Could that rash be from wheat?
Grains can play havoc with your skin. The prolamin proteins, such as gliadin,  trigger autoimmune skin reactions and turn antibodies against the skin enzymes, their lectins fan the fires of inflammation, their proteins provoke allergies, and their amylopectins send blood sugar and insulin sky-high and provoke the skin-disrupting hormone insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF). The whole grain package adds up to an impressive collection of skin conditions that can take a variety of forms, from simple red, itchy rashes to scaly, oily raised patches to large vesicles to gangrene. B...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - February 20, 2019 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: News & Updates Source Type: blogs

Are Grains to Blame for That Rash Too?
Grains can play havoc with your skin. The prolamin proteins, such as gliadin,  trigger autoimmune skin reactions and turn antibodies against the skin enzymes, their lectins fan the fires of inflammation, their proteins provoke allergies, and their amylopectins send blood sugar and insulin sky-high and provoke the skin-disrupting hormone insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF). The whole grain package adds up to an impressive collection of skin conditions that can take a variety of forms, from simple red, itchy rashes to scaly, oily raised patches to large vesicles to gangrene. B...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - February 20, 2019 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: News & Updates Source Type: blogs

Dry Eye: An Interview With Corneal Specialist Dr. Peter Polack
I met ophthalmologist and corneal specialist Dr. Peter Polack while speaking in Ocala, Florida. He told me that, by having his patients with dry eye—which has increased dramatically over the last 20 years—remove all wheat and grains, he is seeing this condition reverse within weeks, along with all the other health benefits. Unlike other ophthalmologists, who virtually have nothing to do with diet and therefore prescribe the costly drugs Restasis and Xiidra (each cost $500-$550 per month), Dr. Polack rarely has to resort to use of these awful agents. Here Dr. Polack speaks about his phenomenal experience. More a...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - July 20, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: News & Updates autoimmune dry eye gluten-free grain-free grains Inflammation restasis undoctored wheat belly xiidra Source Type: blogs

Dry Eye: An Interview With Corneal Specialist Dr. Peter Polak
I met ophthalmologist and corneal specialist Dr. Peter Polak while speaking in Ocala, Florida. He told me that, by having his patients with dry eye—which has increased dramatically over the last 20 years—remove all wheat and grains, he is seeing this condition reverse within weeks, along with all the other health benefits. Unlike other ophthalmologists, who virtually have nothing to do with diet and therefore prescribe the costly drugs Restasis and Xiidra (each cost $500-$550 per month), Dr. Polak rarely has to resort to use of these awful agents. Here Dr. Polak speaks about his phenomenal experience. More a...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - July 20, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: News & Updates autoimmune dry eye gluten-free grain-free grains Inflammation restasis undoctored wheat belly xiidra Source Type: blogs

Tropical Travel Trouble 009 Humongous HIV Extravaganza
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog aka Tropical Travel Trouble 009 The diagnosis of HIV is no longer fatal and the term AIDS is becoming less frequent. In many countries, people with HIV are living longer than those with diabetes. This post will hopefully teach the basics of a complex disease and demystify some of the potential diseases you need to consider in those who are severely immunosuppressed. While trying to be comprehensive this post can not be exhaustive (as you can imagine any patient with ...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - July 7, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Amanda McConnell Tags: Clinical Cases Tropical Medicine AIDS art cryptococcoma cryptococcus HIV HIV1 HIV2 PEP PrEP TB toxoplasma tuberculoma Source Type: blogs

The Price of Progress
By ANISH KOKA, MD No one knows who Bennie Solis is anymore. He had the misfortune of being born in the early 1960s marked for death. He had a rare peculiar condition called biliary atresia – a disease defined by the absence of a conduit for bile to travel from his liver to his intestinal tract. Bile acid produced in the liver normally travels to the intestines much like water from a spring travels via ever larger channels to eventually empty into the ocean. Bile produced in the liver with no where to go dams up in the liver and starts to destroy it. That the liver is a hardy organ was a fact known to the ancient Gree...
Source: The Health Care Blog - January 4, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: anish_koka Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

How to treat dry eyes
How common are dye eyes?The prevalence of dry eyes has been estimated to be 5-30% percent in persons aged 50 years and older, 7% of US adult population has been diagnosed with dry eye disease. The prevalence increases with age (2.7% in those 18 to 34 years old vs. 19% in those aged 75 years and older). Prevalence is higher in women than men (9% versus 4%).What are the risk factors for dry eye disease?- Advanced age- Female gender- Hormonal changes (primarily due to decreased androgens)- Systemic diseases (eg, diabetes mellitus, Parkinson disease)- Contact lens wear- Systemic medications (antihistamines, anticholinergi...
Source: Clinical Cases and Images - Blog - January 2, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: noreply at blogger.com (Ves Dimov) Tags: Ophthalmology Source Type: blogs

The fix for dry eyes
There are two unopened boxes of contact lenses in the cabinet under my sink. I’m not using those tiny disposables anymore; wearing them makes my eyes so dry they feel like they’re being sucked out of their sockets. Actually, it’s not the contacts — those have many benefits, and I’ve worn some version of them since my teens. But as a middle-ager now, the contacts aggravate a condition I have that’s apparently pretty common: dry eye syndrome. “I’d say at least a quarter of my patients have some degree of complaint about dryness,” says Dr. Matthew Gardiner, an ophthalmolog...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - February 10, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Heidi Godman Tags: Eye Health Worplace health Source Type: blogs

Randomized Trialomania
BY ANISH KOKA, MD This story is old, but the age of the story should not detract from the lessons of the story. It was 1982, the place was Tsukuba, Ibaraki Prefecture, Japan. Workers at Fujisawa pharmaceuticals began testing fermented broths of Streptomyces species that had been retrieved from soil samples at the base of Mount Tsukuba.  They were working to solve the remaining achilles heel of organ transplantation – effective suppression of the immune system that would prevent the body from attacking its new guest.  It had quickly became apparent to the medical community that the key to long...
Source: The Health Care Blog - November 18, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: John Irvine Tags: Uncategorized Anish Koka RCT Source Type: blogs

Are We at the Saturation Point Viz-a-Viz Celebrity Pharma Endorsements?
I read with interest today's email missive from Bob Ehrlich, Chairman of DTC Perspectives. He was talking about the"Dry Eye DTC Battle" between Allergan's Restasis and the new kid on the bloc: Shire's Xiidra (two i's - get it? aka two"eyes").Ehrlich pointed out that Shire enlisting Jennifer Aniston is a"big get. Getting a movie star to promote the dry eye condition must have cost Shire a lot in talent fees," said Ehrlich."Obviously they think she is worth it. Her ad just went on air under the'myeyelove' title" (read"Jennifer Aniston is Shilling for Shire!...
Source: Pharma Marketing Blog - September 2, 2016 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Allergan Celebrity Endorsement Dry Eyes Shire Source Type: blogs

Stephen’s return from the medical quagmire
Stephen shared his 60-day Wheat Belly experience: “Started Wheat Belly 60 days ago after a major health crisis. I found out I had type 2 diabetes 2 and very bad cholesterol. My numbers 60 days ago were: cholesterol 189, triglycerides 475, LDL could not be measured as it was so bad, HDL was 32. Two weeks ago: 20 pound weight loss, wearing a 15.5-inch neck size shirt compared to an 18. Triglycerides 79, LDL 25, HDL 40, cholesterol 81. “I was first told on January 24, 2016 that my glucose level was 157. Forty five days later, my average glucose was 107 when measured by my diabetes counselor by downloading the data...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - April 7, 2016 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Wheat Belly Success Stories cholesterol diabetes gluten grains HDL statins triglycerides Weight Loss Source Type: blogs

DM / DNB Cardiology Entrance Mock Test 17
Please wait while the activity loads. If this activity does not load, try refreshing your browser. Also, this page requires javascript. Please visit using a browser with javascript enabled. If loading fails, click here to try again Click on the 'Start' button to begin the mock test. After answering all questions, click on the 'Get Results' button to display your score and the explanations. There is no time limit for this mock test. Start Congratulations - you have completed DM / DNB Cardiology Entrance Mock Test 17. You scored %%SCORE%% out of %%TOTAL%%. Your performance has been rat...
Source: Cardiophile MD - February 16, 2016 Category: Cardiology Authors: Prof. Dr. Johnson Francis, MD, DM, FACC, FRCP Edin, FRCP London Tags: Cardiology MCQ DM / DNB Cardiology Entrance Source Type: blogs

Do you know about behcet’s syndrome?
I was reading some medical records the other day and came upon a condition known as Behcet’s syndrome. It is actually a rare disease, but more frequent and severe in patients from the Eastern Mediterranean and Asia. Inherited (genetic) and environmental factors, such as microbe infections, are suspected to be factors that contribute to the development of Behcet’s. The syndrome is not proven to be contagious. The symptoms of Behcet’s syndrome depend on the area of the body affected. Behcet’s syndrome can involve inflammation of many areas of the body. These areas include the arteries that supply bloo...
Source: Nursing Comments - January 24, 2016 Category: Nursing Authors: Stephanie Jewett, RN Tags: Advice/Education Caregiving General Public Nursing/Nursing Students Patients/Specific Diseases Behcet's disease Behcet's syndrome cortisone genital ulcers inflammation mouth ucerations skin test Source Type: blogs

Do you know about behcet ’s syndrome?
I was reading some medical records the other day and came upon a condition known as Behcet’s syndrome. It is actually a rare disease, but more frequent and severe in patients from the Eastern Mediterranean and Asia. Inherited (genetic) and environmental factors, such as microbe infections, are suspected to be factors that contribute to the development of Behcet’s. The syndrome is not proven to be contagious. The symptoms of Behcet’s syndrome depend on the area of the body affected. Behcet’s syndrome can involve inflammation of many areas of the body. These areas include the arteries that supply bloo...
Source: Nursing Comments - January 24, 2016 Category: Nursing Authors: Stephanie Jewett, RN Tags: Advice/Education Caregiving General Public Nursing/Nursing Students Patients/Specific Diseases Behcet's disease Behcet's syndrome cortisone genital ulcers inflammation mouth ucerations skin test Source Type: blogs

Drug Repurposing
A reader has sent along the question: "Have any repurposed drugs actually been approved for their new indication?" And initially, I thought, confidently but rather blankly, "Well, certainly, there's. . . and. . .hmm", but then the biggest example hit me: thalidomide. It was, infamously, a sedative and remedy for morning sickness in its original tragic incarnation, but came back into use first for leprosy and then for multiple myeloma. The discovery of its efficacy in leprosy, specifically erythema nodosum laprosum, was a complete and total accident, it should be noted - the story is told in the book Dar...
Source: In the Pipeline - August 28, 2014 Category: Chemists Tags: Clinical Trials Source Type: blogs

Am I supposed to be suffering?
I read stories all over the internet and in print about people who are suffering from, a victim of, or a survivor of some ailment I have. I do not consider myself to be suffering, a victim of, or a survivor of any damn thing. I am just living.I do have a new ailment.... Oh joy. But its not that exciting to me. Its called... drum roll.... are  you ready.... well.... its.... dry eyes. See, its not exciting just like I said it wasn't and I probably blogged about it before. But its just another little pain in the ass thing in my life. A sign that my body continue to fall apart at an amazing rate. Dry eyes don't sound that...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - March 18, 2014 Category: Cancer Tags: ailments annoyance dry eyes medication costs suffering Source Type: blogs

What Makes a "Memorable" DTC Ad? The Restasis Case Study
(Source: Pharma Marketing Blog)
Source: Pharma Marketing Blog - January 10, 2014 Category: Pharma Commentators Tags: Allergan DTC Advertising Restasis Source Type: blogs

How Manipulated Clinical Evidence Could Distort Guidelines - the Case of Statins for Primary Prevention
This study excluded many patient for whom the statins were not contraindicated or warned against: uncontrolled hypertension; type 1 or type 2 diabetes mellitus on insulin or with a HgBA1C at least 10%; and body weight more than 50% "desirable limit for height."  (Based on the official contraindications and warnings for commonly used statins, e.g., see contraindications for Lipitor here, active liver disease, pregnancy for likely to become pregnant, nursing mothers, hypersensitivity to the medicine; and warnings: use of cyclosprine or strong CYP3A4 inhibitors, uncontrolled hypothyroidism, renal impairment.)&n...
Source: Health Care Renewal - December 3, 2013 Category: Health Medicine and Bioethics Commentators Tags: American College of Cardiology American Heart Association clinical trials conflicts of interest evidence-based medicine guidelines manipulating clinical research review articles Source Type: blogs

Pre-Clinical Study of Inhaled Propylene Glycol Found No Adverse Respiratory Effects
This study provides pre-clinical evidence that the use of propylene glycol as an excipient for the delivery of drugs by inhalation appears to be acutely safe.The study adds to existing evidence of the acute safety of inhaled propylene glycol. However, further study of the potential long-term effects of propylene glycol inhalation is necessary.Nevertheless, these results help support the contention that the use of electronic cigarettes to quit smoking is a reasonable clinical approach to smoking cessation. (Source: The Rest of the Story: Tobacco News Analysis and Commentary)
Source: The Rest of the Story: Tobacco News Analysis and Commentary - October 29, 2013 Category: Health Medicine and Bioethics Commentators Source Type: blogs

Tolvaptan
True about tolvaptan: a) ADH antagonist b) Rifampicin can decrease its efficacy c) Cyclosporine can increase its effect d) All of the above Correct answer: d) All of the above Effects of rifampicin and cyclosporine are because of the influence on tolvaptan metabolism by the CYP 3A pathway. (Source: Cardiophile MD)
Source: Cardiophile MD - October 26, 2013 Category: Cardiology Authors: Prof. Dr. Johnson Francis MD, DM, FACC, FRCP Edin, FRCP London Tags: Cardiology MCQ DM / DNB Cardiology Entrance ADH tolvaptan Source Type: blogs

MKSAP: 56-year-old woman with Sjögren syndrome
A 56-year-old woman is evaluated during a follow-up visit for a 6-year history of Sjögren syndrome treated with low-dose hydroxychloroquine and cyclosporine eyedrops. She has had two episodes of cutaneous vasculitis, which resolved with corticosteroids. On physical examination, temperature is 36.4 °C (97.6 °F), blood pressure is 116/64 mm Hg, pulse rate is 72/min, and respiration rate is 18/min. Oral mucous membranes are dry. There is a new firm, left parotid gland enlargement without tenderness or warmth, reported by the patient to be progressive over several months, with asymmetry of the parotid glands. Labo...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - October 5, 2013 Category: Family Physicians Tags: Conditions Cancer Rheumatology Source Type: blogs

FDLI 2013: Insights in Enforcement, Litigation & Compliance for Pharmaceutical and Medical Device Manufacturers
The Food and Drug Law Institute (FDLI) recently held its annual Advertising & Promotion Conference, which included in-depth presentations, discussions and updates from various government officials and industry insiders regarding interesting cases, new policies and guidance, and enforcement actions and criminal investigations. Representatives from all four of FDA's medical product centers (CBER, CDER, CDRH, and CVM), the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Office of the Inspector General, the U.S. Department of Justice Consumer Protection Branch, and the Federal Trade Commission provided attendees with the ...
Source: Policy and Medicine - October 2, 2013 Category: Health Medicine and Bioethics Commentators Authors: Thomas Sullivan Source Type: blogs

Pfizer Pays $491M For Illegal Rapamune Marketing That Targeted Blacks
One of the more sensational whistleblower episodes has finally been resolved now that Pfizer has agreed to pay nearly $491 million to settle civil and criminal charges that Wyeth, which the drugmaker purchased four years ago, spent a decade promoting the Rapamune kidney transplant drug for a variety of unapproved uses, and these resulted in false claims submitted to federal healthcare programs. The pair of lawsuits drew considerable attention because the drugmaker was accused of targeting African-Americans, a high-risk patient group. Wyeth managers were allegedly aware of limited data for Rapamune use in such patients, but...
Source: Pharmalot - July 30, 2013 Category: Pharma Commentators Authors: esilverman Source Type: blogs

Pharmalot... Pharmalittle... Good Morning
Rise and shine, everyone, another busy day is on the way. Yes, the middle of the week is here and, as always, there is much to do. Of course, this can be a good thing, unless you planned to take the day off. If not, then it's time to get cracking. So grab a cup of something stimulating and dig in to the menu of tidbits below. Meanwhile, we hope your day is filled with accomplishments and do stay in touch by writing to ed@pharmalot.com We accept classified information... Roche And AstraZeneca To Share Early Trial Data (The Wall Street Journal) Astellas Signs $490M Pact With Cytokinetics (Pharma Times) Common Meds With Caffe...
Source: Pharmalot - June 26, 2013 Category: Pharma Commentators Authors: esilverman Source Type: blogs

Causes of pappilledema (bilateral) with good optic nerve function
  increased intracranial pressure   malignant hypertension   toxins (amiodarone,cyclosporine)   sleep apnea syndrome   uveitis, eg. sarcoidosis     (Source: neurologyminutiae)
Source: neurologyminutiae - April 8, 2013 Category: Neurologists Source Type: blogs

Biomarkers May Signal Early Transplant Rejection
A team of researchers in the Department of Pediatrics at Boston Children’s Hospital and Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center have discovered a set of biomarkers that could detect early signs of chronic heart transplant rejection — a process that is often undetectable until function of the heart has been irreversibly compromised. The team, led by Kevin P. Daly, MD, and David M. Briscoe, MD, of the Transplant Research Program (TRP) at Boston Children’s Hospital, and S. Ananth Karumanchi, MD, of Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, published their findings online in the Journal of H...
Source: Medgadget - January 11, 2013 Category: Technology Consultants Authors: Ravi Parikh Tags: Cardiac Surgery Diagnostics in the news... Source Type: blogs