Early Mongolians ate dairy, but lacked the gene to digest it
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - November 8, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Curry, A. Tags: Anthropology, Evolution, Genetics In Depth Source Type: news

NHGRI joins international team to sequence Mongolian genomes
North Asians, including Mongolians and other Siberian ethnic groups, may be more closely related to Eastern and Northern Europeans - including the people of Finland - than previously thought, according to a new genomics study inNature Genetics. The international team of researchers, including those from the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI), made the connection by comparing the whole-genome sequences of 175 ethnic Mongolians to existing genetic variation data. (Source: NHGRI Homepage Highlights)
Source: NHGRI Homepage Highlights - November 5, 2018 Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Source Type: news

Ancient Teeth Tell the History of Equine Dentistry
Researchers studied 3,000-year-old skeletal remains from Mongolia to understand the origins of veterinary dental practices. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - October 1, 2018 Category: Science Tags: Notebook Magazine Issue Source Type: news

China detains four for transporting pigs amid swine fever outbreaks
Inner Mongolia in northern China has detained four people for forging documents and illegally selling and transporting pigs from a province that has been hit by African swine fever, said the region's animal husbandry bureau late on Wednesday. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - September 27, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

China says new African swine fever outbreak reported in Inner Mongolia
China said on Monday it has confirmed a new outbreak of African swine fever in the Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region of northern China, as authorities struggle to contain the highly contagious disease. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - September 24, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

China reports new African swine fever outbreak in Inner Mongolia
China's northern region of Inner Mongolia has reported a new outbreak of African swine fever, the agriculture ministry said on Monday, as authorities struggle to contain the highly contagious disease. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - September 24, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

China reports new African swine fever outbreak in Inner Mongolia
China's Agriculture Ministry said on Monday a new African swine fever outbreak had been reported in northern China's Inner Mongolia region. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - September 17, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

China reports new outbreaks of African swine fever in Inner Mongolia, Henan: Xinhua
China reported two new outbreaks of African swine fever in the Inner Mongolia region and Henan provinces as the highly contagious disease, which is deadly to pigs, spreads further nationwide, the state-run Xinhua news agency said on Friday. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - September 14, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Scientists Identify the First-Known Offspring of Two Different Groups of Early Humans, Study Says
(BERLIN) — Scientists say they’ve found the remains of a prehistoric female whose mother was a Neanderthal and whose father belonged to another extinct group of human relatives known as Denisovans. The 90,000-year-old bone fragment found in southern Siberia marks the first time a direct offspring of these two groups has been discovered, according to a study published Wednesday in the journal Nature. Both groups disappeared by about 40,000 years ago. Neanderthals lived in Europe and Asia, while fossils of Denisovans are known only from the cave where the fragment was found. Past genetic studies have shown interb...
Source: TIME: Science - August 23, 2018 Category: Science Authors: FRANK JORDANS / AP Tags: Uncategorized onetime overnight Research Source Type: news

Everything You Need to Know About the Last Eclipse of 2018
For much of the world, the last chance to catch an eclipse for a while is about to happen. This weekend’s partial solar eclipse will span across many countries in the Northern hemisphere on Saturday, Aug. 11 — becoming what could be the most widely viewed solar eclipse of 2018. The eclipse kicks off at 5:46 a.m. E.T., and will be visible in Greenland before expanding toward Iceland, northern Europe, most of northern Russia and part of northern China, according to NASA. If the weather is good in the morning, when the eclipse starts (around 4:02 a.m. E.T.), then it may become the most viewed solar eclipse of the ...
Source: TIME: Science - August 10, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Gabby Raymond Tags: Uncategorized onetime space Source Type: news

How Prison Conditions Fuel the Tuberculosis Epidemic
Inmates at the National Penitentiary in Port-au-Prince, Haiti. Credit: David BrydenBy David BrydenWASHINGTON DC, Jul 19 2018 (IPS)Dozens of grown men peered from behind the barred doorway of a crammed window-less prison cell, eyes pleading desperately from sweaty faces.Their physical discomfort was so palpable, I could almost feel it. Because of my work, I also knew of at least one serious unseen risk facing them – that of contracting tuberculosis in the cramped, poorly ventilated space. Touring the largest prison in Port-au-Prince was part of a research visit I made there in 2106. Two years later, the image of those...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - July 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: David Bryden Tags: Development & Aid Featured Global Headlines Health Population Poverty & SDGs TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news

Ukraine Puts Water Strategy High on Development Agenda
A lake in Ukraine, which has a relative scarcity of naturally-occurring water supplies in populated areas. Credit: Vitaliy Motrinets/cc by 4.0By Ed HoltKIEV, Jun 21 2018 (IPS)A campaign to raise awareness of water security in Ukraine could be an inspiration around the world, activists behind it say, after it forced a change in the country’s approach to its water resources.After almost five years of promoting a vision of water security and proactive water management among various stakeholders and the government in Kiev, the issue of water security is now a top development priority for the government.“Ageing infr...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - June 21, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Ed Holt Tags: Climate Change Combating Desertification and Drought Development & Aid Environment Europe Featured Food & Agriculture Headlines Health Natural Resources Poverty & SDGs Projects Water & Sanitation Global Water Partnership Sustai Source Type: news

Project Population: Addressing Asia ’s Ageing Societies
A seventy-year-old woman laughs with family members inside a grocery store in Tachilek, Myanmar. UN Photo/Kibae ParkBy Tharanga YakupitiyageUNITED NATIONS, Jun 20 2018 (IPS)While populations have seen and undergone changes since the beginning of time, one trend in particular is unfolding across the world: less children, older people. In an effort to tackle the complex issue in Asia, government officials are convening to help create a sustainable society where no one is left behind.In Mongolia’s capital of Ulaanbaatar, 40 Members of Parliament (MPs) are gathering to discuss sound policy approaches to population issues...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - June 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tharanga Yakupitiyage Tags: Asia-Pacific Development & Aid Headlines Health Population Poverty & SDGs aging Asian Population and Development Association (APDA) Population Growth Source Type: news

Project Population: Addressing Asia ’s Ageing Societies
Credit: Neeta Lal/IPSBy Tharanga YakupitiyageUNITED NATIONS, Jun 12 2018 (IPS)While populations have seen and undergone changes since the beginning of time, one trend in particular is unfolding across the world: less children, older people. In an effort to tackle the complex issue in Asia, government officials are convening to help create a sustainable society where no one is left behind. In Mongolia’s capital of Ulaanbaatar, 40 Members of Parliament (MPs) are gathering to discuss sound policy approaches to population issues such as ageing and fertility transition which threaten the future of many Asian nations.&ldqu...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - June 12, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tharanga Yakupitiyage Tags: Aid Asia-Pacific Education Featured Gender Headlines Health Population Poverty & SDGs TerraViva United Nations Asian Population and Development Association (APDA) Source Type: news

Emissions of a Banned Ozone-Eating Chemical Are Rising Again and Scientists Don ’t Know Why
(WASHINGTON) — Something strange is happening with a now-banned chemical that eats away at Earth’s protective ozone layer: Scientists say there’s more of it — not less — going into the atmosphere and they don’t know where it is coming from. When a hole in the ozone formed over Antarctica, countries around the world in 1987 agreed to phase out several types of ozone-depleting chemicals called chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs). Production was banned, emissions fell and the hole slowly shrank. But starting in 2013, emissions of the second most common kind started rising, according to a study in We...
Source: TIME: Science - May 16, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Seth Borenstein / AP Tags: Uncategorized Environment onetime Source Type: news

To Have Children or Not: The Importance of Finding a Balance
By Tharanga YakupitiyageUNITED NATIONS, May 11 2018 (IPS)While the world’s population has changed dramatically over the last 50 years, little is still understood about fertility transition and the reasons behind it.Over the last half a century, the global fertility rate has halved, reaching a level of 2.5 births per woman. At the same time, the UN estimates that there will be 11 billion people in the world by 2100.Given such trends, more needs to be understood about the factors that influence fertility rates, but not enough is known about it, Secretary-General of the Asian Population Development Association (APDA) Dr...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - May 11, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tharanga Yakupitiyage Tags: Aid Education Global Global Governance Headlines Health Population Poverty & SDGs TerraViva United Nations Women's Health Source Type: news

Belt and Road Initiative Vows Green Infrastructure with Connectivity
By Diana G MendozaMANILA, May 8 2018 (IPS)“My son in primary school did not attend a birthday celebration because it was cancelled due to bad air — and we live in Seoul, a great place to live,” said Dr. Frank Rijsberman, director-general of the Global Green Growth Institute (GGGI).He was speaking to delegates of a forum that discussed creating environmental policies while enabling economic and regional cooperation among countries in the Belt and Road route during the 51st annual meeting of the Asian Development Bank (ADB) that concluded over the weekend.The initiative covers more than 65 countries -- or m...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - May 8, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Diana G Mendoza Tags: Aid Asia-Pacific Biodiversity Climate Change Combating Desertification and Drought Development & Aid Economy & Trade Energy Environment Featured Food & Agriculture Global Global Green Growth Institute (GGGI) Green Economy Headl Source Type: news

Progress Toward Measles Elimination - Western Pacific Region, 2013-2017
During 2013-2016, a resurgence of measles occurred in Western Pacific Region, with large-scale outbreaks in Mongolia, the Philippines, and Vietnam, and increased endemic transmission in China; in 2014, annual incidence increased to 68.9 cases per million. However, with control of the outbreaks, in 2017, incidence decreased to a new historic low (5.2 per million). (Source: PHPartners.org)
Source: PHPartners.org - May 3, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Mongolians sip 'oxygen cocktails' and ‘lung tea’ to cope with smog
Sold for as little as $1, adverts in Mongolia claim ‘drinking just one oxygen cocktail is equal to a three-hour-walk in a lush forest’. The WHO states there is no scientific evidence supporting this. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - May 3, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Association of comorbidity of mood and anxiety disorders with suicidal behaviors - Wang X, Liu Z, Li Y, Li G, Huang Y.
This study aimed to describe the prevalence and transitions of suicidal behaviors in an Inner Mongolian City of China and to explore the... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - April 30, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Suicide and Self-Harm Source Type: news

For Faulting a Chinese Tonic, He Got 3 Months in Jail. Then Cheers.
A doctor who suggested that a popular, alcohol-based tonic was dangerous was held for nearly 100 days. He emerged as a public hero. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - April 20, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: CHRIS BUCKLEY and KAROLINE KAN Tags: Advertising and Marketing Freedom of Speech and Expression Tencent Holdings Ltd WeChat (Mobile App) Inner Mongolia Guangzhou (China) Source Type: news

Chinese Doctor Arrested, Then Applauded, for Criticizing a Popular Elixir
A doctor who suggested an alcohol-based tonic was dangerous was detained for 3 months, and then freed as a public hero. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - April 19, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: CHRIS BUCKLEY and KAROLINE KAN Tags: Advertising and Marketing Freedom of Speech and Expression Tencent Holdings Ltd WeChat (Mobile App) Inner Mongolia Guangzhou (China) Source Type: news

House Committee Considers NSF Budget Request
The House Committee on Science, Space, and Technology held a hearing on the Budget Proposal for the National Science Foundation (NSF) for Fiscal Year 2019 on 15 March. NSF Director Frances Cordova and National Science Board Chairwoman Maria T. Zuber testified. Committee Chairman Lamar Smith (R-TX) has been critical of the peer-review process at the agency since 2013 when he assumed the chairmanship of the committee. He used the hearing as another platform to criticize some of the grants included in NSF’s research portfolio. Smith argued, “I have been critical of the NSF for funding too many projects that seem ...
Source: Public Policy Reports - April 2, 2018 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

Global Health: Palliative Care Film Challenges Stereotypes About Opioids
“ Hippocratic, ” a documentary about Dr. M.R. Rajagopal, who helps India ’ s dying, shows the desperate need for the same drugs maligned for causing overdoses. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - March 16, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: DONALD G. McNEIL Jr. Tags: Opioids and Opiates Documentary Films and Programs India Mongolia United States Palliative Care Source Type: news

Estimates overstated for Mongolian rangelands damaged by livestock
(Colorado State University) An estimated 70 percent of the rangelands in Mongolia are damaged by livestock and unregulated land use. But new research found less irreversible damage -- up to 10 percent at most -- from livestock in Mongolia's rangelands. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 7, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Glaciers in Mongolia's Gobi Desert actually shrank during the last ice age
(University of Washington) High in Mongolia's Gobi Desert, the climate is so dry and cold that glaciers shrank during the last ice age. Dating of rock deposits shows how glaciers in this less-studied region behave very differently as the climate shifts. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 6, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Mongolian Air Pollution Causing Health Crisis - UNICEF Mongolian Air Pollution Causing Health Crisis - UNICEF
Smog in the Mongolia's capital, Ulaanbaatar, is causing a public health crisis, especially among children, with treatment costs likely to put the cash-strapped country under increasing strain, the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) said.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Allergy Headlines)
Source: Medscape Allergy Headlines - February 26, 2018 Category: Allergy & Immunology Tags: Public Health & Prevention News Source Type: news

Patterns of burns and scalds in Mongolian children: a hospital-based prospective study - Gerelmaa G, Tumen-Ulzii B, Nakahara S, Ichikawa M.
OBJECTIVE: To describe the circumstances of burn injury occurrence among Mongolian children and the products involved. METHODS: Study participants were children aged 15 years and younger who were admitted to the Burn Unit of the National Trauma Ort... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - January 23, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Infants and Children Source Type: news

What Are Cutaneous Lesions Associated with Occult Spinal Dysraphism?
Discussion Neural tube defects are a group of disorders that arise during embryogenesis. They include anenephaly, exencephaly, meningmyelocoeles and encephalocoeles and other malformations including occult spinal dysraphism. Occult spinal dysraphism (OSD) has incomplete fusion of the midline elements of the spine including the bony, neural, and mesenchymal tissues but the abnormalities are covered by skin (ectodermal tissues) and therefore are not obvious. OSD has a higher risk of tethered spinal cord syndrome or other neurological/neurosurgical problems. Normally the caudal end of the spinal cord, the conus medullaris, ha...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - January 8, 2018 Category: Pediatrics Authors: pediatriceducationmin Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Support for alcohol policies among drinkers in Mongolia, New Zealand, Peru, South Africa, St Kitts and Nevis, Thailand and Vietnam: data from the International Alcohol Control Study - Parry CDH, Londani M, Enkhtuya P, Huckle T, Piazza M, Gray-Phillip G, Chaiyasong S, Viet Cuong P, Casswell S.
This study aims to determine the magnitude of public support for 12 alcohol policies and wh... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - December 25, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Alcohol and Other Drugs Source Type: news

Lab notes: raise a glass to your ear and hail the dinosaur swan
It lived about 71m years ago, had a swan-like neck, razor-sharp “killer claws” and a duck-billed snout and was about the size of a mallard, with a long tail and longer legs. This ‘very weird’ creature (not my words, that’s an actual scientist’s description there) is apparently anew species of amphibious dinosaur, discovered in a smuggled fossil from Mongolia. And to toast that exciting news, you ’ll need a really good glass of champagne - but how will you know whether you’ve been passed plonk or premier cru?According to researchers, the sound of the bubbles reveals all ... As...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - December 8, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Tash Reith-Banks Tags: Science Source Type: news

Smuggled fossil 'very weird' new species of amphibious dinosaur, say experts
Halszkaraptor escuillieiis thought to have lived around 71-75m years ago and had a swan-like neck, razor-sharp “killer claws” and a duck-billed snoutAn unusual set of fossilised remains illegally poached from Mongolia belonged to a new species of dinosaur with the rare trait of living on both land and water, researchers have claimed.Thought to have lived around 71 –75m years ago, the creature boasts a swan-like neck, razor-sharp “killer claws” on its feet, a duck-billed snout and forelimbs with proportions that might have helped it swim.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - December 6, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Dinosaurs Science Fossils Biology Evolution Source Type: news

Newly Discovered Dinosaur Species Looks Like Something Dr. Seuss Dreamed Up
(WASHINGTON) — With a bill like a duck but teeth like a croc’s, a swanlike neck and killer claws, a new dinosaur species uncovered by scientists looks like something Dr. Seuss could have dreamed up. It also had flippers like a penguin, and while it walked like an ostrich it could also swim. That’s the first time swimming ability has been shown for a two-legged, meat-eating dinosaur. The tiny creature, only about 18 inches (45 centimeters) tall, roamed 75 million years ago in what is now Mongolia. Its full curled-up skeleton was found in a sandstone rock. “It’s such a peculiar animal,” sa...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - December 6, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Seth Borenstein / AP Tags: Uncategorized dinosaurs onetime Source Type: news

Resilience from people on the edge of global change
Mongolia ’s herders and Madagascar’s fishermen share challenges and strategies for adapting to a changing environment. (Source: SciDev.Net)
Source: SciDev.Net - November 21, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

One health researchers identify hot spots of tick-borne diseases in Mongolia
(George Mason University) Given the critical role livestock play in Mongolia, transmission of tick-borne diseases can have very real health and economic implications for livestock and herders. George Mason University's Dr. Michael von Fricken and colleagues explored the interaction between nomadic herders, the livestock they own, and the tick-borne diseases they are exposed to. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - November 16, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Developing World Faces Challenge of Large Ageing Population
This report too is limited in its scope, and is by no means a compendium of the vast amount of research that has been done on ageing and social security, and does not offer definitive solutions,” Fukuda added. “What it does aim to do is to clearly set out issues surrounding this topic and present critical views that can help Asian countries develop better policies for population ageing.”While sharing the details and findings of the policy brief, Fukuda said that it is necessary to strengthen the gathering of statistics, in particular the census system, and to establish family registration systems in order...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - October 28, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Amna Khaishgi Tags: Asia-Pacific Development & Aid Featured Headlines Health Population Poverty & SDGs Ageing Population Asian Population and Development Association (APDA) United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) Source Type: news

Beyond Genghis Khan: how looting threatens to erase Mongolia's history
Mongolia ’s cold, dry climate can result in incredible archaeological finds, but a harsh economic downturn means looting has risen to disastrous levelsIt ’s a sunny, late summer day in northern Mongolia’s Darkhad Basin – a large glacial lake basin nestled against the country’s Russian border. To the south stretch the grasslands of the Eastern Eurasian Steppe; to the north, the Siberian boreal forest. We stand – almost precisely – at the p lace they meet, at the forest’s edge overlooking a large, grassy valley the administrative district of Ulaan Uul. We’ve come to this ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 26, 2017 Category: Science Authors: William Taylor Tags: Archaeology Science Mongolia Heritage Culture Source Type: news

Meet Junornis:  the tiny Cretaceous bird which reveals the earliest form of bounding flight
Newly-discoveredJunornis huoiwas the oldest bird capable of bounding flight – and represents an exciting update to what we know about complex flightA 126-million-year-old fossil has demonstrated that birds were capable of a special form of flight much earlier than previously thought. The newly namedJunornis huoi (which means “beautiful wing”) is known from a single incredibly preserved specimen with a superb skeleton and extensive preservation of feathers, including the wings and two long tail feathers which were likely used for display.The fossil comes from the famous “Jehol” beds of China, w...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 25, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Dr Dave Hone Tags: Dinosaurs Birds Palaeontology Animals Evolution Fossils Source Type: news

IntraHealth International and Novartis Foundation Team Up to Thwart Hypertension in Senegal
Photo by Nana Kofi Acquah courtesy of the Novartis FoundationSeptember 26, 2017IntraHealth International is partnering with the Novartis Foundation, the Senegal Ministry of Health and Social Action, PATH, local health officials, community-based organizations, and other local stakeholders to address hypertension and improve cardiac health among the population of Dakar.Through the new initiative, Better Hearts Better Cities – Dakar, the ministry will test evidence-based, scalable approaches in Dakar that have the potential to thwart the rise of hypertension and othernoncommunicable diseases (NCDs) throughoutSenegal and...
Source: IntraHealth International - September 26, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: intrahealth Source Type: news

Russian woman spent 17 years with 12-inch tube in stomach
The unidentified patient, 50, from Ulan-Ude, close to the Mongolian border, had the rubber tube put in after suffering a stroke in 2000. It was designed to keep her fed in intensive care. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - September 20, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Mongolian Dinosaurs and the Poaching Problem
High-profile cases of poached fossils shine a light on the black market for paleontological specimens-and how scientists and governments are trying to stop it. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - September 8, 2017 Category: Science Tags: News Analysis Source Type: news

Here ’s Where You Can See Every Total Solar Eclipse for the Next 50 Years
A total solar eclipse will obscure the sun in parts of 14 states across the U.S. on Aug. 21, a rare event that’s been called the “Great American Eclipse.” You can find a detailed map showing the path of the eclipse here. But if you live in a place that won’t see the total eclipse or even a partial eclipse, don’t worry: It won’t be the last time the U.S. — and the rest of the world — will get a chance to see the moon block the sun in the coming decades. The next total solar eclipse to cross the U.S. will take place in seven years, and even before then total eclipses will take ...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - August 16, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Mahita Gajanan Tags: Uncategorized eclipse onetime space 2017 Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Mongolian spots: Causes, pictures, and outlook
Mongolian spots are a type of birthmark that looks similar to a bruise. Learn about the causes and treatments, and how the condition appears on skin. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - August 10, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Dermatology Source Type: news

The doctor will see you now – from afar: Telemedicine brings expert care to remote areas
Language UndefinedULAANBAATAR, Mongolia/UNITED NATIONS, New York – When Myasuren Batjargal announced she was pregnant at age 44, her family and friends were distraught. They thought she might not survive.Ms. Myasuren had long suffered from serious hypertension and a disability related to spinal problems. Health workers agreed the pregnancy was high-risk, but Ms. Myasuren was determined. “I know it’s going to be difficult, but I really want this baby,” she told staff at the hospital in Khovd Province. (Source: UNFPA News)
Source: UNFPA News - June 30, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: zerzan Source Type: news

7 medtech stories we missed this week: April 28, 2017
[Image from unsplash.com]From FDA and Health Canada approvals to joint ventures, here are 7 medtech stories we missed this week but thought were still worth mentioning. 1. FDA clears Joimax Endovapor 2 Joimax announced in an April 26 press release that it has received FDA 510(k) clearance to market its Endovapor 2 Multi-Radio Frequency System. The device generates electricity for monopoly and bipolar cutting and coagulation of tissue structures in surgery. It has programs designed for spinal cord surgery with an interdisciplinary application. It also has 2 monopolar and 2 bipolar sockets with an easy touchpad technolo...
Source: Mass Device - April 28, 2017 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: Danielle Kirsh Tags: Food & Drug Administration (FDA) News Well Surgical Anaconda Biomed Creganna Medical Eclipse Aesthetics Joimax Mederi Therapeutics MedTech Millennium Medical Technologies SiBone Theraclion Source Type: news

Precision chronology sheds new light on the origins of Mongolia's nomadic horse culture
(Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History) According to new research, nomadic horse culture -- famously associated with Genghis Khan and his Mongol hordes -- can trace its roots back more than 3,000 years in the eastern Eurasian Steppes, in the territory of modern Mongolia. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 11, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

World's largest dinosaur footprints discovered in Western Australia
Newly-discovered prints left by gigantic herbivores are part of a rich collection of tracks belonging to an estimated 21 different types of dinosaurThe largest known dinosaur footprints have been discovered in Western Australia, including 1.7 metre prints left by gigantic herbivores.Until now, the biggest known dinosaur footprint was a 106cm track discovered in the Mongolian desert andreported last year.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 28, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Hannah Devlin and agencies Tags: Dinosaurs Science Evolution Australia news Fossils Biology Source Type: news

Women ’s needs take back seat under threat of dzud in Mongolia
Language EnglishDORNOD/KHENTII, Mongolia –Mongolia was struck by harsh conditions this winter, raising risks for pastoral and nomadic communities. An estimated 165,000 people were affected,accordingto the UN Humanitarian Coordinator for Mongolia. The situation has caused particular concern for women and girls, who are experiencing limited access to sexual and reproductive health supplies and care and increased vulnerability to gender-based violence. (Source: UNFPA News)
Source: UNFPA News - March 10, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Authors: zerzan Source Type: news

Toxic Smog in Mongolia's Capital Worsens Amid Harsh Winter Toxic Smog in Mongolia's Capital Worsens Amid Harsh Winter
On most winter mornings, Setevdorj Myagmartsogt wakes up to a cloud of toxic smog blanketing his neighborhood in the Mongolian capital Ulaanbaatar, where the air quality is among the worst in the world.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - February 8, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Emergency Medicine News Source Type: news

Mongolia: Lethal livestock plague now hitting endangered antelope, warns UN agency
The international pledge to eradicate a devastating livestock disease affecting mostly sheep and goats has taken on new urgency in the wake of a mass die-off of a rare Mongolian antelope, according to the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO). (Source: UN News Centre - Health, Poverty, Food Security)
Source: UN News Centre - Health, Poverty, Food Security - January 27, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news