Longitudinal Assessment of Neurocognitive Outcomes in Survivors of Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Treated on a Contemporary Chemotherapy Protocol Pediatric Oncology

Conclusion Two years after chemotherapy-only treatment, neurocognitive function is largely age appropriate. Nonetheless, survivors remain at elevated risk for attention problems that impact real-world functioning. Attention problems at the end of therapy predicted decreased academics 2 years later, suggesting an amplified functional impact of discrete neurocognitive difficulties. Age at diagnosis and patient sex may alter neurocognitive development in survivors of childhood ALL treated with chemotherapy-only protocols.
Source: Journal of Clinical Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Behavioral and Lifestyle Risk Factors, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Long Term Survival & Late Effects, Outcomes Research, Quality of Life Pediatric Oncology Source Type: research

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AbstractPurposeGlioblastoma is an aggressive central nervous system tumor with a 5-year survival rate of  
Source: Journal of Neuro-Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
This study aimed to analyze the role of postoperative treatment for BC in the development of subsequent HM. Using the French National Health Data System, we examined the HM risks in patients diagnosed with an incident primary breast cancer between 2007 and 2015, who underwent surgery as first-line treatment for BC. Main outcomes were acute myeloid leukemia (AML), Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs), multiple myeloma (MM), Hodgkin’s lymphoma or non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (HL/NHL), and acute lymphoblastic leukemia or lymphocytic lymphoma (ALL/LL). Analyses were censored at HM o...
Source: Cancers - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Article Source Type: research
A promising and expensive type of immunotherapy, called CAR T-cell therapy, is now covered by Medicare. This news may affect mesothelioma patients in the future. Chimeric antigen receptor T-cell, or CAR T-cell, therapy involves the laboratory reprogramming of a patient’s T cells, which are a type of white blood cell responsible for protecting the body against infection and disease. The T cells are genetically modified to better recognize and attack cancer. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved the immunotherapy procedure for non-Hodgkin lymphoma and B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia. It is...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Source Type: news
The outcomes of patients with relapsed/refractory (R/R) acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (alloHSCT) are poor. A retrospective analysis of adults with ALL who relapsed after first alloHSCT and received salvage therapies, including a second HSCT, donor lymphocyte infusion with or without prior chemotherapy, radiation therapy, cytoreductive chemotherapy, mild chemotherapy, or palliative care, showed 1- and 2-year overall survival rates of 17% and 10%, respectively [1].
Source: Biology of Blood and Marrow Transplantation - Category: Hematology Authors: Source Type: research
For years, cancer treatment was dominated by chemotherapy, radiation therapy, and stem cell transplantation. New insights into genetic characteristics of leukemic cells have initiated the development of the chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapy. This type of adoptive cell immunotherapy has been a breakthrough in the treatment of aggressive B-cell lymphoma and B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia. In August 2018, the European Commission has approved the first CAR T-cell products – tisagenlecleucel (Kymriah®, Novartis) and axicabtagene ciloleucel (Yescarta®, Gilead) – for hematological n...
Source: Transfusion Medicine and Hemotherapy - Category: Hematology Source Type: research
Background: Young adults (22-39y) with ALL treated at an NCI-designated Comprehensive Cancer Center (CCC) have a superior survival when compared with those treated at a non-CCC site. (Wolfson et al, CEBP, 2017) Despite superior outcomes, specialized cancer centers (such as CCC) have been generally criticized for a higher cost of cancer care (Nardi et al, JNCCN, 2016). However, the magnitude of difference in cost of care for ALL patients by treatment site has not been explored. Here we examine cost of cancer care at CCC and non-CCC sites in YA with ALL.Methods: Using commercial insurance data (OptumLabs® Data Warehouse)...
Source: Blood - Category: Hematology Authors: Tags: 902. Health Services Research-Malignant Diseases: Poster II Source Type: research
Conclusion: This study found that sociodemographic factors were associated with the risk of developing medical conditions in AYA NHL, ALL and AML survivors. As expected, the risk of medical conditions varied by cancer type and treatment, with those undergoing SCT having a higher risk of medical conditions regardless of cancer type. NHL and ALL survivors who were uninsured or publicly insured were at a consistently higher risk of developing medical conditions, as were Hispanic ALL survivors and Black AML survivors. Our findings highlight the higher burden of medical conditions in subgroups of cancer survivors that may relat...
Source: Blood - Category: Hematology Authors: Tags: 904. Outcomes Research-Malignant Conditions: Real World Outcomes Source Type: research
We report a relapsed ALL patient who presented with 2 separate chloromas and cerebrospinal fluid lymphoblastocytosis, and outline a treatment plan of systemic chemotherapy and CNS-directed radiation therapy. A review of the literature indicates that multiagent chemotherapy combined with CNS radiotherapy is effective, with hematopoietic stem cell transplantation used in half of reported cases. We conclude that intensive systemic multiagent chemotherapy with CNS-directed radiation therapy can be successfully used to treat relapsed pediatric ALL with CNS lymphoblastic chloroma.
Source: Journal of Pediatric Hematology Oncology - Category: Hematology Tags: Online Articles: Original Articles Source Type: research
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Source: Leukemia Research - Category: Hematology Authors: Source Type: research
CONCLUSION Cognitive impairment can affect daily functioning, quality of life, and capacity to work in patients with cancer and those in remission. Consequently, cognitive assessment is now an important and necessary part of a comprehensive oncological care plan. Cancer-related cognitive impairment might be due to the direct effects of the cancer itself, nonspecific factors, or comorbid conditions that are independent of the disease and/or due to the adverse effects of the treatment or combination of treatments given for the disease. The prevalence and extent of cognitive impairment associated with cancer is recognized but...
Source: Innovations in Clinical Neuroscience - Category: Neuroscience Authors: Tags: Cognition Current Issue Neuro oncology Neurology Review cancer chemotherapy cognitive impairment neuropsychological assessment treatment Source Type: research
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