U.S. Researchers Test Pig-to-Human Transplant in Donated Body
Researchers on Thursday reported the latest in a surprising string of experiments in the quest to save human lives with organs from genetically modified pigs. This time around, surgeons in Alabama transplanted a pig’s kidneys into a brain-dead man—a step-by-step rehearsal for an operation they hope to try in living patients possibly later this year. “The organ shortage is in fact an unmitigated crisis and we’ve never had a real solution to it,” said Dr. Jayme Locke of the University of Alabama at Birmingham, who led the newest study and aims to begin a clinical trial of pig kidney transplants....
Source: TIME: Health - January 20, 2022 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: LAURAN NEERGAARD / AP Tags: Uncategorized healthscienceclimate Source Type: news

Hospital Defends Transplanting Pig Heart Into Patient With Criminal Past
The University of Maryland Medical Center said the man's eligibility was “based solely on his medical records.” (Source: Science - The Huffington Post)
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - January 14, 2022 Category: Science Source Type: news

Patient in Groundbreaking Pig Heart Transplant Has a Criminal Record
David Bennett Sr. was involved in a serious assault nearly 35 years ago, court records show. Such histories should not disqualify patients, his doctors said. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - January 14, 2022 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Roni Caryn Rabin Tags: your-feed-science Transplants Murders, Attempted Murders and Homicides Assaults Genetic Engineering University of Maryland Medical Center Source Type: news

The U.S. Is Facing Shortages in COVID-19 Drugs as Omicron Rages
Two brand-new COVID-19 pills that were supposed to be an important weapon against the pandemic in the U.S. are in short supply and have played little role in the fight against the Omicron wave of infections. The problem is that production is not yet at full strength and that the pill considered to be far superior, Pfizer’s, takes six to eight months to manufacture. While the supply is expected to improve dramatically in the coming months, doctors are clamoring for the pills now, not just because Omicron is causing an explosion of cases but because two antibody drugs that were once the go-to treatments don’t wor...
Source: TIME: Health - January 13, 2022 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: MATTHEW PERRONE/AP Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Drugs healthscienceclimate wire Source Type: news

Are pigs the future of organ transplants? This company is betting the farm on it
The first successful transplant of a pig heart into a human has grabbed headlines — and accelerates the path forward for the Maryland biotech behind that genetically modified organ. The surgery, performed Friday at the University of Maryland Medical Center in Baltimore, made patient David Bennett the first recipient of a heart developed by Blacksburg, Virginia's Revivicor Inc. , a wholly owned subsidiary of Silver Spring’s United Therapeutics Corp. (NASDAQ: UTHR). It puts the company a step closer… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - January 12, 2022 Category: American Health Authors: Sara Gilgore Source Type: news

In Breakthrough Transplant, Man Receives Genetically Modified Pig Heart
TUESDAY, Jan. 11, 2022 -- In a medical first, doctors from the University of Maryland have implanted the heart of a genetically modified pig in a 57-year-old man facing the final stages of heart disease. The surgical feat, known as... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - January 11, 2022 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Are pigs the future of organ transplants? This Md. company is betting the farm on it.
The first successful transplant of a pig heart into a human has grabbed headlines — and accelerates the path forward for the Maryland biotech behind that genetically modified organ. The surgery, performed Friday at the University of Maryland Medical Center in Baltimore, made patient David Bennett the first recipient of a heart developed by Blacksburg, Virginia's Revivicor Inc. , a wholly owned subsidiary of Silver Spring’s United Therapeutics Corp. (NASDAQ: UTHR). It puts the company a step closer… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - January 11, 2022 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Sara Gilgore Source Type: news

Why pig-to-human heart transplant is for now only a last resort
Analysis: As doctors monitor world ’s first human recipient of pig heart, safety and ethical concerns remainThe world ’s first transplant of a genetically altered pig heart into an ailing human is alandmark for medical science, but the operation, and the approach more broadly, raise substantial safety and ethical concerns.Surgeons at the University of Maryland Medical Center spent eight hours on Friday evening transplanting the heart from the pig into 57-year-old David Bennett, who had been in hospital for more than a month with terminal heart failure.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 11, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Science editor Tags: Medical research Health Science Maryland Gene editing US news Society World news Genetics Heart disease Biology Animal welfare Animals Organ donation Source Type: news

Health Highlights: Jan. 11, 2022
  In a transplant first, man receives genetically modified pig heart. Doctors from the University of Maryland performed the breakthrough surgery on a 57-year-old man facing the final stages of heart disease, raising the possibility that more... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - January 11, 2022 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

In Breakthrough Transplant, Man Receives Genetically Modified Pig Heart
TUESDAY, Jan. 11, 2022 -- In a medical first, doctors from the University of Maryland have implanted the heart of a genetically modified pig in a 57-year-old man facing the final stages of heart disease. The surgical feat, known as... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - January 11, 2022 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

In a First, Man Receives a Heart From a Genetically Altered Pig
The breakthrough may lead one day to new supplies of animal organs for transplant into human patients. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - January 11, 2022 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Roni Caryn Rabin Tags: your-feed-science Transplants Kidneys Genetics and Heredity Pigs Surgery and Surgeons Genetic Engineering Heart Cloning University of Maryland Medical Center Baltimore (Md) Source Type: news

In a medical first, a man with terminal heart disease gets a transplant of genetically modified pig heart
A 57-year-old Maryland man is doing well three days after receiving a genetically modified pig heart in a first-of-its-kind transplant surgery, University of Maryland Medicine said in a news... #newsrelease (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - January 11, 2022 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Pig Heart Successfully Transplanted to Man Pig Heart Successfully Transplanted to Man
It's the first successful transplant of a genetically modified animal heart into a human, in this case a 57-year-old man with no other treatment options, said officials at the University of Maryland.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Cardiology Headlines)
Source: Medscape Cardiology Headlines - January 11, 2022 Category: Cardiology Tags: Transplantation News Source Type: news

Surgeons Transplant Pig Heart Into Human Patient For the First Time Ever
In a medical first, doctors transplanted a pig heart into a patient in a last-ditch effort to save his life and a Maryland hospital said Monday that he’s doing well three days after the highly experimental surgery. While it’s too soon to know if the operation really will work, it marks a step in the decades-long quest to one day use animal organs for life-saving transplants. Doctors at the University of Maryland Medical Center say the transplant showed that a heart from a genetically modified animal can function in the human body without immediate rejection. The patient, David Bennett, 57, knew there was no gua...
Source: TIME: Health - January 10, 2022 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Carla K. Johnson / AP Tags: Uncategorized healthscienceclimate medicine News Desk wire Source Type: news

Maryland doctors transplant pig ’s heart into human patient in medical first
Patient is doing well three days after the highly experimental surgery, doctors say, though it ’s too soon to know if it is a successIn a medical first, doctors in Maryland have transplanted a genetically modified pig ’s heart into a human patient in a last-ditch effort to save his life.Doctors at the University of Maryland medical center said Monday that the patient was doing well three days after the highly experimental surgery, though it is too soon to know if the operation has been a success.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 10, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Guardian staff and agencies Tags: Maryland Medical research US news Science Source Type: news

First-ever pig-to-human heart transplant offers hope for thousands in need of organs
The breakthrough by doctors at the University of Maryland offers hope for those who languish and sometimes die while on organ transplant waitlists. #universityofmaryland #breakthrough (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - January 10, 2022 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

For Some, a Second Pandemic Winter Means Seasonal Affective Disorder Is Hitting Hard
Last winter, A.S.—a 26-year-old from Minnesota who asked to go by her initials to protect her privacy while job searching—was terrified of seasonal affective disorder (SAD). No stranger to seasonal depression during Minnesota’s cold, dark, snowy winters, A.S. worried that pandemic isolation would only make the problem worse. She planned a regimen of prescribed antidepressants, light therapy and exercise, then hunkered down and tried to relax through the winter. To her pleasant surprise, it mostly worked. This year, however, she hasn’t been so lucky. Since daylight saving time hit, “it has been...
Source: TIME: Health - December 23, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 healthscienceclimate Mental Health Source Type: news

Leaders in Health Care 2021: Dr. Donna L. Parker, University of Maryland School of Medicine
Dr. Donna L. Parker says she often tells her students that patient care begins with self care. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines - December 10, 2021 Category: Health Management Authors: Rebecca Logan Source Type: news

Mark Turgeon out as Maryland men ’s basketball coach after 10-plus seasons
The University of Maryland and men's basketball coach Mark Turgeon have mutually agreed to part ways, effective immediately. Assistant Danny Manning will be the interim coach for the remainder of... #markturgeon #mensbasketballcoach #dannymanning (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - December 3, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Scientists build robot that uses CCTV cameras to determine if people are social distancing
A research team at the University of Maryland has invented a system that uses AI, CCTV cameras and thermal imaging to detect social distancing breaches and to inform people of them. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - December 1, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Liberia: Infectious Disease Scientist, Dr. Dougbeh Chris Nyan Gets Award for Public Healthcare Innovation
[FrontPageAfrica] Washington, DC -- At an event held in College Park, Maryland over the weekend at the University of Maryland, infectious disease scientist and social activist, Dr. Dougbeh Chris Nyan, was awarded the first ever Manevia Leadership African Award in Public Healthcare Innovation for 2021 (MALA 2021). (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - November 24, 2021 Category: African Health Source Type: news

40 Under 40: Parikshit Moitra, University of Maryland, Baltimore
Moitra already has multiple patents to his name. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines - November 19, 2021 Category: Health Management Authors: Jessica Iannetta Source Type: news

Why Have We Waited So Long for a Malaria Vaccine? Why Have We Waited So Long for a Malaria Vaccine?
Why has developing an effective malaria vaccine been so elusive? Three experts from the University of Maryland Center for Vaccine Development and Global Health explore some of the challenges.Medscape Infectious Diseases (Source: Medscape Hiv-Aids Headlines)
Source: Medscape Hiv-Aids Headlines - November 9, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: Infectious Diseases Commentary Source Type: news

UMB will use $18M donation to expand health care access, scholarships on Eastern Shore
The University of Maryland, Baltimore announced a nearly $18 million donation pledge Friday that is expected to benefit students and health care providers on the Eastern Shore as well as endow a new cancer research fund. The gift was announced at an outdoor ceremony inaugurating Dr. Bruce Jarrell as the school's seventh president. Jarrell was appointed to the position in September 2020 and had served as interim president before that. Jarrell is an Eastern Shore native. His childhood friend, Lawrence… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - November 5, 2021 Category: American Health Authors: Giacomo Bologna Source Type: news

Men Are Now More Likely to Be Single Than Women. It ’s Not a Good Sign
Almost a third of adult single men live with a parent. Single men are much more likely to be unemployed, financially fragile and to lack a college degree than those with a partner. They’re also likely to have lower median earnings; single men earned less in 2019 than in 1990, even adjusting for inflation. Single women, meanwhile, earn the same as they did 30 years ago, but those with partners have increased their earnings by 50%. These are the some of the findings of a new Pew Research analysis of 2019 data on the growing gap between American adults who live with a partner and those who do not. While the study is les...
Source: TIME: Science - October 5, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Belinda Luscombe Tags: Uncategorized biztech2030 Economy Source Type: news

Covid is evolving 'to become better at spreading in the air'
The Alpha strain is 18 times more transmissible through the air compared to the original strain that originated in China, researchers at the University of Maryland said. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - September 17, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

One of the region's largest employers implements $15 minimum wage
One of the largest private-sector employers in the state has joined with other Greater Baltimore institutions in implementing a $15 an hour minimum wage. The University of Maryland Medical System announced Friday that it would raise its minimum wage to $15 per hour for its more than 29,000 employees. The change, which takes effect with the pay period beginning Sept. 12, will result in a pay raise for about 1,500 people or roughly 5% of the health s ystem's workforce. The new minimum wage applies… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - September 10, 2021 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Jessica Iannetta Source Type: news

‘Better to Stay Ahead of It.’ Why the White House COVID-19 Strategy Now Involves Vaccine Booster Shots
By now, many public health experts, and the public for that matter, have accepted that vaccinated people may need another dose of whichever COVID-19 shot they received in order to better protect against new variants of COVID-19. And on Aug. 18, the White House endorsed a third dose for those who received either of the two-dose Pfizer-BioNTech or Moderna vaccines. People who received the single-shot Johnson & Johnson/Janssen vaccine may also need an additional dose, but the relevant studies are still ongoing. For now, the government plans on rolling out Pfizer and Moderna booster doses the week of Sept. 20, beginning wi...
Source: TIME: Health - August 18, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

How UM Capital Region Health is changing up care in Prince George ’s County
The newly opened University of Maryland Capital Region Medical Center in Largo marks the health system's latest step in improving health in Prince George's County. Part of UM Capital ’s changeUP movement, the $543 million hospital aims to address regional health disparities by expanding community access to high-quality care. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - August 18, 2021 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Jim Molis — Contributor Source Type: news

How UM Capital Region Health is changing up care in Prince George ’s County
The newly opened University of Maryland Capital Region Medical Center in Largo marks the health system's latest step in improving health in Prince George's County. Part of UM Capital ’s changeUP movement, the $543 million hospital aims to address regional health disparities by expanding community access to high-quality care. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - August 18, 2021 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Jim Molis — Contributor Source Type: news

UMD Develops a DASH-Plus community-based hypertension management program for older adults
(University of Maryland) The University of Maryland was awarded funding to develop, test, and deliver an integrated hypertension management program for older adults. The program takes the existing DASH (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension) diet and tailors it to those aged 55 and older through a virtual education program this summer, with an in-person program coming soon. The DASH-Plus intervention incorporates diet, simple chair exercises, access to fresh fruits and vegetables, and blood pressure self-monitoring. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 22, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

UMD collaborates to improve pig muscle growth, implications for sustainability and health
(University of Maryland) The University of Maryland received collaborative funding to enhance efficiency of pork production through improved pig muscle growth. Little is known about how the benefits of early life nutrition can be passed from mother to child, and improved muscle growth means a healthier animal, less feed and waste, and a more sustainable pork industry. This work also has future applications beyond the pork industry to optimize human performance and treat wounded service members. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 20, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

New high-tech portal launched to speed hearing loss innovations
(University of Maryland School of Medicine) Researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM) launched a new online tool that could more quickly advance medical discoveries to reverse progressive hearing loss. The tool enables easy access to genetic and other molecular data from hundreds of technical research studies involving hearing function and the ear. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 19, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

University of Maryland engineers 3D printed a soft robotic hand that can play Nintendo
(University of Maryland) A team of researchers from the University of Maryland has 3D printed a soft robotic hand that is agile enough to play Nintendo's Super Mario Bros. - and win! (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 16, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Monthly child tax credit payments are one of the best forms of government spending, economist says
University of Maryland economist Melissa Kearney told CNBC that Biden's federal child tax credit policy is one of the best forms of... (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - July 15, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Study: Hospitals not   adequately prepared for next pandemic
(University of Maryland School of Medicine) As the COVID-19 pandemic wanes in the U.S., a new study from the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM) and University of Maryland Medical Center (UMMC) finds that hospitals nationwide may not be adequately prepared for the next pandemic. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - July 7, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

UM Upper Chesapeake Health CEO to retire after 26 years
University of Maryland Upper Chesapeake Health CEO Lyle Sheldon will retire later this year after 34 years with the health system, including the last 26 in the top job. Lyle Sheldon, who has been with Upper Chesapeake since 1987 and has served as CEO since 1995, will step down in December, the health system announced Tuesday afternoon. The University of Maryland Medical System is currently in the process of putting together an executive search committee to find S heldon's successor and plans to make… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - July 6, 2021 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Jessica Iannetta Source Type: news

UM Upper Chesapeake Health CEO to retire after 26 years
University of Maryland Upper Chesapeake Health CEO Lyle Sheldon will retire later this year after 34 years with the health system, including the last 26 in the top job. Lyle Sheldon, who has been with Upper Chesapeake since 1987 and has served as CEO since 1995, will step down in December, the health system announced Tuesday afternoon. The University of Maryland Medical System is currently in the process of putting together an executive search committee to find S heldon's successor and plans to make… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - July 6, 2021 Category: American Health Authors: Jessica Iannetta Source Type: news

NIH Avant Garde Award for out-of-box, innovative concept to cure HIV and treat addiction
(University of Maryland School of Medicine) University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM) Professor of Diagnostic Radiology& Nuclear Medicine, Linda Chang, MD, MS, received the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) 2021 Avant Garde Award (DP1) for HIV/AIDS and Substance Use Disorder Research -- a National Institutes of Health (NIH) Director's Pioneer Award. This prestigious award supports researchers with exceptional creativity, who propose high-impact research with the potential to be transformative to the field. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 6, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How the Delta Variant Affects Whether You Should Wear a Mask or Not
As infections involving the new Delta variant of the COVID-19 virus continue to increase around the world, including in the U.S., health experts are yet again revisiting advice about who should wear masks and when. On June 28, the Los Angeles County public health department advised all people, including those who are vaccinated, to wear masks in most indoor public settings, based on the fact that nearly half of the virus from cases in the county that were genetically sequenced now belong to the Delta variant. The variant, first identified in India, is far more contagious than previous strains of SARS-CoV-2, and could cause...
Source: TIME: Health - July 1, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

University of Maryland Children ’s Hospital debuts new 16-bed psychiatric unit in downtown Baltimore
The opening of the new 16-bed hospital unit dedicated to pediatric psychiatry comes as the local and national need for mental health care, especially among young people, has spiked in recent years. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - June 30, 2021 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Morgan Eichensehr Source Type: news

UMD introduces new CRISPR 3.0 system for highly efficient gene activation in plants
(University of Maryland) Yiping Qi at the University of Maryland (UMD) introduced a new and improved CRISPR 3.0 system in plants, focusing on gene activation. This third generation system focuses on multiplexed gene activation that can boost the function of multiple genes simultaneously. This system boasts four to six times the activation capacity of current state-of-the-art CRISPR technology, demonstrating high accuracy and efficiency in up to seven genes at once. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 24, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Recycling of the eye's light sensors is faulty in progressive blindness of older adults
(University of Maryland School of Medicine) With the National Eye Institute reporting that about 11 million older adults in the U.S. endure a condition that leads to progressive blindness, known as age-related macular degeneration, University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM) researchers are starting to understand what goes wrong in the disease, in order to develop new therapies to treat it. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 23, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

US beekeepers continue to report high colony loss rates, no clear improvement
(University of Maryland) US beekeepers lost 45.5% of their managed honey bee colonies from April 2020 to April 2021, according to preliminary results of the 15th annual nationwide survey conducted by the University of Maryland-led nonprofit Bee Informed Partnership (BIP). These losses mark the second highest loss rate the survey has recorded since it began in 2006. The survey results highlight the continuing high rates of honey bee colony turnover. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 23, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Genetic cause of neurodevelopmental disorder discovered
(University of Maryland School of Medicine) University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM) researchers identified a new gene that may be linked to certain neurodevelopmental disorders and intellectual disabilities. The researchers believe that finding genes involved in certain types of developmental disorders, provide an important first step in determining the cause of these disorders and ultimately in developing potential therapies for treating them. The paper was recently published in the American Journal of Human Genetics. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 21, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

UMSOM researchers work to improve use of genetic risk scores in diverse populations
(University of Maryland School of Medicine) Researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM) have received a $5 million federal grant to pool genomic information from existing and new datasets - predominantly in African and African American populations -- in order to calculate the risk of developing specific diseases. They will use sophisticated modeling and genetic datasets to calculate the risk, known as a polygenic risk score, with an emphasis on studying people from different ancestries. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 16, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Researchers develop more reliable rapid tests for COVID-19
(University of Maryland School of Medicine) Researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM) have developed two rapid diagnostic tests for COVID-19 that are nearly as accurate as the gold-standard test currently used in laboratories. Unlike the gold standard test, which extracts RNA and uses it to amplify the DNA of the virus, these new tests can detect the presence of the virus in as little as five minutes using different methods. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 15, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Study links COVID-19 public health efforts to dramatic drop in COPD hospitalizations
(University of Maryland Medical Center) Public health measures designed to reduce the spread of the COVID-19 virus may have fostered a substantial side benefit: A 53 percent drop in hospital admissions for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), likely due to a drop in circulating seasonal respiratory viruses such as influenza. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 14, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Study shows how rudeness leads to anchoring, including in medical diagnoses
(University of Maryland) Research forthcoming in the Journal of Applied Psychology looks at how experiencing rudeness amplifies anchoring bias including in doctors' decision-making. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 10, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Nearly 1 in 5 patients who die from unexplained sudden cardiac death have suspicious gene
(University of Maryland School of Medicine) Researchers from the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM) and their colleagues found that nearly 20 percent of patients with unexplained sudden cardiac death - most of whom were under age 50 - carried rare genetic variants. These variants likely raised their risk of sudden cardiac death. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 9, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news