‘Holy $@*%!’ Science captures behind-the-scenes reactions to asteroid-smashing mission
BALTIMORE— Second by second, as a NASA satellite hurtled toward a pile of rocks in space, scientists gathered at the Applied Physics Laboratory at Johns Hopkins University issued their unfiltered analysis. “It doesn’t look like any asteroid I’ve ever seen!” “That’s totally a rubble pile—I knew it!” “Holy shit!” In the final moments of the Double Asteroid Redirection Test (DART), researchers who had spent years designing and simulating the spacecraft’s collision with the moon of a larger asteroid were glued to the TV. They greeted each new image with heartier applause. Th...
Source: ScienceNOW - September 27, 2022 Category: Science Source Type: news

UMMC, UMB partner to create new center to prevent violence
Dr. Thomas Scalea, distinguished professor of trauma surgery at the University of Maryland School of Medicine and long-time physician-in-chief at the shock trauma center, will lead the organization. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - September 6, 2022 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Matt Hooke Source Type: news

Crab and lobster shells could be used to make renewable batteries
Prototype designed using chemical in crustacean shells remains 99.7% efficient after about 400 hoursScientists want to use a chemical found in crab and lobster shells to make batteries more sustainable, according to research.“We think both biodegradability of material, or environmental impact, and the performance of the batteries are important for a product, which has the potential to be commercialised,” saidLiangbing Hu, the director of the University of Maryland ’s Center for Materials Innovation and lead author of the paper,published in the journal Matter.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 1, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Sofia Quaglia Tags: Energy Science Energy research Energy storage Environment Physics Technology Animals World news Source Type: news

Philadelphia biotech signs exclusive licensing deal with UMBC for cancer treatment candidate
BriaCell Therapeutics Corp., a clinical-stage biotechnology company with operations in Philadelphia and Vancouver, said it has obtained an exclusive license for a potential gene therapy from the University of Maryland, Baltimore County. The new drug candidate, Soluble CD80 (sCD80), is a biologic agent for the treatment of cancer that is designed to restore T cell activation in the immune system. “Our mission has been to develop safe and effective treatments for cancer patients who do not respond… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines - August 8, 2022 Category: Health Management Authors: John George Source Type: news

Scientists identify mechanism responsible for fruit and seed development in flowering plants
With rising global temperatures and dwindling pollinator populations, food production has become increasingly difficult for the world ' s growers. A new study by researchers at the University of Maryland addresses this issue, providing insight into … (Source: NSF News)
Source: NSF News - July 28, 2022 Category: Science Authors: NSF Source Type: news

Is It Easier to Get COVID-19 Outdoors with BA.5?
When the pandemic first began, COVID-19 seemed to lurk around every corner, so it came as a big relief when scientists established that the virus doesn’t easily spread outdoors. This summer, however, that feeling of relative safety has come into question. Now that the BA.5 subvariant is driving a new wave in the U.S., can people count on the open air to keep them safe? The truth is that being outside has never been a sure way to avoid COVID-19 transmission—especially at crowded events, like music festivals, which have been linked to outbreaks in the past. “We certainly hear, in our study, of people who pr...
Source: TIME: Health - July 15, 2022 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tara Law Tags: Uncategorized COVID Questions COVID-19 healthscienceclimate Source Type: news

These New Developments Could Make Living With Type 2 Diabetes More Manageable
Experts often talk about the “burden” of a disease or illness. The word acts as a tidy container for all the unpleasantness people with that condition may experience—from their symptoms, to the cost of their care, to the restrictions imposed on their lifestyle, to the health complications that may arise. For people with Type 2 diabetes, this burden can be high. Routine management of Type 2 diabetes often involves major changes to one’s diet and physical activity. And for many, especially those taking insulin to manage their blood sugar, the disease can necessitate daily blood-glucose monitoring, a p...
Source: TIME: Health - July 15, 2022 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Markham Heid Tags: Uncategorized Disease freelance healthscienceclimate Source Type: news

Pig Organ Transplants Inch Closer With Testing in Brain-Dead Patients
New York researchers transplanted pig hearts into two brain-dead people over the last month, the latest in a string of developments in the long quest to one day save human lives with animal organs. The experiments announced Tuesday come after a historic but failed attempt earlier this year to use a pig’s heart to save a dying Maryland man — sort of a rehearsal before scientists try again in the living. Among the lessons: Practice with the deceased is important. “We learned so much from the first one that the second one is much better,” said Dr. Nader Moazami, who led the operations at NYU Langone He...
Source: TIME: Science - July 12, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Lauran Neergaard / AP Tags: Uncategorized healthscienceclimate medicine wire Source Type: news

Maternal Mortality Up by One-Third During the Pandemic
TUESDAY, July 5, 2022 -- Maternal mortality significantly increased during the COVID-19 pandemic, according to a research letter published online June 28 in JAMA Network Open. Marie E. Thoma, Ph.D., from University of Maryland in College Park, and... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - July 5, 2022 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Bridging Efficacy and Safety to the Obese: Considerations and Scientific Approaches - 11/09/2022
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in collaboration with the University of Maryland Center of Excellence in Regulatory Science and Innovation (M-CERSI) will host a one-day virtual public workshop entitled “Bridging Efficacy and Safety to the Obese: Considerations and Scientific Approaches” on November 9, 2022. (Source: FDA Center for Drug Evaluation and Research - What's New)
Source: FDA Center for Drug Evaluation and Research - What's New - June 30, 2022 Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Authors: FDA Source Type: news

New center provides groundbreaking cancer treatment in one convenient location
The University of Maryland Marlene and Stewart Greenebaum Comprehensive Cancer Center (UMGCCC) is changing how cancer patients and their families receive care with a new cutting-edge facility, the Roslyn and Leonard Stoler Center for Advanced Medicine. The 198,000-square-foot building will enable UMGCCC to provide the most technologically advanced, integrated care to cancer patients throughout Maryland and the region well into the future. This expansion will enhance clinical care and research and… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines - June 22, 2022 Category: Health Management Authors: University of Maryland Greenebaum Comprehensive Cancer Center Source Type: news

Landmark Pig Heart Recipient Had Xenograft Failure, Porcine Virus
(MedPage Today) -- Several lines of inquiry remain for why the recipient of the world's first pig-to-human heart xenotransplantation died 2 months later. The transplant surgeon Bartley Griffith, MD, of University of Maryland School of Medicine... (Source: MedPage Today Cardiovascular)
Source: MedPage Today Cardiovascular - June 22, 2022 Category: Cardiology Source Type: news

UCLA-led research shows majorities of both political parties support legal abortion
Regardless of race, ethnicity and even political party preference, two separate UCLA-led surveys reveal that majorities of people in each group support access to legal abortion in the United States.Recent large-scale surveys of voters and non-voters by UCLA political scientists Lorrie Frasure, Matt Barreto, Lynn Vavreck and Chris Tausanovitch took a pulse on a variety of policy issues, including abortion. These separate findings support previous research and literature that showsbroad support for legal abortion.Data from The Democracy Fund + UCLA Nationscape Project, led by Vavreck and Tausanovitch show broad support for a...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - June 8, 2022 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

News From the Society
“It sounds lofty, but it’s doable if we start one step at a time,” says JoAnne Reifsnyder, PhD, MSN, MBA, FAAN, of a new effort by AMDA – The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine aimed at developing action plans PALTC facilities can use to grow and strengthen their workforce. D r. Reifsnyder, professor of health services leadership and management at the University of Maryland School of Nursing and former executive vice president and chief nursing officer for Genesis HealthCare, is the facilitator for the six-session virtual roundtable series “More of a Good Thing: A Fram ework to Grow and Strengthen...
Source: Caring for the Ages - June 1, 2022 Category: Health Management Source Type: news

Be Part of More of a Good Thing for a Positive “Careforce”
“It sounds lofty, but it’s doable if we start one step at a time,” says JoAnne Reifsnyder, PhD, MSN, MBA, FAAN, of a new effort by AMDA – The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine aimed at developing action plans PALTC facilities can use to grow and strengthen their workforce. D r. Reifsnyder, professor of health services leadership and management at the University of Maryland School of Nursing and former executive vice president and chief nursing officer for Genesis HealthCare, is the facilitator for the six-session virtual roundtable series “More of a Good Thing: A Fram ework to Grow and Strengthen...
Source: Caring for the Ages - May 27, 2022 Category: Health Management Tags: News From the Society Source Type: news