Coronavirus: Aspirin-taking patients '47% less likely to die'
A new study from the University of Maryland School of Medicine found that patients in the aspirin group were 43% less likely to be admitted to the ICU and 44% less likely to need ventilators. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 27, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Hospitalized patients taking aspirin daily were 47% less likely to die of COVID-19 
A new study from the University of Maryland School of Medicine found that patients in the aspirin group were 43% less likely to be admitted to the ICU and 44% less likely to need ventilators. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 27, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Birthrates, marriage, gender roles will change dramatically in post-pandemic world, scientists predict
COVID-19 and America ’s response to it are likely to profoundly affect our families, work lives, relationships and gender roles for years, say12 prominent scientists and authors who analyzed 90 research studies and used their expertiseto evaluate our reaction to the pandemic andpredict its aftermath.The group, which included several UCLA researchers, foresees enduring psychologicalfallout from thecrisis, even amongthose who haven ’t been infected. Their predictions and insights,published Oct. 22 in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, include:Planned pregnancies will decrease in a d...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - October 22, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

New study: aspirin use reduces risk of death in hospitalized patients
(University of Maryland School of Medicine) Hospitalized COVID-19 patients who were taking a daily low-dose aspirin to protect against cardiovascular disease had a significantly lower risk of complications and death compared to those who were not taking aspirin, according to a new study led by researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM). (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 22, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Study: Malaria-preventive drugs dramatically reduce infections in school children
(University of Maryland School of Medicine) Use of preventive antimalarial treatments reduces by half the number of malaria infections among schoolchildren, according to a new analysis published today in The Lancet Global Health. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 22, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

UMD-led study shows fear and anxiety share same bases in brain
(University of Maryland) The report by an international team of researchers led by Alexander Shackman, an associate professor of psychology at UMD, and Juyoen Hur, an assistant professor of psychology at Yonsei University in Seoul, South Korea, provides new evidence that fear and anxiety reflect overlapping brain circuits. The findings run counter to popular scientific accounts, highlighting the need for a major theoretical reckoning. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 19, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Fast 50: Hunt Valley-based Kermit builds mightily on a niche in health care tech
Health care tech firm Kermit has benefitted greatly from the presence of Johns Hopkins and the University of Maryland Medical System, CEO Rich Palarea says. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - October 15, 2020 Category: American Health Authors: Ethan McLeod Source Type: news

Ingestible capsule that could help demystify the gut-brain axis
(University of Maryland) A team of University of Maryland experts from engineering, neuroscience, applied microbiology, and physics has been making headway on building a platform that can monitor and model the real-time processing of gut microbiome serotonin activity. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 15, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

UMD researchers use artificial intelligence language tools to decode molecular movements
(University of Maryland) University of Maryland researchers used language processing AI to turn molecular movements into stories that reveal what forms a protein can take and how and when it changes form--key information for understanding disease and developing targeted therapeutics. This research appears in the October 09, 2020, issue of Nature Communications. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 9, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Mosquitos lost an essential gene with no ill effects
(University of Maryland) University of Maryland scientists discovered mosquitos are missing a gene that's critical for survival in other insects. Alys Jarvela noticed the missing gene and went on the hunt to find out how mosquitos survive without it. She identified the first example of nature swapping out closely related genes, a phenomenon that poses caveats for studies using model organisms as proxies for other species. The research was published September 30, 2020, in Communications Biology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 30, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

The Center for Research on Complex Generics
FDA awards a 5-year grant to the University of Maryland and the University of Michigan to establish a Center for Research on Complex Generics (CRCG). (Source: FDA Center for Drug Evaluation and Research - What's New)
Source: FDA Center for Drug Evaluation and Research - What's New - September 29, 2020 Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Authors: FDA Source Type: news

How zika virus degrades essential protein for neurological development via autophagy
(University of Maryland) Researchers at the University of Maryland (UMD) shed new light on how Zika virus hijacks our own cellular machinery to break down an essential protein for neurological development, getting it to " eat itself " . By triggering this process known as autophagy, Zika virus is able to degrade an important protein, a process that may contribute to the development of neurological or brain deficiencies and congenital birth defects in the newborns of infected pregnant women. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - September 28, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Theater improvisation techniques show promising results for science classroom engagement
(University of Maryland Baltimore County) A researcher at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC) has developed a unique method to improve class participation in a graduate-level thermodynamics course by incorporating theater improvisation activities in the classroom. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 25, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Gene Therapy Clinical Trial for Mesothelioma Moving Forward
This study will compare the effectiveness of the drug against a control group receiving only the gemcitabine and celecoxib. Patients have a one-in-two chance of being randomly assigned to either the adenovirus treatment or the control group. Adenovirus-delivered interferon Alpha-2b is designed as a second- or third-line treatment for patients who have failed in earlier regimens. Patients who previously had aggressive mesothelioma surgery but whose tumors have since progressed would be eligible to enroll. Success at the phase III level would mark the culmination of 20 years of researching and fine tuning gene therapy for us...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - September 23, 2020 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Fran Mannino Source Type: news

Having high cholesterol levels early in life leads to heart problems by middle age
(University of Maryland School of Medicine) Having elevated cholesterol during the teens or early twenties increases a person's risk of having a heart attack, stroke or other cardiovascular event during middle age. That is the finding a new landmark study led by researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM). (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 22, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Dipanjan Pan demonstrates new method to produce gold nanoparticles in cancer cells
(University of Maryland Baltimore County) Researchers published a seminal study in Nature Communications that demonstrates for the first time a method of biosynthesizing plasmonic gold nanoparticles within cancer cells, without the need for conventional bench-top lab methods. It has the potential to notably expand biomedical applications. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - September 11, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Researchers identify role of protein in development of new hearing hair cells
(University of Maryland School of Medicine) Researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM) have conducted a study that has determined the role that a critical protein plays in the development of hair cells. These hair cells are vital for hearing. Some of these cells amplify sounds that come into the ear, and others transform sound waves into electrical signals that travel to the brain. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 11, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Vaccine proponents and opponents are vectors of misinformation online
(George Washington University) Researchers from the George Washington University, University of Maryland and Johns Hopkins University assessed content from the most active vaccine-related accounts on Twitter and found that even accounts with pro-vaccination views and higher public health credibility can be vectors of misinformation in the highly uncertain and rapidly changing environment caused by the COVID-19 pandemic. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - September 9, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Globalization is reweaving the web of life
(University of Maryland) Networks of interactions among species are becoming increasingly similar across ecosystems, according to a global analysis published this week in Nature. Data collected over the last 75 years show the accelerating pace that introduced species are reshaping mutualistic relationships and creating new ecological links between previously disconnected ecosystems. These changes to mutualistic networks will influence which species are winners and losers in future ecosystems and may expose ecological networks to collapse. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 2, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

UMBC study reveals gender bias in bird song research and impact of women on science
(University of Maryland Baltimore County) A new paper has found that women are more likely than men to be authors, and even more likely to be first authors, of research papers about female bird song. The findings support the idea that women have driven a major shift in the scientific understanding of bird song over the last two decades. Believed for centuries to be a male trait, recent work has demonstrated the pervasiveness and importance of female bird song. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 26, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Wide variations in car seat breathing assessment conducted on premature newborns
(University of Maryland Medical Center) A new study from the University of Maryland School of Medicine has found wide variations throughout the United States in the way hospitals ensure that premature or low birth weight infants can breathe safely in a car seat before discharging them. The same infant who passes a screening in one hospital's newborn nursery may fail in similar facilities at another hospital's nursery. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 24, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Developing a replicable model to provide palliative care in nursing homes
(Regenstrief Institute) Research scientists from Regenstrief Institute, Indiana University School of Medicine and University of Maryland are working to develop a model for delivering palliative care (focused on providing comfort and relief) to people living in nursing homes to improve their quality of life. While access to palliative care has become the standard of care in the hospital setting, it is not routinely available in nursing homes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 17, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

UMD discovers a new role for a well-known molecule as a plant hormone
(University of Maryland) Researchers at the University of Maryland have discovered a new role for a well-known plant molecule, providing the first clear example of ACC acting as a likely plant hormone. In Nature Communications, researchers show that ACC has a critical role in pollination and seed production by activating proteins similar to those in human and animal nervous systems. Findings could change textbooks and open the door for research to improve plant health and crop yield. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 14, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Navigation preferences across people with a diverse range of disabilities
(University of Maryland Baltimore County) Researchers at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC) and the University of California, Irvine (UCI) have collaborated to create a universal design schema for navigation technologies to better support people with disabilities in getting from place to place. For this study, researchers worked with technology users with a broad and diverse range of disabilities to find similarities and differences in their navigation preferences. They then used those findings to create a schema that can inform the design of future technologies. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 14, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New UM Capital CEO talks Largo hospital, expanding ambulatory care and what comes after Covid
The University of Maryland Capital Region Health ’s new president and CEO has his bearings — and a vision — about two months into the gig. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - July 30, 2020 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Sara Gilgore Source Type: news

New UM Capital CEO talks Largo hospital, expanding ambulatory care and what comes after Covid
The University of Maryland Capital Region Health ’s new president and CEO has his bearings — and a vision — about two months into the gig. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - July 30, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Sara Gilgore Source Type: news

Researchers discover stem cells in optic nerve that preserve vision
(University of Maryland School of Medicine) Researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM) have for the first time identified stem cells in the region of the optic nerve, which transmits signals from the eye to the brain. The finding, published this week in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), presents a new theory on why the most common form of glaucoma may develop and provides potential to treat a leading cause of blindness. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 30, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Sense of normalcy bounces back fast: New study
(University of Maryland) Forthcoming in the Journal of Applied Psychology, a study of subjects during the outset of the COVID-19 crisis shows that psychological recovery can take place even while a person is still in the throes of a stressful experience. That's significant; previous research has suggested that recovery processes start after stressors abate. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 29, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Subsidies, weather, and financial education promote agricultural insurance adoption
(University of Maryland) A University of Maryland-led study shows that subsidies can help people continually purchase insurance, but only if they have the financial literacy to understand the benefits and have the experience of seeing the policy in action. In a new paper published in American Economic Review, researchers conducted the first ever experimental study to look at the impact of subsidies. This paper provides insight into the " insurance puzzle " , with implications for policy and educational programs. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 29, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study shows three medications currently on the market may have unexpected effects
(University of Maryland) A new study of 1,443 medications found that three prescription drugs currently on the market caused unexpected changes in worms that could point to potential, unrecognized effects in humans. The research was published online on July 23, 2020 in the journal Chemosphere. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 27, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

UMD addresses African vulture poisoning with global disease and biodiversity implications
(University of Maryland) In a new paper published in Global Ecology and Conservation, University of Maryland researchers collaborated with international leaders in wildlife conservation to produce recommendations for vulture poisoning control in Southern Africa. Vultures act as nature's most critical scavengers, working as ecosystem garbage disposals and disinfectors to maintain animal, environmental, and human health. Findings highlight the issue from a conservation and criminology perspective, recommending a more coordinated and holistic approach to regulation, education, and enforcement. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 23, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

UMD researcher highlights trends in consolidation of US agriculture with 35 years of data
(University of Maryland) In a new paper published in Applied Economics Perspectives and Policies, University of Maryland researcher Jim MacDonald presents a detailed history of the consolidation of agriculture in the US based on 35 years of data, with implications for all sectors of agriculture moving forward. Data show a steady shift to fewer and larger farming operations across crops, dairy, and livestock. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 23, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

ACLU sues UMMS hospital for allegedly refusing care to transgender man
The American Civil Liberties Union has sued University of Maryland Medical System and its Towson-based affiliate, St. Joseph Medical Center, for allegedly refusing to provide care to a transgender man. The lawsuit was filed in federal court Thursday on behalf of plaintiff Jesse Hammons, a Baltimore resident. It alleges that St. Joseph Medical Center (SJMC) acted in violation of the U.S. Constitution when it canceled a gender-affirming surgery — a hysterectomy — that Hammons was scheduled to… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - July 20, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Morgan Eichensehr Source Type: news

ACLU sues UMMS hospital for allegedly refusing care to transgender man
The American Civil Liberties Union has sued University of Maryland Medical System and its Towson-based affiliate, St. Joseph Medical Center, for allegedly refusing to provide care to a transgender man. The lawsuit was filed in federal court Thursday on behalf of plaintiff Jesse Hammons, a Baltimore resident. It alleges that St. Joseph Medical Center (SJMC) acted in violation of the U.S. Constitution when it canceled a gender-affirming surgery — a hysterectomy — that Hammons was scheduled to… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - July 17, 2020 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Morgan Eichensehr Source Type: news

UMB startup company ’s exclusive licensed tool supports health care professionals
A company spun out of the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy aims to leverage its approach — combining modern artificial intelligence (AI) with traditional mechanistic models — to arm health care professionals with the best data to provide personalized treatment trajectories for patients. Pumas-Al, a University of Maryland, Baltimore (UMB) startup company, has been granted worldwide, exclusive rights to Lyv, a clinical decision support system designed to help health care professionals… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - July 15, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Jamie Lacey-Moreira Source Type: news

UMB startup company ’s exclusive licensed tool supports health care professionals
A company spun out of the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy aims to leverage its approach — combining modern artificial intelligence (AI) with traditional mechanistic models — to arm health care professionals with the best data to provide personalized treatment trajectories for patients. Pumas-Al, a University of Maryland, Baltimore (UMB) startup company, has been granted worldwide, exclusive rights to Lyv, a clinical decision support system designed to help health care professionals… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - July 15, 2020 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Jamie Lacey-Moreira Source Type: news

Maryland offshore wind farm could become stop-over for migrating sturgeon, striped bass
(University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science) For the endangered Atlantic sturgeon and the commercially important striped bass, the Delaware-Maryland-Virginia coastal shelf serves as an important spring and fall migratory route. Researchers suggest that the development of wind farms on the DelMarVa coastal shelf may alter the migratory behavior of these fish as new wind turbines in this otherwise featureless region could create habitat around which fish linger. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 26, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

New way to analyze fMRI data offers path to improving treatment for schizophrenia
(University of Maryland Baltimore County) Researchers at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC) have developed tools to improve the analysis of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 26, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Researchers identify potent antibody cocktail to treat COVID-19
Researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM) evaluated several human antibodies to determine the most potent combination to be mixed in a cocktail and used as a promising anti-viral therapy against the virus that causes COVID-19. Their research, conducted in collaboration with scientists at Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, was published in the journal Science. (Source: World Pharma News)
Source: World Pharma News - June 18, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Featured Research Research and Development Source Type: news

Researchers receive federal funding to rapidly test new treatments for COVID-1
(University of Maryland School of Medicine) Researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM) will be partnering on an agreement funded by the federal government's Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) to rapidly test hundreds of drugs, approved and marketed for other conditions, to see whether any can be repurposed to prevent or treat COVID-19. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 16, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Researchers identify potent antibody cocktail to treat COVID-19
(University of Maryland School of Medicine) Researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM) evaluated several human antibodies to determine the most potent combination to be mixed in a cocktail and used as a promising anti-viral therapy against the virus that causes COVID-19. Their research, conducted in collaboration with scientists at Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, was published yesterday in the journal Science. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 16, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Notes from the Field: High Prevalence of Fentanyl Detected by the Maryland Emergency Department Drug Surveillance System - Baltimore, Maryland, 2019
This report describes a new University of Maryland study that found that after implementing enhanced testing methods, fentanyl topped the list of drugs detected in overdose patients at two Baltimore hospital emergency departments. (Source: CDC Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report)
Source: CDC Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report - June 11, 2020 Category: American Health Tags: Acetyl Fentanyl Emergency Department Visits MMWR Morbidity & Mortality Weekly Report Opioids Testing Source Type: news

Fentanyl tops list of drugs found in Baltimore overdose patients
(University of Maryland Medical Center) Hospital testing for illicit drug use does not typically include fentanyl, however, a new University of Maryland study found after expanding testing, that fentanyl, a potent synthetic opioid linked to most fatal overdoses in Maryland, tops the list of drugs detected in overdose patients at two Baltimore hospital emergency departments. The researchers suggest the addition of fentanyl to routine drug testing panels. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 11, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Animal territorial behavior could play larger role in disease spread than formerly thought
(University of Maryland) Using a mathematical model, linking animal movement and the spread of disease, a new study finds that territorial behaviors in animals, such as a puma using its scent to mark its domain, may help to decrease the severity of a potential disease outbreak -- but not without the cost of increased persistence of the disease within the population. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 11, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Simulations reveal interplay between scent marking and disease spread
(PLOS) In a new mathematical model that bridges animal movement and disease spread, territorial behaviors decreased the severity of potential disease outbreaks -- but at the cost of increased disease persistence. Lauren White of the University of Maryland's National Socio-Environmental Synthesis Center, Annapolis, MD, and colleagues present these findings in PLOS Computational Biology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 11, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Researchers identify new genetic defect linked to ALS
(University of Maryland School of Medicine) Researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM) have identified how certain gene mutations cause amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), also known as Lou Gehrig's disease. The pathway identified by the researchers may also be responsible for a certain form of dementia related to ALS. The finding could offer potential new approaches for treating this devastating condition. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 10, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

NIH Director Hopes For At Least 1 Safe And Effective Vaccine By Year's End
Dr. Francis Collins says some candidates for a coronavirus vaccine will be ready to start large-scale human trials as early as next month. Scaling up production may start before tests are complete.(Image credit: University of Maryland School of Medicine via AP) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - June 4, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Sarah McCammon Source Type: news

Gov. Hogan moves Maryland into Stage 2 of reopening
Maryland will begin moving into Stage 2 of its reopening plan Friday, which includes lifting the statewide order requiring the closure of non-essential businesses. Gov. Larry Hogan made the announcement Wednesday, citing a lower and sustained coronavirus test positivity rate, and an increase in testing capacity that includes the opening of a new lab at the University of Maryland, Baltimore School of Medicine. Amid the reopening and coronavirus updates, the governor still cautioned residents that… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - June 3, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Carley Milligan Source Type: news

Gov. Hogan moves Maryland into Stage 2 of reopening
Maryland will begin moving into Stage 2 of its reopening plan Friday, which includes lifting the statewide order requiring the closure of non-essential businesses. Gov. Larry Hogan made the announcement Wednesday, citing a lower and sustained coronavirus test positivity rate, and an increase in testing capacity that includes the opening of a new lab at the University of Maryland, Baltimore School of Medicine. Amid the reopening and coronavirus updates, the governor still cautioned residents that… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - June 3, 2020 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Carley Milligan Source Type: news