The long-lasting health effects of separating children from their parents at the U.S. border
Researchers have long looked upon wars, famines and mass migrations as grim but important opportunities to understand how adversity affects children ’s health.They ’ve culled the experiences of orphans warehoused in government facilities, Jewish children dispatched to foreign families ahead of a... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - June 20, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Melissa Healy Source Type: news

World Health Organization says video game addiction is a disease. Why American psychiatrists don't
The World Health Organization has made it official: digital games can be addictive, and those addicted to them need help.In the latest edition of its International Classification of Diseases, released Monday, the United Nations agency concluded that people whose jobs, educations, family or social... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - June 19, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Melissa Healy Source Type: news

Compulsive video-game playing could be mental health problem
Obsessive video gamers know how to anticipate dangers in virtual worlds. The World Health Organization says they now should be on guard for a danger in the real world: spending too much time playing.In its latest revision to a disease classification manual, the United Nations health agency said... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - June 18, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Associated Press Source Type: news

Foods that are both fatty and sweet can hijack the part of the brain that regulates food consumption
It may have taken thousands of generations of hunting, gathering, farming and cooking to get here. But in the end, the genius of humankind has combined fats and carbohydrates to produce such crowning culinary glories as the doughnut, fettuccine Alfredo, nachos and chocolate cake with buttercream... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - June 18, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Melissa Healy Source Type: news

Ties between researchers and alcohol producers prompt NIH to shut down study of moderate drinking
Does drinking a single serving of alcohol each day reduce the risk of developing cardiovascular disease or diabetes?Several observational studies suggest that it could. These reports have found that people who drink moderate amounts of alcohol were less likely to develop Type 2 diabetes and coronary... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - June 15, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Karen Kaplan Source Type: news

All around the world, humans are forcing other mammals to be more active at night
Human encroachment is pushing wild mammals all over the globe to increasingly become creatures of the night, moving their daytime activities toward the darker hours, a new study finds.This day-to-night shift,described in the journal Science, could have a host of implications for the health and... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - June 15, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Amina Khan Source Type: news

Scant abortion-related ER visits suggest there's no medical basis for restrictive laws, study says
Abortions send women to hospital emergency rooms at lower rates than such routine procedures as colonoscopies and surgeries to have wisdom teeth removed, new research has found.In fact, for every 100,000 abortions provided, about 108 women sought out emergency care for what they thought was a... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - June 15, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Melissa Healy Source Type: news

Higher vitamin D levels linked to lower colorectal cancer risk, study finds
Higher concentrations of vitamin D circulating in the bloodstream are linked to a lower risk of colorectal cancer, according to a large international study published Thursday.The researchers said the results strengthen the evidence that the vitamin may play a protective role against the disease,... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - June 14, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Laurie McGinley Source Type: news

U.S. teens are taking fewer risks with their health, though drinking and unsafe sex are still common
The school year is over, and public health officials have issued a report card for America ’s high school students.On the whole, the marks are good. Fewer U.S. teens are having sex or using illicit drugs. (There ’s no mention of rock-and-roll.) They’re also less likely to drink and drive, smoke... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - June 14, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Karen Kaplan Source Type: news

NASA engineers hope the Opportunity rover will sleep through a continent-sized dust storm on Mars
NASA ’s Opportunity rover is incommunicado after being hit by a severe, continent-scale dust storm on Mars, space agency officials said Wednesday — and they’re not sure exactly when they’ll hear from it again.Officials say the rover has probably fallen asleep after being unable to generate enough... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - June 14, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Amina Khan Source Type: news

Antarctica ’s ice is shrinking at an unprecedented rate that could imperil coastal regions worldwide
The Antarctic ice sheet lost nearly 3 trillion metric tons of ice from 1992 to 2017, and its rate of loss over that time tripled in West Antarctica, according to an international collaboration involving about 80 scientists.The finding,published Wednesday in the journal Nature, reveals that the... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - June 13, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Amina Khan Source Type: news

In 25 years, Antarctica lost enough ice to raise sea level by nearly 8 millimeters, research shows
The Antarctic ice sheet lost nearly 3 trillion metric tons of ice from 1992 to 2017 and tripled its rate of loss over that time for West Antarctica, according to an international collaboration involving some 80 scientists.The findingpublished in Nature reveals that Antarctica ’s ice is shrinking... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - June 13, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Amina Khan Source Type: news

What causes ‘chemobrain’? It’s time for neuroscientists to get serious about finding out, experts say
At some point in their treatment for cancer, somewhere between 17% and 75% of patients with malignancies that don ’t affect the central nervous system report the sensation that a mental fog has set in.For months or years after their hair has grown back, the exhaustion has lifted and the medical... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - June 13, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Melissa Healy Source Type: news

Are prescription medications making Americans depressed?
The incidence of depression hasbeen rising in the U.S. for more than a decade. So has Americans ’ reliance on prescription medications that list depression as a possible side effect.Coincidence?Perhaps not, according to anew study in the Journal of the American Medical Assn.Using 10 years of... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - June 12, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Karen Kaplan Source Type: news

Psychedelic drugs change brain cells in ways that could help fight depression, addiction and more
Psychedelic drugs like LSD can change brain cells in rats and flies, making neurons more likely to branch out and connect with one another. This supports the theory that psychedelics could help fight depression, anxiety, addiction and post-traumatic stress disorder. (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - June 12, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Melissa Healy Source Type: news

Africa's baobab trees can live for more than 1,000 years, but many of the oldest and largest are dying
The oldest and biggest angiosperm trees in the world, the African baobabs, are dying or already dead, an international team of scientists has found.The scientists added that the spate of deaths,described in the journal Nature Plants, might be the result of a changing climate – though they say... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - June 12, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Amina Khan Source Type: news

Africa's baobab trees can live for more than 1,000 years, but the oldest and largest of them are dying
The oldest and biggest angiosperm trees in the world, the African baobabs, are dying or already dead, an international team of scientists has found.The scientists added that the spate of deaths,described in the journal Nature Plants, might be the result of a changing climate – though they say... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - June 11, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Amina Khan Source Type: news

Texts reveal political maneuvering ahead of MWD's delta tunnels vote
The days leading up to a key funding vote on the delta tunnels project were marked by intense politicking and head-counting by board members at the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California.The behind-the-scenes campaign to get the board to approve nearly $11 billion in financing for... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - June 8, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Bettina Boxall Source Type: news

Curiosity rover's findings on Mars' organic molecules offer tantalizing clues in the search for life on the planet
Some of the methane on Mars may be trapped in water-based crystals, according to data from NASA's Curiosity rover. The rover found a strong seasonal cycle, suggesting that it's trapped in water crystals that melt in warmer weather. The rover also found a rich assembly of organic molecules. (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - June 8, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Amina Khan Source Type: news

Suicides have increased by more than 30% since 1999 in half the states, CDC says
More than a decade of steadily rising rates have made suicide the nation ’s 10th leading cause of death and one of only three causes of death — including Alzheimer’s disease and drug overdoses — that are increasing in the United States, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - June 7, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Melissa Healy Source Type: news

Paul Boyer, who was awed by cells and won a Nobel Prize for deducing how they use energy, dies at 99
Paul Boyer, a UCLA biochemist who won the Nobel Prize for discovering the “three-cylinder engine” that powers all life as we know it, has died at his home in Los Angeles.He was 99 years old when he died Saturday, and would have celebrated his 100th birthday on July 31.Boyer spent the majority... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - June 7, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Deborah Netburn Source Type: news

Hitting the beach should be cleaner this summer — as long as you avoid these sandy stretches
Some good news (and then some not so good news) for those hitting the beach this summer: A relatively dry year has meant much cleaner beaches — particularly in Southern California, according to Heal the Bay’s new Beach Report Card.The annual survey of more than 450 beaches across the state, released... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - June 7, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Rosanna Xia Source Type: news

Hurricanes and typhoons are slowing down, which means more time to do damage
A new study by a scientist with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration has found that over the past seven decades, tropical cyclones have slowed down near coastlines around the world.Thefindings published in the journal Nature describe a clear link between global warming and the... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - June 6, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Amina Khan Source Type: news

For many lung cancer patients, Keytruda is a better initial treatment than chemotherapy, study finds
In findings that may allow many lung cancer patients to avoid chemotherapy, a large clinical trial has shown that the immunotherapy drug Keytruda is a more effective initial treatment for two-thirds of patients with the most common type of lung cancer.Compared with advanced small-cell lung cancer... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - June 5, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Melissa Healy Source Type: news

'I have definitely hit the jackpot.' Advanced breast cancer disappears after new immunotherapy
In the all-hands effort to harness the powers of the immune system to fight cancer, scientists have reported a new approach that eliminated all evidence of advanced-stage breast cancer in a 49-year-old woman who had run out of treatment options.The patient ’s “complete durable cancer regression”... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - June 4, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Melissa Healy Source Type: news

They can shrink, glow and stain penguin poop pink: Why this scientist wants you to love krill
If you ’re like most people, you probably haven’t given krill much thought.You ’ve heard of them, of course. They’re the small, shrimp-like animals that live in great swarms in most of the world’s oceans.You probably know that they ’re the primary food source of the largest animal on Earth, the... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - June 1, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Deborah Netburn Source Type: news

Dunes of methane ice? Tiny Pluto's surface reveals big surprises
With just a single flyby, NASA ’s New Horizons spacecraft has already revealed that Pluto is an active little world with mountains and an atmosphere. Now it’s found another surprisingly Earth-like feature: dunes.The discovery, published in the journal Science, fills in a portrait of Pluto as a... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - June 1, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Amina Khan Source Type: news

On Thanksgiving, partisan politics cost Americans nearly 74 million hours with family and friends
The 2016 presidential election was so toxic that Americans spent nearly 74 million fewer hours with family and friends on Thanksgiving Day, new research suggests.More than 48 million hours were lost when Thanksgiving guests from precincts that voted for Republican Donald Trump cut short their... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - May 31, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Karen Kaplan Source Type: news

How Pluto got its dunes
This  video demonstrates scientists' best guess about how Pluto wound up with methane dunes despite having such a thin atmosphere. (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - May 31, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: news

Scientists surprised to find dunes on Pluto that are made of tiny grains of methane
With just a single flyby, NASA ’s New Horizons spacecraft has already revealed that Pluto is an active little world with mountains and an atmosphere. Now it’s found another surprisingly Earth-like feature: dunes.The discovery, published in the journal Science, fills in a portrait of Pluto as a... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - May 31, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Amina Khan Source Type: news

Triclosan could be really harmful to your gut, and it's probably in your toothpaste
Triclosan, an antimicrobial agent found in toys, toothpaste, cosmetics and more than 2,000 other consumer products, has been found to wreak havoc on the guts of mice whose blood concentrations of the compound are roughly equivalent to a typical level for humans.One group of mice who were fed a... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - May 31, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Melissa Healy Source Type: news

Hurricane Maria's death toll was 70 times higher than Puerto Rican officials have reported, study says
Officials in Puerto Rico say that64 people lost their lives after Hurricane Maria slammed into the island in September. A new report says that estimate is off — by about 4,600.If the analysis is correct, it means that for every hurricane-related death that ’s currently on the books, another 70... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - May 30, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Karen Kaplan, Amina Khan Source Type: news

Hurricane Maria's death toll was 70 times higher than Puerto Rican officials have let on, study says
Officials in Puerto Rico say that64 people lost their lives after Hurricane Maria slammed into the island in September. A new report says that estimate is off — by about 4,600.If the analysis is correct, it means that for every hurricane-related death that ’s currently on the books, another 70... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - May 29, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Karen Kaplan Source Type: news

Straws. Bottle caps. Polyester. These are the new targets of California's environmental movement
It took years of activist campaigns to turn the plastic bag into a villain, and hard-fought legislation to reduce its presence in oceans and waterways. Now, environmentalists and lawmakers are deploying similar tactics against a new generation of plastic pollutants.There are drinking straws, which... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - May 28, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Rosanna Xia Source Type: news

Deep brain stimulation may offer treatment for type 2 diabetes, study suggests
A surprising (but welcome) side effect of a therapy for obsessive-compulsive disorder may pave the way for a new approach to treating type 2 diabetes — and offer new insights into the links between obesity and the metabolic disease that afflicts close to 1 in 10 American adults.The therapy in... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - May 26, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Melissa Healy Source Type: news

This futuristic pill senses signs of disease inside the body, then sends a wireless alert to a phone
In the 1966 science fiction classic“Fantastic Voyage,” a submarine crew is miniaturized so it can squeeze inside a human body and travel to a hot spot where medical assistance is needed.A team from MIT has adapted this idea for real life, replacing the shrunken squad with specially engineered... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - May 25, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Karen Kaplan Source Type: news

The asteroid that wiped out the dinosaurs also shaped the evolution of birds
Scientists studying plant life around the extinction event that killed the dinosaurs have made a surprising discovery: Out of all the birds living at the time, only the ground-dwelling species survived. (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - May 24, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Amina Khan Source Type: news

The asteroid that wiped out the dinosaurs also shaped the evolution of birds
The only birds that survived after an asteroid struck Earth 66 million years ago (wiping out the dinosaurs) were ones that lived on the ground. (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - May 24, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Amina Khan Source Type: news

New U.S. weather satellite can't keep cool, threatening photo quality
The nation's newest weather satellite, launched under three months ago, has a serious cooling problem that could affect the quality of its pictures.The trouble is with the GOES-17 satellite's premier instrument for taking images of hurricanes, wildfires, volcanic eruptions and other natural calamities,... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - May 24, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Associated Press Source Type: news

Legend of Loch Ness monster will be tested with DNA samples
The stories seem as tall as the lake is deep. For hundreds of years, visitors to Scotland's Loch Ness have described seeing a monster that some believe lurks in the depths.But now the legend of Nessie may have no place left to hide. A New Zealand scientist next month is leading an international... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - May 24, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Associated Press Source Type: news