Scientists spy on superbugs to see how they outsmart our antibiotics
Scientists have discovered yet another way that single-celled organisms have outsmarted us.The tiny bacteria that live inside our guts have an ingenious way of withstanding the onslaught of antibiotics we throw at them, according to a report published Thursday in the journalScience. The two-part... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - May 23, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Emily Baumgaertner Source Type: news

Tiny fish make a huge impact on coral reef ecosystems
The survival of coral reef ecosystems relies on seldom-seen, historically overlooked cryptobenthic reef fishes – the smallest of marine vertebrates.  (Video by Simon Brandl, Music by Carlos Estella) (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - May 23, 2019 Category: Science Source Type: news

Watch as bacterial cells help each other outsmart antibiotic drugs
Bacteria cells with an antibiotic resistance gene (in green) share DNA with other bacteria cells that lack the gene (in red). After the DNA has been transfered and used to make a drug-resistant protein, the previously red cells turn green. (Video courtesy of  Christian Lesterlin) (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - May 23, 2019 Category: Science Source Type: news

Cholesterol levels are improving for American kids and teens, study shows
Cholesterol levels in children and teens have improved, according to the latest analysis of U.S. health surveys, yet only half of them had readings considered ideal.Overall, 7% of kids had high cholesterol in surveys from 2009-16. That was down from 10% a decade earlier. In children, high levels... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - May 21, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Associated Press Source Type: news

Methane is a potent greenhouse gas. Could turning it into CO2 fight climate change?
Usually, choosing between the lesser of two evils is a dismal decision. But sometimes, it ’s an opportunity.A case in point: Turning methane (a powerful greenhouse gas) into carbon dioxide (also a planet-warming pollutant) could help fight climate change, researchers say.It ’s not that CO2 isn’t... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - May 20, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Julia Rosen Source Type: news

Seven things we ’ve learned about Ultima Thule, the farthest place visited by humans
About a billion miles more distant than Pluto isUltima Thule, a peanut-shaped object in the outer solar system that ’s thefarthest place ever visited by humans.NASA ’sNew Horizons spacecraftzipped past Ultima Thule on New Year ’s Eve (Pacific time), flying within 2,200 miles of the space rock’s... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - May 17, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Leila Miller Source Type: news

The kilogram is redefined, and scientists say it was worth the weight
In a subterranean vault in a suburb of Paris lies a small, rarely seen metal cylinder known as Le Grand K.For 130 years, this golf-ball-sized hunk of 90% platinum and 10% iridium has served as the international prototype kilogram. That means it was the single physical object by which all other... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - May 17, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Deborah Netburn Source Type: news

Eating ultra-processed foods will make you gain weight. Here's the scientific proof
For four weeks, 20 healthy volunteers checked into a research center hospital and were served a variety of tempting meals: cinnamon french toast, stir-fry beef with broccoli and onions, turkey quesadillas and shrimp scampi. Researchers scrutinized everything that was eaten and came away with the... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - May 16, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Emily Baumgaertner Source Type: news

America ’s baby bust continued in 2018 with record-low birth rates, CDC says
Birth rates for for American women in their teens and 20s reached record lows in 2018, leading to the fewest babies in 32 years, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.In aprovisional report released Wednesday, researchers from the CDC ’s National Center for Health Statistics... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - May 15, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Times staff and wire reports Source Type: news

To reduce dementia risk, eating well and exercising do more than puzzles and pills
If you want to save your brain from the ravages of dementia, keep the rest of your body well with exercise and healthy habits rather than relying on vitamins or other pills, according to new guidelines from the World Health Organization.About 50 million people around the world haveAlzheimer's... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - May 14, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Associated Press Source Type: news

In a world cloaked in darkness, these fish may have a unique way of seeing colors
Scientists have long presumed that the creatures in the deep ocean experienced a dark, colorless world. But some of the fish who live there may be able to see colors thanks toa newly discovered visual system that ’s never been seen in vertebrates before.The find, reported in the journal Science,... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - May 13, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Leila Miller Source Type: news

Police ID man and woman arrested after Friday ’s wild car chase and gun battle in L.A. County
Homicide investigators have identified the man and woman who they say led police on ahigh-speed chase that ended in a dramatic shootout in Vernon and a tense standoff involving flash-bang grenades on Friday.The male suspect, Dylan Andres Lindsey, 24, of Torrance, had leaned out of the car window... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - May 12, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Rosanna Xia Source Type: news

Why the measles outbreak has roots in today's political polarization
♪ Seizing our newborn infants,Blighting their lives with pain;Filling their veins with poison,Tainting each tender brain ♫So go the lyrics of theAnti-Compulsory Vaccination Hymn, circulated not by the modern-day anti-vaccine bandthe Refusers but by the Anti-Vaccination Society of America.... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - May 9, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Emily Baumgaertner Source Type: news

Uber and Lyft have made San Francisco ’s traffic much worse, study says
Ride-hailing services like Uber and Lyft are so popular in San Francisco that they have become the single biggest factor behind the city ’s increasingly snarled traffic, according toa new report.Researchers analyzed millions of trips and concluded that the services accounted for more than half... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - May 8, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Julia Rosen Source Type: news

Performing surgery on a warming planet: Can anesthesia go green?
It was early morning in an operating theater atProvidence Hospital in Portland, Ore. A middle-aged woman lay on the operating table, wrapped in blankets. Surgeons were about to cut out a cancerous growth in her stomach. But first, Dr.Brian Chesebro put her under by placing a mask over her face.... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - May 8, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Kristian Foden-Vencil Source Type: news

Meet the T. rex cousin that you could look down on
History's most frightening dinosaur, the Tyrannosaurus rex, came from a long line of pipsqueaks.Scientists have identified a new cousin of the T. rex that reached only the 3-foot height of a toddler. If it stretched its duck-billed head, an adult human maybe "would be looking at it in the eye,"... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - May 7, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Seth Borenstein Source Type: news

Nature is in the worst shape in human history, U.N. report says
Nature is in more trouble now than at any other time in human history, with extinction looming over 1 million species of plants and animals, scientists said Monday.It's all because of humans, but it's not too late to fix the problem, according to the United Nations' first comprehensive report... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - May 7, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Associated Press Source Type: news

How teaching kids about climate change can influence their conservative parents
You could say kids are taking the lead on climate change.Greta Thunberg, a 16-year-old Swedish activist and Nobelpeace prize nominee, has barnstormed parliaments and United Nations meetings, calling on leaders to stop “behaving like children” and get serious about tackling climate change.Following... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - May 6, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Julia Rosen Source Type: news

When teaching climate change, tackle the myths along with the facts, researchers say
New research shows that an effective way to make adults more interested in climate change is to teach their children about it in school. More classes have been tackling the subject with help from theNational Center for Science Education.The Oakland-based nonprofit organization has developed a... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - May 6, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Julia Rosen Source Type: news

Luke Perry and John Singleton remind us that strokes can strike younger adults too
Sudden weakness on one side of the body. Slurred speech. Loss of vision. Trouble with balance. Severe headaches.These are signs of a stroke. If it happened to someone close to you, would you know what to do?After the age of 55, the risk of a stroke doubles every decade, but younger people can... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - May 6, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Leila Miller Source Type: news

How bamboo-eating pandas trick their bodies into thinking they are carnivores
On the outside, giant pandas look like herbivores. They spend nearly all of their waking hours eating bamboo.But on the inside, they ’re built like carnivores. About half of the calories they eat come from protein, according to a new study.That puts the giant panda diet on a par with wolves, feral... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - May 3, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Leila Miller Source Type: news

Jawbone found in a Tibetan cave expands the known territory of ancient Denisovans
Nearly 40 years after it was found by a monk in a Chinese cave, a fossilized chunk of jawbone has been revealed as coming from a mysterious relative of the Neanderthals.Until now, the only known remains of these Denisovans were a few scraps of bone and teeth recovered in a cave in Siberia. DNA... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - May 1, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Malcom Ritter Source Type: news

In tree rings, signs that climate change started boosting drought risk long ago
Each spring, hikers flock to Figueroa Mountain, 30 miles northwest of Santa Barbara, to revel in the colorful displays of California poppies and purple lupine. But it ’s the gnarled oaks of the rolling foothills that draw scientists.Blue oaks canlive for centuries, recording the history of the... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - May 1, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Julia Rosen Source Type: news

FDA approves sales of cigarette alternative that heats, but doesn't burn, tobacco
The Food and Drug Administration said Tuesday it will allow Philip Morris International to sell a cigarette alternative that heats tobacco without burning it.But the agency has not yet decided whether to allow the device, iQOS, to be advertised as less harmful than cigarettes. Without that key... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - April 30, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Associated Press Source Type: news

Few details in Newsom ’s water policy directive
Gov. Gavin Newsom on Monday ordered key state agencies to develop a blueprint for meeting California ’s 21st-century water needs in the face of climate change.Theexecutive order includes few details and doesn ’t appear to set a dramatic new water course for the state.Rather, it reaffirms Newsom ’s... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - April 30, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Bettina Boxall Source Type: news

About 1 in 14 Puerto Rican schoolchildren experienced PTSD after Hurricane Maria
Food shortages, damaged homes, fear of death, loved ones leaving. The cumulative stresses of Hurricane Maria contributed to thousands of schoolchildren developing symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder in Puerto Rico, according to anew study.Researchers found that 7.2% of the students — about... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - April 29, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Carmen Heredia Rodriguez Source Type: news

NASA ’s new carbon observatory is set for launch despite Trump’s efforts to ax it
A NASA instrument designed to track carbon in Earth ’s atmosphere is headed to the International Space Station next week, and the president isn’t happy about it.Trump slashed funding for theOrbiting Carbon Observatory 3 and four other Earth science missions in hisproposed spending plan for the... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - April 26, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Deborah Netburn Source Type: news

Robotic device winds its own way through a beating pig heart
Scientists have created arobotic device that safely guides itself through the delicate chambers of a beating pig's heart.The surgical robot, whose motion was inspired by the way cockroaches skitter along walls, is able to navigate without any help from a doctor or anyone else, according to a... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - April 25, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Seth Borenstein, Laura Neergaard Source Type: news

No screen time for babies and only an hour a day for kids under age 5, WHO advises
The World Health Organization has issued its first-ever guidance for how much screen time children under 5 should get: not very much, and none at all for those under 1.The United Nations health agency said Wednesday that kids under 5 should not spend more than one hour watching screens every day... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - April 24, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Associated Press Source Type: news

The real climate change controversy: Whether to engineer the planet in order to fix it
In 1965, leading scientists of the day produced a report for President Lyndon B. Johnson on the rampant pollutionof the environment. It included a section that summed up their understanding of climate change.“Through his worldwide industrial civilization, Man is unwittingly conducting a vast... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - April 24, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Julia Rosen Source Type: news

NASA ’s InSight has likely detected its first ‘marsquake.’ Have a listen
It sounds like a subway train rushing by. Or a plane flying low overhead. But it ’s something much more exotic: in all likelihood, the first “marsquake” ever recorded by humans.NASA ’s InSight mission detected the quake on April 6, four months after the lander’s highly sensitive seismometer was... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - April 24, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Julia Rosen Source Type: news

NASA ’s InSight lander has likely detected its first ‘marsquake,’ seismologists say
It sounds like a subway train rushing by. Or a plane flying low overhead. But it ’s something much more exotic: in all likelihood, the first “marsquake” ever recorded by humans.NASA ’s InSight mission detected the quake on April 6, four months after the lander’s highly sensitive seismometer was... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - April 24, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Julia Rosen Source Type: news

A wellness program at work may make you feel good, but it won ’t improve your health
More than half of U.S. companies offer workplace wellness programs to their employees, but a new study suggests they do very little — if anything — to improve workers’ health.In an unusual clinical trial involving more than 8,000 employees of a warehouse retail chain, the presence of a wellness... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - April 19, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Leila Miller Source Type: news

A quake every 3 minutes: California shaken by 10 times more temblors than previously known
California has experienced 10 times more earthquakes than previously known, according to groundbreaking new research that has helped scientists better understand the region ’s seismology.Scientists documented 1.8 million earthquakes in Southern California over the last decade — with 90% of them... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - April 18, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Rong-Gong Lin II Source Type: news

Discovering microearthquakes
An animation of an earthquake swarm around the town of Cahuilla, Calif., in 2016 and 2017 shows how seismic activity gradually moved westward and became shallower, probably triggered by the movement of groundwater. (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - April 18, 2019 Category: Science Source Type: news

Media coverage of violent events is found to fuel a cycle of stress
In an era of round-the-clock news cycles and ever-present social media apps, violent events that occur thousands of miles away can feel as though they strike increasingly close to home. So perhaps it should come as no surprise that wall-to-wall media coverage of mayhem can induce post-traumatic... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - April 18, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Melissa Healy Source Type: news

Imperial Irrigation District sues to block Colorado River drought plan
Just as a long-negotiated agreement for how California and six other Western states will deal with drought on the Colorado River was about to cross the finish line, the river ’s biggest user put up a roadblock.The Imperial Irrigation District in southeast California filed a lawsuit Tuesday asking... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - April 18, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Bettina Boxall Source Type: news

Brains from slaughtered pigs are partly revived hours after death
Scientistsrestored some activity within the brains of pigs that had been slaughtered hours before, raising hopes for some medical advances and questions about the definition of death.The disembodied brains could not think or sense anything, researchers stressed. By medical standards “this is... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - April 17, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Malcolm Ritter Source Type: news

Notre Dame may take decades to fix. The first concerns are water and soot
Two holes gape where Notre Dame ’s vaulted stone ceiling has collapsed. The cathedral’s 19th century timber spire is gone, as is most of its roof. Portions of the interior walls were blackened by the intense heat of Paris’ most consequential fire in centuries.As the world absorbs the magnitude... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - April 17, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Emily Baumgaertner , Deborah Vankin Source Type: news

Measles outbreak surges again, with 90 new cases in the U.S. in one week
U.S. measles cases have surged again, and are on pace to set a record for the most illnesses in 25 years.Health officials on Monday said555 measles cases have been confirmed so far this year, up from 465 as of a week ago.“This is the second-greatest number of cases reported in the U.S. since... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - April 15, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Times staff and wire reports Source Type: news

The end of California's drought could mean fewer cases of West Nile virus
Researchers say theend of California ’s drought could offer a surprising benefit: reduced transmission of the mosquito-borneWest Nile virus.Drought is themost important weather-related factor that affects the rate of West Nile infection, scientists say.Mosquito eggs need water to hatch, but... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - April 15, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Harriet Blair Rowan Source Type: news

A look behind the Hollister Ranch gates. Will the public ever access these exclusive beaches?
Behind the gates of Hollister Ranch, residents worry how public access will change their way of life. Take a closer look at one of the most pristine stretches of coastline in California - and the people who have fought for decades to preserve the land their way. (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - April 12, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Rosanna Xia Source Type: news

Historic Israeli Beresheet spacecraft crashes into the moon during landing attempt
An Israeli spacecraft crashed into the moon just moments before touchdown, failing in an ambitious attempt to make history Thursday as the first privately funded lunar landing.The spacecraft lost communication with ground control during its final descent. Moments later, the mission was declared... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - April 12, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Associated Press Source Type: news

NASA Twins Study results show how a year in space affects an astronaut ’s DNA
For almost one year, NASA astronaut Scott Kelly circled the planet on the International Space Station, completing three spacewalks, conducting experiments on plants andplaying ping-pong with a ball of water. His earthbound twin, Mark,lobbied for stronger gun laws, played golf and drank an occasional... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - April 12, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Emily Baumgaertner Source Type: news

Here it is, the first-ever image of a black hole
In the swirling heart of a distant galaxy, 55 million light-years from Earth, lies a supermassive black hole with a mass 6.5 billion times greater than that of our sun.The gravitational pull of this dark beast in theMessier 87 galaxy is so strong that not even light can escape its gaping maw.... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - April 11, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Deborah Netburn Source Type: news

In Philippine cave, scientists find bones and teeth belonging to a new human species
Fossil bones and teeth found in the Philippines have revealed a species of long-lost cousins of modern people who evidently lived tens of thousands of years ago, around the time our own ancestors were spreading out of Africa.It's yet another reminder that, although Homo sapiens is now the only... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - April 10, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Associated Press Source Type: news

A visit to Messier 87's supermassive black hole
This is what you would see if you could visit the supermassive black hole at the center of the Messier 87 galaxy up close. (Credit: National Science Foundation) (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - April 10, 2019 Category: Science Source Type: news

How flying cars could help in the fight against climate change
Have you ever been stuck in traffic and wished you could zoom above the gridlock in a flying car? A new study predicts these futuristic vehicles could be good for your commute and good for the environment — as long as they’re used on long-distance trips with several carpool buddies.Thefinding... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - April 10, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Leila Miller Source Type: news

From ruined bridges to dirty air, EPA scientists price out the cost of climate change
By the end of the century, the manifold consequences of unchecked climate change will cost the U.S. hundreds of billions of dollars per year, according to a newstudy by scientists at the Environmental Protection Agency.Those costs will come in the form of water shortages, crippled infrastructure... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - April 8, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Julia Rosen Source Type: news

Japan spacecraft drops explosive on asteroid to make crater
Japan ’s space agency said an explosive dropped Friday from its Hayabusa2 spacecraft successfully blasted the surface of an asteroid for the first time to form a crater and pave the way for the collection of underground samples for possible clues to the origin of the solar system.Friday ’s mission... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - April 5, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Associated Press Source Type: news