University of Guelph researcher develops 3-in-1 vaccine against traveller's diarrhea
(University of Guelph) A U of G Prof. has discovered a novel approach to developing a first-ever vaccine for three common pathogens that cause traveller's diarrhea and kill more than 100,000 children living in developing countries each year. The vaccine yokes together proteins from pathogenic E.coli with sugars from Shigella and Camplyobacter jejuni -- three bugs that are major causes of bacterial diarrhea globally. Currently no licensed vaccines exist against any of these pathogens. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 10, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Shigella infection - what is shigellosis? Signs and symptoms of deadly stomach bug
SHIGELLA symptoms are caused by an intestinal bacteria disease, which can lead to an infection known as shigellosis. But, what is shigella and how can you spot the signs and symptoms of the food poisoning infection? (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - August 31, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

How rabies virus moves through nerve cells, and how it might be stopped
(Princeton University) Researchers found that the rabies virus travels through neurons differently than other neuron-invading viruses, and that its journey can be stopped by a drug commonly used to treat amoebic dysentery. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - August 23, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Strawberry tea can be used to treat diarrhea and dysentery
(Natural News) Did you know that strawberries have medicinal properties, too? Strawberries are among the most recognizable fruits of all, not only for their distinct, heart-shaped, seed-studded appearance but also for their sweet, fruity taste. Their leaves, however, have long been used to treat various illnesses, including gastrointestinal problems. Although not too apparent these days,... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - August 22, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

NARMS 2015 Human Isolates Surveillance Report
Report provides the most recent nationwide data on antibiotic resistance transmitted commonly by food, including: Salmonella, Shigella, Campylobacter, E. coli O157, and Vibrio species other than Vibrio cholera. (Source: PHPartners.org)
Source: PHPartners.org - August 15, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

More Than 600 People Say Eating Chipotle Made Them Sick – But Officials Still Don’t Know the Cause
More than 600 people said they got sick after eating at a Chipotle outside Columbus, Ohio, health officials said Monday. And they still don’t know what has caused it. The Delaware General Health District began investigating the restaurant, located in Powell, Ohio, on July 31 after it received numerous reports from patrons who ate there between July 26 and July 30. The location was briefly closed for an investigation. On Aug. 3, health officials put out an update saying that they had received nearly 700 inquires and had interviewed over 500 people. On Monday, they provided another update on Twitter saying that officia...
Source: TIME: Health - August 6, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Time Tags: Uncategorized Food & Drink Ohio onetime Source Type: news

Breathing Easier with Single-Use Bronchoscopes
This study was specifically done for bronchoscopes because that data was lacking,” says Lars Marcher, CEO and President Ambu A/S, in an interview with MD+DI. Contamination of reusable endoscopes has been known for some time now. “Endoscope Reprocessing Failures Continue to Expose Patients to Infection Risk” was number two on ECRI Institute’s list of Top 10 health technology hazards for 2018. And it has been on the organization’s top 10 list for the past eight years. Shifting to single-use instruments will likely be cost effective as well. According to a 2017 study, “Early Assessment...
Source: MDDI - July 12, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Susan Shepard Tags: Sterilization Source Type: news

Why July Is the Most Dangerous Month To Go Swimming
Just in time for swimming season, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a new report on disease outbreaks associated with swimming in rivers, lakes and oceans. Between 2000 and 2014, public health officials in 35 states, plus Guam, reported a total of 140 disease outbreaks associated with swimming in untreated recreational waters — mainly at beaches and bodies of water in public parks, the report says. These outbreaks led to 4,958 illnesses and two deaths. The vast majority of outbreaks with a confirmed cause were linked to gastrointestinal pathogens such as norovirus, Shigella and E. coli. ...
Source: TIME: Health - June 28, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized healthytime onetime public health Source Type: news

Rise in Possible Fluoroquinolone-Resistant Shigella Isolates Rise in Possible Fluoroquinolone-Resistant Shigella Isolates
The CDC is seeing an increasing number of Shigella isolates that test within the susceptible range for the fluoroquinolone antibiotic ciprofloxacin but harbor one or more resistance mechanisms.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - June 7, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Infectious Diseases News Source Type: news

Scientists Map Genetic Codes Of 3,000 Dangerous Bacteria Scientists Map Genetic Codes Of 3,000 Dangerous Bacteria
Scientists seeking new ways to fight drug-resistant superbugs have mapped the genomes of more than 3,000 bacteria, including samples of a bug taken from Alexander Fleming's nose and a dysentery-causing strain from a World War One soldier.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Pathology Headlines)
Source: Medscape Pathology Headlines - June 7, 2018 Category: Pathology Tags: Infectious Diseases News Source Type: news

Scientists map genetic codes of 3,000 dangerous bacteria
The DNA of deadly strains of plague, dysentery and cholera were decoded in what the researchers said was an effort to better understand some of the world's most dangerous diseases. (Source: CBC | Health)
Source: CBC | Health - June 6, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: News/Health Source Type: news

Scientists map genetic codes of 3,000 dangerous bacteria
(Reuters) - Scientists seeking new ways to fight drug-resistant superbugs have mapped the genomes of more than 3,000 bacteria, including samples of a bug taken from Alexander Fleming's nose and a dysentery-causing strain from a World War One soldier. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - June 6, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Study finds NYC mice may be hotbeds of antibiotic-resistant bacteria
Apartment-dwelling rodents all over the city carry treatment-resistant C. difficile, E. coli, Shigella and Salmonella that can be transmitted to residents, the team found. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - April 17, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Study finds NYC mice are hotbeds of antibiotic-resistant bacteria
Apartment-dwelling rodents all over the city carry treatment-resistant C. difficile, E. coli, Shigella and Salmonella that can be transmitted to residents, the team found. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - April 17, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

NYC Mice Are Carrying Antibiotic-Resistant Germs
People who live in cities are used to the company of furry vermin. But a new study reveals that mice and men may be sharing much more than just living quarters. In a study published in the journal mBio, researchers led by Dr. Ian Lipkin, professor of epidemiology at the Mailman School of Public Health at Columbia University, studied the gut microbes of 416 mice collected from mostly residential buildings all over New York City. Lipkin and his team did a thorough genetic analysis of the microbes they extracted from the feces of the mice, and found that they contained a number of disease-causing bacteria. Nearly 40% of the ...
Source: TIME: Health - April 17, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized Bacteria healthytime Source Type: news

UCLA pediatrician inspires humanism in young doctors
Dr. Lee Miller ’s journey began, as many do, with a train ride. Thirty years ago, he was a UCLA assistant professor traveling from Philadelphia to New York. After threading his way through the crowded aisles of every car, he eyed the last three vacant seats in the caboose.“I chose a fortuitous seat next to an elderly gentleman from Shanghai,” Miller recalled recently in a special address to UCLA medical students. “He was a pediatrician teaching students, just like me.”The ride passed quickly as the older physician recounted stories about his work in global health. When the two exchanged busine...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - March 3, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Researchers find transferable antibiotic resistance gene in pathogen of developing nations
(American Society for Microbiology) A team of investigators has found that the mcr-1 drug resistance gene, which encodes resistance to a drug that is used as a last resort, has been found for the first time in Shigella flexneri. Shigella are one of the leading causes of diarrhea worldwide. The research is published March 2 in Applied and Environmental Microbiology, a journal of the American Society for Microbiology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 2, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The 8th Annual Alexander Awards: The Best Tox Reading of 2017
Alexander Gettler Once again, last year’s outstanding examples of long-form journalism dealing with topics related to medical toxicology were dominated by coverage of the opioid crisis, its origins and the resulting carnage. The must-read article of the year was “The Family That Built a Empire of Pain,” Patrick Radden Keefe’s massive history of the Sacklers, one of America’s richest clans, much of whose wealth comes from their ownership of Purdue Pharma and the marketing and distribution of Oxycontin. The article, which appeared in the New Yorker, notes that the clan’s patriarch, Ar...
Source: The Poison Review - January 2, 2018 Category: Toxicology Authors: Leon Gussow Tags: Medical 2017 Alexander awards opioids Purdue Pharma Sackler Source Type: news

Gay man, 40, develops arthritis after catching a STI
Doctors at Leeds General Infirmary, who treated the unidentified patient and reported the strange case in a medical journal, said the shigella flexneri bacteria caused his reactive arthritis. (stock) (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - December 12, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Shigella: guidance, data and analysis
This guidance was updated in November 2017. A new sub-group added for non-travel associated infection reports The diagnosis, management and epidemiology of shigella (bacillary dysentery). (Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH))
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - December 6, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

When Medicines Don ’t Work Anymore
Credit: BigstockBy Martin KhorPENANG, Malaysia, Dec 4 2017 (IPS)The growing crisis of antibiotic resistance is catching the attention of policy makers, but not at a rate enough to tackle it.More diseases are affected by resistance, meaning the bacteria cannot be killed even if different drugs are used on some patients, who then succumb.We are staring at a future in which antibiotics don’t work, and many of us or our children will not be saved from TB, cholera, deadly forms of dysentery, and germs contracted during surgery.Martin Khor, Executive Director of the South Centre, a think tank for developing countries, base...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - December 4, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Martin Khor Tags: Development & Aid Global Global Governance Headlines Health Poverty & SDGs Regional Categories TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news

“Ambition & Action ” Needed to End Open Defecation
Women village councilors in Penakota, a village in southeast India, go out into a field to relieve themselves, as there are no toilets in their workplace. Credit: Stella Paul/IPSBy Will HigginbothamUNITED NATIONS, Nov 27 2017 (IPS)What would life be like without access to a toilet? What if our waste was not properly disposed of?For those in the developed world, such questions are hard to fathom, but for 2.3 billion people around the world it’s a reality. Without access to a toilet many are forced to defecate in the open, significantly increasing the changes of spreading diseases.The sixth Sustainable Development Goal...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - November 27, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Will Higginbotham Tags: Development & Aid Gender Global Headlines Health Poverty & SDGs Water & Sanitation Source Type: news

Can I Give Cholera Vaccine?
Discussion Cholera is caused by more than 200 serogroups of Vibrio cholerae, a Gram-negative rod that is waterborne. Only two (serogroup O1 which causes about 99% of the cases, and O139) cause disease. There are biotypes of each of these serotypes. The only known hosts are humans. The organism colonizes the epithelial lining of the gut. Cholera toxin is produced by some species and if produced binds to specific receptors on host cells, activating a series of steps which cases massive loss of sodium, potassium, chloride, hydrogen carbonate, and fluids in vomitus and feces. A review of causes of diarrhea can be found here. ...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - November 27, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: pediatriceducationmin Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

University of Maryland School of Medicine receives grant to develop vaccine
(University of Maryland School of Medicine) University of Maryland School of Medicine researchers will develop a vaccine against Shigella and Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 3, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Mass. General researchers show how Shigella survives the gastrointestinal tract
(Massachusetts General Hospital) Researchers from Massachusetts General Hospital have discovered how the bacteria Shigella survives its journey from the mouth to the colon, taking advantage of substances that would kill many less persistent organisms. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - May 31, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Increasing Antibiotic Resistance in Shigella spp. in NYC Increasing Antibiotic Resistance in Shigella spp. in NYC
A new report of shigellosis cases in New York City provides insight into the increasing resistance to antibiotics commonly prescribed to treat the infection.Emerging Infectious Diseases (Source: Medscape Hiv-Aids Headlines)
Source: Medscape Hiv-Aids Headlines - April 24, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: Infectious Diseases Journal Article Source Type: news

CDC Issues Health Advisory on < i > Shigella < /i >
The CDC has released a Health Alert Network health advisory warning clinicians about emergingShigella strains that show possible reduced susceptibility to ciprofloxacin. (Source: AAFP News)
Source: AAFP News - April 20, 2017 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news

CDC Offers New Advice for Managing Shigella Infection Given Reduced Antibiotic Susceptibility (FREE)
By Kelly Young Edited by Richard Saitz, MD, MPH, FACP, DFASAM The CDC is emphasizing that clinicians not treat Shigella infection with antibiotics unless it is clinically indicated — for example, in patients who … (Source: Physician's First Watch current issue)
Source: Physician's First Watch current issue - April 20, 2017 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news

6 Expressions Of Gratitude People Have For The Inspiring Nurses They’ve Encountered
Nursing is not the kind of profession one goes into seeking fame and prestige. Ask any of the nurses in your life, and they’ll all tell you the same story: It involves long hours and hard work, with little acknowledgement of the day-to-day sacrifices. And yet, according to a U.K. survey, nurses are among the world’s most satisfied professionals, along with teachers and engineers, of those who most enjoy their jobs. That’s because, despite the stress and burnout, there’s a shared sense of purpose among those who work in healthcare. In addition to the time and energy they sacrifice to care for their p...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - April 19, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Hilleman Labs, NICED to develop Shigella Vaccine
The two aim to complete the development of this vaccine by 2024, according to Hilleman Labs chief executive officer Davinder Gill. (Source: The Economic Times)
Source: The Economic Times - March 30, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

These 3 Superbugs Pose The Greatest Risk To Human Health
The World Health Organization is issuing a warning about a group of deadly bacteria: Recently, the WHO released its first-ever list of “priority pathogens,” a list of antibiotic-resistant bacteria that the organization says pose the greatest threat to human health. The list is divided into three categories: critical-, high- and medium-priority. Three pathogens made it into the critical-priority group. These bacteria are resistant to multiple antibiotics and pose a high risk to people in hospitals and nursing homes, the WHO says. Multidrug-resistant bacteria, sometimes called “superbugs,” are a ...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - March 23, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

No Water, No Life – Don’t Waste It!
Pastoralists in the Ufeyn region of Puntland are walking further and further to find water for their livestock. Credit: @WFP/K DhanjiBy Baher KamalROME, Mar 21 2017 (IPS)During the final exams of Spanish official high school of journalists, a student was asked by the panel of professors-examiners: If scientists discover that there is water in Planet Mars, how would you announce this news, what would be your title? The student did not hesitate a second: “There is life in Mars!” The student was graduated with the highest score. In spite of this simple truth, human beings have been systematically wasting this prim...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - March 21, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Authors: Baher Kamal Tags: Development & Aid Environment Featured Global Headlines Health Human Rights Inequity Natural Resources Population Poverty & SDGs Water & Sanitation World Water Day Source Type: news

Shigella: guidance, data and analysis
This Guidance Collection covers the diagnosis, management and epidemiology of shigella (bacillary dysentery) (Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH))
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - March 3, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Impending Water Crisis Could Affect Your Health
Most Americans take clean water for granted.We turn on the tap and safe water to drink, bathe in, and cook and clean with comes out of the faucet.But according to a new study, there’s a growing water affordability problem on the horizon that could soon make water scarcer and more costly.The fallout has the potential to be devastating to public health in the United States.The true cost of waterUtility companies actually take a loss on the cost of water.However, between individual households’ water bills and government subsidies, they have historically made enough money to keep operating their businesses while al...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - March 1, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Shigellosis symptoms: Warning over contagious bacteria similar to winter vomiting bug
SHIGELLOSIS - a contagious bug - has spread through three schools in the UK - causing chronic diarrhoea or dysentery, nausea, fever and stomach cramps among those affected. While it does display symptoms similar to the winter vomiting bug - experts said diarrhoea is the most likely symptom. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - February 20, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Shigellosis symptoms: Warning issued over contagious bug which causes severe diarrhoea
SHIGELLOSIS - a contagious bug - has spread through three schools in the UK - causing chronic diarrhoea or dysentery, nausea, fever and stomach cramps among those affected. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - February 15, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Genomic sequencing gives insight into Shigella outbreaks
Amy WallaceSACRAMENTO, Dec. 23 (UPI) -- Researchers have sequenced and analyzed genomes from bacteria associated with major shigellosis outbreaks in California in 2014 and 2015. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - December 23, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Genomic sequencing illuminates recent Shigella outbreaks in California
In a study that could have significant impact on how disease outbreaks are managed, researchers have sequenced and analyzed genomes from Shigella sonnei (S. sonnei) bacteria associated with major shigellosis outbreaks in California in 2014 and 2015. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - December 23, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Genomic sequencing illuminates recent Shigella outbreaks in California
(University of California - Davis Health System) In a study that could have significant impact on how disease outbreaks are managed, researchers at UC Davis and the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) have sequenced and analyzed genomes from Shigella sonnei (S. sonnei) bacteria associated with major shigellosis outbreaks in California in 2014 and 2015. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - December 23, 2016 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Antimicrobial-Resistant Shigella Infection Risk Among MSM Antimicrobial-Resistant Shigella Infection Risk Among MSM
Shigella infection is becoming increasingly resistant to certain antimicrobial agents. What's the best course of action for this high-risk population?Emerging Infectious Diseases (Source: Medscape Hiv-Aids Headlines)
Source: Medscape Hiv-Aids Headlines - November 23, 2016 Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: Infectious Diseases Journal Article Source Type: news

Harnessing the power of predatory bacteria as a 'living antibiotic'
(Wellcome Trust) A naturally occurring predatory bacterium is able to work with the immune system to clear multi-drug resistant Shigella infections in zebrafish, according to a study published today in Current Biology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - November 23, 2016 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Flint’s Water Crisis Is Even Affecting Hand Washing
The city of Flint, Michigan, is seeing a rise in cases of a bacterial illness called shigellosis, and the ongoing water crisis there may be in part to blame, according to news reports. So far this year, there have been 85 cases of shigellosis in Genesee County, which includes Flint, according to The New York Times. That’s the highest number of shigellosis cases among all counties in Michigan this year. A statement from Genesee County Health Department in September said that cases of the bacterial illness are up in both the county and the state. In the entire state of Michigan, there were 454 cases of shigellosis this...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - October 5, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Life With A Traumatic Brain Injury -- Acknowledging The Truth And Moving On
I have a brain injury, but... I have a brain injury. There. I've said it. Publicly. It's so much easier to not say it, to not admit it, to not talk about it. For the first five months after my accident, I didn't talk about my brain injury with anyone. Because I didn't want to talk about it. I didn't want to explain how I felt, or discuss my symptoms, or detail how my healing was going. Even now, I'd rather my injury not be there (and I know how obvious and stupid that statement sounds). I'd rather not be injured, but I am. I have what neurologists classify as a traumatic brain injury, a TBI. Specifics: For the first t...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - September 7, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Clemson scientist receives $424,000 grant to study parasite that infects tens of millions
(Clemson University) Clemson University scientist Cheryl Ingram-Smith has been awarded a three-year, $424,000 grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to study the inner workings of a parasite that causes 50 million cases of amoebic dysentery each year and kills 50,000 to 100,000. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 14, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

[Feature] The Truest Test
Over the past few years, there has been a surge in studies that intentionally infect volunteers with a wide variety of pathogens to test novel drugs and vaccines. The so-called "human challenge model" has a long and checkered past that began with 18th century experiments by smallpox vaccine developer Edward Jenner and later fell under intense scrutiny when they were conducted by Nazi doctors, military researchers, and academic scientists working with prisoners. Today, challenge experiments follow strict ethical guidelines, minimize risks to volunteers at every turn, and face increased scrutiny from regulatory age...
Source: ScienceNOW - May 19, 2016 Category: Science Authors: Jon Cohen Source Type: news

Thanks, Public Health!
If you're like most people you experience gratitude many times each day. Most often, we're thankful for things that happen -- from the simple act of someone holding a door for you to experiencing the recovery of a loved one following an illness. You probably say "thanks" so many times in a day that you can't recall each specific instance. While it's easy to be thankful for kind acts, good experiences, and things that bring joy and satisfaction into your life, it's harder to recognize and be thankful for things that don't happen. Such it is with public health -- a discipline whose achievements are often notable f...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - April 4, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Genomic study of epidemic dysentery reveals how Europe exported a scourge worldwide
(Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute) The largest genetic study on the bacterium responsible for epidemic dysentery has revealed that the Shigella dysenteriae pathogen, which remains a real scourge in Africa and Asia, probably originated in Europe. This research, which was carried out by scientists from the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute and Institut Pasteur in Paris, also charts the development of the pathogen's resistance to antibiotics, and is published in the journal Nature Microbiology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 21, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

What is Shigella? Everything you need to know about the bacterial infection from SEX
POSTERS warning about a serious bacterial gut infection caught by faeces getting into people's mouths during sex have been published by the government. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - March 18, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Key step in process of Shigella infection identified
Researchers have discovered a key mechanism used by Shigella to delivery proteins into target host cells. Their findings may apply to additional bacterial species, including those responsible for typhoid fever, bubonic plague and many hospital-acquired pneumonias. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - March 9, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Mass. General research team identifies key step in process of Shigella infection
(Massachusetts General Hospital) Researchers from the Massachusetts General Hospital Division of Infectious Diseases have discovered a key mechanism used by Shigella to delivery proteins into target host cells. Their findings may apply to additional bacterial species, including those responsible for typhoid fever, bubonic plague and many hospital-acquired pneumonias. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 9, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news