World Humanitarian Day Honors Ebola, Syria And Nepal Health Workers

It’s never been a more dangerous time to be an aid worker.  Yet, when it comes to tending to the immediate needs of victims of natural disasters, disease outbreaks and conflict, medical volunteers remain ready to serve on the frontlines, which is why advocates are honoring their work on this year’s World Humanitarian Day.  Over the past decade, attacks on humanitarian workers have steadily increased to the point of breaking a record in 2013. That year, 474 aid workers were affected by such incidents, according to the U.N.  “When aid workers are attacked, they are unable to help people,” Valerie Amos, head of the U.N. Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs, said in a statement. “Those who target aid workers are penalizing the most vulnerable people in the world; those who are struggling to survive.” Despite such risks, doctors, nurses and health counselors continue to shirk cushy jobs in order to use their life-saving skills to rescue people in the most need. Here are a few of their stories.   U.S.-Based Doctor Died After Treating Ebola Victims Dr. Martin Salia gave up "the luxuries of the United States" to serve people affected by Ebola in his homeland, and died fulfilling that mission, Bockari Stevens, the Sierra Leonean ambassador to the U.S., said in his eulogy in November. A permanent U.S. resident, Salia was born and raised in Kenema, Sierra Leone and trained in both Afric...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Related Links:

AbstractPurpose of ReviewAs research efforts have advanced to understand the pathophysiology of viral hemorrhagic fevers (VHF) and other epidemic viral infections and develop medical countermeasures such as vaccines, pregnant women have remained an underexamined subgroup. To better understand the implications of future outbreaks of VHF for pregnant women amidst an evolving vaccine landscape, we examine three pathogens —yellow fever, Ebola, and Lassa fever—each with different levels of evidence and understanding of disease in pregnancy and at varying stages of vaccine development.Recent FindingsThere are very li...
Source: Current Tropical Medicine Reports - Category: Tropical Medicine Source Type: research
AbstractPurpose of ReviewEbola virus infection has one of the highest overall case fatality rates of any viral disease. It has historically had an especially high case mortality rate among pregnant women and infants —greater than 90% for pregnant women in some outbreaks and close to 100 % in fetuses and newborns. The Merck recombinant vaccine against Ebola virus, termed rVSV-ZEBOV, underwent clinical trials during the 2013–2015 West Africa Ebola epidemic where it was found to be 100% efficacious. It was sub sequently used during the 2018 DRC Équateur outbreak and in the 2018 DRC Kivu Ebola which is still...
Source: Current Tropical Medicine Reports - Category: Tropical Medicine Source Type: research
(N Engl J Med. 2018;379:2492–2493) Knowledge of the effects of Ebola virus disease (EVD) in pregnant women remains severely limited, despite recent occurence of some of the largest Ebola outbreaks to date—the West Africa Ebola outbreak of 2014-2016 included 28,000 cases and claimed 11,000 lives, and in 2018, the 10th EVD outbreak since 1976 was reported in the Democratic Republic of Congo. Surveillance systems in place at those times did not record pregnancy status, which in turn complicated case-investigation and contact-tracing efforts. In fact, monitoring outcomes of pregnant women and newborns was complete...
Source: Obstetric Anesthesia Digest - Category: Anesthesiology Tags: Mother, Fetus, Neonate Source Type: research
More than 1,500 deaths and 2,500 people sickened – that’s the recent account of the ebola outbreak in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) raging in the country since last August, and recently declared a public health emergency of international concern. Experts say efforts to contain the virus are hindered by biological, public health, political, and cultural issues, but we looked around what digital health technologies could do to mitigate the spread and the devastation of the infectious disease. The Spaghetti-like virus… The lethal Ebola virus first appeared in 1976 around a river in Congo &nda...
Source: The Medical Futurist - Category: Information Technology Authors: Tags: Future of Medicine Africa AI artificial intelligence Congo digital digital health digital maps disease disease outbreak ebola epidemic Innovation technology Source Type: blogs
DiscussionThe authors ’ experience at Princess Christian Maternity Hospital provides a model of screening, isolation, and care specifically for maternity patients, and directly addresses infection risk and mortality. The recommendations we provide can be used in future outbreaks.
Source: Journal of Midwifery and Women's Health - Category: Midwifery Authors: Tags: Quality Improvement Report Source Type: research
This report summarizes confirmed malaria cases in persons with onset of illness in 2016 and summarizes trends in previous years. DESCRIPTION OF SYSTEM: Malaria cases diagnosed by blood film microscopy, polymerase chain reaction, or rapid diagnostic tests are reported to local and state health departments by health care providers or laboratory staff members. Case investigations are conducted by local and state health departments, and reports are transmitted to CDC through the National Malaria Surveillance System (NMSS), the National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System (NNDSS), or direct CDC consultations. CDC refer...
Source: MMWR Surveill Summ - Category: Epidemiology Authors: Tags: MMWR Surveill Summ Source Type: research
Pregnant women &vaccines against emerging epidemic threats: Ethics guidance for preparedness, research, and response. Vaccine. 2019 May 03;: Authors: Krubiner CB, Faden RR, Karron RA, Little MO, Lyerly AD, Abramson JS, Beigi RH, Cravioto AR, Durbin AP, Gellin BG, Gupta SB, Kaslow DC, Kochhar S, Luna F, Saenz C, Sheffield JS, Tindana PO, PREVENT Working Group Abstract Zika virus, influenza, and Ebola have called attention to the ways in which infectious disease outbreaks can severely - and at times uniquely - affect the health interests of pregnant women and their offspring. These examples also hig...
Source: Vaccine - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Vaccine Source Type: research
This study examined parental recognition of bullying victimization and associated factors among evacuated children after the 2011 Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident, using a 3-year follow-up data (wave 1: January 2012; wave 2: January 2013; wave 3: February 2014). The sample included the caregivers of 2,616 children in the first–sixth grades of elementary school, who lived in one of the 13 municipalities that were the target areas of the Mental Health and Lifestyle Survey, conducted as part of the Fukushima Mental Health Management Survey. Across 3 years, around 80% of caregivers responded “not true...
Source: Frontiers in Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
In this study, we evaluated ATA as a potential antiviral drug against ZIKV replication. The antiviral activity of ATA against ZIKV replication in vitro showed median inhibitory concentrations (IC50) of 13.87 ± 1.09 μM and 33.33 ± 1.13 μM in Vero and A549 cells, respectively; without showing any cytotoxic effect in both cell lines (median cytotoxic concentration (CC50)> 1,000 μM). Moreover, ATA protected both cell types from ZIKV-induced cytopathic effect (CPE) and apoptosis in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. In addition, pre-treatment of Vero cells with ATA for up to 72 h also resulted...
Source: Frontiers in Microbiology - Category: Microbiology Source Type: research
ConclusionsOur data suggest that EVD-related stigma was much lower more than a year after active Ebola transmission ended in Liberia. Among survivors who screened negative for stigma, additional probing may be considered based on age, education, and referral to care.
Source: PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases - Category: Tropical Medicine Authors: Source Type: research
More News: African Health | Cesarean Section | Children | Ebola | Gastroschisis Repair | Graduation | Health | Hospitals | International Medicine & Public Health | Jobs | Middle East Health | Nepal Health | Nurses | Nursing | Outbreaks | Pregnancy | Syria Health | Warnings | Websites | WHO