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The Journal of Emergency Medical Services Announce the 2018 John P. Pryor, MD/ Street Medicine Society Award
CHARLOTTE, NC –  Benjamin J. Lawner, DO, MS, EMT-P, FACEP, has been awarded the 2018 John P. Pryor, MD/Street Medicine Society Award at the EMS Today conference in Charlotte, NC. Dr. Benjamin J. Lawner is recognized as an emergency medicine advocate focusing on clinical and educational excellence. Dr. Lawner is currently the Medical Director of Prehospital Services for Allegheny General Hospital in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. His academic and operational responsibilities include oversight for EMS agencies, a critical care transport program, and graduate medical education in emergency medical services. D...
Source: JEMS Administration and Leadership - February 21, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: Industry News Administration and Leadership EMS Today Source Type: news

The Journal of Emergency Medical Services Announce the 2018 John P. Pryor, MD/ Street Medicine Society Award
CHARLOTTE, NC –  Benjamin J. Lawner, DO, MS, EMT-P, FACEP, has been awarded the 2018 John P. Pryor, MD/Street Medicine Society Award at the EMS Today conference in Charlotte, NC. Dr. Benjamin J. Lawner is recognized as an emergency medicine advocate focusing on clinical and educational excellence. Dr. Lawner is currently the Medical Director of Prehospital Services for Allegheny General Hospital in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. His academic and operational responsibilities include oversight for EMS agencies, a critical care transport program, and graduate medical education in emergency medical services. D...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - February 21, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: Industry News Administration and Leadership EMS Today Source Type: news

First child vaccinated with typhoid conjugate vaccine in Africa
(University of Maryland School of Medicine) Today the University of Maryland School of Medicine's (UMSOM) Center for Vaccine Development (CVD) is proud to be part of vaccine history in Africa. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - February 21, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Father's stress changes brain development in children
Researchers from the University of Maryland found stress changes the father's sperm, which can then alter the brain development of the child. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - February 16, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

No, the Flu Shot Will Not Make You Spread the Flu
(WASHINGTON) — Getting the flu shot won’t make you spread the disease more, doesn’t weaken your immune system but it does offer some protection from getting infected, despite misleading claims on social media. A post on a site called thewilddoc claimed that being vaccinated does more harm than good, citing a January peer-reviewed study. But one of the main authors of that study called the post “untrue” and “misleading,” not accurately interpreting the study. In January, Dr. Donald Milton and a team of researchers at the University of Maryland published a study in the journal Procee...
Source: TIME: Health - February 16, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Seth Borenstein / AP Tags: Uncategorized APH flu healthytime onetime Source Type: news

New research: Increased stress on fathers leads to brain development changes in offspring
(University of Maryland School of Medicine) New research in mice has found that a father's stress affects the brain development of his offspring. This stress changes the father's sperm, which can then alter the brain development of the child. This new research provides a much better understanding of the key role that fathers play in the brain development of offspring. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 16, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Urgent care clinic to replace Ryan's Daughter at Belvedere Square
A walk-in urgent care clinic will soon open in a space once occupied by the Irish restaurant Ryan's Daughter Irish Pub& Restaurant at Belvedere Square. ChoiceOne Urgent Care inked a deal to lease the 6,000-square-foot building at 600 E. Belvedere Ave. in the north Baltimore development. The clinic will be open this summer and operate seven days a week from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. in a partnership with the nearby University of Maryland St. Joseph Medical Center. Ryan's Daughter closed its doors Jan. 21… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines - February 13, 2018 Category: Health Management Authors: Melody Simmons Source Type: news

Weekly Postings
See something of interest? Please share our postings with colleagues in your institutions! Spotlight NNLM is offering stipends of up to $500 to support travel and lodging for the Health Information for Public Librarians Symposium at the MLA Annual meeting in Atlanta, GA. First come, first serve! Learn more about eligibility and instructions on how to apply. Member Highlights: Central Library of Rochester & Monroe County, Rochester, NY – Learn about the ongoing outreach efforts of Central Library as they strive to eliminate resource barriers in their community. Is your organization working on a similar project? Te...
Source: NN/LM Middle Atlantic Region Blog - February 9, 2018 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Hannah Sinemus Tags: Weekly Postings Source Type: news

Device collects, analyzes how breath transmits flu virus
New research shows the deadly flu virus spreads more easily than previously thought. Researchers at the University of Maryland have created a one-of-a-kind device that collects virus samples from your breath. Using that data, they then track how the flu is transmitted from person to person. Dr. Tara Narula reports. (Source: Health News: CBSNews.com)
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - February 8, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Researchers develop breakthrough technique to combat cancer drug resistance
(University of Maryland) The ability for cancer cells to develop resistance to chemotherapy drugs -- known as multi-drug resistance -- remains a leading cause for tumor recurrence and cancer metastasis, but recent findings offer hope that oncologists could one day direct cancer cells to 'turn off' their resistance capabilities. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 8, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Does Wearing a Surgical Mask Prevent the Flu?
This article originally appeared on Health.com (Source: TIME: Health)
Source: TIME: Health - January 26, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Michael Gollust / Health.com Tags: Uncategorized healthytime onetime public health Source Type: news

Tiny particles have outsized impact on storm clouds and precipitation
(University of Maryland) Tiny airborne particles from urban and industrial air pollution, wildfires and other sources can have a stronger influence on powerful storms than scientists previously predicted, according to a new study co-authored by University of Maryland researchers. The findings suggest that ultrafine aerosols, which are smaller than one-thousandth the width of a human hair, can intensify storms, increase the size of clouds and cause more rain to fall. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 26, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Humans get in the way of mammal movement
(University of Maryland) A new study, co-authored by biologists at the University of Maryland, describes the extent to which highly modified landscapes impede the movement of 57 land-based mammal species from around the world. On average, these mammals cover about a third to half of the distance they would otherwise travel in wild, unmodified landscapes. An international team of more than 100 co-authors published its findings in the Jan. 26, 2018, issue of the journal Science. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 25, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Quarantine: Experts warn the live flu virus is infectious in the air around sick people – it can spread through breathing (no sneezing required)
(Natural News) Covering your mouth when coughing and sneezing may actually do little to stop the flu. Simply breathing out is more than enough for people with influenza to spread the disease. This is what a research team from the University of Maryland uncovered in their alarming study, recently published in the Proceedings of the... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - January 24, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Neil Diamond Was Diagnosed with Parkinson ’s Disease. Here’s What To Know About the Condition
After half a century on the stage, musician Neil Diamond announced on Monday that he’s retiring from touring due to a recent Parkinson’s disease diagnosis. Diamond, who turns 77 on Jan. 24, was about to begin the third leg of his 50th anniversary tour. In a statement posted on his website, the “Sweet Caroline” singer said that while he will no longer perform live, he will continue to write and record for “a long time to come.” “It is with great reluctance and disappointment that I announce my retirement from concert touring. I have been so honored to bring my shows to the public fo...
Source: TIME: Health - January 23, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized healthytime medicine Music Neil Diamond neurodegenerative disease onetime Parkinson's Disease Source Type: news

HealthWatch: Could Getting Breathed On Give You The Flu?
BOSTON (CBS) — Flu activity continues to be widespread across the country and the season could be the worst in years. Almost 9,000 Americans have been hospitalized since early October and at least 30 kids have died so far. As Dr. Mallika Marshall reports, a new study may help explain why the flu tends to spread so fast. Researchers at the University of Maryland looked at 142 patients with a positive flu test and analyzed their breath samples during the first few days of symptoms. They found that 39% of the samples were positive for infectious flu virus. Typically when we think of how the flu and cold viruses get circ...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - January 22, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health Healthwatch Local News Seen On WBZ-TV Syndicated Local Dr. Mallika Marshall Flu Flu Symptoms Source Type: news

University of Maryland Study Determines Nearly 50% of All Healthcare in America is Delivered in Emergency Departments, Validating What Hospital Medical Laboratories Have Long Known
Meanwhile, some insurance payers are dropping coverage for certain medical treatments they consider “unnecessary,” leaving hospitals and their medical laboratories to wonder if they will be reimbursed for the tests they perform Hospital-based medical laboratories and anatomic pathologists are well aware that the emergency department (ED) in their hospital is their single largest customer and […] (Source: Dark Daily)
Source: Dark Daily - January 22, 2018 Category: Laboratory Medicine Authors: Jude Tags: Laboratory Hiring & Human Resources Laboratory Management and Operations Laboratory News Laboratory Operations Laboratory Pathology Laboratory Testing Management & Operations American College of Emergency Physicians Anthem Blue Cross and B Source Type: news

The Flu May Be Spread Just By Breathing, Study Says
For years, you’ve been told to cover your mouth when you cough or sneeze, especially when you’re sick. But a new study finds that it may be possible to spread the flu just by breathing—no coughing or sneezing required. “People shed a lot of virus all the time, even when they don’t cough,” says Donald Milton, author of the study published in PNAS and a professor of environmental health at the University of Maryland School of Public Health. “As a result, it’s important to realize you can be infectious at any time.” During the 2012-2013 flu season, Milton and his colleague...
Source: TIME: Health - January 19, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized coughing flu flu 2018 flu 2018 symptoms flu breathing flu prevention flu season 2018 flu spread by breathing flu symptoms healthytime influenza medicine onetime public health Research Source Type: news

Flu can be spread just by breathing
Analyzing 142 flu patients, researchers at the University of Maryland found infectious virus in the air they exhaled, particularly in the first few days they showed symptoms. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - January 18, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Aerial Photos of Antarctica Reveal the Devastating Toll of Climate Change
A crevasse measuring a few thousand feet from an altitude of 1,500 ft., during a November flyover. The Great Crack-Up By JEFFREY KLUGER Photographs by PAOLO PELLEGRIN—MAGNUM PHOTOS FOR TIME It’s hard to wreck a continent you can barely get your hands on. Human beings typically do our worst environmental damage in the places we live and work—clear-cutting forests, strip-mining mountains. Antarctica, however, was more or less out of reach. No more. Climate change has become our species’ great destructive equalizer, leaving no part of the planet safe from the harm we do. In March 2017, the sea ice arou...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - January 18, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Time Tags: 2017 climate change climate change 2017 global warming 2017 iceberg antarctica 2017 larsen c ice shelf larsen ice shelf massive crack antarctica massive crack in antarctica massive iceberg breaks off antarctica Source Type: news

Flu may be spread just by breathing, new UMD-led study shows
(University of Maryland) It is easier to spread the influenza virus (flu) than previously thought, according to a new study released today. People commonly believe that they can catch the flu by exposure to droplets from an infected person's coughs or sneezes or by touching contaminated surfaces. But, new information about flu transmission reveals that we may pass the flu to others just by breathing. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 18, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

New research could significantly accelerate drug discovery
(University of Maryland School of Medicine) Many drugs work by inhibiting protein enzymes associated with a particular disease. Unfortunately, the same drugs can inhibit protein enzymes unrelated to the disease, resulting in harmful side effects. Computational biologists have a way to identify the features that distinguish one enzyme from similar enzymes. This research has the potential to significantly accelerate drug discovery, allowing scientists to develop more effective drugs, more quickly. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 17, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

UMBC produces more black M.D., PhD graduates than any other U.S. school
University of Maryland, Baltimore County produces more black M.D. and Ph.D. degree-earners than any other college in the country, according to new data from the Association of American Medical Colleges. In total, 44 UMBC alumni who identify as African American or black earned M.D.-Ph.D. degrees. These degrees indicate a combined scientific and medical education and are typically sought by students who want to conduct research in a medical setting. Since 2000, 413 black men and women have earned… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - January 16, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Morgan Eichensehr Source Type: news

UMMC CEO apologizes to patient's family, promises investigation amid PR crisis
Dr. Mohan Suntha, CEO of University of Maryland Medical Center, said there will be "an in-depth analysis" of why a female patient at its Midtown Campus in Baltimore was left outside by staff wearing only a hospital gown Tuesday night. The circumstances were caught on camera and posted on Facebook by Imamu Baraka, a Baltimore man who saw the woman being escorted out of the hospital and left near a bench by a group of security guards. Baraka can be seen in the video questioning the guards about the… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines - January 12, 2018 Category: Health Management Authors: Morgan Eichensehr Source Type: news

UMMC CEO apologizes to patient's family, promises investigation amid PR crisis
Dr. Mohan Suntha, CEO of University of Maryland Medical Center, said there will be "an in-depth analysis" of why a female patient at its Midtown Campus in Baltimore was left outside by staff wearing only a hospital gown Tuesday night. The circumstances were caught on camera and posted on Facebook by Imamu Baraka, a Baltimore man who saw the woman being escorted out of the hospital and left near a bench by a group of security guards. Baraka can be seen in the video questioning the guards about the… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - January 12, 2018 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Morgan Eichensehr Source Type: news

UMMC CEO apologizes to patient's family, promises investigation amid PR crisis
Dr. Mohan Suntha, CEO of University of Maryland Medical Center, said there will be "an in-depth analysis" of why a female patient at its Midtown Campus was left outside by staff wearing only a hospital gown Tuesday night.  The circumstances were caught on camera and posted on Facebook by Imamu Baraka, a Baltimore man who saw the woman being escorted out of the hospital and left near a bench by a group of security guards. Baraka can be seen in the video questioning the guards about the situation.… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - January 12, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Morgan Eichensehr Source Type: news

UMMC CEO apologizes to patient's family, promises investigation amid PR crisis
Dr. Mohan Suntha, CEO of University of Maryland Medical Center, said there will be "an in-depth analysis" of why a female patient at its Midtown Campus was left outside by staff wearing only a hospital gown Tuesday night.  The circumstances were caught on camera and posted on Facebook by Imamu Baraka, a Baltimore man who saw the woman being escorted out of the hospital and left near a bench by a group of security guards. Baraka can be seen in the video questioning the guards about the situation.… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - January 11, 2018 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Morgan Eichensehr Source Type: news

Baltimore Hospital Patient Discharged at Bus Stop, Stumbling and Cold
A video of the woman, who appears to have trouble keeping her balance, shows her wearing nothing but socks and a hospital gown. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - January 11, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: JACEY FORTIN Tags: Hospitals Emergency Medical Treatment Video Recordings, Downloads and Streaming Mental Health and Disorders Baltimore (Md) Imamu Baraka patient-dumping University of Maryland Medical Center Source Type: news

Hospital investigating discharge of patient in hospital gown
The University of Maryland Medical Center is investigating how a woman was discharged from its midtown hospital to a bus stop at night, wearing only a hospital gown (Source: ABC News: Health)
Source: ABC News: Health - January 10, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Health Source Type: news

Employment Opportunity: All of Us Public Library Engagement Coordinator
In cooperation with the National Institutes of Health All of Us Research Program (https://allofus.nih.gov) and the All of Us Training and Coordinating Center, the All of Us Public Library Engagement Coordinator will focus on improving consumer access to high quality health information in communities throughout the U.S., specifically, by working with public libraries. The goals of this 3-year pilot position are to: Help public libraries in supporting the health information needs of their users; Support community engagement through public libraries for All of Us; and Help establish an All of Us Training Program, the home fo...
Source: NN/LM Middle Atlantic Region Blog - January 8, 2018 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Hannah Sinemus Tags: All of Us Employment Source Type: news

Weekly Postings
Happy New Year from NNLM MAR! We are excited to share information with you about our upcoming projects, classes, and news from around the Middle Atlantic Region. See something of interest? Please share our postings with colleagues in your institutions! Spotlight Welcome, Veronica Leigh Milliner! On January 2, Veronica Leigh Milliner, MLIS, joined NNLM MAR in the newly created position of All of Us Community Engagement Coordinator. Veronica will work within our region and in collaboration with other regional and national All of Us Program partners and the National Network of Libraries of Medicine to develop, pilot, model, a...
Source: NN/LM Middle Atlantic Region Blog - January 5, 2018 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Hannah Sinemus Tags: Weekly Postings Source Type: news

Artificial lung dev Breethe raises $3m
Artificial lung developer Breethe raised approximately $3 million in an equity financing round, according to an SEC filing posted late last month. Funds raised during the round will cover the sales and issuance of Series Seed-4 preferred stock and the underlying common stock convertible from it, according to the filing. The Baltimore-based company is developing the Oxy-1 ambulatory artificial lung system which is designed for home use for patients who suffer from acute and chronic lung failure, according to its website. The system includes a portable pack, which contains the unit’s batteries, oxygen source and p...
Source: Mass Device - January 2, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Business/Financial News Respiratory breethe Source Type: news

UMB startup raises $3 million, adding to big year
A Baltimore startup developing artificial organ technology has raised about $3 million in equity funding, according to U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission documents. Medical device firm Breethe Inc. reported the round this month, which included 22 investors. This is the second funding filing of the year for Breethe, a company based at the University of Maryland, Baltimore's BioPark. According to an SEC document filed in August, the startup previously reported seeking $3.6 million, of which… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - December 28, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Morgan Eichensehr Source Type: news

Prince George's health system CEO to step down in 2018
Neil Moore — who was named CEO of Prince George's County's main hospital network after its predecessor, Dimensions Healthcare System, merged into the University of Maryland Medical System earlier this year — will leave that job at the end of June. Moore had led Dimensions Healthcare System — the county' s long-running hospital network that included flagship Prince George's Hospital Center in Cheverly, Laurel Regional Hospital and Bowie Health Center — since 2012. In all, he has been at Dimensions… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - December 22, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Tina Reed Source Type: news

Prince George's health system CEO to step down in 2018
Neil Moore — who was named CEO of Prince George's County's main hospital network after its predecessor, Dimensions Healthcare System, merged into the University of Maryland Medical System earlier this year — will leave that job at the end of June. Moore had led Dimensions Healthcare System — the county' s long-running hospital network that included flagship Prince George's Hospital Center in Cheverly, Laurel Regional Hospital and Bowie Health Center — since 2012. In all, he has been at Dimensions… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - December 22, 2017 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Tina Reed Source Type: news

FDA clears Xcision Medical ’ s GammaPod breast cancer device
The FDA said today that it granted 510(k) clearance to the GammaPod stereotactic radiotherapy device made by Xcision Medical Systems to treat breast cancer. The federal safety watchdog said the GammaPod is designed to treat a portion of the breast in conjunction with breast-conserving surgery. It uses an array of 36 Cobalt-60 sources to beam radiation from within a two-layer vacuum cup that immobilizes the breast to minimize damage to adjacent healthy tissue. GammaPod is not intended to replace whole-breast radiation therapy and has not been shown to be as effective as that technique, the FDA said. The clearance was b...
Source: Mass Device - December 22, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Brad Perriello Tags: Food & Drug Administration (FDA) Radiosurgery Regulatory/Compliance xcisionmedicalsystems Source Type: news

The brain-gut connection: A new study finds that traumatic brain injury also causes intestinal damage
(Natural News) Traumatic brain injury (TBI), aside from causing damage to the brain, can also damage a person’s gut, according to a study published by the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM). Then, in what can only be a described as a vicious cycle — the damage that he receives in the gut may... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - December 22, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

First stereotactic radiotherapy system designed for breast cancer receives FDA clearance
(University of Maryland School of Medicine) The GammaPod ™ -- a first-of-its kind stereotactic radiotherapy system to treat early stage breast cancer -- has received 510(k) clearance from the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), paving the way for the manufacturer to bring the system to market for the treatment of breast cancer patients. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - December 22, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Researchers discover key link between mitochondria and cocaine addiction
(University of Maryland School of Medicine) Scientists at the University of Maryland School of Medicine identified significant mitochondrial changes that take place in cocaine addiction, and they have been able to block them. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Year in Review 2017: UMMS hospital project finally begins in Prince George's
Editor's note: We're counting down the top 10 biggest local business stories of the year. Click here to read all of our choices. And click here to vote in our online poll. Health leaders can be forgiven if they were still holding their breath for the first shovels to break ground at the University of Maryland Medical System’s $543 million state-of-the-art teaching hospital at Largo Town Center, a medical campus expected to anchor Prince George's County's health la ndscape. On Nov. 30, those leaders… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - December 15, 2017 Category: American Health Authors: Tina Reed Source Type: news

Single-dose vaccine could provide faster protection in cholera epidemics
(University of Maryland School of Medicine) Each year there are more than three million cases of cholera worldwide. Research at the University of Maryland School of Medicine now shows that giving a stronger single-dose of a live oral vaccine could be an effective tool in controlling outbreaks more quickly. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - December 11, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Scientists identify first brain cells that respond to sound
(University of Maryland School of Medicine) A new study is the first to identify a mechanism that could explain an early link between sound input and cognitive function, often called the 'Mozart effect.' (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 7, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Edwards Lifesciences acquires mitral repair dev Harpoon Medical for $100 million
Edwards Lifesciences (NYSE:EW) said today it acquired mitral valve repair developer Harpoon Medical for $100 million in cash, with the potential for an additional $150 million in milestone payments over 10 years. Harpoon is developing a system designed to enable echo-guided repair of mitral valve regurgitation through the stabilization of prolapse leaflets to restore coaptation and valve function. The device is currently investigational, though Harpoon is hopeful it will receive CE Mark approval in the European Union in the near future. “We believe the addition of Harpoon Medical’s technology and talented ...
Source: Mass Device - December 6, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Business/Financial News Cardiovascular Mergers & Acquisitions Replacement Heart Valves Edwards Lifesciences Harpoon Medical Source Type: news

Edwards Buys Harpoon for up to $250 Million
Edwards Lifesciences may be best known for its leadership in transcatheter valve therapies, but the company appears to be turning to its surgical valve portfolio as part of its growth strategy for the coming year. The company's acquisition of Harpoon Medical, announced Wednesday afternoon, is the first major indicator of this shift. Harpoon is developing beating-heart repair technology for degenerative mitral regurgitation (DMR). Edwards paid $100 million up front for Harpoon and agreed to pay up to $150 million more in milestone payments over the next 10 years. The company has had an eye on Harpoon since 2015 wh...
Source: MDDI - December 6, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Amanda Pedersen Tags: Medical Device Business Source Type: news

New study: Traumatic brain injury causes intestinal damage
(University of Maryland School of Medicine) Researchers have found a two-way link between traumatic brain injury and intestinal changes. These interactions may contribute to increased infections in these patients, and may also worsen chronic brain damage. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 6, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Children ’s National plans regional outpatient center near future UMMS hospital
Children's National Health System is in growth mode. The D.C.-based health system is planning to open a 60,000-square-foot regional outpatient center in Prince George's County by 2020. Officials have scheduled a ceremonial groundbreaking Wednesday at the location in Woodmore Towne Centre, less than three miles from the future site of the University of Maryland Capital Region Medical Center. Officials are seeking a certificate of need for a comprehensive pediatric outpatient and specialty medical… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines - December 5, 2017 Category: Health Management Authors: Tina Reed Source Type: news

University of Maryland Medical System breaks ground on new Largo hospital
The University of Maryland Medical System broke ground Thursday on a  $543 million teaching hospital at Largo Town Center. The ceremonial first shovel signified a major step in the lengthy effort to replace the long-struggling Prince George's Hospital Center in Cheverly. County officials say the new 205-bed hospital — named University of Maryland Capital Region M edical Center — will transform health care for residents and revitalize nearby businesses. County Executive Rushern Baker told the… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - November 30, 2017 Category: American Health Authors: Drew Hansen Source Type: news

Prince George's breaks ground on new Largo hospital
The University of Maryland Medical System broke ground Thursday on a  $543 million state-of-the-art teaching hospital at Largo Town Center. The ceremonial first shovel signified a major step in the lengthy effort to replace the long-struggling Prince George's Hospital Center in Cheverly. County officials say the new 205-bed hospital — named University of Maryland Capital Region Medical Center — will transform health care for residents and revitalize nearby businesses. County Executive Rushern… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - November 30, 2017 Category: American Health Authors: Drew Hansen Source Type: news

University of Maryland orthopaedic surgeons to receive international research award
(University of Maryland Medical Center) A research team led by Mohit N. Gilotra, MD, assistant professor of orthopaedics at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM), will receive the prestigious 2018 Charles S. Neer Award from the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) for a clinical study that demonstrated an effective method to potentially reduce the risk of serious infection following shoulder surgery. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 30, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Insightec wins FDA nod for Exablate Neuro glioblastoma trial
Insightec said today it won FDA approval to launch a safety and feasibility trial of its Exablate Neuro, testing its ability to disrupt the blood brain barrier in patients with glioblastoma. The Exablate Neuro device, which won FDA approval last July for treating essential tremor, uses high-intensity, focused ultrasound to thermally ablate targeted tissue, guided by continuous magnetic resonance imaging; the procedure can be performed non-invasively through an intact skull. In the trial, a research team will inject commonly used a sonographic microbubble solution into the bloodstream of a patient with a malignant...
Source: Mass Device - November 28, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Clinical Trials Food & Drug Administration (FDA) Neurological INSIGHTEC Source Type: news