Big Soda Challenged on World Diabetes Day
A soda-lemonade stand with soda bottles topped with lemons, in Rishikesh, India. Credit: Surya Prakash / CC-BY-SA-3.0By Lyndal RowlandsUNITED NATIONS, Nov 12 2014 (IPS)Corporations marketing unhealthy foods to poorer consumers are being challenged for their role in the growing global burden of diseases like diabetes.Over 340 million people are living with diabetes, and the World Health Organization predicts the number of people who die from diabetes each year will double between 2005 and 2030.  Nov. 14 is World Diabetes Day."Being poor also puts you at risk in countries like Indonesia where soda companies actually purpose...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - November 12, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Authors: Lyndal Rowlands Tags: Active Citizens Civil Society Featured Food & Agriculture Global Headlines Health Poverty & MDGs TerraViva United Nations diabetes fast food obesity Source Type: news

Turn the Pages of a Rare Book on Mongolian Astrology from the NLM Collections
The National Library of Medicine announces the release of a new Turning the Pages virtual book on its Web site, via iPad App, and in kiosks onsite at the NLM. The new project features selections from a colorfully illustrated 19th-century manuscript from Mongolia on astrology and divination following Mongolian and Tibetan Buddhist traditions. (Source: News from the National Library of Medicine)
Source: News from the National Library of Medicine - November 12, 2014 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Fossils reveal very awkward dinosaur once roamed the Earth
Palaeontologists in the Mongolia's Gobi Desert have discovered new fossils that allow them to create a picture of what one of the most unusually-shaped dinosaurs looked like. (Source: The Independent - Science)
Source: The Independent - Science - October 23, 2014 Category: Science Tags: Science Source Type: news

Newly Discovered Fossils Reveal Goofy-Looking Dinosaur
Scientists in Mongolia’s Gobi Desert have unearthed fossils that have allowed them for the first time to build a complete picture of one of the more bizarre-looking dinosaurs. Deinocheirus mirificus, which means “unusual horrible hand” in Latin, has stunned scientists with its strange combination of features, according to a study in the journal Nature. The recently discovered 70 million-year-old fossils suggest deinocheirus was humpbacked, had a ”beer-belly,” tufts of feathers and wide hips and feet that caused it to waddle. “This is an entirely new body plan,” said Stephen Brusatt...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - October 23, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: hcregan Tags: Uncategorized Deinocheirus mirificus dinosaurs fossils mongolia Paleontology Source Type: news

Bizarre dinosaur reconstructed after 50 years of wild speculation
Deinocheirus mirificus, or unusual horrible hand, had long, clawed forearms, a sail on its back and a duck-like bill Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 22, 2014 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample, science editor Tags: Dinosaurs Evolution Fossils Zoology Science World news Mongolia Source Type: news

Bizarre dinosaur reconstructed after 50 years of wild speculation
Deinocheirus mirificus, or ‘unusual horrible hand’, had long, clawed forearms, a sail on its back and a duck-like billNearly 50 years after researchers uncovered the gigantic arms of a mysterious dinosaur in the Gobi desert, the true nature of the beast has finally been established.Since its discovery in 1965, the only clues to the engimatic creature were its shoulders and forelimbs – the latter measuring an astounding 2.4 metres long – and a few ribs and vertebrae dug from the ground by a joint Polish-Mongolian expedition.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 22, 2014 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample, science editor Tags: Dinosaurs Evolution Fossils Zoology Science World news Mongolia Source Type: news

Women driven by status, wealth rather than wanting babies, study suggests
Women are more driven to seek wealth and status than they are to reproduce, a new study suggests. The research says although low fertility may seem to go against traditional ideas about evolutionary success, a woman will delay and reduce her fertility if it brings her opportunities for higher status. The findings are based on interviews with 9,000 women in Mongolia, a country that underwent a sudden transition from a Soviet-style state to mass privatization. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - October 18, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

Earliest-known lamprey larva fossils unearthed in Inner Mongolia
Few people devote time to pondering the ancient origins of the eel-like lamprey, yet the evolutionary saga of the bloodsucker holds essential clues to the biological roots of humanity. Scientists now have a description of fossilized lamprey larvae that date back to the Lower Cretaceous -- at least 125 million years ago. They're the oldest identified fossils displaying the creature in stages of pre-metamorphosis and metamorphosis. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - October 14, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

Vitamin D significantly improves symptoms of winter-related atopic dermatitis in children
A study conducted in more than 100 Mongolian schoolchildren found that daily treatment with a vitamin D supplement significantly reduced the symptoms of winter-related atopic dermatitis, a type of eczema. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - October 3, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

Vitamin D significantly improves symptoms of winter-related atopic dermatitis in children
(Massachusetts General Hospital) A study conducted in more than 100 Mongolian schoolchildren found that daily treatment with a vitamin D supplement significantly reduced the symptoms of winter-related atopic dermatitis, a type of eczema. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 3, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

The role of peacekeeping in Mongolia's military strategy: a new paradigm for security - Pultz C.
This article examines the military component of Mongolia's security strategy and argues that the Mongolian Armed Forces (MAF) have redefined their objectives and identity by creating a modern military centered on peacekeeping and global peace-support opera... (Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated))
Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated) - September 8, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Jurisprudence, Laws, Legislation, Policies, Rules Source Type: news

Hippocampal neuron-related factor expression and neuronal injury after TBI
(Neural Regeneration Research) Traumatic brain injury causes gene expression changes in different brain regions. Cyclooxygenase-2, glutamate receptor-2, and platelet activating factor receptor expression levels are related to the occurrence and development of TBI. However, the precise relationship between the expression levels of these three factors and neuronal injury after TBI remains poorly understood. Zhiqiang Li, Inner Mongolia Corps Hospital, Chinese People's Armed Police Forces, China performed a study and showed that sequential expression of cyclooxygenase-2, glutamate receptor-2, and platelet activating factor rec...
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 14, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Bizarre parasite from the Jurassic had mouthparts for sucking blood of salamanders
Around 165 million years ago, a spectacular parasite was at home in the freshwater lakes of present-day Inner Mongolia (China): A fly larva with a thorax formed entirely like a sucking plate. With it, the animal could adhere to salamanders and suck their blood with its mouthparts formed like a sting. To date no insect is known that is equipped with a similar specialized design. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - June 24, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

Bizarre parasite from the Jurassic
(University of Bonn) Around 165 million years ago, a spectacular parasite was at home in the freshwater lakes of present-day Inner Mongolia, China: A fly larva with a thorax formed entirely like a sucking plate. With it, the animal could adhere to salamanders and suck their blood with its mouthparts formed like a sting. To date no insect is known that is equipped with a similar specialized design. The international scientific team is now presenting its findings in the journal 'eLIFE.' (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 24, 2014 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Holding out a hand: Youth-to-youth initiative making a difference in Mongolia - 21 May 2014
ZAVKHAN PROVINCE, Mongolia – “Y-Peer saved my life. For that, I am so thankful,” says Oyuka, recalling a time when she contemplated suicide. That was before Enkhbat, an educator with the youth peer education programme Y-Peer, reached out to her and saved her life. (Source: UNFPA News)
Source: UNFPA News - June 12, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news