Child abuse, disruptive behavior disorders, depression, and salivary cortisol levels among institutionalized and community-residing boys in Mongolia - Kohrt BA, Hruschka DJ, Kohrt HE, Carrion VG, Waldman ID, Worthman CM.
This study explores the relationship of diurnal salivary cortisol levels with oppositional defiant ... (Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated))
Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated) - June 6, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

Holding out a hand: Youth-to-youth initiative making a difference in Mongolia - 21 May 2014
ZAVKHAN PROVINCE, Mongolia – “Y-Peer saved my life. For that, I am so thankful,” says Oyuka, recalling a time when she contemplated suicide. That was before Enkhbat, an educator with the youth peer education programme Y-Peer, reached out to her and saved her life. (Source: UNFPA News)
Source: UNFPA News - June 5, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Fossil of a 70-million-year-old ‘Terror Lizard’ goes back to Mongolia
A fossil of one of the most fearsome predators to have stalked the earth is being returned to Mongolia after it was located in Britain as part of an investigation into dinosaur smuggling, The Independent can reveal. (Source: The Independent - Science)
Source: The Independent - Science - June 4, 2014 Category: Science Tags: News Source Type: news

Holding out a hand: Youth-to-youth initiative making a difference in Mongolia - 21 May 2014
ZAVKHAN PROVINCE, Mongolia – “Y-Peer saved my life. For that, I am so thankful,” says Oyuka, recalling a time when she contemplated suicide. That was before Enkhbat, an educator with the youth peer education programme Y-Peer, reached out to her and saved her life. (Source: UNFPA News)
Source: UNFPA News - June 4, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Breaking down barriers: An appeal to conserve migratory ungulates in Mongolia's grasslands
Mongolian and international conservationists have joined forces to raise awareness of the global importance of Mongolia´s steppes. The Gobi-Steppe Ecosystem is home to a unique diversity of animal and plant species, among them several large migratory mammals. The scientists recommend reconciling the rapid infrastructure development that is currently taking place in Mongolia with the needs of migratory species, such as Asiatic wild ass and Mongolian gazelles. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - June 3, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

Holding out a hand: Youth-to-youth initiative making a difference in Mongolia - 21 May 2014
ZAVKHAN PROVINCE, Mongolia – “Y-Peer saved my life. For that, I am so thankful,” says Oyuka, recalling a time when she contemplated suicide. That was before Enkhbat, an educator with the youth peer education programme Y-Peer, reached out to her and saved her life. (Source: UNFPA News)
Source: UNFPA News - June 3, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Woman finds 9 pins inside her body after getting an x-ray
Medics x-rayed Alatan Hsia, from Jarud Banner in north China’s Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region, after she had suffered incredible pains for more than a decade. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - May 29, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Holding out a hand: Youth-to-youth initiative making a difference in Mongolia - 21 May 2014
ZAVKHAN PROVINCE, Mongolia – “Y-Peer saved my life. For that, I am so thankful,” says Oyuka, recalling a time when she contemplated suicide. That was before Enkhbat, an educator with the youth peer education programme Y-Peer, reached out to her and saved her life. (Source: UNFPA News)
Source: UNFPA News - May 28, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Global perspectives on poisonous plants: The 9th International Symposium on Poisonous Plants - Molyneux RJ, Panter KE, Zhao M.
The 9th International Symposium on Poisonous Plants (ISOPP9) was held July 15-21, 2013, at the Inner Mongolia Agricultural University in Hohhot, Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region of China. The symposium consisted of three days of oral and poster presentatio... (Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated))
Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated) - May 27, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Home and Consumer Product Safety Source Type: news

Holding out a hand: Youth-to-youth initiative making a difference in Mongolia - 21 May 2014
ZAVKHAN PROVINCE, Mongolia – “Y-Peer saved my life. For that, I am so thankful,” says Oyuka, recalling a time when she contemplated suicide. That was before Enkhbat, an educator with the youth peer education programme Y-Peer, reached out to her and saved her life. (Source: UNFPA News)
Source: UNFPA News - May 26, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Goji Berries: how much do you really know about this superfruit?
(NaturalNews) Goji berry is the popular name of wolfberry, scientifically known as Lycium barbarum. It is a member of the nightshade family and is cultivated in the regions of China and Mongolia. Herbalists in ancient China used goji berries to protect the liver, improve sexual functions... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - May 20, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Pollutants from coal-burning stoves strongly associated with miscarriages in Mongolia
Burning coal for domestic heating may contribute to early fetal death according to a new study that took place in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia -- the coldest capital city in the world. Researchers report "alarmingly strong statistical correlations" between seasonal ambient air pollutants and pregnancy loss. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - April 23, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

Pollutants from coal-burning stoves strongly associated with miscarriages in Mongolia
(Children's Hospital Los Angeles) Burning coal for domestic heating may contribute to early fetal death according to a new study by experts from the Saban Research Institute of Children's Hospital Los Angeles and Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia -- the coldest capital city in the world. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 23, 2014 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Fire behavior of Quercus mongolica leaf litter fuelbed under zero-slope and no-wind conditions. II. Analysis and modelling of fireline intensity, fuel consumption, and combustion efficiency - Zhang JL, Liu BF, Di XY, Chu TF, Jin S.
Mongolian oak (Quercus mongolica) is an important constructive and accompanying species in mixed broadleaf-conifer forest in Northeast China, In this paper, a laboratory burning experiment was conducted under zero-slope and no-wind conditions to study the ... (Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated))
Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated) - April 12, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Burns, Electricity, Explosions, Fire, Scalds Source Type: news

Fortifying foods: four lessons for micronutrient distribution
Getting essential vitamins and minerals on the menu for all children is key to reducing undernutrition. Four lessons can help roll out the distribution of micronutrients all over the worldChildren in developed countries benefit from vitamins and minerals added to foods like cereals that boost healthy brain development and physical growth, helping to support the social and economic potential of the next generation. Unfortunately, not all children around the world share this advantage. Deficiencies of vitamins and minerals (also called micronutrients) are part of the larger problem of undernutrition which is an underlying ca...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 24, 2014 Category: Science Tags: Improving nutrition Global development professionals network Science Nutrition and development Policy and advocacy Global health Maternal health Food poverty Food safety Blog Guardian Professional Blogposts Source Type: news

Fortifying foods: four lessons for micronutrient distribution
Getting essential vitamins and minerals on the menu for all children is key to reducing undernutrition. Four lessons can help roll out the distribution of micronutrients all over the worldChildren in developed countries benefit from vitamins and minerals added to foods like cereals that boost healthy brain development and physical growth, helping to support the social and economic potential of the next generation. Unfortunately, not all children around the world share this advantage. Deficiencies of vitamins and minerals (also called micronutrients) are part of the larger problem of undernutrition which is an underlying ca...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 24, 2014 Category: Science Tags: Nutrition Global health Improving nutrition Blog Blogposts Guardian Professional Food poverty Food safety Global development professionals network Policy and advocacy Maternal health Science Nutrition and development Source Type: news

Dinosaur dubbed 'chicken from hell' was armed and dangerous
Feathered beast, Anzu wyliei, was built for speed, measured three metres from beak to tail and had long, sharp clawsThe fossilised remains of a bizarre, bird-like dinosaur, nicknamed the "chicken from hell" by scientists, have been unearthed in the US.The 66-million-year-old feathered beast would have resembled a beefed-up emu with a long neck, a metre-long tail and a tall crest on its head. At the end of its forelimbs were long, sharp claws. The creature stood 1.5 metres high at the hip and reached more than three metres from beak to tail. Researchers believe it lived on ancient floodplains and fed on plants, sm...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 20, 2014 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Tags: The Guardian United States Evolution World news Dinosaurs UK news Fossils Zoology Science Source Type: news

Fossils of earliest stick insect to mimic plants discovered: Ancient stick insect species mimicked plant leaves
An ancient stick insect species may have mimicked plant leaves for defense, according to a new article. Many insects have developed defense mechanisms, including the ability to mimic the surrounding environment. Stick and leaf insects mimic plants from their environment, but scientists know little about the original of this interaction due to little or no previous stick insect fossil records showing this adaptation. The scientists discovered three specimens, one female and two males, belonging to a new fossil stick insect referred to as Cretophasmomima melanogramma, in Inner Mongolia at the Jehol locality, a site from the ...
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - March 20, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

Did rainy climate aid Genghis Khan?
Scientists ask whether a period of unusual weather — suggested by ancient trees — helped the Mongol conqueror expand his power.In the rings of ancient and gnarled trees, scientists have found evidence of a period of an unusual stretch of warmth and wetness in Mongolia between the years 1211 and 1225 — the exact time that Genghis Khan was in power. (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - March 15, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

Did rainy climate aid Genghis Khan? Tree rings offer clues.
Scientists ask whether a period of unusual weather — suggested by ancient trees — helped the Mongol conqueror expand his power.In the rings of ancient and gnarled trees, scientists have found evidence of a period of an unusual stretch of warmth and wetness in Mongolia between the years 1211 and 1225 — the exact time that Genghis Khan was in power. (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - March 15, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news