Podcast: Procrastination or Mental Health Issues?
 Since time was invented, people have fallen into three main categories: Chronically early, on-time, or late. You don’t need mental illness to put things off until the last minute and it doesn’t take anxiety to get things done well ahead of schedule. But, there’s also no denying that living with mental illness can – and does – impact our ability to be punctual and to accomplish goals. In this episode, Gabe and Michelle discuss the difference between putting things off because we are making bad choices and putting things off because of mental health issues. Listen now! SUBSCRIBE & REV...
Source: World of Psychology - July 22, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: A Bipolar, a Schizophrenic, and a Podcast Tags: A Bipolar, A Schizophrenic, and a Podcast Personal Schizophrenia Self-Help Source Type: blogs

Podcast: Religion and Mental Illness
From leisure activities to politics to relationships, people tend to be influenced by their religious beliefs. In this episode, Gabe and Michelle discuss the pros and cons of religious influence when it comes to treating mental illness and explore whether it is helpful when trying to reach recovery. SUBSCRIBE & REVIEW “They are dead (by suicide) and we are still stigmatizing their behavior.” – Gabe Highlights from ‘Religion and Mental Illness’ Episode [2:00] The intersection of religion and mental illness. [4:30] How the Jewish faith views mental illness. [10:00] How Christianity vie...
Source: World of Psychology - July 15, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: A Bipolar, a Schizophrenic, and a Podcast Tags: A Bipolar, A Schizophrenic, and a Podcast Depression Ethics & Morality Schizophrenia Spirituality & Health Source Type: blogs

Advancing Trainee Leaders and Scholars (ATLAS): A New Initiative From Academic Medicine
Academic Medicine recently launched the Advancing Trainee Leaders and Scholars (ATLAS) initiative, which I will oversee as the journal’s inaugural Assistant Editor for Trainee Engagement. So, you might be wondering, who am I and why ATLAS? I hope this blog post will help answer those questions! Who am I? I’m a 3rd-year internal medicine resident at NYU Langone Health in New York City, and am planning to pursue a career as an academic hospitalist. As mentioned above, I will serve as the inaugural Assistant Editor for Trainee Engagement, overseeing the ATLAS initiative. My term will last until summer 2020, ...
Source: Academic Medicine Blog - July 9, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Guest Author Tags: ATLAS Featured learners Source Type: blogs

The Phantom of the North
This blog post isn’t about some supernatural Geordie, rather a species of owl that haunts the northern parts of the Americas and Eurasia- the Great Grey Owl (Strix nebulosa). It’s the largest species of owl we have, by length, although ignore the feathers and it isn’t quite so impressive looking, but then which bird is? Also known as the cinereous owl, spectral owl, Lapland owl, spruce owl, bearded owl, and sooty owl. The Phantom of the North, photo by dB/ at Linton Zoo, Cambs, 7 Apr 2016 The sub-species S. n. nebulosa flies from central Alaska eastward across Canada to south-western Quebec, and south to ...
Source: David Bradley Sciencebase - Songs, Snaps, Science - April 5, 2019 Category: Science Authors: David Bradley Tags: Sciencebase Source Type: blogs

Eliminating Counterfeit Drugs from the Pharmaceutical Supply Chain: Interview with FarmaTrust CEO
Around the world, an estimated 1 million deaths are attributed to substandard and counterfeit drugs. The World Custom Organization’s Anti-Counterfeiting and Piracy Coordinator Christophe Zimmerman has claimed in the past that, “We have more fakes than real drugs in the market.” Inflexible, legacy systems and fragmented technical solutions have stymied improvement to the pharmaceutical supply chain. With new US and European legislation expected to come into effect by early 2019 aiming to increase accountability, a new approach, ideally one connecting all stakeholders, will be required. Stepping into this o...
Source: Medgadget - December 19, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Exclusive Informatics Medicine Public Health Society Source Type: blogs

The Future Holds Smart Habitats for People With Special Needs
No matter whether it’s about the problems of aging, vision, hearing, disabilities or other permanent conditions, modern urban environments or residential places often disregard people with special needs. Luckily, technology and smart design might offer solutions on how to make cities more accessible, more inclusive and entirely suited for everyone in the future. Technology could support smart habitats for people’s real needs Grandmas, children, pregnant women, Filipinos, French or American people, tall, small, big, round-faced, blond, black-haired or bold – people differ in all kinds of ways, and we could...
Source: The Medical Futurist - November 1, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: Future of Medicine Healthcare Design Medical Professionals Patients Policy Makers Researchers accessible disability health technology inclusive Innovation people with special needs smart city smart design Source Type: blogs

As I ’ve always suspected, Health Care = Communism + Frappuccinos
By MATTHEW HOLT Happy 15th birthday THCB! Yes, 15 years ago today this little blog opened for business and changed my life (and at least impacted a few others). Later this week we are going to celebrate and tell you a bit more about what the next 15 years (really?) of THCB might look like. But for now, I’m rerunning a few of my favorite pieces from the mid-2000s, the golden age of blogging. Today I present “Health Care = Communism + Frappuccinos”, one of my favorites about the relationship between government and private sector originally published here on Jan7, 2005. And like the Medicare one from last we...
Source: The Health Care Blog - August 12, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: matthew holt Tags: Matthew Holt OP-ED 15th Birthday Celebration Commumism Frappuchinos Source Type: blogs

The hemp-eating linen weaver – Linaria cannabina
Don’t often see avian couples together…or more to the point, I don’t often catch them “on film” together. Here are Mr and Mrs Linnet (Linaria cannabina) at their residence in Rampton Pocket Park a few miles north of Cambridge. The bird’s English name comes from the species’ fondness for flax seed from which we make linen, the second part of its scientific name from its liking for hemp seed (Cannabis sativa). The bird is found across Europe into western and central Siberia and is non-breeding in north Africa and southwest Asia. As you can hopefully see from my, not particularly sha...
Source: David Bradley Sciencebase - Songs, Snaps, Science - August 4, 2017 Category: Science Authors: David Bradley Tags: Science Source Type: blogs

Big Dreams, Great Job at Minnesota Best Buy for Man with Cerebral Palsy
Mongolia native finds Best Buy job with help from ProAct, leads smartphone app session for disability leaders, selected as national conference panelist (Source: Disabled World Blogs)
Source: Disabled World Blogs - June 16, 2017 Category: Disability Tags: Blogs - Writings - Stories Source Type: blogs

What India’s Teleradiology Market Teaches Us About the Future of Medicine
By SAURABH JHA, MD Teleradiology has the same effect on radiologists as Lord Voldemort has on Muggles. It’s the feared end point of the commoditization of imaging, with Rajeev in Bangalore outpricing Rajeev in Chicago for reading follow-up CTs for lung nodules. But despite the fears of U.S. radiologists, their counterparts in India have more pressing things on their mind. “U.S. radiologists think that Indian radiologists are [itching] to steal their jobs. We have plenty of work in India,” reassured Dr. Sumer Sethi, director of TeleRad Providers of New Delhi. A tech-savvy blogger, Sethi founded TeleRad Pro...
Source: The Health Care Blog - June 10, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: John Irvine Tags: THCB Radiology Saurabh Jha Teleradiology Source Type: blogs

Why Do Pictures of Food Rate Higher Than My Blog Posts?
As a long time blogger, I’ve written hundreds of blog posts on many different subjects, but not one of them has elicited as much interest than my pictures of food that I post to Facebook. Beach Break Cafe Oceanside This crazy phenomenon has led to many conclusions. I’ve considered… Blogging is dead I’m a lousy writer I’m interested in stupid stuff Then I considered it from the other side. Maybe… People are hungry Brightly colored food is interesting People are on a diet and long for a real meal I’m not sure what the real reason is, but I thought I would re-post some of my bes...
Source: Success Begins Today - October 2, 2013 Category: Life Coaches Authors: John Richardson Tags: Diet Food Source Type: blogs

Bad Habits: Why Are They Difficult To Break?
There is a lot of misinformation and misunderstandings surrounding habits. As such, I was happy to get an e-mail recently from friend and fellow self development blogger Vlad Dolezal that gives me the opportunity to revisit the topic. I’m going to reproduce Vlad’s e-mail and for the sake of this post I’m going to call his blog reader Bob: “I got an e-mail from a reader asking about breaking habits. I realized I’m not that knowledgeable about this topic, and I remember I heard you talk about it before. I thought you might know the answer, and take a few minutes of your valuable time to enlight...
Source: Life Coach Blog: The Discomfort Zone : - January 6, 2013 Category: Life Coaches Authors: Tim Brownson Tags: Life Coaching bad habits behavior breaking habits rituals Source Type: blogs

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Genetic Isolates in East Asia: A Study of Linkage Disequilibrium in the X ChromosomeThe background linkage disequilibrium (LD) in genetic isolates is of great interest in human genetics. Although many empirical studies have evaluated the background LD in European isolates, such as the Finnish and Sardinians, few data from other regions, such as Asia, have been reported. To evaluate the extent of background LD in East Asian genetic isolates, we analyzed the X chromosome in the Japanese population and in four Mongolian populations (Khalkh, Khoton, Uriankhai, and Zakhchin), the demographic histories of which are quite differe...
Source: Genetic Chaos - September 1, 2006 Category: Geneticists and Genetics Commentators Authors: Havelock Source Type: blogs