Medication Treatment for OUD Linked With 80% Lower Risk of Fatal Overdose
Patients with opioid use disorder (OUD) who receive treatment with methadone or buprenorphine have a significantly lower risk of dying from an opioid overdose compared with patients receiving nonmedication treatment, according to astudy inAddiction.“Compared with patients in nonmedication treatment, those in medication treatment had an 80% lower hazard of overdose death during care,” wrote Noa Krawczyk, Ph.D., of the NYU School of Medicine, and colleagues. The risk of fatal overdose significantly increased, however, in the first few weeks following discharge, regardless of the treatment type.The researchers use...
Source: Psychiatr News - February 27, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Tags: Buprenorphine Methadone Substance use disorder Fatal overdose Medication treatment opioid opioid use disorder Source Type: research

Adverse Childhood Experiences Linked to Social Deficits in People at High Risk for Psychosis
Among people at high risk of psychosis, adverse childhood experiences, especially emotional abuse, diminish the ability to recognize other people ’s facial emotions as adults—a common social deficit in patients with schizophrenia, according to areport inSchizophrenia Bulletin.The relationship was strongest among those high-risk patients who went on to develop schizophrenia. The study “confirms that emotional abuse seems to be an important risk factor for the subgroups who go on to develop psychosis,” wrote Stefania Tognin, Ph.D., M.Sc., of the Institute of Psychiatry at King’s College and coll...
Source: Psychiatr News - February 26, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Tags: ACEs Adverse Childhood Experiences clinical high risk for psychosis emotional abuse facial emotion recognition schizophrenia social deficits in schizophrenia Source Type: research

Report Finds Rates of U.S. Deaths From Alcohol Use ‘Accelerating’
Deaths in the United States due to alcohol consumption appear to be rising, according to areport in JAMA Network Open.“The rate of alcohol-induced deaths, largely due to alcoholic liver disease, increased substantially among men and women in the United States from 2000 to 2016, especially in more recent years,” wrote Susan Spillane, Ph.D., of the National Institutes of Health and colleagues.Spillane and colleagues analyzed data from the death certificates of U.S. residents (older than 15 years) who died between 2000 and 2016. The authors defined alcohol-induced deaths as those “due to alcohol consumption ...
Source: Psychiatr News - February 25, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Tags: Alaska Native alcohol alcohol-induced mortality American Indian death certificates deaths JAMA Network Open liver disease Susan Spillane Source Type: research

Most Emergency Department Patients With Mental Health Problems Don ’t Receive Timely Follow-up Care
Less than half of individuals who were seen in an emergency department (ED) in Ontario for a mental health –related issue had a follow-up visit with a physician within two weeks after discharge, according to astudy published today inPsychiatric Services in Advance. Those who had a substance use disorder were even less likely to have a follow-up visit with a physician during this period compared with those who did not have a substance use disorder, the study found.“Whether individuals present voluntarily because of subjective distress or involuntarily (for example, with police escort) because of acute risk, psyc...
Source: Psychiatr News - February 24, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Tags: bipolar disorder emergency department follow-up visit Lucy Barker Ontario Psychiatric Services in Advance schizophrenia serious mental illness substance use disorders Source Type: research

Tendency Toward Negative Moods in Preadolescence Linked to Eating Disorders in Young Adulthood
Negative affectivity, a tendency toward feeling negative emotions such as anger or sadness, may increase the risk of developing eating disorders in young adulthood, astudy in theInternational Journal of Eating Disorders has found.Annelies E. van Eeden, M.D., of Parnassia Psychiatric Institute in the Netherlands and colleagues used data from the Tracking Adolescents ’ Individual Lives Survey (TRAILS), a Dutch community cohort study tracking youth from preadolescence to adulthood. Over the course of TRAILS, participants had assessments at ages 11, 13, 16, 19, 22, and 26 years. Their temperaments were assessed at age 11...
Source: Psychiatr News - February 21, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Tags: Annelies E. van Eeden BMI disordered eating eating disorders International Journal of Eating Disorders negative affectivity negative mood preadolescence Source Type: research

Cognitive Benefits of Exercise in Patients With Schizophrenia Sustained Over One Year, Study Shows
Several studies have found that patients with schizophrenia experience cognitive benefits from exercise. Astudy inPsychiatric Research suggests schizophrenia patients who participate in a 12-week aerobic exercise program may continue to experience cognitive benefits months after the program ends.“These findings encourage the incorporation of [aerobic exercise] in psychosocial treatment regimens [for schizophrenia],” wrote Takeshi Shimada, Ph.D., of the Medical Corporation Seitaikai Mental Support Soyokaze Hospital in Japan and colleagues.Shimada and colleagues conducted a randomized trial in which patients were...
Source: Psychiatr News - February 20, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Tags: Brief Assessment of Cognition in Schizophrenia exercise group exercise psychiatric research schizoaffective disorders Takeshi Shimada Source Type: research

Youth Who Stay in ED Overnight for Mental Health Problems Often Discharged Without Psychiatric Evaluation
Two-thirds of children and adolescents who had to stay in an emergency department (ED) for at least 24 hours with a mental health complaint had suicidal thoughts or behaviors, yet many did not receive a formal psychiatric evaluation by a psychiatrist with treatment recommendations, according to areport inJAMA Pediatrics.Staying overnight in the emergency department without receiving care, known as boarding, is a significant problem related to the shortage of inpatient psychiatric beds. Erin O ’Donnell, M.D., of the Division of Pediatric Emergency Medicine at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and colleagues ...
Source: Psychiatr News - February 19, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Tags: adolescents behavior disorder boarding children emergency department Erin O'Donnell JAMA Pediatrics psychiatric evaluation suicidal ideation youth Source Type: research

Severe Infection Associated With Increased Risk of Substance-Induced Psychosis
People with a history of severe infection such as hepatitis or sepsis may be more likely to develop substance-induced psychosis than people without such history, suggests areport inAJP in Advance.Previousresearch by Carsten Hjorth øj, Ph.D., M.Sc., of Copenhagen University Hospital and colleagues revealed that people with substance-induced psychosis—psychosis that occurs during intoxication and resolves after use of the substance is terminated—are more likely to develop schizophrenia compared with the general population. “However, relatively little is known about the etiology and exact pathophysiol...
Source: Psychiatr News - February 18, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Tags: ajp in advance Carsten Hjorth øj hepatitis infection schizophrenia severe infection substance-induced psychosis Source Type: research

Secondhand Smoke May Raise Risk of Depressive Symptoms in Adolescents
Adolescents who are exposed to secondhand smoke may be more likely to develop symptoms of depression, astudy in theAmerican Journal of Preventive Medicine has found. The risk is also dose-dependent, meaning that the more secondhand smoke to which an adolescent is exposed, the higher the risk.“Smoking has been linked with depressive symptoms in adolescents, but data on secondhand smoking and depressive symptoms in low- and middle-income countries are scarce,” wrote Louis Jacob, Ph.D., of the University of Versailles Saint-Quentin-en-Yvelines in France and colleagues. “This is an im portant omission as enfo...
Source: Psychiatr News - February 14, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Tags: adolescents American Journal of Preventive Medicine cigarettes depression Louis Jacob low-income countries middle-income countries nicotine secondhand smoke smoking tobacco Source Type: research

Psychiatric Medications Not Associated With Poorer Weight Loss Following Bariatric Surgery
Psychiatric medications do not appear to interfere with weight loss in obese patients who have had bariatric surgery, according to areport inPsychosomatics, the journal of the Academy of Consultation-Liaison Psychiatry.Moreover, serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) may be associated with greater weight loss than other types of antidepressants one year after bariatric surgery, according to Michael Hawkins, M.D., of the Scarborough Health Network-Centenary Site in Ontario and colleagues.Comorbid psychiatric illness is common among obese patients who have bariatric surgery, and some antidepressants are known t...
Source: Psychiatr News - February 13, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Tags: antidepressants and weight gain bariatric surgery psychiatric medications and weight gain Psychosomatics: The Journal of Consultation-Liaison Psychiatry weight loss after bariatric surgery Source Type: research

APA Announces Results of 2020 Election
APA ’s Committee of Tellers has approved the following results of APA’s 2020 national election. Please note that these results are considered public but not official until approved by the Board of Trustees at its meeting on March 14 and 15 in Washington, D.C.President-electVivian B. Pender, M.D.TreasurerRichard F. Summers, M.D.Trustee-At-LargeMichele Reid, M.D.Area 2 TrusteeGlenn A. Martin, M.D.Area 5 TrusteeJenny Boyer, M.D., Ph.D., J.D.Resident-Fellow Member Trustee-electSanya Virani, M.D., M.P.H.“I congratulate Dr. Pender and all of today’s successful candidates on their election,” said APA...
Source: Psychiatr News - February 12, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Tags: 2020 APA election Bruce Schwartz Glenn Martin Jenny Boyer Michele Reid Richard Summers Sanya Virani Saul Levin Vivian Pender Source Type: research

Exposure to Mother ’s Heightened Immune Response in Womb May Increase Schizophrenia Risk
Exposure to a mother ’s heightened immune response early in pregnancy may increase an individual’s risk of developing schizophrenia, suggests astudy inLancet Psychiatry.“We found that higher concentrations of proinflammatory cytokines [TNFα, IL-1β, and IL-6] in specifically the first half of pregnancy were associated with a risk for psychosis among offspring, implicating an earlier timepoint in gestation than previously understood,” wrote Dana Allswede, M.S., and Tyrone Cannon, Ph.D., of Yale University and colleagues. “These three cytokines are potent proinflammatory proteins that ...
Source: Psychiatr News - February 11, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Tags: Bruno Agustini Dana Allswede IL-1 β IL-6 inflammatory response Lancet Psychiatry Michael Berk pregnancy proinflammatory cytokines schizophrenia TNF α Tyrone Cannon Source Type: research

Computer Model Might Help Identify Patients at Risk of Not Taking Their Antidepressants
Using electronic health records, researchers have developed a computer program that can predict which patients are at risk of not taking their prescribed antidepressants with about 70% accuracy. Thestudy was published inTranslational Psychiatry.“Treatment discontinuation may reflect a range of features, from depression-associated amotivation and hopelessness to failure to perceive a benefit to concerns about cost,” wrote Melanie Pradier, Ph.D., of Harvard University and colleagues. “However heterogeneous, the consequences of treatmen t discontinuation are substantial, contributing to poor treatment outcom...
Source: Psychiatr News - February 10, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Tags: antidepressant antidepressant nonadherence bupropion citalopram duloxetine escitalopram fluoxetine machine learning medication discontinuation mirtazapine paroxetine sertraline Venlafaxine Source Type: research

Family Conflict, Low Parental Supervision Risk Factors for Suicidality in Children, Study Finds
Family conflict and low parental supervision are associated with suicidality in children, according to astudy published today inJAMA Network Open.“Although many factors that influence a child’s risk for suicide may not necessarily be directly modifiable, family conflict and parental monitoring present targets for intervention,” wrote Danielle C. DeVille, M.A., of the Laureate Institute for Brain Research and colleagues.DeVille and colleagues analyzed baseline data from the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development (ABCD) study, a longitudinal study supported by the National Institute of Mental Health that is...
Source: Psychiatr News - February 7, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Tags: ABCD study Danielle DeVille family conflict JAMA Network Open parental supervision self-harm suicidal ideation suicide Source Type: research

Pain Linked to Increased Risk of Hazardous Drinking in Smokers
Experiencing frequent or intense pain is linked to hazardous drinking in people who smoke tobacco, astudy in theAmerican Journal on Addictions has found. The study also suggests that the impact of pain on a person ’s mood may be partly to blame.“Relative to the general population, smokers are four times more likely to be dependent on alcohol and are more likely to experience severe pain,” wrote Lisa R. LaRowe, M.S., of Syracuse University in New York and colleagues. To examine the relationship between pain and alcohol use among smokers , the researchers analyzed measurements of pain and alcohol use in 225...
Source: Psychiatr News - February 6, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Tags: alcohol AUDIT cigarettes hazardous drinking Lisa LaRowe pain pain severity smokers substance use disorders the American Journal on Addictions Source Type: research

Experts Say Coronavirus Outbreak Demands Swift Mental Health Response
Mental health care is urgently needed for patients and health care workers affected by coronavirus, wrote Yu-Tao Xiang, M.D., of the University of Macau in China and colleagues in aneditorial published Tuesday inLancet Psychiatry. The authors suggest that the lessons learned from the 2003 severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) outbreak can guide the mental health response to coronavirus.The outbreak of the 2019 novel coronavirus pneumonia (2019-nCoV) has garnered international attention and produced a wave of anxiety. Officials in China, where the outbreak originated, and elsewhere have enacted a range of measures to com...
Source: Psychiatr News - February 5, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Tags: anxiety biological disaster coronavirus depression Lancet Psychiatry mental health SARS suicidality Yu-Tao Xiang Source Type: research

Many Older U.S. Adults Who Died By Suicide Did Not Have Known Mental Illness, Study Suggests
Many U.S. adults 65 and older who died of suicide between 2003 and 2016 did not have a known mental illness, according to areport in theAmerican Journal of Preventive Medicine. The majority those who died of suicide were reported as having physical health problems —a precipitating circumstance that was more commonly documented for older adults without known mental illness.“Suicide risk increases with age, and evidence exists for the underdiagnosis and undertreatment of suicide risk in older adults,” wrote Timothy J. Schmutte, Psy.D., and Samuel T. Wilkinson, M.D., both of Yale School of Medicine.To better...
Source: Psychiatr News - February 4, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Tags: American Journal of Preventive Medicine firearms National Violent Death Reporting System older adults physical health problems Samuel Wilkinson suicide Timothy Schmutte Source Type: research

Optimizing Stimulant Treatment May Help Reduce Aggression in Children With ADHD
Children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) who also have aggression problems might benefit from adjustments to their stimulant regimen and behavioral therapy, reports astudy in theJournal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. If these interventions do not adequately reduce aggressive behaviors, additional treatment with the antipsychotic risperidone or the mood stabilizer divalproex may be advised, the study found.Joseph Blader, Ph.D., of the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio and colleagues enrolled 175 children aged 6 to 12 with ADHD and either oppositional d...
Source: Psychiatr News - February 3, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Tags: ADHD aggression behavioral therapy conduct disorder divalproex Joseph Blader Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry oppositional defiant disorder risperidone stimulant Source Type: research

Self-Guided Online CBT May Benefit Patients With Insomnia
People with insomnia may find significant relief of their symptoms through self-guided, internet-based cognitive-behavioral therapy (iCBT), astudy in theJournal of Affective Disorders suggests. This could help address a need in communities where mental health professionals are in short supply, the researchers wrote.Ashlee B. Grierson of St. Vincent ’s Hospital in Sydney, Australia, and colleagues measured the effectiveness of an iCBT program consisting of four online lessons. The lessons were presented as an illustrated story about a male character with insomnia who learns about the condition and ways to manage his s...
Source: Psychiatr News - January 31, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Tags: Ashlee Grierson cognitive-behavioral therapy iCBT insomnia insomnia severity index Journal of Affective Disorders Kessler 10-item Psychological Distress Scale Well-Being Index Source Type: research

FDA Warns Untreated Constipation From Clozapine Use Can Lead to Serious Bowel Complications
The FDA on Tuesday issued anupdated warning that constipation caused by the antipsychotic clozapine may increase the risk of serious bowel complications in some patients.Constipation is already an identified side effect of clozapine, but “serious and fatal events continue to be reported,” according to the FDA’swebsite. The medication affects how the intestines function in most patients, and an uncommon but serious problem is complete blockage of the bowel. The risk is greater with clozapine compared with other schizophrenia medications, the FDA wrote.Higher doses of clozapine and the use of clozapine in c...
Source: Psychiatr News - January 30, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Tags: anticholinergic antipsychotic bowel complications clozapine constipation FDA FDA MedWatch program Food and Drug Administration warning Source Type: research

Risk Calculator Predicts Youth Likely to Experience Recurrence of Bipolar Symptoms
It is possible to predict whether youth with a history of bipolar disorder will experience a recurrence of symptoms using a risk calculator that factors in patient characteristics commonly measured in clinical practice.That ’s the finding from areport that appears in theJournal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. “The risk calculator offers a potentially useful clinical and research tool to predict the individual progression of the illness and guide treatment,” wrote Boris Birmaher, M.D., of the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine and colleagues.The researchers created a bi...
Source: Psychiatr News - January 29, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Tags: bipolar disorder Bipolar risk calculator Boris Birmaher depression Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry mania mood disorders recurrence youth Source Type: research

Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation Found to Improve Cognition in Patients With Depression
This study enrolled 130 adults 18 and older with unipolar or bipolar depression who had been experiencing a major depressive episode for at least four weeks. The participants were randomized to receive 20 sessions (given on consecutive weekdays over four weeks) of either high-dose tDCS (2.5 mA for 30 minutes) or low-dose tDCS (0.034 mA for 30 minutes). Afterwards, all participants had the option to continue with four weeks of open-label, high-dose tDCS treatment.At baseline, after four weeks, and after eight weeks, the researchers assessed participants ’ mood as well as verbal learning, memory, selective attention, a...
Source: Psychiatr News - January 28, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Tags: attention bipolar depression cognition & Anxiety memory processing speed Shawn McClintock Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation unipolar depression Source Type: research

Youth Suicide Rates Higher in Areas With Greater Poverty, Study Finds
Youth suicide rates are higher in U.S. counties with elevated poverty rates, according to astudy published today inJAMA Pediatrics. The association between suicide and county-level poverty was particularly prominent for suicides by firearms.“As pediatric suicide rates in the United States continue to increase, understanding of the upstream contributors to pediatric suicide, including poverty-related factors, appears to be needed so that suicide prevention efforts can focus on the youths at highest risk,” wrote Jennifer Hoffmann, M. D., of the Ann& Robert H. Lurie Children ’s Hospital of Chicago and co...
Source: Psychiatr News - January 27, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Tags: adolescent risk for suicide child and adolescent psychiatry counties firearm deaths firearm suicides JAMA Pediatrics poisoning poverty suffocation Source Type: research

Buprenorphine Use for Treating OUD Rising, Except in Youth
The rate of buprenorphine use to treat opioid use disorder more than doubled between 2009 and 2018, according to astudy inJAMA. However, this trend did not hold true for patients aged 15 to 24 years, in whom buprenorphine use declined.Mark Olfson, M.D., M.P.H., of Columbia University and colleagues analyzed data from the IQVIA Real World Data: Longitudinal Prescription database to determine the number of buprenorphine prescriptions filled by people aged 15 to 80 years old between 2009 and 2018, excluding formulations that were not approved for treating opioid use disorder. The researchers defined a new episode of buprenorp...
Source: Psychiatr News - January 24, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Tags: buprenorphine JAMA Mark Olfson opioid use disorder opioid-related overdose death treatment gap young people youth Source Type: research

Adults in Pain More Likely to Use Cannabis Without Prescription, Study Finds
Adults who experience pain are more likely to use cannabis without a prescription and have cannabis use disorder than those without pain, according to astudy published yesterday inAJP in Advance.“These results suggest that, among adults with pain, frequent nonmedical cannabis use and cannabis use disorder are growing problems,” wrote Deborah S. Hasin, Ph.D., of the New York State Psychiatric Institute and colleagues. “[T]he need remains for other interventions to manage pain that do n ot incur risk of another substance use disorder (i.e., cannabis use disorder) as an adverse treatment outcome.”Hasin...
Source: Psychiatr News - January 23, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Tags: ajp in advance cannabis cannabis use disorder Deborah Hasin National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions pain Source Type: research

Digital CBT Found Effective for Reducing Insomnia During Pregnancy
Digital cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) is a safe and effective approach for reducing insomnia symptoms in pregnant women, reports astudy published today inJAMA Psychiatry.“Although sleep disturbance during pregnancy may be viewed as normative and innocuous, research indicates that it is associated with an increased risk of adverse maternal outcomes, including depression and preterm birth,” wrote Jennifer Felder, Ph.D., of the University of California, San Francis co, and colleagues. “A digital CBT-I [CBT for insomnia] program may be of particular interest for pregnant women, who report a preference fo...
Source: Psychiatr News - January 22, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Tags: anxiety CBT cbt-i cognitive behavioral therapy depression insomnia insomnia severity index JAMA Psychiatry online intervention pregnancy preterm birth Source Type: research

Family Therapy May Delay Mood Episodes in Youth at High Risk of Bipolar Disorder
Family therapy focused on building communication and problem-solving skills may benefit youth at high risk of bipolar disorder, according to areport inJAMA Psychiatry. Specifically, the study found that youth with mood symptoms and a family history of bipolar disorder who participated in a four-month program with their parents (and, when possible, siblings) had longer periods between symptoms of depression, mania, hypomania, or mixed episodes (mood episodes) than those who participated in a program with less intensive family involvement.Previous studies show that youth at highest risk of progressing to bipolar disorder ear...
Source: Psychiatr News - January 21, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Tags: bipolar disorder communication David J. Miklowitz depression family therapy family-focused therapy JAMA Psychiatry manic episodes mood episodes mood symptoms problem solving youth Source Type: research

Help APA Understand How Burnout Affects Different Groups
APA ’s Committee on Well-being and Burnout wants to know more about psychiatrists’ experiences with burnout and/or depression.APA members are urged to complete a newsurvey/self-assessment tool developed by the committee that includes questions about demographics (age, gender, geographic location, minority status, and other variables) and practice setting (private practice, group practice, community mental health center, academic medical center, etc.). The survey also includes questions about burnout using the Oldenburg Burnout Inventory and the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9) to screen for depression. Th...
Source: Psychiatr News - January 17, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Tags: APA Committee on Psychiatrist Wellbeing and Burnout depression how does burnout affect minority psychiatrists M.D. M.P.H. minorities online survey physician burnout Uchenna Okoye Source Type: research

Study Shows Benefits of Long-Term Antipsychotic Use for Patients With Schizophrenia
Long-term antipsychotic use is associated with substantially decreased mortality compared with no antipsychotic use, especially among patients treated with clozapine, according to areport inWorld Psychiatry, the journal of the World Psychiatric Association.Moreover, long ‐term antipsychotic use does not increase the likelihood that a patient will experience severe illness leading to hospitalization, wrote Heidi Taipale, Ph.D., of the Karolinska Institute in Sweden and colleagues.People with schizophrenia have a shorter average life expectancy than the general population. Taipale and colleagues wanted to know if these dif...
Source: Psychiatr News - January 16, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Tags: antipsychotics death Heidi Taipale hospitalization long-term use schizophrenia side effects suicide World Psychiatry Source Type: research

Study Takes Closer Look at Violence Targeting People With Psychiatric Disorders
Astudy appearing today inJAMA Psychiatry found that fewer than 7% of patients with psychiatric disorders in Sweden had either been subjected to violence severe enough to require specialist medical treatment or had perpetrated violence.Amir Sariaslan, Ph.D., of the University of Oxford and colleagues identified 250,419 individuals from Sweden ’s National Patient Register who were born between 1973 and 1993 and had been diagnosed psychiatric disorders. Psychiatric disorders included anxiety disorders, depression, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, personality disorders, alcohol use disorder, and drug use disorder. The pa...
Source: Psychiatr News - January 15, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Tags: Amir Sariaslan anxiety bipolar disorder depression JAMA Psychiatry Paul Appelbaum personality disorders schizophrenia substance use disorder violence Source Type: research

College Students in States With Legalized Marijuana Report Greater Use of Drug
College students in states where recreational use of marijuana is legal appear to be using marijuana more frequently than peers in states where such use is not legal, according to areport inAddiction.“Identifying whether [recreational marijuana legalization] affects different patterns of use is important from the perspectives of policy evaluation and prevention implications,” wrote Harold Bae, Ph.D., and David C. R. Kerr, Ph.D., of Oregon State University. “The present findings suggest tha t [recreational marijuana legalization] may increase the likelihood of patterned marijuana use… .”Bae an...
Source: Psychiatr News - January 14, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Tags: addiction college David C.R. Kerr Harold Bae marijuana recreational marijuana legalization use Source Type: research

Shortened CBT Program May Help Youth With Anxiety Problems
Youth with anxiety problems can benefit from as few as five sessions of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) delivered at school, suggests astudy published in theJournal of the American Academy of Child& Adolescent Psychiatry.Studies in multiple countries including the United States have shown that school-based CBT programs that identify and treat youth considered at risk of disorders like depression or anxiety can be effective. A typical course of CBT involves eight to 12 sessions, which can be difficult to implement in a school setting, wrote Bente Storm Mowatt Haugland, Ph.D., of the University of Bergen in Norway and...
Source: Psychiatr News - January 13, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Tags: anxiety brief CBT child and adolescent psychiatry cognitive behavioral therapy Journal of the American Academy of Child & school-based intervention targeted intervention Source Type: research

Patients With Psychosis, Nonopioid SUDs More Likely to Receive Referral to Specialist
Primary care visits involving a diagnosis of psychosis or a substance use disorder not involving opioids are more likely to result in referrals to specialists than visits involving other behavioral health conditions like depression, astudy inPsychiatric Services in Advancesuggests.“Referral patterns for behavioral health diagnoses are an important component of high-quality primary care,” wrote Kimberley H. Geissler, Ph.D., and John E. Zeber, Ph.D., of the University of Massachusetts. “Optimizing referral patterns is a key way to improve coordination of care and resource allocation.”Geissler and Zebe...
Source: Psychiatr News - January 10, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Tags: coordination of care depression John Zeber Kimberley Geissler opioids primary care Psychiatric Services in Advance psychosis referrals substance use disorder Source Type: research

Energy Drink Consumption Among Youth Associated With Tobacco, Alcohol Use
Youth who drink energy drinks (beverages that contain high levels of caffeine) may be more likely to start drinking alcohol or using tobacco, suggests astudy published in theJournal of Psychopharmacology. “Aggressive marketing tailored toward youth through carefully crafted campaigns, including sponsorship of events that appeal to this age group (for example, snowboarding), and product placement in video games and social media has resulted in exponential growth of their sales among minors in recent years,” wrote Artur Galimov, M.D., of Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California and co...
Source: Psychiatr News - January 9, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Tags: alcohol Artur Galimov energy drinks Journal of Psychopharmacology risk taking stress tobacco Source Type: research

Psychotic Experience In Adolescence Associated With Psychotic Disorder as Young Adults
The majority of young people diagnosed with a psychotic disorder by age 24 have had a psychotic-like experience at age 12 or later, yet many have never sought professional help, according to areport inAJP in Advance.Sarah A. Sullivan, Ph.D., of the University of Bristol, United Kingdom, and colleagues analyzed data on 3,866 adults aged 24 years who had been assessed at age 12, 18, and 24 as part of the Avon Longitudinal Birth Study. The researchers inquired about psychotic experiences using the Psychosis-Like Symptoms Interview.Participants were diagnosed as having a psychotic disorder at age 24 if they had a definite psyc...
Source: Psychiatr News - January 8, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Tags: ajp in advance delusions early identification of psychosis hallucinations psychotic disorder psychotic experiences in adolescence Source Type: research

Patients With Treatment-Resistant OCD Found to Improve After Deep Brain Stimulation
Deep brain stimulation (DBS) may lead to improvements in patients with treatment-resistant obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), reports astudy published today in AJP in Advance.In the open study of 70 OCD patients who received DBS of a region called the ventral anterior limb of the internal capsule (vALIC), Damiaan Denys, M.D., Ph.D., of the University of Amsterdam and colleagues found that during the first year following the procedure, patients on average experienced significant improvements in symptoms of OCD, anxiety, and depression. The findings support the results of a DBS trial involving 16 OCD patients reported in 2...
Source: Psychiatr News - January 7, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Tags: ajp in advance anxiety Damiann Denys deep brain stimulation depression HAM-A HAM-D obsessive-compulsive disorder Y-BOCS Source Type: research

Early Treatment Key to Rapid Concussion Recovery
Young athletes who sustain a concussion are more likely to achieve a speedy recovery if they start receiving clinical care right away, according to astudy published today inJAMA Neurology. On average, athletes who were evaluated and began treatment within seven days of their head injury recovered within 51 days, compared with 66 days for athletes who were evaluated eight or more days postinjury.“[O]nce care was established, time to recovery did not differ for athletes evaluated within the first week of injury compared with those evaluated 2 to 3 weeks postinjury,” wrote Anthony Kontos, Ph.D., of the University ...
Source: Psychiatr News - January 6, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Tags: Anthony Kontos athletes concussion JAMA Neurology recovery vertigo Source Type: research

As U.S. Auto Plants Closed, Opioid Overdose Deaths Rose
Opioid overdose deaths have jumped in parts of the country where automotive assembly plants closed, demonstrating a link between economic downturn and the opioid crisis, according to astudy inJAMA Internal Medicine. Within five years of plant closure, opioid overdose deaths in the affected counties were 85% higher than expected compared with counties with no plant closures. “Our findings illustrate the importance of declining economic opportunity as an underlying factor associated with the opioid overdose crisis,” wrote Atheendar S. Venkataramani, M.D., Ph.D., of the University of Pennsylvania Perelman Sch...
Source: Psychiatr News - January 3, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Tags: Atheendar S. Venkataramani auto plant closures JAMA Internal Medicine opioid overdose deaths opioids Source Type: research

AJP Articles Named ‘Top Stories of 2019’ By NEJM Journal Watch Psychiatry
Two articles published last year in theAmerican Journal of Psychiatry have been named “top stories of 2019” by the editorial board ofNEJM Journal Watch Psychiatry.“As always, we looked for high clinical relevance, balanced with solid methodology, and every study we chose focused on improving clinicians' abilities to treat patients, whether by identifying the best options or highlighting the weaknesses of some once-touted approaches,” wrote Peter Roy-Byrne , M.D., editor-in-chief ofNEJM Journal Watch Psychiatry, in a post announcing the selection of top journal articles of the year. These are theAJP ...
Source: Psychiatr News - January 2, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Tags: AJP anorexia nervosa Evelyn Attia NEJM Journal Watch Psychiatry olanzapine Peter Roy-Byrne Sidney Zisook treatment-resistant depression VAST-D Source Type: research

Subtle Cognitive Deficits May Precede Amyloid Accumulation in Alzheimer ’s, Study Suggests
In the progression of Alzheimer ’s disease (AD), subtle cognitive difficulties may develop prior to or alongside the early phases of amyloid accumulation, according to astudy published Monday inNeurology. The findings challenge the hypothesis that amyloidosis (the buildup of amyloid proteins) comes first in the Alzheimer ’s disease process.Kelsey R. Thomas, Ph.D., of the VA San Diego Healthcare System and colleagues analyzed data from 747 people aged 55 to 90 without dementia who participated in theAlzheimer ’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative. The participants received PET imaging to determine amyloid lev...
Source: Psychiatr News - December 31, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Tags: Adam M. Brickman Alzheimer's disease amyloid attention Beth E. Snitz entorhinal cortex Kelsy Thomas language memory mild cognitive impairment Neurology Source Type: research

FDA Program for Reducing Unsafe Opioid Prescribing and Adverse Events Fails to Produce Clear Results
It is unclear whether the government ’s strategy for reducing unsafe opioid prescribing and adverse events associated with opioids is working, according to areport published today inJAMA Internal Medicine. The findings were based on an analysis of documents obtained from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA).To reduce risks associated with extended-release/long-acting (ER/LA) opioids, the FDA in 2012 mandated a Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategy (REMS) for ER/LA products. The REMS required ER/LA manufacturers to offer continuing education to health care providers on safe prescribing of ER/LA opioids, develop me...
Source: Psychiatr News - December 30, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Tags: distribution Food and Drug Administration JAMA Internal Medicine James Heyward opioids REMS Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategy William Hubbard Source Type: research

Many U.S. Counties Have No Child Psychiatrists, Study Finds
Though the total number of child psychiatrists in the United States increased between 2007 and 2016, a shortage remains in large swaths of the country, particularly in lower-income areas, according to astudy published inPediatrics.“More than half of the children in the United States with a treatable mental health disorder do not receive treatment from a mental health professional,” wrote Ryan K. McBain, Ph.D., M.P.H., of the RAND Corporation and colleagues. “One of the driving factors contributing to this unmet need is a shortage in child psychiatrists.”McBain and colleagues examined data from the A...
Source: Psychiatr News - December 27, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Tags: access to care Area Health Resource Files child psychiatrists mental health pediatrics Ryan McBain Source Type: research

FDA Approves Caplyta to Treat Schizophrenia in Adults
The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) this week approved Caplyta (lumateperone), an oral atypical antipsychotic medication to treat schizophrenia in adults.“Schizophrenia is a complex disease that severely impacts patients and their families,” Jeffrey A. Lieberman, M.D., the Lawrence C. Kolb Professor and Chairman of Psychiatry at Columbia University, said in astatement. “Effective treatment provided in a timely fashion can be game-changing for people living with schizophrenia. The efficacy and safety profile of Caplyta … offers health care providers an important new option for treating people liv...
Source: Psychiatr News - December 26, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Tags: Caplyta Food and Drug Administration Intra-Cellular Therapies Jeffrey A. Lieberman lumateperone Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale schizophrenia Source Type: research

Knowing Others in Treatment May Encourage People With Depression to Seek Care
People with depression may be more likely to seek treatment if they know of others with emotional problems or others who have sought treatment for emotional problems, suggests astudy inPsychiatric Services in Advance.“Our findings suggest that mere personal knowledge [of others with mental illness] may carry unique importance for treatment seeking beyond other well-studied social factors, such as social support and perceived stigma,” wrote Michelle M. Tran, M.S., of Palo Alto University and colleagues.The findings were based on a follow-up survey of adults aged 18 years or older who participated in an internati...
Source: Psychiatr News - December 23, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Tags: depression family Michelle Tran Psychiatric Services in Advance stigma treatment seeking Source Type: research

Heavy Alcohol Use Associated With Higher Risk for Suicide
Alcohol use may raise the short-term risk of suicide in patients who receive outpatient mental health treatment, according to astudy published inGeneral Hospital Psychiatry. The findings point to the importance of closely monitoring alcohol use in patients seeking psychiatric care.Julie E. Richards, Ph.D., M.P.H., of the Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Research Institute and colleagues analyzed data from the electronic health records of more than 44,000 adults who had outpatient visits to a mental health professional between January 2010 and June 2015. All patients had received the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification ...
Source: Psychiatr News - December 20, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Tags: Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test-Consumption AUDIT-C electronic health records General Hospital Psychiatry Julie E. Richards suicide suicide prevention Source Type: research

More Green Space Around Schools May Reduce ADHD Symptoms, Study Finds
Increasing the amount of green space around schools may lower the odds that children will exhibit attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptoms, according to astudy published inJAMA Network Open.“Accumulating evidence indicates that living in greener areas is associated with many beneficial health outcomes,” wrote Bo-Yi Yang, Ph.D., of Sun Yat-sen University in Guangzhou, China, and colleagues. “Given that attention is a critical prerequisite for learning, greenness in school settings may be of great public health significance.”The authors conducted the population-based study between Apri...
Source: Psychiatr News - December 19, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Tags: ADHD attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder Bo-Yi Yang China green space JAMA Network Open Nature neurodevelopment Source Type: research

Early Psychosis Program in Washington State Shows Promise
People with first-episode psychosis (FEP) who received services through a coordinated specialty care program in Washington state called New Journeys experienced significant improvements in symptoms and quality of life after 12 months, according to areport inPsychiatric Services in Advance.Coordinated specialty care involves a team of specialists who work with patients with FEP to create a treatment plan that may include psychotherapy, medication management, family education and support, case management, and work or education support. Coordinated specialty care was specifically designed for patients with FEP and was tested ...
Source: Psychiatr News - December 18, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Tags: anxiety coordinated specialty care first-episode psychosis New Journeys Oladunni Oluwoye Psychiatric Services psychotic experiences RAISE Source Type: research

Report Examines Changes in Suicide Patterns Among U.S. Army Personnel Over Time
Suicide rates among active-duty U.S. Army personnel increased during the wars in Vietnam, Afghanistan, and Iraq —reversing a trend dating back to the late-19th century in which suicides decreased among soldiers during wartime, according to areport inJAMA Network Open.“As historical trends appear to show decreases in wartime suicide rates and as suicide is multifactorial, the findings of this study suggest that factors away from the battlefield may be associated with the change in suicide rates during active combat and among personnel in the U.S. Army,” wrote Jeffrey Allen Smith, Ph.D., of the University o...
Source: Psychiatr News - December 17, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Tags: David S. Jones historical analysis JAMA Network Open Jeffrey Allen Smith military suicide U.S. Army wartime Source Type: research

Meta-Analysis Identifies Effective Doses and Dose Equivalents for 20 Antipsychotics
Ameta-analysis published today inAJP in Advance reports the maximum effective dose for 20 antipsychotic medications, including both oral and long-acting injectable (LAI) formulations. The report also included the authors ’ calculations of the dose equivalents of these 20 medications.“The dose-response relationships of antipsychotic drugs for the acute treatment of schizophrenia are not well understood, but further defining them would be important for many reasons,” wrote Stefan Leucht, M.D., of the Technical University of Munich and colleagues. “Clinicians need to know th e minimum effective doses a...
Source: Psychiatr News - December 16, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Tags: antipsychotic aripiprazole dosage dose equivalent dose response long-acting injectable lurasidone meta-analysis olanzapine risperidone schizophrenia Source Type: research

Male Sex, Comorbid Psychiatric Conditions, Romantic Status Linked to Faster Progression to OCD
It takes an average of seven years for people who have some, but not all, symptoms of obsessive-compulsive disorder (subthreshold OCD) to develop full-blown OCD, according to astudyin theJournal of Affective Disorders. The study also suggests that certain characteristics, such as male sex, the presence of other psychiatric conditions, and romantic status, may be associated with a faster transition from subthreshold OCD to OCD.Emma M. Thompson, a Ph.D. candidate at Monash University in Australia, and colleagues examined data from 954 patients who were enrolled in treatment centers in the Brazilian Research Consortium on Obs...
Source: Psychiatr News - December 13, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Tags: Emma Thompson Journal of Affective Disorders Monash University obsessive-compulsive disorder subthreshold OCD Source Type: research