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How to make a robot that will build your Ikea furniture
Here ’s one way to tackle the dreaded task of assembling your Ikea furniture: Get a robot to do it for you.With some off-the-shelf robotics hardware and a substantial amount of programming, researchers at Nanyang Technological University in Singapore built a machine capable of assembling the Swedish... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - April 20, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Sean Greene Source Type: news

A search for some of Earth ’s most extreme creatures in the West Coast's deepest underwater canyon
GeobiologistVictoria Orphan stands at the stern of the research vessel Western Flyer, watching her colleagues put the last touches on an unusual spread. Among the offerings: a large turkey leg, an alligator head and bowls of gelatinous agar that resemble consomme.This meal isn ’t for the ship’s... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - April 20, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Amina Khan Source Type: news

The more humans spread, the smaller other mammals get. Elephants, rhinos and hippos had better watch out
Thirteen thousand years ago Southern California was crawling with enormous mammals — all of which are extinct today.There were massive mammoths three times bigger than modern-day elephants, giant ground sloths up to 20 feet in length, and strange, armadillo-like beasts known as glyptodons that... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - April 20, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Deborah Netburn Source Type: news

Fruit flies help explain why a male orgasm matters
Yes, dear reader, fruit flies ejaculate.And new research brings us this further news flash: They like it. It ’s what they like best about mating. So, that’s the part of the whole courtship process that keeps them coming back for more. And more (ensuring the circle of life and all...).And that ’s... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - April 19, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Melissa Healy Source Type: news

The food that goes bad in your fridge amounts to trillions of gallons of wasted water
You walk into the grocery store with the best intentions, filing your cart with kale, broccolini, tofu and Greek yogurt.Then you get home, feel pressed for time and order a pizza.Before you know it, the perishables are going bad at the back of the fridge. They ’ll wind up in the trash, like so... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - April 19, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Karen Kaplan Source Type: news

Liver transplants are better all around when you hold the ice
To preserve more livers for transplant patients who desperately need them, surgeons should take newly harvested organs out of their ice baths and immerse them instead in a warm, nutrient-rich soup, new research suggests.In a head-to-head comparison of the two methods, preserving donor livers in... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - April 19, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Melissa Healy Source Type: news

Liftoff! TESS, NASA's new planet-hunting space telescope, is now in space
Move over, Kepler. NASA ’s TESS spacecraft launched Wednesday at 3:51 p.m. Pacific time on a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida.In a matter of minutes, the rocket went supersonic, shed its first stage, which returned to a drone ship in the Atlantic Ocean, and... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - April 18, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Amina Khan Source Type: news

Corals on Great Barrier Reef will never be the same after back-to-back heat waves, scientists say
The Great Barrier Reef suffered a catastrophic die-off after two back-to-back marine heat waves in 2016 and 2017, a new study finds – and many of its reef communities have been fundamentally changed.The grim discovery,described in the journal Nature, reveals just how vulnerable many coral species... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - April 18, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Amina Khan Source Type: news

Attention women: Your choice of blood pressure medicine may affect your risk of pancreatic cancer
In findings with potentially broad implications for the public ’s health, new research has found that some women who treat their high blood pressure with a class of drugs that relaxes the blood vessels were more likely to develop pancreatic cancer than those who use other hypertension medications.... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - April 18, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Melissa Healy Source Type: news

One of the solar system ’s early planets didn’t survive, but its diamonds are now on Earth
Scientists have found the first hard evidence of a large and ancient protoplanet embedded in extraterrestrial diamonds that fell to Earth about 10 years ago.To be clear, the diamonds did not fall to Earth on their own. Instead, they were discovered inside a small asteroid that slammed into the... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - April 17, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Deborah Netburn Source Type: news

Organs from drug overdose victims could save the lives of patients on transplant waiting list
The widening tragedy that is the U.S. drug-overdose epidemic could have an improbable silver lining: for the 120,000 desperate Americans on the waiting list for a donated organ, the line could get a little shorter.In 2000, only 149 organs from donors who suffered a fatal drug overdose were transplanted... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - April 17, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Melissa Healy Source Type: news

NASA's new spacecraft will remain on the launchpad until Wednesday as SpaceX conducts rocket tests
The launch of NASA ’s TESS spacecraft, planned for launch Monday afternoon, has been delayed until Wednesday, SpaceX and NASA officials said.The Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite was set to take off at 3:32 p.m. Pacific time from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida on a SpaceX Falcon... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - April 16, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Amina Khan Source Type: news

Too much sitting may thin the part of your brain that's important for memory, study suggests
If you want to take a good stroll down memory lane, new research suggests you ’d better get out of that chair more often.In a first-of-its-kind study, researchers have found that in people middle-aged and older, a brain structure that is key to learning and memory is plumpest in those who spend... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - April 13, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Melissa Healy Source Type: news

NASA is about to step up its planet-hunting game with the launch of TESS
NASA's Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite will scan the neighboring sky, searching for dips in the brightness of stars that signal the presence of a planet. A few worlds TESS finds may be small, rocky bodies like Earth. And a few of those might be habitable places for life as we know it. (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - April 13, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Amina Khan Source Type: news

Singing tail feathers and a high speed dive help this hummingbird find a mate
You already know that hummingbirds are amazing animals — they can hover in place for minutes at a time, fly backwards at will, and flap their buzzing wings up to 70 times per second.But how much do you know about their bizarre courtship rituals?The details vary among species, but the principles... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - April 12, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Deborah Netburn Source Type: news

A personalized vaccine helps patients fight back against ovarian cancer
In early research that extends the possibilities of immunotherapy to a killer feared by women, a personalized vaccine helped patients with ovarian cancer mount a stronger defense against their tumors and substantially improved their survival rate.The vaccine was tested in a preliminary clinical... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - April 12, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Melissa Healy Source Type: news

What role should the L.A. River play in a future Los Angeles?
A thriving river, teeming with wildlife.A future in which the city meets its own water needs without importing extra from elsewhere.Can Los Angeles have both?That ’s the challenge facing a city that aspires to live within its environmental means.If local agencies follow through on their most... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - April 12, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Deborah Netburn Source Type: news

Bad news for night owls. Their risk of early death is 10% higher than for early risers, study finds
Night owls beware: A new study of mortality rates of nearly half a million people finds that individuals who strongly preferred to stay up late were more likely to be dead at the end of a six-and-a-half-year period.The findings, described in the journal Chronobiology International, offer the first... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - April 12, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Amina Khan Source Type: news

What ails America? The answer varies from state to state
The state of the union ’s health is improving. But it is doing so very unequally, and recent signs of progress are in danger of being reversed by diseases of excess and despair, including obesity, depression, suicide and substance abuse.Those are the broad conclusions of anew roundup of Americans ’... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - April 10, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Melissa Healy Source Type: news

Vote on Southern California's investment in delta tunnel project could be a nail-biter
With the city of Los Angeles and Orange County on opposite sides, Southern California's role in financing a massive water delivery project is likely to hinge on a few smaller agencies.In what will be a crucial decision, the board of the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California is expected... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - April 10, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Bettina Boxall Source Type: news

A finger bone from an unexpected place and time upends the story of human migration out of Africa
It ’s only 3 centimeters long and less than 1 centimeter wide, but it has the potential to rewrite the history of our ancestors’ migration out of Africa.The object in question is a fossilized piece of a bone, probably the middle portion of a middle finger. Based on its shape, scientists believe... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - April 9, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Karen Kaplan Source Type: news

California zigzags on ambitious water-delivery project, puts two-tunnel concept back on the table
Four days after Southern California ’s biggest water agencydropped a plan to pay for most of a major water delivery project, the funding proposal is back on the table.In agenda materials posted Friday afternoon, the staff of the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California presented two... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - April 7, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Bettina Boxall Source Type: news

Another twist in road to delta tunnels
Four days after Southern California ’s biggest water agencydropped a plan to pay for most of a major water delivery project, the funding proposal is back on the table.In agenda materials posted Friday afternoon, the staff of the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California presented two... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - April 7, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Bettina Boxall Source Type: news

Could this drug help the brain recover after a stroke?
Despite years of effort, researchers have so far failed to find a pill you could take or a food you could eat to harden your brain against the injury that could be caused by a stroke.But new research offers the prospect of limiting a stroke ’s long-term damage in a different way: with a drug that... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - April 6, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Melissa Healy Source Type: news

Surprise! Scientists find signs of new brain cells in adults as old as 79
Do we continue to add new neurons to our brain circuitry throughout our lives? Or does our neuron count remain fixed once we reach adulthood?The scientific debate rages on.In areport published Thursday in Cell Stem Cell, scientists from Columbia University present new evidence that our brains... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - April 5, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Deborah Netburn Source Type: news

This retinal implant may one day cure blindness caused by macular degeneration
For many of the 10 million Americans who are losing their vision to a thievish eye condition with no treatment, help may be on its way.In a very early clinical trial, researchers have implanted a stem cell “patch” to repair failing retinal cells in four patients with a condition called “dry” macular... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - April 5, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Melissa Healy Source Type: news

If two eyes are good, four were even better for this lizard species
Here ’s a sight for four eyes. Scientists say they’ve found evidence of a fourth eye in the fossil skulls of extinct monitor lizards — an ocular abundance found in no other known jawed vertebrate.The discovery, published in the journal Current Biology, offers scientists a strange bloom on the vertebrate... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - April 3, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Amina Khan Source Type: news

A sudden loss of wealth may be hazardous to your health
Your financial health may have more bearing on your physical health than you realize.American adults who experienced a sudden and substantial loss of wealth were 50% more likely to die in a 20-year period than were others in their age group whose financial picture remained relatively stable, or... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - April 3, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Karen Kaplan Source Type: news

Bringing meals to people with food insecurity may deliver savings to the healthcare system
Imagine you are the tightfisted potentate of a small republic, plotting the least expensive way to care for subjects in fragile health who depend on your beneficence.You could watch while your subjects who are elderly or disabled (or both) scramble to find and pay for healthy meals. And you could... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - April 3, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Melissa Healy Source Type: news

Metropolitan Water District backs away from plan to finance both delta tunnels
The Metropolitan Water District of Southern California is dropping plans to push ahead with a two-tunnel proposal to revamp the state ’s water delivery system, opting to pursue a scaled-back version instead.In a memo to the agency ’s board on Monday, MWD officials said the decision followed discussions... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - April 3, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Bettina Boxall Source Type: news

New rules would make it easier to find oil — and endanger whales and dolphins
The search for offshore oil begins with a boom.Before the oil rigs arrive and the boring begins, operators need to fire intense seismic blasts repeatedly into the ocean to find oil deposits.For decades, environmental rules that protected whales and other marine life from this cacophony have limited... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - April 2, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Rosanna Xia Source Type: news

New rules would make it easier to find oil — and noisier for whales
The search for offshore oil begins with a boom.Before the oil rigs arrive and the boring begins, operators need to fire intense seismic blasts repeatedly into the ocean to find oil deposits.For decades, environmental rules that protected whales and other marine life from this cacophony have limited... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - April 2, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Rosanna Xia Source Type: news

Welcome home, Tiangong-1: China's wayward space lab has returned to Earth
China ’s defunct space laboratory has returned to Earth, with pieces apparently splashing down in the Pacific Ocean off the coast of South America.Tiangong-1 reentered Earth ’s atmosphere at about 5:16 p.m. Pacific time on Sunday, according to the U.S. Strategic Command’s Joint Force Space Component... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - April 2, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Karen Kaplan Source Type: news

Roving robot lets UCI student attend classes virtually while on bed rest
When Tess Messiha was prescribed three weeks ’ bed rest during her pregnancy, she was worried she would have to take a leave of absence from school.But the UC Irvine law student attended classes virtually in December with the help of a robot she controlled from home. She could talk, listen and... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - March 31, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Priscella Vega Source Type: news

InSight: NASA's next mission to Mars will go deep beneath the red planet's surface
NASA has launched many groundbreaking missions to Mars, but its next mission will do so literally.The Mars InSight lander, planned for launch May 5, will be the first spacecraft dedicated to studying the deep interior of the red planet. The discoveries it makes could unlock hidden secrets about... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - March 30, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Amina Khan Source Type: news

These monkeys surprised scientists by sharing even more when no one was looking
Marmoset monkeys exist on a branch of the evolutionary tree that isdistinct from the one that led to humans. But these fellow primates consistently astonish researchers with social behavior that seems, well, pretty highly evolved.Marmosets engage in rigorously politepatterns of communication... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - March 30, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Melissa Healy Source Type: news

Opioid overdose deaths are still rising in nearly every segment of the country, CDC says
The opioid epidemic that claims the lives of 115 Americans each day just keeps getting worse, according to a new report from the CDC. It says that deaths linked to opioid overdoses rose by 28% in just one year. (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - March 29, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Karen Kaplan Source Type: news

Richard Taylor, Stanford physicist who won Nobel Prize for discovering quarks, dies at 88
Shortly after learning he ’d won the Nobel Prize in physics, Richard Taylor stared at his reflection in a mirror.“Murray Gell-Mann is smart. Dick Garwin is smart,” he told himself, referring to two pioneering 20th-century physicists. “You are lucky.”The self-effacing Taylor, a Stanford University... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - March 29, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Amina Khan Source Type: news

Scientists are baffled by mysterious galaxy that seems to be missing its dark matter
Astronomers have discovered a strange galaxy that is missing most, if not all, of its dark matter.The absence of this mysterious stuff in NGC 1052-DF2,described Wednesday in the journal Nature, could shed light on galaxy formation and help scientists narrow down what dark matter actually is. ... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - March 28, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Amina Khan Source Type: news

After weight-loss surgery, singles were more likely to start a relationship and couples were more likely to split
Surgical reduction of the stomach may do more than change signals of hunger and appetite, improve metabolic function and induce substantial weight loss. New research suggests it may change some hearts as well.A large Swedish study hasfound that obese people who had a spouse or live-in partner... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - March 28, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Melissa Healy Source Type: news

Southern California might foot the bill for delta tunnels project — with no promise of reimbursement
Southern California ’s biggest water agency is considering picking up most of the bill for overhauling the state’s waterworks without any guarantee that it will eventually recoup its additional, multibillion-dollar investment.At a board workshop Tuesday, officials of the Metropolitan Water District... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - March 28, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Bettina Boxall Source Type: news

Bear cubs get more motherly love when their moms are protected from hunters
Twenty-five years ago, brown bear mothers in Sweden rarely spent more than 18 months raising their cubs. Today, it ’s not unusual for moms to devote 2 1/2 years to their cubs before they go off on their own.What ’s behind this new passion for parenting? Researchers attribute it to a hunting regulation... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - March 27, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Karen Kaplan Source Type: news

By going vegan, America could feed an additional 390 million people, study suggests
More than 41 million Americans find themselves at risk of going hungry at some point during the year, the U.S. Department of Agriculturesays.But it doesn ’t have to be this way. New research suggests the country could feed all327 million Americans— plus roughly 390 million more — by focusing... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - March 26, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Karen Kaplan Source Type: news

Yes, a Chinese space station is about to plummet to Earth. Here's why you don't need to freak out
Sometime between Thursday and the middle of next week ​​​​​​​, the Chinese space station known as Tiangong-1 is expected to fall out of the sky. Most of the 18,740-pound space lab likely will burn up in the atmosphere, experts said. But not all of it. (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - March 26, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Deborah Netburn Source Type: news

Alien mystery solved: Tiny skeleton belonged to a human girl with rare genetic defects
In the 15 years since it was found in an abandoned mining town in Chile ’s Atacama Desert, the bizarre 6-inch skeleton has inspired fervid speculation, including theories of unearthly origins.It had 10 pairs of ribs — two fewer than the normal human complement — and an elongated skull with a pronounced... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - March 22, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Melissa Healy Source Type: news

The Great Pacific Garbage Patch counts 1.8 trillion pieces of trash, mostly plastic
The Great Pacific Garbage Patch is getting greater. Twice the size of Texas, the floating mass is up to 16 times larger than previously thought — carrying about 79,000 metric tons of plastic — according to scientists who performed an aerial survey.Thediscovery, published in the journal Scientific... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - March 22, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Amina Khan Source Type: news

Mystery solved: Tiny skeleton belonged to a human girl with a combination of rare genetic defects
In the 14 years since it was found in an abandoned mining town in Chile ’s Atacama Desert, the bizarre 6-inch skeleton has inspired fervid speculation, including theories of unearthly origins.It had 10 pairs of ribs — two fewer than the normal human complement — and an elongated skull with a pronounced... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - March 22, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Melissa Healy Source Type: news

Modified Pap tests can show early warning signs of other gynecological cancers
The Pap test has already reduced the incidence of cervical cancerby more than 60%. Now it may become a key step in the early detection of two other gynecological malignancies — ovarian and endometrial cancers — that have been notorious killers because they’re typically caught so late.A new study... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - March 22, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Melissa Healy Source Type: news

It looks like a fish, but it ’s not. Meet the robot built to spy on ocean life
It looks like a fish. It swims like a fish. But it isn ’t a fish.So what is it?It ’s SoFi, the robotic fish!Developed by researchers at MIT, SoFi is a soft-bodied robot that glides silently through the water with a smooth, undulating motion designed to mimic the movements of real fish.It is the... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - March 21, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Deborah Netburn Source Type: news

Oceans on ancient Mars may have got an assist from volcanoes
The oceans that once covered Mars may have formed somewhere around 3.7 billion years ago, even earlier than previously thought, according to UC Berkeley scientists.The findings,published in the journal Nature, highlight a potential link between the birth of Martian oceans and the rise and fall... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - March 20, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Amina Khan Source Type: news