Don ’ t Overlook Vitamin D
Vitamin D is a fat-soluble vitamin with many roles in the body related to bone health, immune support, and inflammation reduction. Some studies show it may have a role in the prevention and treatment of diabetes and with sexual function. Vitamin D is now routinely tested with blood workups, and about 50% of the population has been shown to have vitamin D insufficiency with levels less than 30ng/dl. There are many possible signs and symptoms that can be associated with low vitamin D levels, including getting sick often, feeling tired, having lower back pain or bone pain, having muscle pain, experiencing hair loss, or feelin...
Source: Cord Blood News - March 31, 2020 Category: Perinatology & Neonatology Authors: Maze Cord Blood Tags: Health Source Type: blogs

Vitamin D and coronavirus
I’ve been cautious, very cautious, about writing a post on supplements that might help reduce the risk of being infected with Covid-19, for what I think are obvious reasons!, but this morning I came across an interesting new study by the University of Turin showing that hospitalized coronavirus patients here in Italy have very low levels of vitamin D. Low levels of vitamin D might also explain why the virus has been killing mostly elderly people here in Italy… At any rate, this news just got released, so I couldn’t find any articles in English, unfortunately, but you can use Google Translate, if needed. ...
Source: Margaret's Corner - March 27, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Margaret Tags: Blogroll vitamin D and coronavirus Source Type: blogs

Vitamin D and Immunity
The post Vitamin D and Immunity appeared first on Dr. William Davis. (Source: Wheat Belly Blog)
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - March 27, 2020 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Wheat Belly Lifestyle coronavirus covid-19 immune immunity improve immune response vitamin D Source Type: blogs

Harvard Health Ad Watch: What ’s being cleansed in a detox cleanse?
Lately, I’ve been hearing a lot from patients and friends who are enthusiastically pursuing a “whole body cleanse” or “colon cleanse,” or a “detoxification cleanse.” And I’ve seen ads about these cleanses promising a number of health benefits, based on the general principle that every so often it’s a good idea to rid yourself of toxins that are undoubtedly accumulating within you. Spring cleaning for your body? The idea goes back centuries. And sure, cleansing — or cleaning — is clear enough for bathing or mopping a floor. But how does a cleanse work in the ...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - March 25, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Robert H. Shmerling, MD Tags: Digestive Disorders Health Men's Health Women's Health Source Type: blogs

Harvard Health Ad Watch: Are nutritional drinks actually good for you?
I first heard of nutritional drinks in the 1980s, early in my medical training. They were recommended for people struggling to maintain a healthy weight, often due to loss of appetite, cancer, or swallowing problems. Since then, nutritional supplement drinks like Boost and Ensure have gone mainstream. Their widespread, primetime advertising aimed at a much broader audience has proven highly effective. The market for nutritional drinks is now worth many billions of dollars. In 2019, Ensure sales alone totaled nearly $400 million. When you watch ads for nutritional drinks, do you wonder if you should start drinking them? Wil...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - March 20, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Robert H. Shmerling, MD Tags: Health Healthy Eating Nutrition Vitamins and supplements Source Type: blogs

Some unconventional thoughts on coronavirus (COVID-19)
Public health authorities are advising frequent hand washing and social distancing, especially in the absence of confirmatory testing for COVID-19. I don’t have any wisdom to add to these practices. Vaccines are in the works, as are anti-viral drugs—nothing to add here, either. But let me reiterate what we do in the Wheat Belly and Undoctored lifestyles. In general, we do not treat diseases; we correct the factors that allow disease to emerge in the first place—a big difference. Take rheumatoid arthritis, for example. In conventional healthcare, the joint pain and swelling of rheumatoid arthritis are...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - March 18, 2020 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Open probiotic undoctored wheat belly Source Type: blogs

Talking to Children about COVID-19:  Reducing Hysteria During a Global Emergency
“Wash your hands!” My kids hear me say this all the time, but this week these three words have taken on a new meaning. Now washing your hands represents an important protective behavior against the coronavirus pandemic. After getting home from school yesterday, I reminded my children, as per usual, to wash their hands, but this time I stressed,  “for at least 20 seconds because we need to be extra vigilant against getting the coronavirus.” My generally cool-as-a-cucumber son immediately replied, “I don’t want to hear about that anymore!” While we are all adjusting to social di...
Source: World of Psychology - March 16, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Rochelle Davidson Mhonde Tags: Health-related Minding the Media Parenting coronavirus COVID-19 mass hysteria pandemic Source Type: blogs

Coronavirus (COVID19), catastrophising – and caution
I don’t often leap aboard a popular topic and blog about it, but I’m making an exception right now because, although COVID19 is new – catastrophising is not. There are a number of people who really do not like the term “catastrophising”. There are comments that this is a pejorative term, used to deny the validity of a person’s experience. That it means the person is exaggerating or being melodramatic or in some way not believable. But as I read the many, many headlines about COVID19, including the international toilet paper frenzy, reading about Vitamin C or “anti-inflammator...
Source: HealthSkills Weblog - March 15, 2020 Category: Anesthesiology Authors: BronnieLennoxThompson Tags: Chronic pain Clinical reasoning Resilience/Health Science in practice catastrophising COVID19 Source Type: blogs

Insulin Resistance: the silent killer that you can completely reverse – even if your doctor doesn ’ t know how
You may have already heard the term “insulin resistance,” as it has been widely discussed by doctors and the media. But did you know that you can reduce or reverse it in the vast majority of people? Insulin resistance, i.e., the inability of the body’s cells, especially liver, muscle, and brain, to respond to insulin and allow blood sugar to enter cells, drives numerous abnormal health conditions including type 2 diabetes, hypertension, coronary heart disease, fatty liver, Alzheimer’s dementia, and cancer. It is therefore a driving force behind so many modern and common chronic health conditions. Yo...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - March 12, 2020 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Open can belly fat can insulin resistance be reversed lose weight reduce belly fat reverse inflammation visceral fat wheat belly Source Type: blogs

Pandemic Fears: What the AIDS Battle Should Teach Us About COVID-19
By ANISH KOKA, MD As the globe faces a novel, highly transmissible, lethal virus, I am most struck by a medicine cabinet that is embarrassingly empty for doctors in this battle.  This means much of the debate centers on mitigation of spread of the virus.  Tempers flare over discussions on travel bans, social distancing, and self quarantines, yet the inescapable fact remains that the medical community can do little more than support the varying fractions of patients who progress from mild to severe and life threatening disease.  This isn’t meant to minimize the massive efforts brought to bear to keep...
Source: The Health Care Blog - March 12, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Christina Liu Tags: CORVID-19 Health Policy Patients Physicians AIDS Anish Koka AZT coronavirus COVID-19 FDA novel coronavirus Pandemic Source Type: blogs

To screen, or not to screen (for dementia), that is still the question
A leading group of medical experts on Tuesday declined to endorse cognitive screening for older adults, fueling a debate that has simmered for years. The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force said it could neither recommend nor oppose cognitive screening, citing insufficient scientific evidence of the practice’s benefits and harms and calling for further studies. The task force’s work informs policies set by Medicare and private insurers. Its recommendations, an accompanying scientific statement and two editorials were published Tuesday in the Journal of the American Medical Association. The task force’s ne...
Source: SharpBrains - March 11, 2020 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Judith Graham at Kaiser Health News Tags: Cognitive Neuroscience Health & Wellness Alzheimer’s Disease Annual Wellness Visit cognition cognitive decline cognitive-abilities Cognitive-impairment cognitive-screening dementia geriatric psychiatrists geriatricians JAMA Jou Source Type: blogs

10 Ways Technology Is Changing Healthcare
The future of healthcare is shaping up in front of our very eyes with advances in digital technologies, such as artificial intelligence, VR/AR, 3D-printing, robotics or nanotechnology. We have to familiarize with the latest developments in order to be able to control technology and not the other way around. The future of healthcare lies in working hand-in-hand with technology and healthcare workers have to embrace emerging technologies in order to stay relevant in the coming years. Be bold, curious and informed! Are you afraid that robots will take over the jobs of nurses, doctors and other healthcare professionals? Are y...
Source: The Medical Futurist - March 3, 2020 Category: Information Technology Authors: berci.mesko Tags: Future of Medicine 3d printing AI artificial intelligence augmented reality genetics Health Healthcare nanotechnology Personalized medicine pharma pharmacology robotics virtual reality wearables GC1 Source Type: blogs

What ’s new with the Nutrition Facts label?
The Nutrition Labeling and Education Act of 1990 (NLEA) mandated nutrition labeling on most packaged foods. These include canned and frozen foods, breads, cereals, desserts, snacks, beverages, and a variety of other foods that line the aisles of grocery stores. Food labels — officially called Nutrition Facts labels — are intended to help consumers choose healthy foods. It is the FDA’s responsibility to make sure that foods are properly labeled. Over the years there have been many changes to the initial law, and to the label. The newest version of the food label rolled out on January 1, 2020 for larger foo...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - February 27, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Katherine D. McManus, MS, RD, LDN Tags: Health Healthy Eating Nutrition Source Type: blogs

As coronavirus spreads, many questions and some answers
The rapid spread of the coronavirus now called COVID-19 has sparked alarm worldwide. The World Health Organization (WHO) has declared a global health emergency, and many countries are grappling with a rise in confirmed cases. In the US, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is advising people to be prepared for disruptions to daily life that will be necessary if the coronavirus spreads within communities. Below, we’re responding to a number of questions about COVID-19 raised by Harvard Health Blog readers. We hope to add further questions and update answers as reliable information becomes available. Do...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - February 27, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Todd Ellerin, MD Tags: Children's Health Cold and Flu Infectious diseases Men's Health Women's Health Source Type: blogs

“ 5 things I wish I knew before I spent a lot of money on a weight loss program! ”
You can spend–throw away?–a ton of money buying meal replacement shakes, subscription meal plans, nutritional supplements, prescription drugs, even weight loss surgery. But understand these 5 basic principles and you can enjoy weight loss rapidly, effortlessly, and inexpensively. It does NOT involve cutting calories, reducing fat, extreme exercise, certainly not drugs or procedures. It applies simple logic and recent science to craft a hugely effective way to lose weight. 1) Cutting calories is useless–Yes, you can lose weight upfront, but the reduction in metabolic rate that develops over time will cause...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - February 26, 2020 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Open gluten-free grain-free opiates Weight Loss wheat belly Source Type: blogs

Hands or feet asleep? What to do
We’ve all been there. You awaken in the morning and one of your hands is completely numb. It feels dead, heavy, and simply won’t work. Perhaps there’s some tingling as well. Or, you arise from a long dinner or movie and one of your legs feels that way. Then over a few minutes — maybe you shook your hands, stamped your foot — everything goes back to normal. Until the next time. The first time this happened, it might have been worrisome. Now that you know it’s temporary and happens to everyone, it may not bother you. But did you ever wonder why in the world this happens? Read on! When the ...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - February 21, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Robert H. Shmerling, MD Tags: Health Healthy Aging Neurological conditions Source Type: blogs

Using a Plant Virus to Create a Contrast Medium
Researchers at the University of Texas Dallas (UTD) are playing with alchemy by transforming a virus into an organic radical contrast agent (ORCA), an alternative to gadolinium-based contrast agents to be used in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) procedures. ORCA molecules had been previously considered too dim for scanning and were easily eradicated by vitamin C in the body. UTD researchers found that by connecting the molecules to a  tobacco mosaic virus, a virus that attacks plant cells and disrupts cell activity, they were able to eliminate those issues and make the ORCA an effective agent. Once the ORCA ...
Source: radRounds - February 21, 2020 Category: Radiology Authors: Julie Morse Source Type: blogs

How Does Dehydration Trigger Heart Problems?
Being in a dry environment, such as on a plane, can cause dehydration and heart issues. According to Mellanie True Hills, CEO of StopAfib.org, a patient advocacy organization that hosts the number one arrhythmia site and one of the top five heart disease sites worldwide, “The significantly dry air on a plane wicks moisture out of the body, causing dehydration quickly. Dehydration thickens the blood and depletes the body of essential minerals such as potassium and magnesium. Magnesium regulates the heart rhythm and potassium helps it work. Inadequate levels of potassium or magnesium can trigger abnormal heart rhythms,...
Source: Embrace Your Heart Wellness Initiative - February 20, 2020 Category: Cardiology Authors: Eliz Greene Tags: Diet and Nutrition Tips Heart Health Source Type: blogs

A Mental Sign of Vitamin D Deficiency
Vitamin D may be linked to critical neurotransmitters and inflammatory markers. → Support PsyBlog for just $5 per month. Enables access to articles marked (M) and removes ads. → Explore PsyBlog's ebooks, all written by Dr Jeremy Dean: Accept Yourself: How to feel a profound sense of warmth and self-compassion The Anxiety Plan: 42 Strategies For Worry, Phobias, OCD and Panic Spark: 17 Steps That Will Boost Your Motivation For Anything Activate: How To Find Joy Again By Changing What You Do (Source: PsyBlog | Psychology Blog)
Source: PsyBlog | Psychology Blog - February 15, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Jeremy Dean Tags: Depression Nutrition Source Type: blogs

The Vitamin Deficiency Linked To ADHD (M)
ADHD is one of the most common mental health problems in children. → Support PsyBlog for just $5 per month. Enables access to articles marked (M) and removes ads. → Explore PsyBlog's ebooks, all written by Dr Jeremy Dean: Accept Yourself: How to feel a profound sense of warmth and self-compassion The Anxiety Plan: 42 Strategies For Worry, Phobias, OCD and Panic Spark: 17 Steps That Will Boost Your Motivation For Anything Activate: How To Find Joy Again By Changing What You Do (Source: PsyBlog | Psychology Blog)
Source: PsyBlog | Psychology Blog - February 11, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Jeremy Dean Tags: ADHD subscribers-only Source Type: blogs

One Microbiome, Two Tests: Let ’s compare Atlas and Thryve
Your gut bacteria is like a subtenant. A pretty cool subtenant. As I’m sure you already know, bacteria that live in your gut play an important part in digestion and as a form of paying the rent, they give you vitamins and protection against their harmful peers. Experts are saying that the microbiome acts like an organ itself, and it’s central to the body’s operations. It affects aging, digestion, the immune system, cognitive functions – and, as a study from UCLA found, even mood. So, what is the microbiome? “All the organisms that call us home, that live in us and that interact with eac...
Source: The Medical Futurist - February 11, 2020 Category: Information Technology Authors: szandra Tags: E-Patients Future of Food Genomics microbiome Personalized medicine research review microbiome test Source Type: blogs

The Vitamin Linked To 100% More Weight Loss
There is evidence that higher levels of this vitamin leads to weight loss. → Support PsyBlog for just $5 per month. Enables access to articles marked (M) and removes ads. → Explore PsyBlog's ebooks, all written by Dr Jeremy Dean: Accept Yourself: How to feel a profound sense of warmth and self-compassion The Anxiety Plan: 42 Strategies For Worry, Phobias, OCD and Panic Spark: 17 Steps That Will Boost Your Motivation For Anything Activate: How To Find Joy Again By Changing What You Do (Source: PsyBlog | Psychology Blog)
Source: PsyBlog | Psychology Blog - February 8, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Jeremy Dean Tags: Weight Loss Source Type: blogs

With a little planning, vegan diets can be a healthful choice
Recently there has been much discussion and many questions about vegan diets. Are vegan diets — which exclude meat, poultry, seafood, eggs, and dairy — healthful? Do they provide complete nutrition? Should I try one? Will it help me lose weight? Many people around the world eat plant-based diets for a variety of reasons, some because meat is not readily available or affordable, others because of religious convictions or concerns about animal welfare. Health has become another reason people are moving to plant-based diets. And research supports the idea that plant-based diets, including vegan diets, provide heal...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - February 6, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Katherine D. McManus, MS, RD, LDN Tags: Healthy Eating Source Type: blogs

A Mental Sign Of Vitamin B12 Deficiency
Vitamin B12 deficiency is even linked to brain shrinkage. → Support PsyBlog for just $5 per month. Enables access to articles marked (M) and removes ads. → Explore PsyBlog's ebooks, all written by Dr Jeremy Dean: Accept Yourself: How to feel a profound sense of warmth and self-compassion The Anxiety Plan: 42 Strategies For Worry, Phobias, OCD and Panic Spark: 17 Steps That Will Boost Your Motivation For Anything Activate: How To Find Joy Again By Changing What You Do (Source: PsyBlog | Psychology Blog)
Source: PsyBlog | Psychology Blog - February 3, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Jeremy Dean Tags: Nutrition Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, February 3rd 2020
In conclusion, this study suggests that epigenetic age acceleration is significantly associated with lung function in women older than 50 years. We hypothesised that this could be due to menopause. However, we have observed that menopause has minimal effect and therefore there is possibility of other unknown physiological factors at older age in females mediating the epigenetic age acceleration effect on lung function. While, it is still unknown what exactly epigenetic aging from DNA methylation measures, this study suggests it can be utilised as one of the important factors to assess women's lung health in old age. DNA me...
Source: Fight Aging! - February 2, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Be careful where you get your news about coronavirus
News about a deadly virus that appeared in Wuhan, China in December (now called 2019 novel coronavirus, or 2019-nCoV) is everywhere lately. And as the number of cases rises, it’s understandable if you’re wondering how likely it is that you or a loved one will become ill. And quite likely, you’re also wondering how to prevent this. So, where should you turn for the latest information on a rapidly changing situation? It’s hard to beat the convenience of the internet, and we know there’s a lot of useful and reliable information online. But there’s also a lot of misinformation. The trick is ...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - February 1, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Robert H. Shmerling, MD Tags: Cold and Flu Emergency Planning Health Infectious diseases Travel health Source Type: blogs

A Conservative View on Lifestyle versus Pharmacological Interventions for Aging
This open access commentary reflects a reasonable conservative position on the development of means to treat aging, which is that nothing can yet greater and more reliable results in humans than undertaking a better lifestyle. In this view, some combination of aerobic exercise, strength training, and calorie restriction robustly does more for most people than any of the other options on the table. Ten years ago I would have agreed. Now, however, I think it clear that, at the very least, senolytic therapies to selectively destroy senescent cells and some forms of mesenchymal stem cell transplantation, those capable of produ...
Source: Fight Aging! - January 28, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

What can you do to reduce the risk of birth defects?
You’ve done it! You’ve taken that last birth control pill, removed your IUD, or stopped using your contraceptive method of choice. You’ve made the decision to try to conceive a pregnancy, and while this is an exciting time in your life, it can also feel overwhelming. There is so much advice around fertility and pregnancy, and sifting through it all just isn’t possible. For many mothers, their goals crystallize around ensuring that their baby is healthy. Evidence-based steps that may prevent birth defects January is Birth Defects Prevention Month, so we want to focus on things you can do to reduce th...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - January 22, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Huma Farid, MD Tags: Family Planning and Pregnancy Fertility Vaccines Women's Health Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, January 20th 2020
This study provides strong evidence that following a healthy lifestyle can substantially extend the years a person lives disease-free." Commentary on Recent Evidence for Cognitive Decline to Precede Amyloid Aggregation in Alzheimer's Disease https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2020/01/commentary-on-recent-evidence-for-cognitive-decline-to-precede-amyloid-aggregation-in-alzheimers-disease/ I can't say that I think the data presented in the research noted here merits quite the degree of the attention that it has been given in the popular science press. It is interesting, but not compelling if its role...
Source: Fight Aging! - January 19, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

A Tiring Sign Of Vitamin D Deficiency
A walk of as little 20 minutes in the daylight is enough to provide sufficient levels of vitamin D. → Support PsyBlog for just $5 per month. Enables access to articles marked (M) and removes ads. → Explore PsyBlog's ebooks, all written by Dr Jeremy Dean: Accept Yourself: How to feel a profound sense of warmth and self-compassion The Anxiety Plan: 42 Strategies For Worry, Phobias, OCD and Panic Spark: 17 Steps That Will Boost Your Motivation For Anything Activate: How To Find Joy Again By Changing What You Do (Source: PsyBlog | Psychology Blog)
Source: PsyBlog | Psychology Blog - January 16, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Jeremy Dean Tags: Nutrition Source Type: blogs

Three Evidence-Based Ways to Feel Better During Winter  
With Christmas behind us and the winter months stretching out ahead, for many people this part of the year can feel particularly miserable — and most especially if they suffer with Seasonal Affective Disorder. While it’s crucial to head to the doctor if you are finding it difficult to cope, there are evidence-backed self-help methods to boost our mood during winter, which can help us to tackle the January blues and no longer feel as if life is on hold until Spring.  Stay Social It can be tempting to hide away in winter, and a variety of factors can make it difficult for people to socialize even if they wan...
Source: World of Psychology - January 15, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Heather Mason Tags: Mental Health and Wellness New Year's Self-Help Seasonal Affective Disorder Winter Blues Source Type: blogs

6 Ways to Stay Positive During the Dark and Cold Winter
“In the depths of winter I finally learned there was in me an invincible summer.” Albert Camus “If we had no winter, the spring would not be so pleasant: if we did not sometimes taste of adversity, prosperity would not be so welcome.” Anne Bradstreet  Up here in Sweden the winter is dark, cold and often comes with a mix of rain and snow. And spring is still far away. It is not easy to keep the energy and optimism up like in the bright and warm summer days. So today I'd like to share 6 habits I use that make it a lot easier to stay positive even throughout this dark and often grey season. 1. Fi...
Source: Practical Happiness and Awesomeness Advice That Works | The Positivity Blog - January 15, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Henrik Edberg Tags: Habits Happiness Personal Development Success Source Type: blogs

“I Want Complete Labs Ordered Before My Physical”
By HANS DUVEFELT, MD Many patients make this or similar requests, especially in January it seems. This phenomenon has its roots in two things. The first is the common misconception that random blood test abnormalities are more likely early warning signs of disease than statistical or biochemical aberrances and false alarms. The other is the perverse policy of many insurance companies to cover physicals and screening tests with zero copay but to apply deductibles and copays for people who need tests or services because they are sick. It is crazy to financially penalize a person with chest pain for going to the ...
Source: The Health Care Blog - January 14, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Christina Liu Tags: Medical Education Medical Practice Physicians Primary Care blood tests Hans Duvefelt Labs Source Type: blogs

Transplantation of Engineered Macrophages Rescues Mice from Sepsis
In this study, researchers collected monocytes from the bone marrow of healthy mice and cultured them in conditions that transformed them into macrophages. The lab also developed vitamin-based nanoparticles that were especially good at delivering messenger RNA, molecules that translate genetic information into functional proteins. The scientists, who specialize in messenger RNA for therapeutic purposes, constructed a messenger RNA encoding an antimicrobial peptide and a signal protein. The signal protein enabled the specific accumulation of the antimicrobial peptide in internal macrophage structures called lysosomes...
Source: Fight Aging! - January 13, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

The Common Vitamin That Can Double Weight Loss
50 percent of people are deficient in this vitamin. → Support PsyBlog for just $5 per month. Enables access to articles marked (M) and removes ads. → Explore PsyBlog's ebooks, all written by Dr Jeremy Dean: Accept Yourself: How to feel a profound sense of warmth and self-compassion The Anxiety Plan: 42 Strategies For Worry, Phobias, OCD and Panic Spark: 17 Steps That Will Boost Your Motivation For Anything Activate: How To Find Joy Again By Changing What You Do (Source: PsyBlog | Psychology Blog)
Source: PsyBlog | Psychology Blog - January 9, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Jeremy Dean Tags: Weight Loss Source Type: blogs

What are ultra-processed foods and are they bad for our health?
You hear it all the time: the advice to “eat less processed food.” But what is processed food? For that matter, what is minimally processed food or ultra-processed food? And how do processed foods affect our health? What are processed and ultra-processed foods? Unprocessed or minimally processed foods are whole foods in which the vitamins and nutrients are still intact. The food is in its natural (or nearly natural) state. These foods may be minimally altered by removal of inedible parts, drying, crushing, roasting, boiling, freezing, or pasteurization, to make them suitable to store and safe to consume. Unproc...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - January 9, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Katherine D. McManus, MS, RD, LDN Tags: Healthy Eating Source Type: blogs

Harvard Health Ad Watch: When marketing puts your health at risk
The goal of advertising is, of course, to catch your attention and sell you a product. But when it comes to health-related products, inaccuracies in advertising can be detrimental to your health. Perhaps you’ve seen a Vitamin Water ad recently that touts the health benefits of Vitamin Water while seeming to discourage getting a flu shot as out of fashion. It originally appeared in 2011 but has mysteriously resurfaced online. The text of the ad states, “Flu shots are so last year,” and subheadings add “more vitamin C, more immunity, less snotty tissues.” The average customer seeing this ad coul...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - January 8, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Robert H. Shmerling, MD Tags: Cold and Flu Complementary and alternative medicine Health Vaccines Vitamins and supplements Source Type: blogs

What parents need to know about a vegan diet
A vegan diet is made up of only plant-based products — no meat, fish, dairy, or eggs (some people also exclude honey). While these diets are still relatively rare, they are becoming more common. Some families or teens choose them for health reasons, and it’s certainly true that plant-based diets are low in saturated fat and can have other health benefits. Some choose them for philosophical reasons — either sustainability, or not wanting to harm animals, or both. Whatever the reason, it’s important to get educated before you begin. You should talk to your doctor, and if possible it’s a good ide...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - January 7, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Claire McCarthy, MD Tags: Adolescent health Children's Health Nutrition Parenting Source Type: blogs

This Vitamin Can Quadruple Weight Loss, Study Finds
As many as 40 percent of the population have a vitamin D deficiency. → Support PsyBlog for just $5 per month. Enables access to articles marked (M) and removes ads. → Explore PsyBlog's ebooks, all written by Dr Jeremy Dean: Accept Yourself: How to feel a profound sense of warmth and self-compassion The Anxiety Plan: 42 Strategies For Worry, Phobias, OCD and Panic Spark: 17 Steps That Will Boost Your Motivation For Anything Activate: How To Find Joy Again By Changing What You Do (Source: PsyBlog | Psychology Blog)
Source: PsyBlog | Psychology Blog - January 5, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Jeremy Dean Tags: Weight Loss Source Type: blogs

The Vitamin-Like Nutrient That Reduces Dementia Risk (M)
People with the highest intakes had a 28 percent lower risk of dementia, the study found. → Support PsyBlog for just $5 per month. Enables access to articles marked (M) and removes ads. → Explore PsyBlog's ebooks, all written by Dr Jeremy Dean: Accept Yourself: How to feel a profound sense of warmth and self-compassion The Anxiety Plan: 42 Strategies For Worry, Phobias, OCD and Panic Spark: 17 Steps That Will Boost Your Motivation For Anything Activate: How To Find Joy Again By Changing What You Do (Source: PsyBlog | Psychology Blog)
Source: PsyBlog | Psychology Blog - January 4, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Jeremy Dean Tags: Dementia subscribers-only Source Type: blogs

Why medical research keeps changing its mind
Did you ever wonder why medical research seems to flip-flop so often? Eggs used to be terrible for your health; now they’re not so bad. Stomach ulcers were thought to be due to stress and a “type A personality” but that’s been disproven. I was taught that every postmenopausal woman should take hormone replacement therapy to prevent heart disease and bone loss; now it’s considered way too risky. It can make you question every bit of medical news you hear. But maybe that’s not such a bad thing. Questioning what you read or hear is reasonable. And maybe medical reversals — when new re...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - January 3, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Robert H. Shmerling, MD Tags: Health Medical Research Prevention Tests and procedures Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, December 30th 2019
This study presents the effects of berberine (BBR) on the aging process resulting in a promising extension of lifespan in model organisms. BBR extended the replicative lifespan, improved the morphology, and boosted rejuvenation markers of replicative senescence in human fetal lung diploid fibroblasts. BBR also rescued senescent cells with late population doubling (PD). Furthermore, the senescence-associated β-galactosidase (SA-β-gal)-positive cell rates of late PD cells grown in the BBR-containing medium were ~72% lower than those of control cells, and its morphology resembled that of young cells. Mechanistically...
Source: Fight Aging! - December 29, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

To Reduce Vaping Illness, Legalize Marijuana
Jeffrey MironStates that permit recreational marijuana sales tend to have lower rates of vaping-related hospitalizations, according todata published by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The CDC haslinked vitamin E acetate, an adulterant typically reserved to the black market, to 48 of the 51 hospitalized patients it has examined. Governments have often responded to these contaminations byenacting bans on e-cigarettes and other vaping products, but the CDC data suggest they should take the opposite approach.Frommy column with Jacob Rich at reason.com.    (Source: Cato-at-liberty)
Source: Cato-at-liberty - December 28, 2019 Category: American Health Authors: Jeffrey Miron Source Type: blogs

Should you use probiotics for your vagina?
You know probiotics can be good for your gut, but does your vagina need one too? You might think so, based on probiotic marketing these days. Probiotics are in everything from drinks to pills and powders, and in many cases, are being promoted as a means of improving your vaginal health. Women seem to be listening, says Dr. Caroline Mitchell, assistant professor of obstetrics, gynecology, and reproductive biology at Harvard Medical School. Vaginal probiotic supplements are hugely popular. This includes both probiotic pills and suppository capsules that are inserted into the vagina using an applicator. But evidence of effect...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - December 27, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Kelly Bilodeau Tags: Health Sexual Conditions Vitamins and supplements Women's Health Source Type: blogs

I Wonder Why This Press Release From The ADHA Was Sent Out On A Friday Less Than A Week Before Christmas?
Here is the release:Media release : Another milestone reached - Webstercare becomes the first organisation to start using the Pharmacist Shared Medicines List20 December 2019: The Australian Digital Health Agency, together with Webstercare – the creator of the Webster-pak® – has today launched a new clinical document within My Health Record to reduce medication-related problems in Australia, and specifically those experienced by Australia’s older population. The Pharmacist Shared Medicines List (PSML) is a consolidated list of medicines prepared by a pharmacist and uploaded to a patient’s My He...
Source: Australian Health Information Technology - December 27, 2019 Category: Information Technology Authors: Dr David G More MB PhD Source Type: blogs

Eating to Heal the Mind
Generations of moms and grandmothers have gone to their gardens and cupboards to heal ailments of all kinds. Herbs, medicinal recipes (including chicken soup), and vegetables are gaining the attention of doctors and scientists, who rely on controlled studies rather than anecdotal evidence to prove what works in the body reliably and safely. Today, just as throughout history, in every culture, there are foods that can be used as medicine, but can what you eat affect your mental health as well? Is it possible to treat things like anxiety and depression with food?  Research is showing the Mediterranean Diet and the DASH ...
Source: World of Psychology - December 26, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Jan McDaniel Tags: Alternative and Nutritional Supplements Mental Health and Wellness Depression food Mood Disorder Mood Swings Source Type: blogs

Bioprinting Liver Organoids with Patient-Derived Cells
This study combined bioengineering techniques, such as cell reprogramming and the cultivation of pluripotent stem cells, with 3D bioprinting. Thanks to this strategy, the tissue produced by the bioprinter maintained hepatic functions for longer than reported by other groups in previous studies. "More stages have yet to be achieved until we obtain a complete organ, but we're on the right track to highly promising results. In the very near future, instead of waiting for an organ transplant, it may be possible to take cells from the patient and reprogram them to make a new liver in the laboratory. Another importan...
Source: Fight Aging! - December 25, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

American Academy of Family Physicians Bemoans Fact that Many People Correctly Link Respiratory Disease Outbreak to THC Vapes
The American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP) hasreleased the results of a survey it commissioned to examine public attitudes regarding what CDC has incorrectly called the EVALI (e-cigarette, or vaping-associated lung illness) outbreak. The AAFP reports the results as follows:" In the online survey of 1,000 people aged 16 to 30 who vape, 93% of respondents said they were aware of the EVALI outbreak, and 65% said they were closely following news regarding the issue. More than 70% of respondents indicated they planned to be more careful about the products they buy and to reduce their use of vape products, and 86% wer...
Source: The Rest of the Story: Tobacco News Analysis and Commentary - December 24, 2019 Category: Addiction Source Type: blogs

Newest CDC Data Confirm that Respiratory Disease Outbreak was Caused by Vitamin E Acetate Oil in THC Vaping Cartridges
The CDC has released new data which almost definitively confirm that the respiratory disease outbreak was caused by vitamin E acetate oil in THC vaping products (and perhaps some CBD vaping products as well).I came to the same conclusion on August 25th, as did many experts from the cannabis industry who helped to inform my conclusion. Why it took the CDC four additional months of intensive investigation to discover something that cannabis industry experts had recognized much earlier is mystifying.Previously, CDC had tested lung fluids from 29 of the case patients. All 29 contained vitamin E acetate. This past Thursday, CDC...
Source: The Rest of the Story: Tobacco News Analysis and Commentary - December 22, 2019 Category: Addiction Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, December 23rd 2019
In this study, by adenovirus-mediated delivery and inducible transgenic mouse models, we demonstrate the proliferation of both HCs and SCs by combined Notch1 and Myc activation in in vitro and in vivo inner ear adult mouse models. These proliferating mature SCs and HCs maintain their respective identities. Moreover, when presented with HC induction signals, reprogrammed adult SCs transdifferentiate into HC-like cells both in vitro and in vivo. Finally, our data suggest that regenerated HC-like cells likely possess functional transduction channels and are able to form connections with adult auditory neurons. Epige...
Source: Fight Aging! - December 22, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs