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Single-dose vaccine could provide faster protection in cholera epidemics
(University of Maryland School of Medicine) Each year there are more than three million cases of cholera worldwide. Research at the University of Maryland School of Medicine now shows that giving a stronger single-dose of a live oral vaccine could be an effective tool in controlling outbreaks more quickly. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - December 11, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Scientists identify first brain cells that respond to sound
(University of Maryland School of Medicine) A new study is the first to identify a mechanism that could explain an early link between sound input and cognitive function, often called the 'Mozart effect.' (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 7, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Edwards Lifesciences acquires mitral repair dev Harpoon Medical for $100 million
Edwards Lifesciences (NYSE:EW) said today it acquired mitral valve repair developer Harpoon Medical for $100 million in cash, with the potential for an additional $150 million in milestone payments over 10 years. Harpoon is developing a system designed to enable echo-guided repair of mitral valve regurgitation through the stabilization of prolapse leaflets to restore coaptation and valve function. The device is currently investigational, though Harpoon is hopeful it will receive CE Mark approval in the European Union in the near future. “We believe the addition of Harpoon Medical’s technology and talented ...
Source: Mass Device - December 6, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Business/Financial News Cardiovascular Mergers & Acquisitions Replacement Heart Valves Edwards Lifesciences Harpoon Medical Source Type: news

Edwards Buys Harpoon for up to $250 Million
Edwards Lifesciences may be best known for its leadership in transcatheter valve therapies, but the company appears to be turning to its surgical valve portfolio as part of its growth strategy for the coming year. The company's acquisition of Harpoon Medical, announced Wednesday afternoon, is the first major indicator of this shift. Harpoon is developing beating-heart repair technology for degenerative mitral regurgitation (DMR). Edwards paid $100 million up front for Harpoon and agreed to pay up to $150 million more in milestone payments over the next 10 years. The company has had an eye on Harpoon since 2015 wh...
Source: MDDI - December 6, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Amanda Pedersen Tags: Medical Device Business Source Type: news

New study: Traumatic brain injury causes intestinal damage
(University of Maryland School of Medicine) Researchers have found a two-way link between traumatic brain injury and intestinal changes. These interactions may contribute to increased infections in these patients, and may also worsen chronic brain damage. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 6, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Children ’s National plans regional outpatient center near future UMMS hospital
Children's National Health System is in growth mode. The D.C.-based health system is planning to open a 60,000-square-foot regional outpatient center in Prince George's County by 2020. Officials have scheduled a ceremonial groundbreaking Wednesday at the location in Woodmore Towne Centre, less than three miles from the future site of the University of Maryland Capital Region Medical Center. Officials are seeking a certificate of need for a comprehensive pediatric outpatient and specialty medical… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines - December 5, 2017 Category: Health Management Authors: Tina Reed Source Type: news

University of Maryland Medical System breaks ground on new Largo hospital
The University of Maryland Medical System broke ground Thursday on a  $543 million teaching hospital at Largo Town Center. The ceremonial first shovel signified a major step in the lengthy effort to replace the long-struggling Prince George's Hospital Center in Cheverly. County officials say the new 205-bed hospital — named University of Maryland Capital Region M edical Center — will transform health care for residents and revitalize nearby businesses. County Executive Rushern Baker told the… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - November 30, 2017 Category: American Health Authors: Drew Hansen Source Type: news

Prince George's breaks ground on new Largo hospital
The University of Maryland Medical System broke ground Thursday on a  $543 million state-of-the-art teaching hospital at Largo Town Center. The ceremonial first shovel signified a major step in the lengthy effort to replace the long-struggling Prince George's Hospital Center in Cheverly. County officials say the new 205-bed hospital — named University of Maryland Capital Region Medical Center — will transform health care for residents and revitalize nearby businesses. County Executive Rushern… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - November 30, 2017 Category: American Health Authors: Drew Hansen Source Type: news

University of Maryland orthopaedic surgeons to receive international research award
(University of Maryland Medical Center) A research team led by Mohit N. Gilotra, MD, assistant professor of orthopaedics at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM), will receive the prestigious 2018 Charles S. Neer Award from the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) for a clinical study that demonstrated an effective method to potentially reduce the risk of serious infection following shoulder surgery. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 30, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Insightec wins FDA nod for Exablate Neuro glioblastoma trial
Insightec said today it won FDA approval to launch a safety and feasibility trial of its Exablate Neuro, testing its ability to disrupt the blood brain barrier in patients with glioblastoma. The Exablate Neuro device, which won FDA approval last July for treating essential tremor, uses high-intensity, focused ultrasound to thermally ablate targeted tissue, guided by continuous magnetic resonance imaging; the procedure can be performed non-invasively through an intact skull. In the trial, a research team will inject commonly used a sonographic microbubble solution into the bloodstream of a patient with a malignant...
Source: Mass Device - November 28, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Clinical Trials Food & Drug Administration (FDA) Neurological INSIGHTEC Source Type: news

Philips snaps up imaging workflow provider Analytical Informatics
Royal Philips (NYSE:PHG) said last week that it spent an unspecified sum to acquire imaging workflow solutions provider Analytical Informatics to beef up its PerformanceBridge portfolio. Founded in 2011 and spun out of the University of Maryland, Baltimore-based Analytical Informations offers vendor-agnostic workflow tools and applications based on technology licensed from the university’s medical school, Philips said. “Integrating Analytical Informatics’ software tools and applications into our current offerings will enable us to accelerate the delivery of next-generation technology, software and se...
Source: Mass Device - November 27, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Brad Perriello Tags: Health Information Technology Imaging Mergers & Acquisitions Wall Street Beat analyticalinformatics royalphilips Source Type: news

AAAS announces animal and avian sciences professor Iqbal Hamza as a 2017 Fellow
(University of Maryland) Dr. Iqbal Hamza of the University of Maryland has been named a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). Election as an AAAS Fellow is an honor bestowed upon AAAS members by their peers. Dr. Hamza was elected for groundbreaking discoveries and distinguished contributions on the biochemical and cell biology mechanisms underlying heme and iron trafficking and their regulation. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 22, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Ketamine boosts mices' mood when administered by men
A study by University of Maryland researchers found that ketamine, an anesthesia drug also commonly used as a party drug, has anti-depressant properties in mice, but only when administered by men. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - November 22, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Weekly Postings
See something of interest? Please share our postings with colleagues in your institutions! Spotlight Funding available! The National Network of Libraries of Medicine, Middle Atlantic Region, is accepting applications for health information outreach, health literacy initiatives, emergency preparedness partnerships and health sciences library projects. Applications will be due by COB on December 1. See a recent blog post from Executive Director, Kate Flewelling for details, or review our funding opportunities and start your application today! Closing Today! The Fall 2017 offering for the Health Sciences Library Association o...
Source: NN/LM Middle Atlantic Region Blog - November 17, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Hannah Sinemus Tags: Weekly Postings Source Type: news

Study: Process used to select lung transplant patients may need to be changed
(University of Maryland Medical Center) New research from the University of Maryland School of Medicine suggests that the system for choosing transplant recipients in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) may underestimate how long a person might survive without a lung transplant and therefore, may mislead clinicians. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 14, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

A new urgent care facility is opening at the Rotunda
A new ChoiceOne Urgent Care facility is set to open Dec. 8 at the Rotunda, to help serving a growing community in and around Hampden. The 3,500-square-foot facility, operating in partnership with the University of Maryland St. Joseph Medical Center, will house six private exam rooms, with a triage area and onsite x-ray services. It will be ChoiceOne's ninth urgent care location to open in Maryland and the fourth to partner with St. Joseph's. Other St. Joseph's partner locations are in Dundalk,… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - November 8, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Morgan Eichensehr Source Type: news

UMD neuroscientists identify source of early brain activity
(University of Maryland) A new study led by University of Maryland neuroscientists is the first to identify a mechanism that could explain an early link between sound input and cognitive function, often called the 'Mozart effect.' Working with an animal model, the researchers found that a type of cell present in the brain's primary processing area during early development, long thought to form structural scaffolding with no role in transmitting sensory information, may conduct such signals after all. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 7, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Viewpoint: How Maryland could become a biotech leader
The Baltimore region and state of Maryland appears to have all the critical components to emerge as a nationwide leader in the biotech and life sciences market. Indeed, the Maryland Life Sciences Advisory Board, an agency that reports to the Department of Commerce, has adopted as its vision statement “to become a top three biohealth ecosystem by 2023.” Buoyed by Johns Hopkins University and the University of Maryland, and together with an entrepreneur ial private sector, state officials are optimistic… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - November 2, 2017 Category: American Health Authors: David S. Rosen Source Type: news

Viewpoint: How Maryland could become a biotech leader
The Baltimore region and state of Maryland appears to have all the critical components to emerge as a nationwide leader in the biotech and life sciences market. Indeed, the Maryland Life Sciences Advisory Board, an agency that reports to the Department of Commerce, has adopted as its vision statement “to become a top three biohealth ecosystem by 2023.” Buoyed by Johns Hopkins University and the University of Maryland, and together with an entrepreneur ial private sector, state officials are optimistic… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - November 2, 2017 Category: Biotechnology Authors: David S. Rosen Source Type: news

University of Maryland Medical Center breaks ground on $116 million tower
The 275,000-square-foot facility will focus on population health improvement and chronic disease management for patients in West Baltimore. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - November 2, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Morgan Eichensehr Source Type: news

UMD School of Medicine researchers studying new approach to antibiotic resistance
(University of Maryland School of Medicine) Antibiotic resistance to serious wound and systemic infections is a growing concern, particularly among those injured in combat. Researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UM SOM) are studying how to fend off deadly infections by targeting the body's immune response to harmful bacteria. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - November 1, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Yet another risk for kids on antidepressants: Higher chance of developing type-2 diabetes, according to new study
(Natural News) Antidepressants are often prescribed for individuals who exhibit signs of major depressive disorders and various conditions such as anxiety, chronic pain, and sleep disorders. Now, a recent study has proven that children and adolescents who take antidepressants could develop type-2 diabetes. Researchers from the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy and the University... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - October 30, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

New molecule shows promise in HIV vaccine design
(University of Maryland) Researchers at the University of Maryland and Duke University have designed a novel protein-sugar vaccine candidate that, in an animal model, stimulated an immune response against sugars that form a protective shield around HIV. The molecule could one day become part of a successful HIV vaccine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 27, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Martine Rothblatt shares details about her company's next crusade: Xenotransplantation
Rothblatt's company, Silver Spring biotech United Therapeutics Corp., has put considerable money behind a xenotransplantation center at the University of Maryland — just one move it's made to advance the field of organ manufacturing and transplantation. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines - October 26, 2017 Category: Health Management Authors: Tina Reed Source Type: news

Martine Rothblatt shares details about her company's next crusade: Xenotransplantation
Rothblatt's company, Silver Spring biotech United Therapeutics Corp., has put considerable money behind a xenotransplantation center at the University of Maryland — just one move it's made to advance the field of organ manufacturing and transplantation. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - October 26, 2017 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Tina Reed Source Type: news

FDA approves pivotal trial for Insightec ’ s Exablate Neuro in Parkinson ’ s
Insightec said today that it won FDA approval for a pivotal trial of its Exablate Neuro device in treating refractory Parkinson’s disease. Haifa, Israel-based Insightec said the the study will evaluate using Exablate Neuro’s MR-guided focused ultrasound to ablate portions of the globus pallidus in the brain, which helps regulate voluntary movement. The trial, led by principal investigator Dr. Howard Eisenberg of the University of Maryland, aims to treat dyskinesia in patients with advanced Parkinson’s who have not responded to medication. “Insightec remains committed to advancing research to ex...
Source: Mass Device - October 25, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Brad Perriello Tags: Clinical Trials Food & Drug Administration (FDA) Imaging Radiosurgery INSIGHTEC Source Type: news

Labor union, UMMC Midtown launch hospital apprenticeship program
A labor union representing health care workers is working with the University of Maryland Medical Center Midtown Campus to develop an apprenticeship program to train entry-level hospital employees to fill in-demand patient care jobs. The effort is backed by $70,000 in grant funding, including $50,000 from the Maryland Department of Labor's Apprenticeship Innovation Fund and another $20,000 from the Health Career Advancement Program, a national labor organization. The local 1199SEIU chapter and… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - October 19, 2017 Category: American Health Authors: Morgan Eichensehr Source Type: news

Shock Trauma chief Scalea working on disaster plan for 'when' terrorism hits Baltimore
The head of University of Maryland's Shock Trauma Center wants to formulate a disaster plan for "when, not if" the city is affected by a terror attack or mass shooting event. National tragedies seem to be becoming fairly commonplace, unfortunately. Dr. Thomas Scalea, physician in chief at the R Adams Cowley Shock Trauma Center, said it is hard for him to watch news events, like the mass shootings in Orlando and Las Vegas or the school shootings at Sandy Hook Elementary and University of Virginia,… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - October 18, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Morgan Eichensehr Source Type: news

Report: Half of U.S. medical care delivered at emergency rooms
A new study from the University of Maryland School of Medicine found that nearly half of U.S. medical care is delivered by emergency departments. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - October 17, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

New study: nearly half of US medical care comes from emergency rooms
(University of Maryland School of Medicine) Nearly half of all US medical care is delivered by emergency departments, according to a new study by researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine. In recent years, the percentage of care delivered by emergency departments has grown. The paper highlights the major role played by emergency rooms in US health care. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 17, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Can A Gadget Designed By Undergraduates Diagnose Alzheimer's?
A team of sophomores at the University of Maryland won a national competition for their prototype portable EEG device to diagnose Alzheimer ’s. Can it work? (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - October 8, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Next Avenue, Contributor Source Type: news

Study highlights 10 most unnecessary and overused medical tests and treatments
(University of Maryland School of Medicine) Unnecessary medication. Tests that don't reveal the problem, or uncover a 'problem' that isn't really there. Procedures that have more risk than benefit. A new study highlights some of the most egregious examples of medical overuse in America. The goal is not to shame anyone, but to make healthcare more effective and efficient. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 5, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Complicated Recovery Awaits Victims Injured in Vegas Attack
LAS VEGAS (AP) — Their concert turned into a siege, and now their lives may become a battle. The staggering count of people injured in the shooting at a Las Vegas music festival means their recoveries are likely to be as varied as the victims themselves. Some injuries are as simple as broken bones, others gunshot wounds involving multiple surgeries and potential transplants, and all come with the added emotional scars of enduring the deadliest shooting in modern U.S. history, with 59 killed. At least 130 people remained hospitalized Tuesday, with 48 listed in critical condition. Hospitals said 185 others had already ...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - October 4, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Amanda Lee Myers and Mat Sedensky, Associated Press Tags: Major Incidents News Mass Casualty Incidents Patient Care Source Type: news

Complicated Recovery Awaits Victims Injured in Vegas Attack
LAS VEGAS (AP) — Their concert turned into a siege, and now their lives may become a battle. The staggering count of people injured in the shooting at a Las Vegas music festival means their recoveries are likely to be as varied as the victims themselves. Some injuries are as simple as broken bones, others gunshot wounds involving multiple surgeries and potential transplants, and all come with the added emotional scars of enduring the deadliest shooting in modern U.S. history, with 59 killed. At least 130 people remained hospitalized Tuesday, with 48 listed in critical condition. Hospitals said 185 others had already ...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - October 4, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Amanda Lee Myers and Mat Sedensky, Associated Press Tags: Major Incidents News Mass Casualty Incidents Patient Care Source Type: news

Researchers identify protein that could reduce death, improve symptoms in flu and other infections
(University of Maryland School of Medicine) A new study by researchers has identified an innovative strategy for treating influenza, and perhaps other infectious diseases as well. Scientists showed that a small protein called retrocyclin-101 (RC-101) could potentially improve the symptoms and mortality associated with the flu and possibly other types of infectious illness as well. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - September 29, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Researchers identify intriguing link between sleep, cognition and schizophrenia
(University of Maryland School of Medicine) Many people with schizophrenia have trouble with learning and memory. A new study has found intriguing links between sleep, cognition and a compound called kynurenine. These links could illuminate the mechanism that causes cognitive problems among those with the disease, and could point the way to new treatments to reduce some of the disease's symptoms. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 28, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

National Eye Institute awards prize for 'Retina in a dish' competition
(NIH/National Eye Institute) A proposal to create a living model of the human retina, the light-sensitive tissue at the back of the eye, won $90,000 in the National Eye Institute (NEI) 3-D Retina Organoid Challenge (3-D ROC). The NEI 3-D ROC is an initiative that seeks to design human retinas from stem cells. Erin Lavik, Sc.D., at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, led the awarded team. The NEI is part of the National Institutes of Health. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 28, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

UMD partners with Fraunhofer, Signature Science on DNA screening technologies
(University of Maryland) Computational biologists in the University of Maryland Institute for Advanced Computer Studies (UMIACS) are collaborating with other experts to develop new approaches and tools for screening DNA sequences that might accidentally -- or intentionally -- be altered, resulting in a biological threat. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 28, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Two Group A Streptococcus genes linked to 'flesh-eating' bacterial infections
(University of Maryland) Group A Streptococcus bacteria cause illnesses ranging from mild nuisances like strep throat to life-threatening conditions such as flesh-eating disease, also known as necrotizing fasciitis. Life-threatening infections occur when the bacteria spread underneath the surface of the skin or throat and invade the underlying soft tissue. Researchers have found two group A Streptococcus genes involved in invasive infections, which may be potential targets for therapeutics. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - September 22, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

New clinical trial explores combining immunotherapy and radiation for sarcoma patients
(University of Maryland Medical Center) University of Maryland School of Medicine researchers are investigating a new approach to treat high-risk soft-tissue sarcomas by combining two immunotherapy drugs with radiation therapy to stimulate the immune system to destroy the main tumor as well as leftover microscopic cancer cells that may seed other tumors. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - September 20, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Researchers identify millions of new genes in the human microbiome
(University of Maryland School of Medicine) A new study of the human microbiome has uncovered millions of previously unknown genes from microbial communities in the human gut, skin, mouth, and vaginal microbiome, allowing for new insights into the role these microbes play in human health and disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - September 20, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Researchers identify critical molecular link between inflammation and diabetes
(University of Maryland School of Medicine) A new study has uncovered how inflammation contributes to a key feature of diabetes, the body's inability to metabolize glucose, a condition known as insulin resistance. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 12, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Novel intensive care improves treatment for heart patients -- and cuts costs
(University of Maryland Medical Center) Researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine find that a new, collaborative treatment model for seriously ill heart patients with breathing difficulties results in better care and lower costs. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 11, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Research identifies causes and possible treatments for deadly diseases affecting children
(University of Maryland School of Medicine) Research conducted at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UM SOM), has identified four pathogens are responsible for the vast majority of diarrheal illnesses - leading the way for potential new treatments. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - September 11, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

UMMS takes critical step toward building a new Prince George's hospital
University of Maryland Medical System assumed ownership over Dimensions Healthcare System on Friday, a major milestone in a yearslong battle to secure funding and state approvals to build a new $543 million state-of-the-art teaching hospital in Prince George's County. Dimensions — which oversaw the cash-strapped Prince George's Hospital Center in Cheverly that's set to be replaced by the new hospital — will be renamed University of Maryland Capital Region Health. Dimensions President and CEO… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - September 5, 2017 Category: American Health Authors: Tina Reed Source Type: news

UMMS takes critical step toward building a new Prince George's hospital
University of Maryland Medical System is expected to assume ownership over Dimensions Healthcare System on Friday, a major milestone in a yearslong battle to secure funding and state approvals to build a new $543 million state-of-the-art teaching hospital in Prince George's County. Dimensions — which oversaw the cash-strapped Prince George's Hospital Center in Cheverly that's set to be replaced by the new hospital — will be renamed University of Maryland Capital Region Health. Dimensions President… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - September 1, 2017 Category: American Health Authors: Tina Reed Source Type: news

University of Maryland Medical Center's $100M expansion wins design OK
The demolition of the former Maryland General Hospital will begin immediately. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - August 31, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Melody Simmons Source Type: news

Undergraduates develop tools to diagnose Alzheimer's disease before patients show symptoms
(University of Maryland) A team of seven University of Maryland A. James Clark School of Engineering undergraduates earned the top prize in this year's National Institutes of Health (NIH) Design by Biomedical Undergraduate Teams (DEBUT) challenge for their efforts to develop low-cost tools to diagnose Alzheimer's disease before patients show symptoms. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 28, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New use of blood cleaning device saves high-risk patients with liver failure
(University of Maryland Medical Center) University of Maryland School of Medicine researchers report that a device that removes toxins from the blood can also effectively provide a bridge to liver transplantation or buy time for a traumatically injured liver to heal, suggesting broader uses for the device than previously thought. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 23, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New Use of Blood Cleaning Device Saves High-Risk Patients With Liver Failure
Severe acute liver failure (ALF), a rare but life-threatening illness, is associated with high death rates if patients don’t receive timely treatment or a liver transplant. Unlike the heart or the kidneys, there is no established mechanical device to replace the liver’s function. Now, University of Maryland School of Medicine (UM SOM) researchers report that a device that removes toxins from the blood can also effectively provide a bridge to liver transplantation or buy time for a traumatically injured liver to heal, suggesting broader uses for the device than previously thought. (Source: University of Maryland...
Source: University of Maryland School of Medicine News Headlines - August 23, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news