Drug - Resistant Dysentery Emerging Among Gay Men
(Source: Fertility News - Doctors Lounge)
Source: Fertility News - Doctors Lounge - November 11, 2014 Category: Reproduction Medicine Tags: Infections, Reproductive Medicine, News, Source Type: news

World War I Soldier Gives New Clues to Fighting Dysentery
Title: World War I Soldier Gives New Clues to Fighting DysenteryCategory: Health NewsCreated: 11/6/2014 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 11/7/2014 12:00:00 AM (Source: MedicineNet Crohn's Disease General)
Source: MedicineNet Crohn's Disease General - November 7, 2014 Category: Gastroenterology Source Type: news

Drug-resistant superbug found in 1915 soldier killed by dysentery
Private Ernest Cable of the East Surrey Regiment - who died in March of 1915, could hold the key to understanding superbugs, say researchers at the Wellcome Trust. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - November 7, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

World War I Soldier Gives New Clues to Fighting Dysentery
Sample of bacterium that killed British man in 1915 shows how germ changed over time, researchers saySource: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Pages: Bacterial Infections, Diarrhea (Source: MedlinePlus Health News)
Source: MedlinePlus Health News - November 7, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

WHO warns about threat of drug resistance
“WHO calls for urgent action to preserve power of antibiotics and make new ones,” The Guardian reports. The World Health Organization (WHO), has published a report highlighting the growing global threat of drug resistance. Expert opinions on the implications of the WHO report have been informative, such as the quote, on BBC News, from Dr Jennifer Cohn, medical director of Médecins sans Frontières' Access Campaign, who said that this report should be “a wake-up call to governments to introduce incentives for industry to develop new, affordable antibiotics that do not rely [on] patents and hig...
Source: NHS News Feed - May 1, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Medication QA articles Source Type: news

World water day: are filters the future?
780 million people still lack access to clean drinking water. A new breed of filter could change that but must be made more affordable alongside wider sanitation effortsSince 1990 more than 2 billion people have gained access to improved water sources. It's a huge achievement that has saved thousands of lives, but the biggest challenge will be getting water to the remaining 780 million, many of whom live in the most remote and underdeveloped places on earth.Another considerable but necessary task is to provide clean water to those hit by humanitarian disasters. According to the UK government, diseases caused by dirty water...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 22, 2014 Category: Science Tags: Global health innovation Guardian Professional World news Society Water Access to water Features Hygiene Global development professionals network Environment Humanitarian response Sanitation Science Source Type: news

World water day: are filters the future?
780 million people still lack access to clean drinking water. A new breed of filter could change that but must be made more affordable alongside wider sanitation effortsSince 1990 more than 2 billion people have gained access to improved water sources. It's a huge achievement that has saved thousands of lives, but the biggest challenge will be getting water to the remaining 780 million, many of whom live in the most remote and underdeveloped places on earth.Another considerable but necessary task is to provide clean water to those hit by humanitarian disasters. According to the UK government, diseases caused by dirty water...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 22, 2014 Category: Science Tags: Global development professionals network Global health innovation Water Environment Access to water Sanitation Society Hygiene Humanitarian response Science World news Guardian Professional Features Source Type: news

Shigella
Title: ShigellaCategory: Diseases and ConditionsCreated: 1/13/2010 4:06:00 PMLast Editorial Review: 3/19/2014 12:00:00 AM (Source: MedicineNet Hepatitis C General)
Source: MedicineNet Hepatitis C General - March 19, 2014 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Notes from the Field: Shigella with Decreased Susceptibility to Azithromycin Among Men Who Have Sex with Men — United States, 2002–2013
(Source: CDC Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report)
Source: CDC Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report - February 13, 2014 Category: American Health Source Type: news

Shigella dysentery on the rise in gay and bisexual men
An increasing number of sexually-acquired shigella dysentery cases have been reported in men who have sex with men (MSM), leading Public Health England to launch a new campaign Hide related content:  Show related content read more (Source: Nursing in Practice)
Source: Nursing in Practice - February 3, 2014 Category: Nursing Authors: Lalah-Simone Springer Tags: Men ' s health Sexual health Infections Editor s pick Latest News Source Type: news

Newspath November 2013 - Shigellosis: Past, Present, and Future
In 1898, a young microbiologist named Dr. Kiyoshi Shiga1 isolated a gram-positive bacillus from patients suffering from sekiri, or "red diarrhea." That organism, now known as Shigella, is responsible for an estimated 1.1 million deaths a year worldwide. (Source: NewsPath - Pathology News for the Medical Community)
Source: NewsPath - Pathology News for the Medical Community - January 15, 2014 Category: Pathology Source Type: news

Zimbabwe: Diarrhoea Kills 26
[The Herald]Twenty-six people died of diarrhoeal diseases countrywide in one week alone during the festive season, a weekly disease surveillance report has revealed. According to the report, 16 died of common diarrhoea while 10 others died from dysentery in week ending December 26. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - January 13, 2014 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Clemson hosting scientists who study devastating diseases
(Clemson University) Clemson University is hosting the region's leading scientists for discussions about the causative agents of some of the most devastating and intractable diseases of humans, including malaria, amoebic dysentery, sleeping sickness, Chagas disease and fungal meningitis. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 24, 2013 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Aid increased for refugees fleeing violence in DRC
Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) is providing urgently needed medical care and water and sanitation in western Uganda, following an influx of tens of thousands of refugees fleeing insecurity in North Kivu, Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), in mid-July. Uganda 2013 © Andres-Romero/MSFMSF staff providing services to Congolese refugees who have fled into Uganda. Around 22,000 refugees are now living in the Bubukwanga transit camp,18 kilometresfrom the DRC border, in a space designed for only 12,500 people. MSF is providing medical care including maternity healthcare, vaccinations and nutrition treatment...
Source: MSF News - August 27, 2013 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Uganda NEWS Frontpage Democratic Republic of Congo Source Type: news

The Biochemical Role Of Crucial TonB Protein In Bacterial Iron Transport And Pathogenesis
A Kansas State University-led study has discovered the role of a protein in bacteria that causes a wide variety of diseases, including typhoid fever, plague, meningitis and dysentery. The results may lead to new and improved antibiotics for humans and animals. Phillip E. Klebba, professor and head of the department of biochemistry and molecular biophysics, made the findings with two colleagues in the department: Lorne D. Jordan, doctoral candidate, Manhattan, and Salete M. Newton, research professor... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - July 3, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Infectious Diseases / Bacteria / Viruses Source Type: news

Study finds biochemical role of crucial TonB protein in bacterial iron transport and pathogenesis
(Kansas State University) Scientists have discovered the role of the membrane protein TonB in bacteria that cause a wide variety of diseases, including typhoid fever, plague, meningitis and dysentery. The results may lead to new and improved antibiotics for humans and animals. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 1, 2013 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Vitamins: stop taking the pills
This article was corrected on 7 June 2013. During editing, a line in the fifth from last paragraph, beginning 'Another example is St John's wort…' was accidentally transposed, leading to the suggestion that serotonin was a medicine rather than a brain chemical.Alternative medicineHealth & wellbeingHealthCancerCancerMedical researchPharmaceuticals industryDepressionguardian.co.uk © 2013 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. | Use of this content is subject to our Terms & Conditions | More Feeds     (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 7, 2013 Category: Science Tags: The Guardian Depression Pharmaceuticals industry Health Medical research & wellbeing Society Extracts Features Cancer Life and style Alternative medicine Science Source Type: news

Shigella Uses Natural 'Thermometer' To Trigger Diarrheal Disease
How does the bacterium Shigella - the cause of a deadly diarrheal disease - detect that it's in a human host? Ohio University scientists have found that a biological "RNA thermometer" monitors whether the environment is right for the bacterium to produce the factors it needs to survive within the body, according to a study published in the journal PLOS ONE. The scientists have been seeking more information about the genetic pathways of Shigella in the hope of finding new treatment options for the disease it causes... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - May 23, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Infectious Diseases / Bacteria / Viruses Source Type: news

Rates Of Foodborne Illness Cases On The Rise
Rates of food borne illnesses - also known as "food poisoning" are on the rise, according to a new report released today by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The report compared rates of food borne infections from 2012 to rates from the period spanning 2006-2008 and found that the prevalence of infections from bacteria called Campylobacter and Vibrio increased. Additionally, they found that rates of infections from Cryptosporidium,�Listeria,�Salmonella,�Shigella, Shiga toxin-producing�Escherichia coli�(STEC) O157, and�Yersinia�rema...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - April 18, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: GastroIntestinal / Gastroenterology Source Type: news

Water Shortage Hits Pacific Women
The Solomon Islands, a developing island nation in the south-west Pacific Islands, has one of the highest urbanisation rates in the region, and the basic service infrastructure is struggling to cater for the influx of people from the provinces to the capital, Honiara. Thirty-five percent of the city’s population, who live in informal settlements, are facing the health consequences of a dire shortage of clean water and sanitation. Located on the main island of Guadalcanal, Honiara is a coastal city and port of 64,600 people growing at 2.7 percent a year. Thirty informal settlements in the capital are home to more than...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - April 8, 2013 Category: Global & Universal Authors: Catherine Wilson Tags: Active Citizens Aid Asia-Pacific Civil Society Development & Aid Economy & Trade Environment Featured Gender Gender Identity Gender Violence Headlines Health Population Regional Categories TerraViva Europe Water & Sanitatio Source Type: news

NIH-Funded Researchers Begin Trial of Shigella Vaccine Candidates
Source: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases - Related MedlinePlus Page: Bacterial Infections (Source: MedlinePlus Health News)
Source: MedlinePlus Health News - February 21, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

NIH-funded researchers begin trial of Shigella vaccine candidates
(NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases) Researchers have launched an early-stage human clinical trial of two related candidate vaccines to prevent infection with Shigella, bacteria that are a significant cause of diarrheal illness, particularly among children. The Phase I clinical trial, funded by NIAID, part of NIH, will evaluate the vaccines for safety and their ability to induce immune responses among 90 healthy adults ages 18 to 45 years. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 20, 2013 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

From the Archives…
Supporting the Troops: Red Cross and the Spanish American War February 15 marks 115 years since the USS Maine exploded in Cuba’s Havana Harbor. The explosion resulted in more than 200 deaths and served as a catalyst for the Spanish American War of 1898. It was also the first time the American Red Cross responded to a military event.   Wreckage of the USS Maine, 1898, U.S. Bureau of Ships, National Archives The U.S. government signed the 1864 Geneva Convention in 1882, providing the mandate for the Red Cross to support the military. So in 1898 the young Red Cross set out to assist the troops who went off to fight...
Source: Red Cross Chat - February 15, 2013 Category: Global & Universal Authors: Susan Watson Tags: History SAF Uncategorized Red Cross history Spanish American War USS Maine Source Type: news

News: Updated Lab manual from GFN
The GFN Lab Subcommittee are pleased to announce the updated laboratory manual on the Isolation of Salmonella and Shigella from Faecal Specimens. Please see the link below to access the manual online: http://www.antimicrobialresistance.dk/232-169-215-protocols.htm (Source: The Journal of Infection in Developing Countries: Announcements)
Source: The Journal of Infection in Developing Countries: Announcements - November 25, 2010 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

News: Updated Lab manual from GFN
The GFN Lab Subcommittee are pleased to announce the updated laboratory manual on the Isolation of Salmonella and Shigella from Faecal Specimens.Please see the link below to access the manual online: http://www.antimicrobialresistance.dk/232-169-215-protocols.htm (Source: The Journal of Infection in Developing Countries: Announcements)
Source: The Journal of Infection in Developing Countries: Announcements - November 25, 2010 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news