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What dolphin diets reveal about climate change's effects off the California coast
Scientists studying dolphins dining off the California coastline have found that the marine food web is starting to look a little threadbare. The length of food chains in that web appears to have gotten shorter in response to environmental changes — such as those caused by El Niño events.Thefinding... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - October 20, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Amina Khan Source Type: news

With Obamacare, fewer Americans were uninsured when they were told they had cancer
As President Trump and his allies in Congress keep pushing to get rid of Obamacare, new research shows that the contentious law has succeeded in expanding health insurance coverage for Americans with cancer.But not everywhere. This upside of Obamacare — known formally as thePatient Protection... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - October 19, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Karen Kaplan Source Type: news

Scientists engineer proteins that caused obese animals to lose weight and lower cholesterol
As the U.S. obesity rate has galloped toward 40%, doctors, drug designers and dispirited dieters have all wondered the same thing: What if a pill could deliver the benefits of weight-loss surgery, but without the knife?New research brings that hope a notch closer.Scientists from the biotechnology... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - October 19, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Melissa Healy Source Type: news

How volcanic eruptions in Alaska could have impacted the lives of ancient Egyptians
Did violent volcanoes in Russia, Greenland and Alaska affect the lives of ancient Egyptians?It may sound improbable, but according to a new study, the answer is yes.In apaper published Tuesday in Nature Communications, a team of researchers shows that explosive volcanic eruptions in high northern... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - October 17, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Deborah Netburn Source Type: news

Controversial Cadiz water pipeline gets OK from federal government
In an about-face, the federal government has givenCadiz Inc. the go-ahead to lay a pipeline for its proposed desert water project in an existing railroad right-of-way.The decision by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management follows otherTrump administration moves to eliminate a legal hurdle erected... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - October 17, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Bettina Boxall Source Type: news

Doctors urged to make a public commitment to talk to their patients about guns and gun safety
As guardians of health and gatekeepers to the world of medicine, primary care doctors are expected to plunge dauntlessly into the most delicate topics with their patients. Now, in the wake of the worst mass shooting in recent U.S. history, a new campaign is challenging these physicians to talk... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - October 17, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Melissa Healy Source Type: news

Astronomers strike gold – and platinum – as they watch two neutron stars collide
For the first time, scientists have witnessed the collision of two neutron stars - and in the process, they've confirmed that this is how gold and other heavy metals are made. Some researchers are saying this is a bigger deal than the first detection of gravity waves. (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - October 16, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Amina Khan Source Type: news

How guilt, anxiety and distress may help fight cancer
Having cancer would make anyone scared, stressed and angry. In some cases, that might be a good thing.Recent research suggests that negative emotions may improve the health of cancer survivors by motivating them to behave in healthier ways."Negative emotions get a bad rap," saysAndree Castonguay... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - October 13, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Eryn Brown Source Type: news

Immunotherapy is the newest weapon in the fight against cancer
The human immune system is both clever and powerful. But it is often foiled by cancer ’s wily ways.A new approach to cancer treatment — immunotherapy — aims to unmask the disease for the deadly threat it is, then direct the full force of the immune system on malignancies that would otherwise grow... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - October 13, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Melissa Healy Source Type: news

The origins of immunotherapy
Through the centuries, physicians and scientists have repeatedly returned to the promise of harnessing the body ’s own immune system to fight against cancer. Often, their search was inspired by a cancer patient’s sudden return to health after beating back a viral or bacterial infection.In 1898,... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - October 13, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

PSA tests aren't great for diagnosing prostate cancer. Here are some better options in the works
The PSA test is an imperfect way to screen men for prostate cancer. But now, doctors have new tools to help them detect and manage the often-perplexing disease. (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - October 13, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Chris Woolston Source Type: news

Nearly 4 in 10 U.S. adults are now obese, CDC says
Americans ’ obesity rates have reached a new high-water mark. Again.In 2015 and 2016, just short of 4 in 10 American adults had a body mass index that put them in obese territory.In addition, just under 2 in 10 American children — those between 2 and 19 years of age — are now considered obese... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - October 13, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Melissa Healy Source Type: news

How NASA tracks carbon emissions from space to better understand — and deal with — climate change
Fires, drought and warmer temperatures were to blame for excess carbon dioxide in the atmosphere during the 2015-2016 El Ni ño, scientists with NASA’s Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 say.The findings, part of five papers published in the journal Science, shed light on the mechanisms through which... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - October 12, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Amina Khan Source Type: news

Kern County agency votes to help fund delta water delivery system
In a small step forward forCalifornia WaterFix, a major San Joaquin Valley irrigation district on Thursday tentatively endorsed a partial investment in the water-delivery project.With virtually no discussion, the board of the Kern County Water Agency approved a letter to the state saying that... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - October 12, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Bettina Boxall Source Type: news

What drove Las Vegas shooter to kill? We don't know, and it drives us crazy
We need to know.Close to two weeks after 64-year-oldStephen Paddockrained down bullets on attendees of a country music festival in Las Vegas,killing 58 and injuring nearly 500 others, investigators are no closer to understanding the gunman ’s motives.For a nation riveted by the deadliest mass... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - October 12, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Melissa Healy Source Type: news

Your guide to the latest in cancer screening tests: Which do you need, which can you skip?
Cancer screening could save your life. Then again, it could give you a false alarm or lull you into a false sense of security. Here's a round-up of the latest advice from the experts. (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - October 12, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Karen Ravn Source Type: news

With cancer, it's not necessarily where it starts but how it starts
Ever since 1761, when the Italian physicianGiovanni Battista Morgagni published his detailed findings from 700 autopsies, cancers have been inextricably linked with the organs they inhabit.Over the next 250 years, physicians would learn that even after a tumor had been fully excised from one... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - October 12, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Melissa Healy Source Type: news

When it comes to cancer, here's what you should sweat and here's what you shouldn't
We all want to avoid cancer. That's a given. But when cancer risk seems to lurk everywhere, it's hard to know what you really need to do to protect yourself. Here's what you should sweat, and here's what you shouldn't worry about. (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - October 12, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Chris Woolston Source Type: news

Rethinking cancer, from the basics to the breakthroughs
A Q&A with Dr. Otis Brawley, chief medical officer of the American Cancer Society, who talks about various ways our ideas about cancer have changed. (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - October 12, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Melissa Healy Source Type: news

Life after cancer: “The real battle happened after treatment”
Bin McLaurin was lucky. Doctors detected his prostate cancer early, and he successfully completed the surgery, radiation and hormone therapy he needed to keep the disease at bay.But two years out from his 2014 diagnosis, McLaurin didn't feel so great. He had gained 60 pounds during treatment,... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - October 12, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Eryn Brown Source Type: news

Curing cancer isn't always the goal. Sometimes you just want it to be a manageable chronic disease
If you can ’t beat ’em, manage ’em.Millions of patients live by that rule every day — patients with chronic conditions that can’t be cured but can be kept under control with the right combination of medication, diet and lifestyle choices.High blood pressure can be treated this way. So can diabetes.... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - October 12, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Karen Ravn Source Type: news

Beyond the orbit of Neptune, a dwarf planet is found to have a ring
Scientists have discovered a ring around Haumea, a dwarf planet located beyond Neptune. The ring lies in the same plane as its equator and as the orbit of its outer moon, Hi'iaka. (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - October 11, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Deborah Netburn Source Type: news

Beyond the orbit of Neptune, scientists find a dwarf planet with a ring
Scientists have discovered a ring around Haumea, a dwarf planet located beyond Neptune. The ring lies in the same plane as its equator and as the orbit of its outer moon, Hi'iaka. (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - October 11, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Deborah Netburn Source Type: news

MacArthur fellow Emmanuel Cand ès uses little bits of data to see the big picture
In the world of consumer electronics, a camera that can pack more pixels into a single image is something to boast about. ButEmmanuel Jean Cand ès won a MacArthur Foundation “genius” grant for doing the opposite.The applied mathematician and statistician from Stanford works in a field called compressed... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - October 11, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Amina Khan Source Type: news

For fighting cybercrime and boosting internet security, UCSD's Stefan Savage wins a MacArthur award
A Q&A with newly minted MacArthur Fellow Stefan Savage and his work. He's a computer scientist at UCSD who was picked for his work that identifies and addresses the technological, economic and social vulnerabilities underlying internet security challenges and cybercrime. (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - October 11, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Deborah Netburn Source Type: news

Southern California water agency approves pitching in $4.3 billion for massive delta tunnels project
Southern California ’s largest water agency Tuesday threw a lifeline to California WaterFix, approving a $4.3-billion buy-in to the water delivery project.The closely watched vote by the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California board does not ensure the survival of the $17-billion project,... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - October 11, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Bettina Boxall Source Type: news

'Guns kill people,' and leading doctors want to treat them like any other threat to public health
The doctors who lead the medical profession ’s debates on how best to preserve and restore our health are done with moments of silence in the face of gun-related violence.In the wake of a mass shooting that killed 59 people and wounded hundreds more in Las Vegas, they neither minced words nor observed... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - October 10, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Melissa Healy Source Type: news

The Cadiz desert water project is facing a new hurdle
A state commission is throwing a new hurdle in front ofCadiz Inc.’s plans to turn a remote desert valley into a lucrative water source for Southern California.In a Sept. 20 letter to Cadiz, theState Lands Commission informed the company that its proposed water pipeline crosses a strip of state-owned... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - October 8, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Bettina Boxall Source Type: news

Guns play an outsized role in deaths from terrorist attacks, especially in the U.S., data show
Explosives. Arson. Guns. Driving into a crowd of people.These are the most common tools that terrorists use to inflict fear and destruction on an unwitting public.But a new study suggests that these violent methods, while all horrific, are not equally deadly.In aresearch letter published Friday... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - October 6, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Deborah Netburn Source Type: news

Guns play an outsized role in deaths from terror attacks, especially in the U.S., data show
Explosives. Arson. Guns. Driving into a crowd of people.These are the most common tools that terrorists use to inflict fear and destruction on an unwitting public.But a new study suggests that these violent methods, while all horrific, are not equally deadly.In aresearch letter published Friday... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - October 6, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Deborah Netburn Source Type: news

State auditor faults handling of delta tunnels planning contracts
California water managers awarded a multimillion-dollar contract to a Sacramento consulting firm without going through the required competitive bidding process, according to the state auditor.In a report released Thursday, state auditor Elaine Howle criticized the California Department of Water... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - October 6, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Bettina Boxall Source Type: news

As much as 2.6% of your DNA is from Neanderthals. This is what it's doing
Modern humans are a little more Neanderthal than we thought.A highly detailed genetic analysis of a Neanderthal woman who lived about 52,000 years ago suggests that our extinct evolutionary cousins still influence our risk of having a heart attack, developing an eating disorder and suffering from... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - October 5, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Melissa Healy Source Type: news

Gov. Brown visits L.A. to lobby for the $17-billion delta water project
With two key CaliforniaWaterFix votes looming, Gov. Jerry Brown expressed confidence Thursday that water agencies will commit to enough funding to sustain the massive project.Brown was in Los Angeles to lobby for the $17-billion proposal, which would re-engineer the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta,... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - October 5, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Bettina Boxall Source Type: news

U.S. researcher among 3 awarded Nobel Prize in chemistry for developments in electron microscopy  
Three scientists who developed new ways to capture the clearest snapshots of life ’s complex molecules have been awarded the Nobel Prize in chemistry.Jacques Dubochet of the University of Lausanne in Switzerland,Joachim Frank of Columbia University in New York andRichard Henderson of the MRC... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - October 4, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Amina Khan Source Type: news

U.S. researcher among three awarded Nobel Prize in chemistry for developments in electron microscopy  
Three researchers based in the U.S., Britain and Switzerland have won the Nobel Prize in chemistry for developments in electron microscopy.The $1.1-million prize is shared by Jacques Dubochet of the University of Lausanne, Joachim Frank at New York's Columbia University and Richard Henderson of... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - October 4, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Associated Press Source Type: news

Flush with a new Nobel, the LIGO team parties at Caltech
In some ways, it was a typical Southern California scene.Late Tuesday morning, two men found themselves surrounded by an entourage of friends, family and publicists and preceded by a gaggle of photographers running backward and cameras clicking at a furious pace.Onlookers whispered to each other... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - October 4, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Deborah Netburn Source Type: news

2 Caltech scientists share Nobel Prize in physics for gravitational wave discoveries
Three scientists who envisioned and built twin machines that discovered gravitational waves, predicted by Albert Einstein more than a century ago, have won theNobel Prize in physics.Kip Thorne andBarry Barish of Caltech together split half of the $1.1-million prize, andRainer Weiss of MIT received... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - October 3, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Amina Khan Source Type: news

Explosive bursts of methane helped ancient Mars keep liquid water flowing, study finds
In a drying time, Mars may have been kept warm enough for liquid water to remain stable on the surface thanks to explosive bursts of methane gas, a new study finds.The simulations,described in the journal Nature Geoscience, could explain how Mars managed to sustain a series of lakes in a climate... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - October 2, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Amina Khan Source Type: news

3 Americans win Nobel Prize in medicine for uncovering the science behind our biological clocks
The Nobel Prize for medicine has been awarded to three Americans for discoveries about the body's daily rhythms.The laureates are Jeffrey Hall, Michael Rosbash and Michal Young. Robash is on the faculty at Brandeis University, Young at Rockefeller University and Hall is at the University of Maine.... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - October 2, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Associated Press Source Type: news

Once harmless, the Zika virus became lethal after a single genetic mutation took hold around 2013
When the Zika virus was first isolated from a Ugandan forest monkey in 1947 and found in mildly ill humans a few years later, it was hardly worth a mention in the annals of human disease.What a difference a mutation can make.In a new round of genetic sleuthing, Chinese researchers have pinpointed... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - September 28, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Melissa Healy Source Type: news

Watch these 'transformer' robots fold themselves into boats, wheels and other useful shapes
Here ’s a little robot that knows how to dress for the occasion. Scientists at MIT have built a bot that can, with a little origami action, change its shape from a walking bot to a rolling or even a gliding one.The tiny folding machines, described in the journal Science Robotics, could make it... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - September 28, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Amina Khan Source Type: news

Three detectors, two black holes and one really big collision: Gravitational waves found again
Scientists have announced the fourth discovery of gravitational waves produced by two colliding black holes — and it’s the first such smash-up found with the help of the European Virgo detector.The discovery of GW170814 by both the LIGO and Virgo collaborations, described at the G7 science ministers... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - September 28, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Amina Khan Source Type: news

Abortions: easier to obtain than ever, yet nearly half worldwide are deemed unsafe, study finds
It's never been easier to have a safe abortion. Yet more than 25 million unsafe abortions are performed around the world each year, according to a new report. (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - September 27, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Karen Kaplan Source Type: news

Scientists may have found a way to diagnose CTE in football players while they're still alive
It is a humbling but very motivating fact that a person currently has to die before doctors can make a diagnosis of chronic traumatic encephalopathy, the degenerative brain disease that afflicts many professional football players and other athletes who have sustained repeated blows to the head.... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - September 27, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Melissa Healy Source Type: news

In New York, major crime complaints fell when cops took a break from ‘proactive policing’
When New York police officers temporarily reduced their “proactive policing” efforts on low-level offenses, major-crime reports in the city actually fell, according to a study based on New York Police Department crime statistics.The findings, published in the journal Nature Human Behaviour, put... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - September 26, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Amina Khan Source Type: news

There is a multibillion-dollar hole in the delta tunnels funding plan
The decision by one of the state ’s major water players to opt out of California’s $17-billion replumbing project was a surprise to many. The reasons for it were not.California WaterFix ’s financing plans have assumed that the Westlands Water District and other agricultural districts would cover... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - September 24, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Bettina Boxall Source Type: news

Look up! You might see NASA's asteroid-hunting spacecraft fly past Earth
It ’s time to wave goodbye ... for now. This morning, NASA’s OSIRIS-REx is zipping past Earth on its way to the asteroid Bennu – the last time we’ll see the spacecraft until 2023.At 9:52 a.m. Pacific, OSIRIS-REx (short for Origins, Spectral Interpretation, Resource Identification and Security-Regolith... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - September 22, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Amina Khan Source Type: news

Mosquitoes spread deadly diseases, and public health experts hope to fight back with this new emoji
Mosquitoes are more than a spoiler of backyard barbecues. They threaten more than half the world ’s population with their disease-spreading bites. In fact, mosquitoes are deadlier — by far — than sharks and snakes.They are the incubator and chief disseminator of malaria, dengue and yellow fevers,... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - September 22, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Melissa Healy Source Type: news

Plant-eating dinosaurs may have dined on crustaceans on special occasions, study says
Think dinosaurs didn ’t mix things up at mealtime? Think again. Researchers studying fossilized dinosaur feces from about 75 million years ago have discovered that at least some plant-eating dinosaurs also snacked on shellfish.The discovery of crustacean remains in the droppings, described in Scientific... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - September 22, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Amina Khan Source Type: news

Disgraced ex-Patriots player Aaron Hernandez found to have CTE and early brain atrophy
Five months after Aaron Hernandez hanged himself in a prison cell with a bedsheet while serving a life sentence for first-degree murder, the former New England Patriots tight end has been diagnosed with severe chronic traumatic encephalopathy.Hernandez, who died at age 27, is one of the youngest... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - September 21, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Nathan Fenno Source Type: news