study the impact of storms, sea-level rise, and climate change on estuaries and bays. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 30, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Infectious disease experts warn of outbreak risks in US border detention centers
(University of Maryland School of Medicine) Over the past year, at least seven children have died from diseases including influenza while being detained by the US Department of Homeland Security's Customs and Border Protection (CBP) agency. Infectious disease experts at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM) called for protections like influenza vaccinations to prevent serious outbreaks. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 29, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

LifeBridge taps new presidents at Carroll, Northwest hospitals
LifeBridge Health announced new presidents at two more of its hospitals Monday, meaning all four of the health system's hospitals will have new leaders in 2020. Craig Carmichael, previously at the University of Maryland Medical System, will become president and chief operating officer at Northwest Hospital in Randallstown. He takes over for Leslie Simmons, an executive vice president with LifeBridge, who has led the hospital on an interim basis since June when Faraaz Yousuf left to join the Bon… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - January 27, 2020 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Jessica Iannetta Source Type: news

UMD-led study named Science's most impactful paper of 2019
(University of Maryland) The American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) awarded its 2019 Newcomb Cleveland Prize to University of Maryland entomologists Raymond St. Leger, Brian Lovett and their seven West African collaborators for their study describing the development and testing of a genetically engineered fungus to fight mosquito-borne diseases such as malaria, dengue& Zika. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 24, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Transformational innovation needed to reach global forest restoration goals
(University of Maryland Baltimore County) New research finds that global South countries have pledged the largest areas of land to forest restoration, and are also farthest behind in meeting their targets due to challenging factors such as population growth, corruption, and deforestation. 'We've identified countries that need help, not failures,' says UMBC's Matt Fagan. With the right kind of international support -- that listens to locals and generates creative solutions -- communities can implement policy that will make positive change. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 17, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Research shows that older patients with untreated sleep apnea need greater medical care
(University of Maryland School of Medicine) Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common and costly medical Researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM) found that the medical costs are substantially higher among older adults who go untreated for obstructive sleep apnea. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 16, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news