The more equal women and men are, the less they want the same things, study finds
Imagine an egalitarian society that treats women and men with equal respect, where both sexes are afforded the same opportunities, and the economy is strong.What would happen to gender differences in this utopia? Would they dissolve?The answer, according to a new study, is a resounding no.The... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - October 18, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Deborah Netburn Source Type: news

What is AFM? Everything you need to know about the polio-like virus suddenly affecting children across the U.S.
It ’s mysterious, it’s dangerous and it’s got parents on edge from coast to coast.It ’s a medical condition calledacute flaccid myelitis, or AFM. The disease causes sudden, unexplained paralysis, usually in children. Its resemblance to polio has caused the public to take notice.Federal health... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - October 17, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Soumya Karlamangla Source Type: news

What Civil War soldiers can teach us about how trauma is passed from generation to generation
An experience of life-threatening horrors surely scars the person who survives it. It also may have a corrosive effect on the longevity and health of that person ’s children and, in some cases, on the well-being of generations beyond.The latest evidence of trauma ’s long shadow comes from the families... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - October 17, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Melissa Healy Source Type: news

Paralyzing polio-like illness affecting mainly children is confirmed in 22 states, CDC says
Federal health officials are worried about an increase in a mysterious and rare condition that mostly affects children and can paralyze arms and legs, with 127 confirmed or suspected cases reported as of Tuesday.Of those, 62 cases of acute flaccid myelitis, or AFM, have been confirmed in 22 states,... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - October 17, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Lena H. Sun Source Type: news

DNA testing raises a delicate question: What does it mean to be Native American?
With theresults of Sen. Elizabeth Warren ’s DNA test stirring up controversyin the White House and beyond, the definition of what it means to be Native American has come into the spotlight. In this 2005 report, Times staff writer Karen Kaplan explores how the then-new commercial availability of... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - October 16, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Karen Kaplan Source Type: news

You may be getting more than you bargained for with over-the-counter supplements, study finds
You ’ve seen the ads for the pill that promises to make you skinny without having to diet or exercise, or for the supplement that claims it will make you the envy of the other weightlifters at the gym.Their labels say they are all-natural and safe. But are they really?Not necessarily, new research... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - October 16, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Rachel Bluth Source Type: news

Paging Dr. Facebook: How the social network could help doctors screen patients for depression
More than half of Americans who suffer from depression never get any treatment, and in many cases that ’s because their symptoms are never diagnosed. The U.S. Preventive Services Task Forceadvises primary care physicians to screen all of their patients for depression and make sure proper care gets... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - October 15, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Karen Kaplan Source Type: news

So many people have had their DNA sequenced that they've put other people's privacy in jeopardy
Everyone ’s DNA sequence is unique. But for those who wish to maintain their genetic privacy, it may not be unique enough.A new study argues that more than half of Americans could be identified by name if all you had to start with was a sample of their DNA and a few basic facts, such as where they... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - October 12, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Deborah Netburn Source Type: news

The fight is on at Hollister Ranch, as coastal officials delay development in push for beach access
In a one-two punch on Wednesday, coastal officials revived efforts to implement a long-delayed ranch-wide public route while also unanimously agreeing to start a new fight with one ranchowner. (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - October 11, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Rosanna Xia Source Type: news

American and Russian headed to International Space Station are safe after emergency landing
Two astronauts from the U.S. and Russia were safe after an emergency landing Thursday in the steppes of Kazakhstan following the failure of a Russian rocket carrying them to the International Space Station.Atop a Soyuz rocket, NASA astronaut Nick Hague and Roscosmos' Alexei Ovchinin lifted off... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - October 11, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Associated Press Source Type: news

As states near deal on Colorado River shortage, California looks at water cuts of as much as 8%
After years of stop-and-go talks, California and two other states that take water from the lower Colorado River are nearing an agreement on how to share delivery cuts if a formal shortage is declared on the drought-plagued waterway.Under the proposed pact, California — the river’s largest user... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - October 11, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Bettina Boxall Source Type: news

Advice to NASA's astrobiologists as they search for life beyond Earth
It ’s one of the biggest questions there is: Are we alone in the universe?NASA scientists in the field ofastrobiology are looking for answers. A new report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine has some advice to help them along.The report was released Wednesday in... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - October 10, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Karen Kaplan Source Type: news

Watch science and art in action in these award-winning microscopic videos
Sometimes there ’s a fine line between science and art.Nikon Instruments recently unveiled the winners of its annual Small World in Motion contest, a microscopic videography competition that highlights the beautiful and strange sights of an often unseen world.This year ’s top winners, Elizabeth... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - October 10, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Sean Greene Source Type: news

'Incredibly grim' prognosis on global warming also carries clarion call for global action
A major new report on global warming makes a chilling prediction: Without swift and sweeping worldwide intervention, some devastating effects of climate change will hit harder — and decades sooner — than previously expected.The report, released Monday by a U.N. organization, served as a stark... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - October 8, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Laura King, Liam Dillon, Shashank Bengali Source Type: news

Study gives depressing look at how climate change puts Americans ’ mental health at risk
Is climate change stressing you out? Anew study linking weather and mental health in the United States suggests things could get much worse.The study outlines three separate ways that hotter and more extreme weather stand to undermine the mental well-being of the people forced to experience it.... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - October 8, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Karen Kaplan Source Type: news

Global warming report carries life-or-death warning
Preventing an extra single degree of heat could make a life-or-death difference in the next few decades for multitudes of people and ecosystems on this fast-warming planet, an international panel of scientists reported Sunday. But they provide little hope the world will rise to the challenge.The... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - October 8, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Associated Press Source Type: news

The long reach of sexual assault and sexual harassment: Both can worsen women's health at midlife
Being a victim of sexual assault or of sexual harassment in the workplace can do more than crush a young soul and stunt a rising career. New research finds that the experience of sexual violence or intimidation can take a toll on women ’s physical and mental health years later, at a crucial juncture.... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - October 5, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Melissa Healy Source Type: news

California beaches are supposed to be public. So why is the Hollister Ranch coast an exception?
With officials now looking into every way possible to open up Hollister Ranch, many have asked: How exactly did 8.5 miles of California's most pristine coastline remain so private, and with so little scrutiny, for four decades? The answer lies in a special section of the Coastal Act. (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - October 5, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Rosanna Xia Source Type: news

How does the brain see? MacArthur fellow Doris Tsao says the answer will reveal how the brain works
How does the brain turn millions of electrical impulses into objects we recognize?That question is at the heart ofDoris Tsao’s research.The Caltech visual neuroscientist uses brain imaging technology, electrical recording techniques and mathematical modeling in her search for answers. That quest... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - October 4, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Melissa Healy Source Type: news

MacArthur winner Sarah Stewart explores how random collisions shaped our planet and solar system
As a young Trekkie,Sarah Stewart knew she wanted to study distant worlds. But as a kid, she never imagined where that interest would lead.“Nobody as a little child thinks, I’m going to grow up and have a lab full of cannons,” said Stewart, a planetary scientist who wasawarded a "genius" fellowship... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - October 4, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Deborah Netburn Source Type: news

Caltech scientist is among 3 awarded Nobel Prize in chemistry for sparking ‘a revolution in evolution’
For 3.7 billion years, nature has used the power of evolution to shape every living thing on Earth, creating a vast diversity of molecules with an ever-increasing array of abilities.Three scientists who harnessed that power — and sped it up in the lab — were honored Wednesday with theNobel Prize... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - October 4, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Deborah Netburn, Karen Kaplan Source Type: news

More than 1 in 3 Americans eat fast food on a typical day, and we eat it all day long
If you ’re an adult in America, there’s a better than 1 in 3 chance that you’ll eat fast food today — if you haven’t already.New survey data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention show that 36.6% of us eat some kind of fast food on any given day. That includes 37.9% of men and 35.4%... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - October 3, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Karen Kaplan Source Type: news

Physicists who turned science fiction into reality share the Nobel Prize for their work on lasers
Three physicists whose pioneering work transformed lasers from science-fiction fantasy into powerful tools were awarded the 2018 Nobel Prize in physics.Arthur Ashkin, a researcher at Bell Laboratories in New Jersey, receives half of the $1.01-million prize for inventing "optical tweezers" — focused... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - October 2, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Sarah Kaplan Source Type: news

U.S. Supreme Court declines to take Martins Beach case — a win for California's landmark coastal access law
In a significant victory for coastal access rights in California, the U.S. Supreme Court on Monday rejected a Silicon Valley billionaire ’sappeal to keep a beach to himself.The decision caps an all-out legal battle over a small stretch of sand in San Mateo County known as Martins Beach. What began... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - October 1, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Rosanna Xia Source Type: news

James Allison and Tasuku Honjo win Nobel Prize for landmark cancer immunotherapy discoveries
Two scientists who first harnessed the power of the immune system to fight incurable cancers have won the 2018 Nobel Prize in medicine or physiology.The discoveries made by American researcher James P. Allison and Japan ’s Tasuku Honjo have brought real hope of long-term survival to patients with... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - October 1, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Melissa Healy Source Type: news

After a small change in kickoff rules, Ivy League football players saw a big drop in concussions
In the Ivy League, not all experiments occur in research laboratories. Some occur on the gridiron.Since 2016, the league ’s eight football teams have been testing a rule change designed to reduce concussions. And according to astudy published Monday in the Journal of the American Medical Assn.,... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - October 1, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Karen Kaplan Source Type: news

Here's what experts who study sexual violence say about the credibility of Christine Blasey Ford's testimony
What Christine Blasey Ford remembers best about that night 30-plus years ago is the laughter.It came, she said, from Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh and his friend Mark Judge — two high school boys who drunkenly locked her into the bedroom of a friend’s house where she was sexually assaulted... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - September 28, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Melissa Healy Source Type: news

If Christine Blasey Ford's testimony stirred up painful memories, here's where you can get help
Millions of people heard Christine Blasey Ford tell the Senate Judiciary Committee about a long-ago gathering where she said Supreme Court nominee Brett M. Kavanaugh pinned her to a bed, pushed his body against hers, tried to remove her clothes and held his hand over her mouth as she tried to scream... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - September 27, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Karen Kaplan, Melissa Healy Source Type: news

Here's what sexual assault experts say you should keep in mind as Christine Blasey Ford shares her story
The Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on Thursday featuring Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh and his accuser Christine Ford Blasey is likely to be a collision of sexual politics and old-fashioned power politics.There'll be a lot of heat, but not necessarily much light.Still, the situation... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - September 27, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Melissa Healy Source Type: news

Why Australia's famed gun control laws probably wouldn't reduce shooting deaths in America
On a spring day in the Tasmanian town of Port Arthur, a lone gunman shot an elderly couple at the inn they owned, 22 diners lunching at a nearby tourist spot, two tour bus drivers and several of their passengers, four occupants of a BMW, and two customers at a gas station.By the time the bullets... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - September 26, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Karen Kaplan Source Type: news

Cornell researcher who studied what we eat and why will step down after six studies are retracted
A Cornell University professor whose attention-getting studies reported that guests at Super Bowl parties consumed more calories when served snacks from larger bowls and that couch potatoes ate nearly twice as much when watching an action-packed movie than when viewing a PBS talk show will step... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - September 22, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Karen Kaplan Source Type: news

Over four decades, an 'inexorable' epidemic of drug overdoses reveals its inner secrets
Americans have long construed drugs of abuse as choices. Poor choices that can cost users their lives, to be sure, but choices nonetheless.But what if drugs of abuse are more like predators atop a nationwide ecosystem of potential prey? Or like shape-shifting viruses that seek defenseless people... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - September 20, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Melissa Healy Source Type: news

More than 2 million U.S. middle and high school students have vaped marijuana, study finds
Electronic cigarettes are the most popular tobacco product among U.S. teens, but tobacco isn ’t the only thing they’re vaping. Anew report from researchers at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says that more than 2 million middle and high school students have used an e-cigarette to... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - September 17, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Karen Kaplan Source Type: news

It's been an especially bad summer for mosquitoes. These fish can help
Outfitted in chest-high camouflage waders and tall rubber boots, Ryan Amick stepped cautiously into a murky artificial pond in South Los Angeles.Ducks preened themselves on a small island and half a dozen turtles slid gently through the green water. Amick ignored them. He was there for the fish.... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - September 17, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Deborah Netburn Source Type: news

How the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention responds to a hurricane like Florence
For all the political chatter about the human toll of hurricanes, one lesson of past monster storms is clear and increasingly urgent: Hurricanes claim lives and erode health before, during and after the water, wind and rain hit.To reduce the short-term and long-term health consequences of these... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - September 14, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Melissa Healy Source Type: news

Did archaeologists find the oldest drawing made by humans?
In an ancient seaside cave on the South African coast, archaeologists have found what may be the earliest known drawing created by a human.This ancient piece of art is about 73,000 years old, its discoverers say. It ’s on the smooth, concave side of a grindstone tool that’s only 1.5 inches long,... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - September 14, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Deborah Netburn Source Type: news

How Saturday's satellite launch will improve understanding of rising sea levels
Shortly before dawn on Saturday, NASA is set to launchICESat-2, a satellite that will use a laser to measure the changing height of Earth ’s ice.Scientists are trying to understand how frozen and icy areas — known as the cryosphere — are being affected by the warming of the planet.The satellite... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - September 13, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Gary Robbins Source Type: news

An 'epidemic of nicotine addiction' among kids prompts FDA to get tough on e-cigarette makers
Responding to an “epidemic of nicotine addiction” among American youths, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Wednesdayannounceda comprehensive crackdown on e-cigarette manufacturers, directing the industry ’s giants to draw up detailed plans for halting sales to minors and threatening to... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - September 12, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Melissa Healy Source Type: news

An 'epidemic of nicotine addiction' among youth prompts FDA to get tough on e-cigarette makers
Responding to an “epidemic of nicotine addiction” among American youths, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Wednesdayannounceda comprehensive crackdown on e-cigarette manufacturers, directing the industry ’s giants to draw up detailed plans for halting sales to minors and threatening to... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - September 12, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Melissa Healy Source Type: news

These baby beetles are masters of deception. Here's how they invade bees' nests
Blister beetles are born with a mission: Infiltrate a bee ’s nest. And they waste no time getting to work.The larvae emerge from their eggs by the hundreds, climb the nearest blade of grass and coalesce into a wriggling ball of bodies and faux bee pheromones.The beetles aim to deceive male bees... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - September 12, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Sean Greene Source Type: news

UCLA scientist shares 2018 Lasker Prize for figuring out how genes turn on and off
Michael Grunstein, a longtime professor of biological chemistry at UCLA who uncovered the key role that DNA ’s “packing material” plays in turning genes on and off, haswon the Albert Lasker award for basic medical research.He shares the prize with Rockefeller University biochemist C. David Allis,... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - September 11, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Melissa Healy Source Type: news

Shooters are twice as deadly when a semiautomatic rifle is in the mix, study finds
Any time a shooter opens fire in a school, a church or anywhere else, the consequences can be deadly. But the danger is about double when a semiautomatic weapon is involved.In the United States, shootings that involved a semiautomatic rifle resulted in nearly twice as many deaths compared with... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - September 11, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Karen Kaplan Source Type: news

Active shooters are twice as deadly when a semiautomatic weapon is in the mix, study finds
Any time an active shooter opens fire in a school, a church or anywhere else, the consequences can be deadly. But the danger is about double when a semiautomatic weapon is involved.In the United States, shootings that involved a semiautomatic rifle resulted in nearly twice as many deaths compared... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - September 11, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Karen Kaplan Source Type: news

Active shooters are twice as deadly when a semiautomatic weapon is in the mix
Any time an active shooter opens fire in a school, a church or anywhere else, the consequences can be deadly. But the danger is about double when a semiautomatic weapon is involved.In the United States, shootings that involved a semiautomatic rifle resulted in nearly twice as many deaths compared... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - September 11, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Karen Kaplan Source Type: news

Driver arrested in fatal hit-run of man he had argued with in Long Beach, police say
A motorist has been arrested in a fatal hit and run involving a pedestrian he had argued with moments before, Long Beach police said Sunday.Sokhorn Hor, 29, of Long Beach was held in the crash that occurred near Market Street and Orange Avenue about 11 p.m. Saturday, police said.Long Beach resident... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - September 9, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Rosanna Xia Source Type: news

Rosh Hashana, the two-day holiday celebrating the Jewish new year, begins at sundown
Sundown on Sunday marks the beginning of Rosh Hashana, the two-day holiday celebrating the Jewish new year and the start of the 10 High Holy Days leading up to Yom Kippur, the Day of Atonement.During the two days of Rosh Hashana, observers commemorate God's creation of humanity. It is a time for... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - September 9, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Rosanna Xia Source Type: news

Gov. Brown signs bills to block Trump's offshore oil drilling plan
Gov. Jerry Brown on Saturday signed two bills that would block new offshore oil drilling in California by barring the construction of pipelines, piers, wharves or other infrastructure necessary to transport the oil and gas from federal waters to state land.This locks into law the vows of Brown... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - September 8, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Rosanna Xia Source Type: news

Why scientists in Los Angeles are so excited about a new collection of ancient amber
Insects have been the most dominant land animals on the planet, as measured by mass and ecological effects, since before the time of the dinosaurs. Yet their biological bulk is not necessarily reflected in the traditional fossil record.“If you are a big goofy dinosaur, you are going to be preserved... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - September 7, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Deborah Netburn Source Type: news

Wind and solar farms can make their own weather, including extra rain over the Sahara
You already know that using solar and wind power can influence the climate by reducing our dependence onheat-trapping fossil fuels. Now scientists say these renewable forms of energy can change the climate more directly — and do it in ways that might surprise you.Ifwind turbines andsolar panels... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - September 6, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Karen Kaplan Source Type: news

Trump administration talks of boosting Central Valley water deliveries. But is it just talk?
With talk of boosting water deliveries to Central Valley agriculture, the Trump administration is telling growers exactly what they want to hear.But given California ’s complex water system and a web of federal and state environmental regulations, such promises could prove more political than practical.... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - September 2, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Bettina Boxall Source Type: news