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Two Group A Streptococcus genes linked to 'flesh-eating' bacterial infections
(University of Maryland) Group A Streptococcus bacteria cause illnesses ranging from mild nuisances like strep throat to life-threatening conditions such as flesh-eating disease, also known as necrotizing fasciitis. Life-threatening infections occur when the bacteria spread underneath the surface of the skin or throat and invade the underlying soft tissue. Researchers have found two group A Streptococcus genes involved in invasive infections, which may be potential targets for therapeutics. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - September 22, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

New clinical trial explores combining immunotherapy and radiation for sarcoma patients
(University of Maryland Medical Center) University of Maryland School of Medicine researchers are investigating a new approach to treat high-risk soft-tissue sarcomas by combining two immunotherapy drugs with radiation therapy to stimulate the immune system to destroy the main tumor as well as leftover microscopic cancer cells that may seed other tumors. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - September 20, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Researchers identify millions of new genes in the human microbiome
(University of Maryland School of Medicine) A new study of the human microbiome has uncovered millions of previously unknown genes from microbial communities in the human gut, skin, mouth, and vaginal microbiome, allowing for new insights into the role these microbes play in human health and disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - September 20, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Researchers identify critical molecular link between inflammation and diabetes
(University of Maryland School of Medicine) A new study has uncovered how inflammation contributes to a key feature of diabetes, the body's inability to metabolize glucose, a condition known as insulin resistance. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 12, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Novel intensive care improves treatment for heart patients -- and cuts costs
(University of Maryland Medical Center) Researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine find that a new, collaborative treatment model for seriously ill heart patients with breathing difficulties results in better care and lower costs. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 11, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Research identifies causes and possible treatments for deadly diseases affecting children
(University of Maryland School of Medicine) Research conducted at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UM SOM), has identified four pathogens are responsible for the vast majority of diarrheal illnesses - leading the way for potential new treatments. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - September 11, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

UMMS takes critical step toward building a new Prince George's hospital
University of Maryland Medical System assumed ownership over Dimensions Healthcare System on Friday, a major milestone in a yearslong battle to secure funding and state approvals to build a new $543 million state-of-the-art teaching hospital in Prince George's County. Dimensions — which oversaw the cash-strapped Prince George's Hospital Center in Cheverly that's set to be replaced by the new hospital — will be renamed University of Maryland Capital Region Health. Dimensions President and CEO… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - September 5, 2017 Category: American Health Authors: Tina Reed Source Type: news

UMMS takes critical step toward building a new Prince George's hospital
University of Maryland Medical System is expected to assume ownership over Dimensions Healthcare System on Friday, a major milestone in a yearslong battle to secure funding and state approvals to build a new $543 million state-of-the-art teaching hospital in Prince George's County. Dimensions — which oversaw the cash-strapped Prince George's Hospital Center in Cheverly that's set to be replaced by the new hospital — will be renamed University of Maryland Capital Region Health. Dimensions President… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - September 1, 2017 Category: American Health Authors: Tina Reed Source Type: news

University of Maryland Medical Center's $100M expansion wins design OK
The demolition of the former Maryland General Hospital will begin immediately. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - August 31, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Melody Simmons Source Type: news

Undergraduates develop tools to diagnose Alzheimer's disease before patients show symptoms
(University of Maryland) A team of seven University of Maryland A. James Clark School of Engineering undergraduates earned the top prize in this year's National Institutes of Health (NIH) Design by Biomedical Undergraduate Teams (DEBUT) challenge for their efforts to develop low-cost tools to diagnose Alzheimer's disease before patients show symptoms. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 28, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New use of blood cleaning device saves high-risk patients with liver failure
(University of Maryland Medical Center) University of Maryland School of Medicine researchers report that a device that removes toxins from the blood can also effectively provide a bridge to liver transplantation or buy time for a traumatically injured liver to heal, suggesting broader uses for the device than previously thought. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 23, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New Use of Blood Cleaning Device Saves High-Risk Patients With Liver Failure
Severe acute liver failure (ALF), a rare but life-threatening illness, is associated with high death rates if patients don’t receive timely treatment or a liver transplant. Unlike the heart or the kidneys, there is no established mechanical device to replace the liver’s function. Now, University of Maryland School of Medicine (UM SOM) researchers report that a device that removes toxins from the blood can also effectively provide a bridge to liver transplantation or buy time for a traumatically injured liver to heal, suggesting broader uses for the device than previously thought. (Source: University of Maryland...
Source: University of Maryland School of Medicine News Headlines - August 23, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Columbia lab readies to test marijuana products as first growers approved (Video)
A Columbia laboratory is set up, inspected and ready to start testing medical marijuana, as newly approved growing operations start producing in Maryland. Dr. Andrew Rosenstein, a physician from University of Maryland St. Joseph Medical Center, is CEO of the Steep Hill Maryland lab. The lab was the first to win pre-approval from the Maryland Medical Cannabis Commission to operate as an independent marijuana testing facility. And after a round of fin al inspections, Rosentein said he expects to receive… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - August 21, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Morgan Eichensehr Source Type: news

Tenth Annual Kids Mini-Med School Celebrates Graduation Day
In 2008, the University of Maryland School of Medicine decided to expand its Mini-Med School program by initiating a Kids Mini-Med at the Salvation Army’s Franklin Square Boys & Girls Club in West Baltimore. (Source: University of Maryland School of Medicine News Headlines)
Source: University of Maryland School of Medicine News Headlines - August 18, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Mother-Daughter Kayaking Team to Complete 300-Mile Trip in Baltimore to Honor Late UM SOM Scientist Dr. Angela Brodie
Patients who receive life-saving care from a physician or surgeon are often so grateful that they make generous gifts to medical schools and hospitals where they were treated. (Source: University of Maryland School of Medicine News Headlines)
Source: University of Maryland School of Medicine News Headlines - August 15, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Seeing without eyes: The world of nonvisual photoreception
A University of Maryland researcher says that light sensitive cells are also found outside the eyes, generally to regulate sleep and wake and other cycles synchronized to the changes of day and night. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 10, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

A metabolic pathway that feeds liver cancer
(American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology) A little-studied gene may explain how some liver cancer cells obtain the nutrition they need to proliferate, according to new research from the University of Maryland. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - August 10, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Study Finds That Proton-Beam Therapy is Safe for Treating an Aggressive Type of Lung Cancer
Proton-beam radiotherapy is safe and appears to be effective in treating some cases of small cell lung cancer (SCLC), an aggressive cancer that accounts for about 10 to 15 percent of all lung cancers, according to a new study published online in the journal Cancer. (Source: University of Maryland School of Medicine News Headlines)
Source: University of Maryland School of Medicine News Headlines - August 10, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Energy drinks make people more likely to use cocaine
Researchers from the University of Maryland found such people aged 21 to 25 are also more at risk of taking prescription drugs for non-medical reasons and having alcohol problems at an older age. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 9, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

This Newly Discovered Dinosaur Makes T. Rex ‘Look Like a Dwarf’
(WASHINGTON) — A study proclaims a newly named species the heavyweight champion of all dinosaurs, making the scary Tyrannosaurus rex look like a munchkin. At 76 tons (69 metric tons), the plant-eating behemoth was as heavy as a space shuttle. The dinosaur’s fossils were found in southern Argentina in 2012. Researchers who examined and dated them said the long-necked creature was the biggest of a group of large dinosaurs called titanosaurs. “There was one small part of the family that went crazy on size,” said Diego Pol of the Egidio Feruglio paleontology museum in Argentina, co-author of the study p...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - August 9, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Associated Press Tags: Uncategorized dinosaurs onetime Science Source Type: news

UM SOM Names Deputy Director of Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies for its Graduate Program in Life Sciences
Dudley K. Strickland, PhD, Associate Dean for Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UM SOM), along with UM SOM Dean E. Albert Reece, MD, PhD, MBA, announced that Peixin Yang, PhD, Professor of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences (OB-GYN), has been named Deputy Director of Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies in UM SOM’s Graduate Program in Life Sciences (GPILS). (Source: University of Maryland School of Medicine News Headlines)
Source: University of Maryland School of Medicine News Headlines - August 9, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Regular energy drink use linked to later drug use among young adults
(University of Maryland) Could young adults who regularly consume highly caffeinated energy drinks be at risk for future substance use? In a study of young adults ages 21-25, led by the University of Maryland School of Public Health, researchers found evidence that individuals who regularly consumed highly caffeinated energy drinks, and sustained that consumption over time, were more likely to use cocaine, nonmedically use prescription stimulants, and be at risk for alcohol use disorder at age 25. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 8, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

University of Maryland School of Medicine receives grant to develop vaccine
(University of Maryland School of Medicine) University of Maryland School of Medicine researchers will develop a vaccine against Shigella and Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 3, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

University of Maryland School of Medicine receives grant for HIV research in Malawi
(University of Maryland School of Medicine) Researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine will study the impact exposure to HIV has on the immune systems of infants in utero. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - August 2, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

UMD engineers invent the first bio-compatible, ion current battery
(University of Maryland) Engineers at the University of Maryland have invented a new kind of battery; one that is bio-compatible because it produces the same kind of ion-based electrical energy used by humans and other living things. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 24, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

What do sex in moss and neurons have in common?
This study will be published in Nature on 24 July. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 24, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Receptors for neuron communication in humans vital for reproduction in mosses
(University of Maryland) Glutamate receptors, which play a central role in the human nervous system, have been thought to only function in neural transmission. However, they exist on many other human tissues, and in many species without nervous systems, including plants. A UMD-led study has shown that the glutamate receptor-like genes in the moss Physcomitrella patens are crucial for sexual reproduction, shedding light on a possible evolutionarily conserved, non-neural function for this family of genes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 24, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Civil Unrest After Freddie Gray's Death Harms Health in Baltimore Mothers
The April 2015 civil unrest associated with Freddie Gray’s death while in police custody caused a significant spike of stress in mothers of young children living in affected neighborhoods, according to new research from the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UM SOM). (Source: University of Maryland School of Medicine News Headlines)
Source: University of Maryland School of Medicine News Headlines - July 24, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Civil unrest after Freddie Gray's death harms health in Baltimore mothers
(University of Maryland Medical Center) The April 2015 civil unrest associated with Freddie Gray's death while in police custody caused a significant spike of stress in mothers of young children living in affected neighborhoods, according to new research from the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UM SOM). (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 21, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

University Of Maryland School Of Medicine Scientist Receives Top Award for His Pioneering Work on Improving Radiation Therapy Outcome
Søren M. Bentzen, PhD, DMSc, a professor in the Department of Epidemiology and Public Health (EPH) at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UM SOM), has been awarded a gold medal from the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO). This is the highest honor bestowed upon ASTRO members. It recognizes a distinguished scientist who has made major contributions to the field of radiation oncology. (Source: University of Maryland School of Medicine News Headlines)
Source: University of Maryland School of Medicine News Headlines - July 21, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Third Year Medical Student Students Attended the Annual Student Clinician Ceremony
The annual Student Clinician Ceremony was held in Davidge Hall recently, to formally welcome the third-year medical students to their clinical rotations. As they were just about to start their third year the Class of 2019 gathered to hear inspirational messages from their mentors, pin professionalism pins on each other, and recite the Student Clinician Oath to symbolize their transition from classroom learning to patient care. (Source: University of Maryland School of Medicine News Headlines)
Source: University of Maryland School of Medicine News Headlines - July 20, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Third-Year Medical Students Celebrate Annual Student Clinician Ceremony
The annual Student Clinician Ceremony was held in Davidge Hall recently, to formally welcome the third-year medical students to their clinical rotations. As they were just about to start their third year the Class of 2019 gathered to hear inspirational messages from their mentors, pin professionalism pins on each other, and recite the Student Clinician Oath to symbolize their transition from classroom learning to patient care. (Source: University of Maryland School of Medicine News Headlines)
Source: University of Maryland School of Medicine News Headlines - July 20, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Head injuries nearly double your risk of dementia
Experts say the study by University of Maryland neuroscientists could transform how brain inflammation is understood, and, ultimately, how it is treated. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - July 7, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Maryland scientists discover depression gene
Unprecedented research by the University of Maryland School of Medicine has identified a gene that can either protect from anxiety or trigger chronic stress. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - July 6, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

New study identifies gene that could play key role in depression
(University of Maryland School of Medicine) Depression affects more than 300 million people annually. Now, a new study has pinpointed how one particular gene plays a central role -- either protecting from stress or triggering a downward spiral, depending on its level of activity. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 6, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

America's fracking boom drives pregnancy surge
Despite a decrease in overall fertility rates, there has been an uptick in births among families working on lucrative fracking sites, according to economists at the University of Maryland. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - July 4, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Why America's Deep South still has the highest HIV rates
Two professors at the University of Maryland explain the underlying issues which mean HIV is so prevalent among Southern African Americans. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - June 29, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

New research identifies key mechanism behind some deafness
(University of Maryland School of Medicine) Although the basic outlines of human hearing have been known for years -- sensory cells in the inner ear turn sound waves into the electrical signals that the brain understands as sound -- the molecular details have remained elusive. New research has identified a crucial protein in this translation process. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 29, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

University of Maryland School of Medicine Scientist Receives Top Award for His Work on the Relationship Between Potassium and Blood Pressure
Paul Welling, MD, a professor of physiology at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UM SOM), has been named the 2017 Carl W. Gottschalk Distinguished Lecturer of the American Physiological Society. The award recognizes a distinguished scientist who has made major contributions to understanding physiological processes through innovative research. (Source: University of Maryland School of Medicine News Headlines)
Source: University of Maryland School of Medicine News Headlines - June 29, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Giving birth multiple times has impact on stroke recovery, study shows
(University of Maryland School of Medicine) New research published in the   Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences shows that while perimenopausal female mice that gave birth multiple times (multiparous) were at higher risk of stroke, they recovered better than mice that had not ever reproduced. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 27, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Mosquito-killing fungi engineered with spider and scorpion toxins could help fight malaria
(University of Maryland) A new study from the University of Maryland and colleagues from Burkina Faso, China and Australia suggests that a mosquito-killing fungus genetically engineered to produce spider and scorpion toxins could serve as a highly effective biological control mechanism to fight malaria-carrying mosquitoes. The fungus is specific to mosquitoes and does not pose a risk to humans. Further, the study results suggest that the fungus is also safe for honey bees and other insects. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 13, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

UMD bioengineers develop new technologies to drive next-generation therapies for MS
(University of Maryland) Researchers in the University of Maryland Fischell Department of Bioengineering Jewell Laboratory are using quantum dots -- tiny semiconductor particles commonly used in nanotechnology -- to decipher the features needed to design specific and effective therapies for multiple sclerosis (MS) and other autoimmune diseases. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 13, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

USM institute wins $6 million grant to develop hepatitis C vaccine
The National Institutes of Health has awarded a University System of Maryland institute a $6 million grant to develop a vaccine for the hepatitis C virus. The Institute for Bioscience and Biotechnology Research will conduct the grant-funded research over a five-year period. The institute is a joint research enterprise between the University of Maryland, College Park, the University of Maryland, Baltimore and the National Institute of Standards and T echnology. The project was initially seeded with… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines - June 12, 2017 Category: Health Management Authors: Morgan Eichensehr Source Type: news

USM institute wins $6 million grant to develop hepatitis C vaccine
The National Institutes of Health has awarded a University System of Maryland institute a $6 million grant to develop a vaccine for the hepatitis C virus. The Institute for Bioscience and Biotechnology Research will conduct the grant-funded research over a five-year period. The institute is a joint research enterprise between the University of Maryland, College Park, the University of Maryland, Baltimore and the National Institute of Standards and T echnology. The project was initially seeded with… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - June 12, 2017 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Morgan Eichensehr Source Type: news

An egg a day may prevent stunted growth in infants
Conclusion This study sounds like good news for undernourished children in parts of the world where stunted growth or being underweight are common, such as the Andean mountains of Ecuador. The study showed that eggs seem to be a safe and practical way of boosting children's nutrition in this population. But this research has some limitations. Adding one food to a diet is likely to affect the rest of the diet, too. And caregivers for the children may have given them different foods in addition to the eggs, or treated them differently in some ways. The children in the control group may also have eaten more eggs than they ...
Source: NHS News Feed - June 8, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Pregnancy/child Food/diet Source Type: news

Study: Fear of crime, general sense of danger drives gun ownership
Studies by the University of Groningen, The Netherlands and the University of Maryland suggest differing motivations behind handgun and shotgun ownership. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - June 8, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

University of Maryland School of Medicine Vaccine Researcher Receives Top Award in the Study of Infectious Diseases from National Foundation
Myron M. Levine, MD, DTPH, the Simon and Bessie Grollman Distinguished Professor and Associate Dean for Global Health, Vaccinology and Infectious Disease at UM SOM, has been awarded the Maxwell Finland Award for Scientific Achievement by the National Foundation for Infectious Diseases (NFID). (Source: University of Maryland School of Medicine News Headlines)
Source: University of Maryland School of Medicine News Headlines - June 8, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

In Memoriam: Angela Hartley Brodie, Ph.D., Internationally Renowned Breast Cancer Researcher at University of Maryland School of Medicine
Angela Hartley Brodie, PhD, Professor Emeritus in the Department of Pharmacology at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, and an internationally-recognized scientist whose groundbreaking cancer research is considered among the greatest advances in treating breast cancer, passed away today of complications from Parkinson’s disease at her home in Fulton, MD. She was 82. (Source: University of Maryland School of Medicine News Headlines)
Source: University of Maryland School of Medicine News Headlines - June 7, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

University of Maryland School of Medicine Researchers Identify Gene That May Play a Central Role in Heart Disease
Heart disease kills more than 600,000 Americans every year, which translates to more than one in every four deaths. Although lifestyle choices contribute to the disease, genetics play a major role. This genetic facet has remained largely mysterious. But new research by scientists at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UM SOM) has identified what may be a key player: a mutated gene that leads to irregular heartbeat, which can lead to a dangerously inefficient heart. (Source: University of Maryland School of Medicine News Headlines)
Source: University of Maryland School of Medicine News Headlines - June 7, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

University of Maryland School of Medicine Director of the Anatomical Services Receives Top Award from American Association of Clinical Anatomists
Ronald S. Wade, Director of the Anatomical Services Division, University of Maryland School of Medicine (UM SOM), Director of the Maryland State Anatomy Board Department of Health and Mental Hygiene and Director of the Anatomical Services Division, will be the 2017 recipient of the R. Benton Adkins Jr. Distinguished Service Award from the American Association of Clinical Anatomists (AACA). (Source: University of Maryland School of Medicine News Headlines)
Source: University of Maryland School of Medicine News Headlines - June 6, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news