How 'healthy' fruit snacks for children can contain the equivalent of up to FIVE teaspoons of sugar
Action on Sugar looked at 56 products sold across leading grocery retailers in the UK. It found Urban Fruits Gently Baked Strawberries contained 20g of sugar in a small 35g packet. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - September 16, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

7 easy summer recipes that celebrate farm-fresh fruits and vegetables
Ahhh, summer! As the season approaches, I look forward to getting my fill of local succulent strawberries and blueberries, tender asparagus, tasty tomatoes, juicy peaches and watermelon and sweet summer corn. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - July 23, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Why you shouldn't worry about eating the bugs that live on your strawberries
Bugs crawling on your strawberries? That's normal, according to some experts, despite a recent TikTok trend that suggests otherwise. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - May 21, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The Foods That May Lower Dementia Risk
Blueberries, strawberries and red wine were among the foods tied to a lower risk of dementia. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - May 19, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Nicholas Bakalar Tags: Fruit Alzheimer ' s Disease Dementia Diet and Nutrition Vegetables Source Type: news

Whole strawberries studied for their anti-inflammatory benefits
(University of Massachusetts Amherst) University of Massachusetts Amherst food scientist Hang Xiao has received a new federal grant to expand his research into the health benefits of certain fruits and vegetables; in this case, strawberries. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 30, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Face masks to strawberries: Abu Dhabi hospital keeps tabs on resources
(This April 23 story clarifies that masks are disinfected, not sterilized, in paragraph 2) (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - April 26, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Farmworkers face coronavirus risk: 'You can't pick strawberries over Zoom'
California's 420,000 farmworkers are working through the crisis. But language barriers and a lack of communication on the coronavirus put many at risk. (Source: L.A. Times - Health)
Source: L.A. Times - Health - April 1, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Andrea Castillo Source Type: news

Study: Consuming more strawberries can help prevent Alzheimer's in the elderly
(Natural News) Do you love snacking on sweet and juicy strawberries? Well, keep at it: A recent study suggests that they can lower your risk of developing Alzheimer’s dementia (AD). In a study published in Current Developments in Nutrition and funded by the California Strawberry Commission, researchers from Rush University found that elderly people who consumed high amounts of strawberries were less likely... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - January 28, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Dance of the honey bee reveals fondness for strawberries
(University of G ö ttingen) Bees are pollinators of many plants, but their diversity and density is declining. A team led by G ö ttingen investigated their foraging behaviour in agricultural landscapes. They found that honey bees prefer strawberry fields, even if flowering next to oilseed rape fields. Only when oilseed rape was in full bloom were fewer honey bees in the strawberries. Wild bees, on the other hand, consistently chose the strawberry field. Results appeared in the journal Agriculture, Ecosystems& Environment. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 24, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Study: Consuming more strawberries can help prevent Alzheimer's in the elderly
(Natural News) Do you love snacking on sweet and juicy strawberries? Well, keep at it: A recent study suggests that they can lower your risk of developing Alzheimer’s dementia (AD). In a study published in Current Developments in Nutrition and funded by the California Strawberry Commission, researchers from Rush University found that elderly people who... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - January 21, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Pot edibles will soon be legal in Canada, but this woman will still make her own. Here's why
Patsy Copus makes batches of pot-infused gummy bears or cannabis-coated chocolate strawberries every few weeks to help her arthritis and other medical conditions. Although cannabis edibles are expected to be sold legally in December, Copus said buying store items will likely be a financial struggle. (Source: CBC | Health)
Source: CBC | Health - October 29, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: News/Canada/Windsor Source Type: news

Pot edibles will soon be legal to buy in Canada, but this woman will still make her own. Here's why
Patsy Copus makes batches of pot-infused gummy bears or cannabis-coated chocolate strawberries to help her arthritis and other medical conditions. Although cannabis edibles are expected to be sold legally in December, the Ontario resident says buying store items will likely be a financial struggle. (Source: CBC | Health)
Source: CBC | Health - October 29, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: News/Canada/Windsor Source Type: news

Want To Live Longer? Study Suggests You Should Ditch Soda
This study, as well as other research on the connection between diet and sugary beverages and health risks, is observational and cannot show cause and effect. That’s a major limitation, researchers say, as it’s impossible to determine whether the association is due to a specific artificial sweetener, a type of beverage, obesity or another hidden health issue. “The cause behind these associations isn’t clear,” said Bergquist. “Other potential biological causes could be attributed to experimental evidence linking consumption of artificial sweeteners to sugar cravings, appetite stimulation ...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - September 3, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News CNN Soda Source Type: news

Antioxidant-rich belimbing dayak, a Malaysian fruit, can help lower bad cholesterol
(Natural News) Antioxidants are all the rage these days, and for most people, it means lining up to buy blueberries and strawberries – even in areas where they can be expensive. Fortunately, penny-pinchers who would still like to have more antioxidant-rich foods don’t need to look any further than their local produce. A recent study... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - May 22, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Ceylon ironwood is widely known for its durable wood – but what about its antioxidant-rich fruit?
(Natural News) Fruits have long been known to contain antioxidants, which is why they are indispensable parts of a healthy diet. In case you need a refresher, antioxidants are naturally occurring chemicals that get rid of free radicals, which are harmful to our cells. Some of the fruits known to be packed with antioxidants are grapes, strawberries, blueberries,... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - May 22, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

What is road rash and how can you treat it at home?
Also known as raspberries or strawberries, road rash wounds are a type of skin abrasion. Most road rash wounds are minor injuries that you can easily treat at home if you know the right steps to take. Here's your quick guide to road rash: Biking accidents are common causes of road rash. What is road rash? Caused by an unfortunate run-in with a rough surface, road rash occurs when a layer of skin is scraped away from the body. Road rash injuries commonly result from falls when biking, skateboarding or running outside. Severe injuries that rip away multiple layers of tissue may require skin grafting surgery to rep...
Source: Advanced Tissue - May 20, 2019 Category: Dermatology Authors: AdvancedTissue Tags: Wound Care Wound healing Source Type: news

What do green coffee, blueberries, tomatoes, and strawberries have in common? They all contain the anticancer phenol chlorogenic acid
(Natural News) Coffee is one of the most commonly consumed drinks in the world and it has been shown to have health benefits. Researchers from India evaluated the anticancer properties of chlorogenic acid complex, an active compound in green coffee beans. Their findings appeared in the Food Science and Human Wellness journal. Chlorogenic acid (CGA) is the... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - April 24, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Doctors stunned by woman's rare disease that made her gums look like strawberries
WARNING: GRAPHIC CONTENT An unnamed 42-year-old woman from Iran visited a dermatologist complaining of overgrown gums. She was diagnosed with a rare condition called 'strawberry gingivitis'. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - April 17, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Enjoy These Sweet Strawberry Treats Without Guilt
WEDNESDAY, March 27, 2019 -- Berries are nature's natural sweetener and they come loaded with benefits. Fiber, vitamins and antioxidants sweeten the deal. Fresh strawberries are a plentiful spring and summer fruit, so load up on them at the... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - March 27, 2019 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Strawberries, spinach and kale top "dirty dozen" list: How to minimize pesticide intake
Nearly 70 percent of conventionally grown produce sold in the U.S. was found to have pesticide residue, according to a new report from the Environmental Working Group. Samantha Heller, registered dietitian at NYU Langone Health, joins "CBS This Morning" to discuss how strawberries, spinach, and kale top their so-called "dirty dozen" list of produce with the most pesticide contamination. (Source: Health News: CBSNews.com)
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - March 21, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Kale Is a Surprise on 2019's'Dirty Dozen' List Kale Is a Surprise on 2019's'Dirty Dozen' List
Kale took third place on this year's'Dirty Dozen'list of   fruits and vegetables   with the most pesticide residue. Strawberries and spinach took first and second, as they did on last year's list.WebMD Health News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - March 20, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Family Medicine/Primary Care News Source Type: news

Kale Joins ‘ Dirty Dozen ’ List Of Fruits And Vegetables Most Likely To Contain Pesticides
(CBS Local) — Kale, that popular green of the health conscious consumer, has joined the list of 12 fruits and vegetables with the most pesticide residues, according to the Environmental Working Group. For the third straight year, strawberries top the EWG’s “Dirty Dozen” list. Spinach and kale finished in second and third place, respectively. Other “dirty” foods include nectarines, apples and grapes. Analysis found 92 percent of conventionally grown kale samples had residue from at least two or more pesticides. Some samples contained as many as 18 different pesticides. The most common pes...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - March 20, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News Local TV talkers Source Type: news

Kale Is One of the Most Contaminated Vegetables You Can Buy. Here ’s Why
Each year, the Environmental Working Group (EWG) publishes its Dirty Dozen list, which ranks the 12 pieces of produce that contain the highest amounts of pesticide residues. This year, one of the dirtiest fruits and vegetables turns out to be kale, occupying the third spot on the EWG’s list of most contaminated. Strawberries top the list, followed by spinach. (The full 2019 Dirty Dozen list, ranked from most contaminated to least, include strawberries, spinach, kale, nectarines, apples, grapes, peaches, cherries, pears, tomatoes, celery and potatoes.) The list is compiled from the results of regular testing done by t...
Source: TIME: Health - March 20, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized Diet/Nutrition Source Type: news

Nearly 70% of fruits and veg have pesticide residue on them even AFTER being washed
Strawberries, spinach and kale claimed the top three spots of produce with the most pesticide residue on the annual Dirty Dozen report from the Environmental Working Group. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - March 20, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Kale joins the ranks of the annual 'Dirty Dozen' pesticide list
Kale, that popular green of the health conscious, has joined the ignoble list of 12 fruits and vegetables with the most pesticide residues, according to the Environmental Working Group. The last time kale was on the list was in 2009 when it was ranked eighth. Strawberries and spinach took the top two spots again this year, respectively, followed by kale. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - March 20, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Uncovering the origins of cultivated strawberries
(Michigan State University) In a new study published in Nature Genetics, researchers now unveil how the strawberry became an octoploid, as well as the genetics that determine important fruit quality traits. What researchers uncovered is a complex evolutionary history that started long ago on opposite sides of the world. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 25, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Eating blueberries and strawberries is a proactive solution for preventing cognitive impairment
(Natural News) In highly vaccinated populations, cognitive impairment begins at an early age. The antigens in vaccines are not benign; they are combined with aluminum cations to stimulate the response of immune cells in the human recipient. As immune-responsive cells uptake the antigen, they simultaneously carry aluminum cations throughout the body and into the brain.... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - February 12, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Where do the best strawberries grow?
(University of G ö ttingen) Agricultural production benefits enormously from flower-visiting bees and other insects. Hedgerows and the edges of forests represent important habitats for pollinators. A team from the University of G ö ttingen investigated whether hedgerows and their proximity to forests might affect the pollination of strawberries. In fact, both the weight and the quality of strawberries increased when plants were at hedgerows or hedgerows next to forests. The results were published in the journal Agriculture, Ecosystems& Environment. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 4, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Organic strawberries found to stop the growth of cancer cells
(Natural News) Berries have been widely studied for their potential health benefits, particularly their anti-cancer properties. Various studies have provided evidence that among berries, strawberries, organic ones, in particular, can fight against cancer. In a study conducted by researchers from Sweden, it was revealed that extract from organic strawberries are especially effective at inhibiting cancer... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - February 1, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The Surprising Way to Resist the Lure of Junk Food
Just about everyone has ordered a side of fries after catching an intoxicating whiff. But new research, which was published in the Journal of Marketing Research, says that basking in the scent of junk food for at least two minutes can actually help you make healthier food choices. In a series of experiments, the researchers found a surprising relationship between ambient scents and food choices. Time after time, they found that people who sniffed indulgent foods, like pizza or cookies, were actually less likely to choose or purchase unhealthy foods than those who smelled nutritious options, such as apples and strawberries...
Source: TIME: Health - January 22, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized Diet/Nutrition healthytime Source Type: news

Gene editing could create spicy tomatoes, say researchers
Scientists also looking at altering colour of kiwis and taste of strawberriesSpicy tomatoes could soon be on the menu thanks to the rise of genome-editing technology, say researchers.It is not the first time experts have claimed the techniques could help to precisely and rapidly develop fruits and vegetables with unusual traits: scientists have already been looking at changing the colour of kiwi fruits andtweaking the taste of strawberries.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 7, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Food science & drink industry Genetics Farming Source Type: news

Organically grown strawberries improve gut health, make you less likely to have diarrhea
(Natural News) An individual with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), a set of painful conditions that are linked to extreme diarrhea and fatigue, may sometimes require medications and surgery. However, study findings have revealed that consuming less than one cup of strawberries daily can help patients with IBD. The dietary intervention could help alleviate inflammation in the colon... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - December 7, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Strawberries top the Dirty Dozen list AGAIN as the most pesticide-ridden crop you can eat
(Natural News) It’s difficult to imagine that any fruit or vegetable could actually be bad for you, but the unfortunate fact is that conventionally grown produce is virtually drowned in pesticides which cannot be removed even with careful washing and peeling – a process which changes these nutrient-packed natural gifts into nothing more than poison... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - October 30, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Arthritis: Tart cherries, strawberries and raspberries can help soothe joint pain
ARTHRITIS can be painful and distressing to live with, especially during periods of flare-ups. But symptoms and joint pain can be improved by eating food with anti-inflammatory properties, such as tart cherries, strawberries and raspberries. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - October 24, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Produce ALERT: New EXPERIMENTAL Monsanto Franken-Fruits hit the produce racks soon – watch out for genetically mutated mushrooms, tomatoes, bananas and strawberries
(Natural News) Gene editing of food happens when scientists remove part of a plant or seed’s DNA sequence and replace it with bacteria or pathogens that would normally never grow that way in nature. There is absolutely no science proving this is safe for humans, so anyone who consumes genetically modified foods is playing Russian roulette with... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - October 18, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Try this instead of oysters: Garlic chives are a natural way to increase libido and treat erectile dysfunction
(Natural News) Food doesn’t just affect your physical health, it can influence your sexual health as well. Oysters, walnuts, and strawberries are just a few foods believed to improve the libido. There are several more out there that aren’t as well-known but are no less effective, and garlic chives are one of them. Practitioners of... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - October 9, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Young boy arrested for allegedly putting needles in strawberries
Police say the boy admitted to inserting the needles, possibly as a prank. (Source: Health News: CBSNews.com)
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - September 20, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Robot strawberry pickers better than humans?
(Natural News) Are robots going to replace humans in strawberry picking too? Scientists are developing robot strawberry pickers as a solution to the shortage of workers due to Brexit. Because of the lack of workers, nearly 20 percent of soft fruits like strawberries are being wasted as they are not being harvested, according to researchers... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - September 20, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Australian officials searching for culprit putting needles in strawberries
In a bizarre and disturbing turn of events, someone in Australia is putting needles in strawberries and the culprit is still on the loose. (Source: Health News: CBSNews.com)
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - September 19, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

E-Cigarette Warnings Coming To High School Bathrooms Nationwide
By Sandee LaMotte, CNN (CNN) — The US Food and Drug Administration will stage a massive education campaign aimed at the nearly 10.7 million teens at risk for e-cigarette use and potential addiction, the agency said Tuesday. For the first time, the agency will take the message that vaping is dangerous into high school bathrooms and social media feeds of those at-risk youth to stop what the FDA calls an epidemic of e-cigarette use by minors. The trend was flagged in a 2016 report from the US surgeon general, which cited a 900% increase in e-cigarette use by high school students between 2011 to 2015. More than 2 million...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - September 19, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News e-cigarettes FDA vaping Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Can people be allergic to strawberries?
Strawberry allergies are less common than other allergies, but they do occur. Most allergic reactions to strawberries are mild, but they can occasionally be life-threatening for some people. In this article, we look at the symptoms of this allergy as well as the risk factors and diagnosis. We also cover foods to avoid. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - September 14, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Food Allergy Source Type: news

Jumping genes drive sex chromosome changes in strawberries
(University of Pittsburgh) The discovery shows that plant sex regions can 'jump' and indicates that the phenomenon may be adaptive by gathering and locking new genes into linkage with sex. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 10, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Where would we 'bee' without pollinators?
Without pollinators there would be no strawberries, apples and chocolate. At this weekend's Bee Festival at the University of Bristol Botanic Garden people will be able to find out how they can help bees and other vital pollinators or learn about growing fruit and vegetables. The Festival will also celebrate the 90th anniversary of the Avon Beekeepers Association Annual Honey Show. (Source: University of Bristol news)
Source: University of Bristol news - August 29, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: Public engagement; Faculty of Life Sciences, Faculty of Life Sciences, School of Biological Sciences; Press Release Source Type: news

The many health benefits of eating organic strawberries
(Natural News) Strawberries are more than just their delectable taste. This fruit, particularly its organic versions, offer many health benefits. Here are some of them: Strawberries are an excellent source of antioxidants: Strawberries are rich in antioxidants because of their flavonoid content. Because of their antioxidant capacity, they ward off free radical damage to low-density... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - August 24, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Strawberry tea can be used to treat diarrhea and dysentery
(Natural News) Did you know that strawberries have medicinal properties, too? Strawberries are among the most recognizable fruits of all, not only for their distinct, heart-shaped, seed-studded appearance but also for their sweet, fruity taste. Their leaves, however, have long been used to treat various illnesses, including gastrointestinal problems. Although not too apparent these days,... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - August 22, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Strawberry cure for painful illnesses
STRAWBERRIES could help reduce harmful inflammation in the colon. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - August 21, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Strawberries could reduce colon inflammation, study finds
Eating a few strawberries a day could reduce effects of inflammation of the colon, including severe diarrhea and fatigue, according to study on mice. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - August 20, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Strawberries could treat bowel disease, reduce diarrhoea and weight loss
Scientists at the University of Massachusetts claim eating whole strawberries could help calm inflammation in the colon among people with inflammatory bowel disease. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 20, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Strawberries may reduce gut inflammation
According to a recent study, less than one cup of strawberries per day could reduce the distressing symptoms of inflammatory bowel disease. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - August 20, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: GastroIntestinal / Gastroenterology Source Type: news

Weird new fruits could hit aisles soon thanks to gene-editing
Supermarkets stocked with peach-flavoured strawberries and seedless tomatoes on horizon, scientists saySmooth or hairy, pungent or tasteless, deep-hued or bright: new versions of old fruits could be hitting the produce aisles as plant experts embrace cutting-edge technology, scientists say.While researchers have previously produced plants with specific traits through traditional breeding techniques, experts say new technologies such as thegene-editing tool Crispr-Cas9 could be used to bring about changes far more rapidly and efficiently.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 19, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Food science Genetics Agriculture Farming Environment Biology GM Source Type: news