Scientists have new clues in the 66-million-year-old case of the dinosaurs' demise
It ’s one of the greatest whodunits of all time: What killed the dinosaurs, along with three-quarters of all other species on Earth?We never tire of the story of this grisly extinction. Perhaps the demise of the dinosaurs gives us a sense of geologic schadenfreude. Or perhaps it ’s just the opposite:... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - February 21, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Julia Rosen Source Type: news

Neptune has a tiny moon we've never seen until now. Here's how Voyager missed it
When Voyager II flew past Neptune in August of 1989 it revealed a complex system of 13 moons, six of which had never been seen before.Thirty years later, scientists say the space probe missed one.Using data from the Hubble Space Telescope, astronomers have discovered an elusive seventh ice moon... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - February 19, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Deborah Netburn Source Type: news

Flight from L.A. to London reaches 801 mph as a furious jet stream packs record-breaking speeds
Tuesday is a nice day across the Northeast. Temperatures near 40 in New York, light winds out of the north at 5 mph to 10 mph, and wall-to-wall sunshine sound like a tranquil day — especially by February standards. But high up in the atmosphere, it's a different story.The jet stream, the high-altitude... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - February 19, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Matthew Cappucci Source Type: news

Police investigating deadly triple shooting in gated Porter Ranch community
Three people were found shot and killed Monday afternoon inside a gated community on the border of Porter Ranch and Chatsworth, in what police are investigating as a triple homicide, authorities said.Officers responded to a call at 3:52 p.m. of shots fired in the 20300 block of Via Galileo, where... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - February 19, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Rosanna Xia Source Type: news

Scientist says some pollution is good for you — a disputed claim Trump’s EPA has embraced
In early 2018, a deputy assistant administrator in the EPA, Clint Woods, reached out to a Massachusetts toxicologist best known for pushing a public health standard suggesting that low levels of toxic chemicals and radiation are good for people.“I wanted to check to see if you might have some... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - February 19, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Susanne Rust Source Type: news

Why American voters were primed for a president who talks like Trump
When in the grips of oratorical passion, President Obamaliked to paraphrase the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. about the“long arc of history” bending toward justice.But when it comes to the oratory of American politicians, history ’s long arc is bending away from such lofty rhetorical flourishes.... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - February 15, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Melissa Healy Source Type: news

For scientists, the ripple effects of the government shutdown are still spreading
Matt Helgeson knew it was time to pull the plug.For weeks, the UC Santa Barbara professor of chemical engineering had held out hope that politicians in Washington would find a way to end the government shutdown. If they did, his graduate students could still make their long-planned trip to Maryland... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - February 15, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Julia Rosen Source Type: news

Two crises in one: As drug use rises, so does syphilis
Public health officials grappling with record-high syphilis rates around the nation have pinpointed what appears to be a major risk factor: drug use.“Two major public health issues are colliding,” said Dr. Sarah Kidd, a medical officer at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and lead... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - February 14, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Anna Gorman Source Type: news

Cancer still kills more black people than white. But the gap has narrowed — a lot
Longtime cancer disparities between African Americans and whites — with blacks having a sharply higher mortality rate — have narrowed significantly over the last several years and disappeared entirely for a few age groups, according to a new study by the American Cancer Society.African Americans... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - February 14, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Laurie McGinley Source Type: news

Timeline: Opportunity ’s record-setting mission on Mars
Here are selected highlights from Opportunity ’s 15-year mission on Mars: Jan. 24, 2004 | Opportunity lands on Mars, bouncing its way right into the center of a small craterNASA declared it an interplanetary “hole in one” and named the landing spot Eagle Crater. March 2, 2004 | Opportunity finds... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - February 14, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Karen Kaplan Source Type: news

NASA declares end to Opportunity ’s unequaled Mars mission: ‘We did love this rover’
Opportunity, the intrepid NASA rover that spent 15 years on Mars climbing in and out of craters to gather evidence of the planet ’s watery past, has been brought down by tiny particles of dust.It ’s a humble ending for a machine that survived a 300-million-mile journey through space, executed a ... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - February 13, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Deborah Netburn Source Type: news

Opportunity ’s record-setting mission on Mars appears to have reached its end
Halfway up the slope of a crater on Mars lies a small robotic geologist that won ’t wake up.The Smart car sized rover got caught in anepic dust storm that enveloped the Red Planet in June, and it hasn ’t been heard from since.For the last eight months, scientists and engineers at NASA ’s Jet Propulsion... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - February 13, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Deborah Netburn Source Type: news

Opportunity's record-setting mission on Mars appears to have reached its end
Halfway up the slope of a crater on Mars lies a small robotic geologist that won ’t wake up.The Smart car sized rover got caught in anepic dust storm that enveloped the Red Planet in June, and it hasn ’t been heard from since.For the last eight months, scientists and engineers at NASA ’s Jet Propulsion... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - February 13, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Deborah Netburn Source Type: news

Hey L.A., want to feel like you're in Cabo without leaving home? Just wait til 2080
Scientists have just revealed the climate forecast for the year 2080 in hundreds of cities across North America, and — surprise! — it looks like it’s going to get a whole lot warmer in all of them.If humanity continues to emit greenhouse gases at the same rate it does today, in 60 years L.A. ’s... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - February 12, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Deborah Netburn Source Type: news

Hey L.A., want to feel like you ’re in Cabo without leaving home? Just wait til 2080
Scientists have just revealed the climate forecast for the year 2080 in hundreds of cities across North America, and — surprise! — it looks like it’s going to get a whole lot warmer in all of them.If humanity continues to emit greenhouse gases at the same rate it does today, in 60 years L.A. ’s... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - February 12, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Deborah Netburn Source Type: news

In big win for coastal advocates, judge refuses to approve deal that would limit the public from reaching Hollister Ranch beaches
In a major victory for coastal advocates, a Santa Barbara judge refused to approve acontroversial deal that would have allowed access to Hollister Ranch ’s coastline only to landowners, their guests, visitors with guides, and those who could boat or paddle in from two miles away.The settlement... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - February 11, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Rosanna Xia Source Type: news

Why opioids hit white areas harder: Doctors there prescribe more readily, study finds
Across California, a blessing has become a curse for patients who dwell in overwhelmingly white communities: their ready access to opioid pain relievers.A newstudy of prescribing practices across all of California ’s 1,760 ZIP codes helps explain why opiates, some of medicine’s most addictive... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - February 11, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Melissa Healy Source Type: news

Rare tiger kills prospective mate in London at first meeting
For 10 days, the London Zoo kept its newly arrived male Sumatran tiger Asim in a separate enclosure from Melati, the female tiger who was supposed to become his mate.Zoologists gave them time to get used to each other's presence and smells, and waited for what they felt would be the right time... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - February 8, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Associated Press Source Type: news

OB-GYNs remain conflicted about abortion, survey shows, but pills may be changing attitudes
With the national abortion debate entering a new stage, a survey of U.S. obstetricians and gynecologists has found that while nearly 3 out of 4 had a patient who wanted to end a pregnancy in the past year, fewer than 1 in 4 were willing and able to perform one themselves.Among the doctors who... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - February 8, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Melissa Healy Source Type: news

Beaches look like trash dumps after multiple storms in Southern California
Recent storms may have given Los Angeles a fresh feeling, but all that rainwater has to go somewhere.Everything you can imagine — from plastic bottles and cans to blankets, pillows and mattresses — has been funneled through the riverbeds of Los Angeles and Orange counties and dumped on the area’s... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - February 7, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Alejandra Reyes-Velarde Source Type: news

2018 was one of the hottest years on record — and this year could be even hotter
All five of the hottest years on record have occurred in the last five years, according to global temperature data released Wednesday by NASA and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.While 2018 was slightly cooler than the three prior years, Earth still had its fourth-warmest year... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - February 6, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Tony Barboza Source Type: news

Scientists scour the cosmos to find the origins of the periodic table ’s 118 elements
Since theinvention of the periodic table 150 years ago this month, scientists have worked to fill in the rows of elements and make sense of their properties.But researchers have also pursued a parallel quest: scouring the cosmos to figure out where all 118 elements came from.After centuries... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - February 5, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Julia Rosen Source Type: news

CRISPR revolutionized gene editing. Now its toolbox is expanding
The gene-editing tool that has revolutionized biology is becoming even more powerful.CRISPR, as the system is known, allows scientists to target and snip a specific sequence of letters on a strand of DNA with unprecedented precision. That has opened up new possibilities fortreating genetic diseases... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - February 4, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Deborah Netburn Source Type: news

With Colorado River water shortages looming, feds will intervene on drought plan
The federal government Friday moved closer to imposing water delivery cuts along the drought-depleted Colorado River after California and Arizona failed to meet a deadline for inking a broad agreement on how the seven states that depend on the river would cope with shortages.The federal official... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - February 1, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Bettina Boxall Source Type: news

Even in best-case scenario, opioid overdose deaths will keep rising until 2022
In the nation ’s opioid epidemic, the carnage is far from over.Anew projection of opioid overdose death rates suggests that even if there is steady progress in reducing prescription narcotic abuse across the country, the number of fatal overdoses — which reached70,237 in 2017— will rise sharply... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - February 1, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Melissa Healy Source Type: news

The fascinating backstory of the periodic table, which is about to turn 150 years old
The periodic table has become an icon of science. Its rows and columns provide a tidy way of showcasing the elements — the ingredients that make up the universe.It seems obvious today, but it wasn ’t to generations of early chemists. That changed whenDmitri Mendeleev started writing a textbook... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - February 1, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Julia Rosen Source Type: news

Climate change should tamp down California ’s wildfire-fanning Santa Ana winds, study finds
Scientists have warned that California should brace for more wildfire as global warming drives longer bouts of hot and dry weather.Now researchers at UC San Diego ’s Scripps Institution of Oceanography have found a positive trend when it comes to Southern California’s battle against destructive... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - January 31, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Joshua Emerson Smith Source Type: news

In honor of Super Bowl LIII, 53 facts about the original Los Angeles rams
When a Cleveland football team migrated to Los Angeles in 1946, they weren ’t the only rams in town.Thousands of bighorn sheep call the desert and mountains east of the city home. They survive in some of North America ’s harshest environments, including the Mojave Desert.But as humans marched through... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - January 31, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Sean Greene Source Type: news

E-cigarettes beat traditional methods of helping smokers quit in new clinical trial
A major new study provides the strongest evidence yet that vaping can help smokers quit, with e-cigarettes proving nearly twice as effective as nicotine gums and patches.Theresearch, published Wednesday in the New England Journal of Medicine, could influence what doctors say to their patients... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - January 30, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Associated Press Source Type: news

Obesity, climate change and hunger must be fought as one, health experts declare
Maybe, when it comes to finding a way out of a global crisis of obesity, we ’re just thinking too small.Maybe the steps needed to reverse a pandemic of unhealthy weight gain are the same as those needed to solve two other crises of human health: malnutrition and climate change.So instead of trying... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - January 28, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Melissa Healy Source Type: news

Waterproof workout patch studies a surprising source of info: your sweat
Elite athletes must listen carefully to their bodies during workouts and competition. Their muscles. Heart rate. And, sometime soon, maybe even their sweat.Scientists have created a soft, bandage-like device that collects and analyzes an athlete ’s perspiration as they run, bike and even swim underwater.... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - January 28, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Sean Greene Source Type: news

Rams to host massive Super Bowl send-off rally for fans in Inglewood on Sunday
The Los Angeles Rams will host a send-off rally for fans Sunday morning in Inglewood before the team heads to Atlanta to take on the New England Patriots in Super Bowl LIII.The 10 a.m. rally will also offer fans a peek at the new L.A. Stadium at Hollywood Park, the team ’s home starting in 2020.... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - January 27, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Rosanna Xia Source Type: news

School homicides have become more common and more deadly, CDC data show
A new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention confirms what too many students across the country already know: The incidence of mass homicides on school campuses has risen steeply in recent years, as has their toll.Between 1994 and 2018, there were 38 school rampages that resulted... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - January 25, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Melissa Healy Source Type: news

One obsession begets another: A biologist yearns to discover the secrets of Watts Towers ’ shells
Thirteen miles from the coast, marine biologistBruno Pernet found himself surrounded by concrete, asphalt and an assortment of roughly 10,000 seashells.There were the iridescent shells of black abalone, the chalky shells of California Venus clams, and the sun-bleached shells of Pismo clams.None... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - January 24, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Deborah Netburn Source Type: news

Total lunar eclipse meets supermoon Sunday night
Here comes a total lunar eclipse and supermoon, all wrapped into one.The moon, Earth and sun will line up this weekend for the only total lunar eclipse this year and next. At the same time, the moon will be ever so closer to Earth and appear slightly bigger and brighter than usual — a supermoon.... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - January 20, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Associated Press Source Type: news

Researchers link opioid deaths to marketing by drugmakers
Researchers sketched a vivid line Friday linking the dollars spent by drugmakers to woo doctors around the country to a vast opioid epidemic that has led to tens of thousands of deaths.Thestudy, published in JAMA Network Open, looked at county-specific federal data and found that the more opioid-related... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - January 18, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Victoria Knight Source Type: news

County by county, researchers link opioid deaths to marketing by drugmakers
Researchers sketched a vivid line Friday linking the dollars spent by drugmakers to woo doctors around the country to a vast opioid epidemic that has led to tens of thousands of deaths.Thestudy, published in JAMA Network Open, looked at county-specific federal data and found that the more opioid-related... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - January 18, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Victoria Knight Source Type: news

Researchers come face-to-face with huge great white shark
Two shark researchers who came face-to-face with what could be one of the largest great whites ever recorded are using their encounter as an opportunity to push for legislation that would protect sharks in Hawaii.Ocean Ramsey, a shark researcher and conservationist, told the Associated Press that... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - January 18, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Associated Press Source Type: news

Doctors call California ’s probe of opioid deaths a ‘witch hunt’
The Medical Board of California has launched investigations into doctors who prescribed opioids to patients who suffered fatal overdoses, in some cases months or even years later.The effort, dubbed “the Death Certificate Project, ” has angered physicians in California and beyond, in part because... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - January 18, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Cheryl Clark Source Type: news

Climate change is making us sicker and shortening our lives, doctors say
In the welter of daily demands upon physicians, it might be easy to imagine that weaning the world off its reliance on fossil fuels is asking a bit too much.But preventing sickness and averting premature death are squarely in a physician ’s wheelhouse. And dramatic increases in both are projected... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - January 18, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Melissa Healy Source Type: news

As shutdown drags on, scientists scramble to keep insects, plants and microbes alive
Three days a week, Don Weber shows up to work at the U.S. Department of Agriculture campus in Beltsville, Md. The parking lot is empty and the hallways are dark. Like other federal facilities across the country, the lab is closed because of the partial government shutdown.“It's like a ghost town,”... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - January 17, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Julia Rosen Source Type: news

Your sustainable diet for the year 2050: More nuts, less sugar and red meat
Good news, Earthlings! An international team of scientists reports that it is indeed possible to feed everyone on the planet a healthy and environmentally sustainable diet by the year 2050.All it will take is a wholesale, radical change to what foods we eat and the way we produce them.“We call... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - January 17, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Deborah Netburn Source Type: news

Oil put L.A. on the map. It may have exaggerated the city's quake risk too
Hoping to escape traffic on her way home from Los Angeles International Airport, Susan Hough found herself driving down La Cienega Boulevard through the heart of the Inglewood Oil Field. It was a jarring scene: Scores of black pump jacks nodded lazily in the scrubby hills, like a herd of mechanical... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - January 17, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Julia Rosen Source Type: news

Oceans had their hottest year on record in 2018 as global warming accelerates
Earth ’s oceans had their warmest year on record in 2018, a stark indication of the enormous amount of heat being absorbed by the sea as greenhouse gas emissions continue to rise, scientists reported Wednesday.Theanalysis by an international team of scientists confirms the oceans are heating up... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - January 16, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Tony Barboza Source Type: news

Preventing breast cancer just got easier. Will more women give these drugs a try?
Breast cancer will strike 1 in 8 women in her lifetime. But women who face an increased risk of being that one unlucky patient may improve their chances with three prescription medications, according to a new report.If 1,000 women took one of the three medications for roughly five years, somewhere... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - January 16, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Melissa Healy Source Type: news

More wildfires, drought and climate change bring devastating changes to California wildlands
Southern California's native landscapes are famously tough. But repeated wildfire and drought amplified by climate change pose a growing threat to wildlands that provide us with drinking water, untamed refuge from the Southland's sprawl and stop mountainsides from sliding into our living rooms. (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - January 12, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Bettina Boxall Source Type: news

One day our sun will solidify into a giant crystal orb
Our sun and billions of stars just like it are headed for a strange, cold destiny.New research suggests that long after our roiling, boiling life-giving star runs out of fuel, it will slowly form a cold, dead, super-dense crystal sphere about the size of the Earth that will linger like a translucent... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - January 11, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Deborah Netburn Source Type: news

Drug overdose deaths among American women have more than tripled since 1999
For many decades, drugs of abuse were a menace that mostly threatened the lives of men. In 1999, fewer than 1 in 25,000 adult women in the United States died of a drug overdose, and childbirth was twice as deadly.No more. Drug overdoses have become a prodigious thief of female lives in the U.S.... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - January 11, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Melissa Healy Source Type: news

California ’s native landscapes can’t take this many fires
Southern California's native landscapes are famously tough. But repeated wildfire and drought amplified by climate change pose a growing threat to wildlands that provide us with drinking water, untamed refuge from the Southland's sprawl and stop mountainsides from sliding into our living rooms. (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - January 11, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Bettina Boxall Source Type: news