Future Care Planning Can Help Patients With SMI, Aging Caregivers With Major Life Transitions
Future care planning can be difficult for aging parents and caregivers of people with serious mental illness (SMI). Anarticle inPsychiatric Services in Advance describes the important role that mental health professionals can play in helping families to prepare for the future.“Just as mental health professionals guide parent caregivers to facilitate medication adherence and prevent relapses for a child with serious mental illness, they should also routinely take the lead in discussing and cocreating a future care plan [when caregivers and patients are older],” wrote Thanapal Sivakumar, M.D., of the National Ins...
Source: Psychiatr News - July 26, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Tags: aging caregivers future care planning Psychiatric Services in Advance serious mental illness Source Type: research

Nonpartner Physical Violence Affects More Than Half of Men With Disabilities
More than half of men who have disabilities have experienced nonpartner physical violence, mostly by strangers, astudy in theAmerican Journal of Preventive Medicine has found. The findings highlight the need for violence prevention and intervention programs that are inclusive of and responsive to the needs of men and women with disabilities.Zarintaj A. Malihi, Ph.D., of the University of Auckland in New Zealand and colleagues analyzed data from the 2019 New Zealand Family Violence Survey/He Koiora Matapopore, in which face-to-face interviews were conducted with 2,887 New Zealanders aged 16 years or older between 2017 and 2...
Source: Psychiatr News - July 23, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Tags: American Journal of Preventive Medicine disabilities men New Zealand Family Violence Survey nonpartner violence physical violence psychological disabilities relatives sexual violence strangers women Source Type: research

More Than 1.5 Million Children Globally Lost Caregivers Due to COVID-19 Pandemic
An estimated 1.562 million children worldwide lost a caregiver from March 2020 to April 2021 due to the COVID-19 pandemic, according to astudy published this week inThe Lancet.“Studies like this play a crucial role in illuminating the COVID-19 pandemic’s long-lasting consequences for families and the future mental health and well-being of children across the globe,” said National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) Director Nora D. Volkow, M.D., in anews release. NIDA helped fund the study.Susan Hillis, Ph.D., of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention COVID-19 Response Team and colleagues noted that or...
Source: Psychiatr News - July 22, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Tags: caregivers children COVID-19 fathers grandparents mothers Nora Volkow orphans pandemic The Lancet trauma United States worldwide Source Type: research

Dementia at Younger Ages More Prevalent Than Previously Estimated, Meta-Analysis Suggests
The development of dementia in people between the ages of 30 and 64 years (known as young-onset dementia) is more common than previously estimated, according to areport published Monday inJAMA Neurology. The new report estimates young-onset dementia affects some 3.9 million people globally.“Although this is higher than previously thought, it is probably an underestimation owing to lack of high-quality data,” wrote lead author Stevie Hendriks, M.Sc., of Maastricht University in the Netherlands and colleagues. Specifically, “more data are needed from low-income countries as well a s studies that include you...
Source: Psychiatr News - July 21, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Tags: Alzheimer's disease dementia frontotemporal dementia JAMA Neurology meta-analysis prevalence vascular dementia young-onset dementia Source Type: research

COVID-19 Has Numerous Neuropsychiatric Consequences, Report Finds
Anarticle appearing today in theJournal of Neuropsychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences provides a comprehensive overview of the neurological and psychiatric impact of the COVID-19 pandemic.“Although best known for its severe effects on respiratory function, SARS-CoV-2 produces a broad range of acute and chronic neurological and neuropsychiatric problems,” wrote Theodora Manolis, M.D., of Red Cross Hospital in Athens, Greece, and colleagues. “The COVID-19 pandemic has also had an important impact on the mental health of many individuals in the general population as a result of loss of loved ones, fear of ca...
Source: Psychiatr News - July 20, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Tags: COVID-19 delirium depression headache hypoxia Journal of Neuropsychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences muscle pain neurological problems psychiatric problems psychosis stroke Source Type: research

VA Study Shows Patients With Schizophrenia Least Likely to Discontinue Clozapine, LAI Antipsychotics
Patients with schizophrenia may be less likely to stop treatment if prescribed clozapine or the long-acting injectable (LAI) formulations of aripiprazole and paliperidone compared with oral olanzapine, reports astudy published today inAJP in Advance. The study made use of data from over 37,000 veterans“Randomized controlled trials are the gold-standard design used to test the efficacy of antipsychotics but only reflect effectiveness in patients who volunteer for such trials,” wrote Marc Weiser, M.D., of the Stanley Medical Research Institute and colleagues.Weiser and colleagues used the U.S. Department of Veter...
Source: Psychiatr News - July 19, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Tags: ajp in advance antipsychotics clozapine long-acting injectables oral antipsychotics schizophrenia Source Type: research

Want to Present at APA's 2022 Annual Meeting? Abstract Submissions Are Now Being Accepted
APA is now acceptingabstract submissions for its 2022 Annual Meeting, which will be held May 21 through 25 in New Orleans. The theme of the meeting is “Social Determinants of Mental Health.” Submissions must be made electronically through APA's online abstract submission system to be considered. The site will close onThursday, September 9, at 5p.m. ET.APA has made the following updates to the submission process:All presenters/co-authors must attest to their participation in the proposal.A single author cannot be listed on more than five submissions of any type, including a maximum of two posters.A general sessi...
Source: Psychiatr News - July 16, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research

In Canada, Black Patients More Likely to Receive Coercive Treatment, Study Finds
Black people of Caribbean or African descent with first-episode psychosis in Canada were more likely to be coercively referred for treatment and to receive coercive psychiatric services compared with patients of other races and ethnicities, according to astudy published Tuesday inPsychiatric Services in Advance.“Medical coercion refers to the use of force, threats, or other means to gain compliance from another person who is deemed an imminent danger to themselves or others,” wrote Sommer Knight, M.Sc., and G. Eric Jarvis, M.D., M.Sc., of McGill University in Montreal and colleagues. In Canada, the aut hors con...
Source: Psychiatr News - July 15, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Tags: black Canada first-episode psychosis medical coercion non-Black minority Psychiatric Services in Advance racism white Source Type: research

Telehealth Services Increased During Pandemic, but Age and Regional Disparities Exist
Telehealth visits accounted for nearly two-thirds of all mental health visits by patients enrolled in private insurance plans in the early months of the COVID-19 pandemic, according to areport published Tuesday inPsychiatric Services in Advance.However, telehealth use for mental health services from April to June 2020 was lower in rural areas compared with urban areas, and lower among those over 65 years of age compared with those 24 to 35 years of age.“Telehealth-based mental health services increased overall, but future work might examine why uptake was lower in rural areas and among older individuals and how broad...
Source: Psychiatr News - July 14, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Tags: adjustment disorder COVID-19 disparities generalized anxiety disorder major depressive disorder mental health services pandemic Psychiatric Services in Advance telehealth Source Type: research

Benefits of ECT May Outweigh Risks for Patients Hospitalized for Depression
Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) does not appear to significantly increase the risk of serious medical events in adults who are hospitalized for depression, according to a study published Monday inThe Lancet Psychiatry. Additionally, thestudy found that ECT may reduce the risk of suicide in these patients.Despite substantial evidence that ECT can help patients with treatment-resistant depression, ECT remains underused, due in part to patients ’ concerns over potential side effects of the treatment, wrote Tyler S. Kaster, M.D., of the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health in Toronto and colleagues. “For patients...
Source: Psychiatr News - July 13, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Tags: death depression ECT electroconvulsive therapy hospitalization Lancet Psychiatry suicide Source Type: research

ADHD May Develop in Children Following Severe TBI
Children who experience a severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) appear to be at greater risk of developing attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) than children who experience less severe injuries, reports ameta-analysis published today inJAMA Pediatrics. Mild or moderate TBI was not associated with any subsequent risk of ADHD.“Given the clinical significance of ADHD in pediatric practices and parental concerns about the serious effects of mild TBI/concussion stimulated by media reports, information about the risk for ADHD following TBI may be useful in managing children with TBI and counseling their parents,&r...
Source: Psychiatr News - July 12, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Tags: ADHD attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder injury JAMA Pediatrics meta-analysis mild TBI severe TBI traumatic brain injury Source Type: research

FDA Narrows Use of New Alzheimer ’s Drug to Early Stage Patients
The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved anupdated label for the recently approved Alzheimer ’s drug Aduhelm (aducanumab) to emphasize that the anti-amyloid monoclonal antibody should be used only in patients whose Alzheimer’s disease is in early stages.The updated label states, “Treatment with Aduhelm should be initiated in patients with mild cognitive impairment or mild dementia stage of disease, the population in which treatment was initiated in clinical trials. There are no safety or effectiveness data on initiating treatment at earlier or later stages of the disease than were studied.&rdqu...
Source: Psychiatr News - July 9, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Tags: accelerated approval aducanumab Aduhelm Alzheimer's disease amyloid beta cognitive impairment FDA mild dementia Source Type: research

Missing Emotional Development Milestones in Childhood Associated With Anorexia Risk
Children who struggle to regulate their emotions as they grow older may be at greater risk of exhibiting symptoms consistent with a diagnosis of anorexia nervosa at age 14, according to astudy published in JAMA Psychiatry.Though interventions in childhood could prevent anorexia nervosa, “targets for such interventions are elusive,” wrote Mariella Henderson, M.Sc., of the University College London, Helen Bould, Ph.D., of Bristol Medical School, and colleagues. Emotion regulation, however, “defined as the ability to both intrinsically and extrinsically monitor, appraise, and mo dify one’s emotional st...
Source: Psychiatr News - July 8, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Tags: adolescents anorexia body image Child Social Behavior Questionnaire children emotional regulation JAMA Psychiatry Millennium Cohort Study Source Type: research

Non-White Patients May Be More Likely to Be Excluded From Alzheimer ’s Disease Trials
This study is an ongoing 240-week, placebo-controlled, randomized phase 3 trial of an anti-Aβ monoclonal anti body in older adults with preclinical AD. Specifically, the researchers looked at the recruiting and screening processes for 5,107 White candidates, 323 Black candidates, 261 Hispanic candidates, 112 Asian candidates, and 142 candidates who reported race or ethnicity as “other.”While multiple strategies were used to recruit candidates for the trial (including community outreach, referrals by trial investigators, paid advertisements, and more), White candidates were more likely to report referrals f...
Source: Psychiatr News - July 7, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Tags: Alzheimer's disease clinical trials health disparities JAMA Network Open screening study recruitment Source Type: research

Mobile Intervention as Effective as Group Intervention for Promoting Weight Loss in Young People With SMI
Young adults with serious mental illness (SMI) who are overweight or obese experienced similar weight loss and cardiorespiratory fitness improvements after participating in a 12-month group intervention as those who received one-on-one mobile health (mHealth) coaching for 12 months, areport inPsychiatric Services in Advance has found.The findings suggest that “mHealth coaching may be a more scalable approach for addressing modifiable cardiometabolic risk factors among young adults with serious mental illness,” wrote Stephen J. Bartels, M.D., M.S., of Massachusetts General Hospital and colleagues.The study invol...
Source: Psychiatr News - July 6, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Tags: cardiovascular disease group intervention mHealth mobile health intervention obese overweight Psychiatric Services serious mental illness SMI weight loss Source Type: research

Study Reveals Extent of Unmet Need for Mental Health Counseling During Pandemic
More than 1 in 4 American adults who had symptoms of depression or anxiety reported an unmet need for mental health counseling at the end of 2020, astudy inPsychiatric Services in Advance has found. Overall, more than 1 in 10 adults in the study reported this unmet need.“COVID-19 has laid bare the unmet need for mental health counseling that varies across gender and racial lines throughout the adult population,” wrote Jason M. Nagata, M.D., M.Sc., of the University of California, San Francisco, and colleagues.The researchers analyzed data from approximately 70,000 adults in the Household Pulse Survey, which was...
Source: Psychiatr News - July 2, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Tags: COVID-19 mental health counseling pandemic Psychiatric Services in Advance unmet need Source Type: research

Oral Medication Shows Promise for Postpartum Depression in Phase 3 Trial
This study was funded by Sage Therapeutics, which also manufactures brexanolone.To read more on this topic, see thePsychiatric News article “Novel Medication Speeds Recovery From Postpartum Depression. ”(Image: iStock/fotostorm)For previous news alerts,click here. (Source: Psychiatr News)
Source: Psychiatr News - July 1, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Tags: antidepressant brexanolone JAMA Psychiatry oral medication postpartum depression Sage Therapeutics zuranolone Source Type: research

Paid Family Leave May Reduce Psychological Distress of New Parents
Paid family leave policies enacted by states for new parents appear to improve mental health and decrease psychological distress of new parents, according to areport in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.“This evidence comes at a critical time of ongoing policy debates at the state and federal levels in the U.S. when public and policymaker support for a national [paid family leave] policy is growing,” wrote Rita Hamad, M.D., Ph.D., of the University of California, San Francisco, and colleagues.In the United States, the federal Family and Medical Leave Act provides 12 weeks of unpaid leave to eligible w...
Source: Psychiatr News - June 30, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Tags: American Journal of Preventive Medicine California Kessler 6 score Mental Health Indicator score New Jersey paid family leave psychological distress Source Type: research

People With Substance-Induced Psychosis Found to Be at Greater Risk of Death Than General Population
People with substance-induced psychosis appear to be at a greater risk of dying earlier than those who do not experience psychosis, according to astudy inAddiction. The analysis revealed that the risk of death was elevated in people with substance-induced psychosis regardless of whether they later developed schizophrenia.“Although not necessarily a causal finding, this provides a strong rationale for monitoring people with [a] previous diagnosis of substance-induced psychosis and developing and implementing interventions to reduce this excess mortality,” wrote Carsten Hjorthøj, Ph.D., M.Sc., of the Unive...
Source: Psychiatr News - June 29, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Tags: addiction death mortality schizophrenia substance use disorder substance-induced psychosis suicide Source Type: research

Research to Prevent Suicide of Black Youth Must Take Ground Zero Approach, Say Experts
More research on the prevention of suicide among Black youth is urgently needed, yet clinicians can and should address suicidality within this population in their practices now, according to two viewpoints published today inJAMA Pediatrics.Over the past several decades, data have clearly illustrated the rising trend of suicide among Black youth,wrote Arielle H. Sheftall, Ph.D., a principal investigator in the Center for Suicide Prevention and Research at the Abigail Wexner Research Institute at Nationwide Children ’s Hospital in Ohio, and Adam Bryant Miller, Ph.D., a research assistant professor in the Department of ...
Source: Psychiatr News - June 28, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Tags: Adam Bryant Miller Arielle Sheftall Black youth suicide JAMA Pediatrics race-related stressors racism suicidal ideation suicidality screenings suicide attempts suicide prevention Tennisha Riley Source Type: research

Support Minority Youth by Participating in APA ’s Inaugural Moore Equity in Mental Health 5K
On Saturday, July 10, APA will host the first annualMoore Equity in Mental Health 5K to raise funds for the APA Foundation ’s Moore Equity in Mental Health Community Grants Initiative. The initiative provides education about the mental health needs of minority youth and supports individuals and organizations that develop and provide culturally sensitive mental health services. July is BIPOC Mental Health Awareness Mon th.“There has been progress in mental health research, policy, and programs, but children, adolescents, and young adults continue to experience poor mental health outcomes, particularly minority a...
Source: Psychiatr News - June 25, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Tags: adolescents APA BIPOC Brandon Marshall children health disparities immigrants Moore Equity in Mental Health 5K people of color Regina James Saul Levin young adults Source Type: research

Support BIPOC Youth by Participating in APA ’s Inaugural Moore Equity in Mental Health 5K
On Saturday, July 10, APA will host the first annualMoore Equity in Mental Health 5K to raise funds for the APA Foundation ’s Moore Equity in Mental Health Community Grants Initiative. The initiative provides education about the mental health needs of youth who identify as Black, Indigenous, or People of Color (BIPOC) and supports individuals and organizations that develop and provide culturally sensitive mental healt h services. July is BIPOC Mental Health Awareness Month.“There has been progress in mental health research, policy, and programs, but children, adolescents, and young adults continue to experience...
Source: Psychiatr News - June 25, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Tags: adolescents APA BIPOC Brandon Marshall children health disparities immigrants Moore Equity in Mental Health 5K people of color Regina James Saul Levin young adults Source Type: research

Discharge Planning Improves Engagement With Psychiatric Care, Study Finds
Regardless of a patient ’s level of engagement in psychiatric care prior to being hospitalized, having an appointment scheduled when discharged from the hospital may increase the likelihood that the patient receives follow-up care, according to astudy published yesterday inPsychiatric Services.“In the United States, 42%−51% of adults and 31%−45% of youths do not attend mental health visits within 30 days after discharge,” which can increase the risk of relapse, rehospitalization, and death, wrote Thomas Smith, M.D., of the New York State Psychiatric Institute and colleagues. “Pa tients w...
Source: Psychiatr News - June 24, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Tags: engagement follow-up care hospitalization outpatient visit Psychiatric Services in Advance Source Type: research

Cannabis Use May Increase Risk of Suicidality in Young Adults, Study Suggests
Cannabis use appears to be associated with an increased risk of suicidal thoughts and actions in young adults, according to astudy published Tuesday inJAMA Network Open. These risks were similar regardless of whether the young adults had major depression and were more pronounced in women than men.“Suicide is a leading cause of death among young adults in the United States, and the findings of this study offer important information that may help us reduce this risk,” said lead study author Beth Han, M.D., Ph.D., M.P.H., of the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) in anews release.Han and colleagues analyzed d...
Source: Psychiatr News - June 23, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Tags: cannabis use JAMA Network Open Nora Volkow suicidal ideation suicide suicide plan Source Type: research

Depression Risk After NICU Discharge Decreases in Moms, but Not Dads
Mothers and fathers of premature infants are known to be at higher risk of postpartum depression compared with parents of full-term infants. Astudy inPediatrics has found that while mothers ’ risk of depression decreased after an infant’s discharge from the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) at the hospital, fathers’ depression risk stayed relatively constant during and after the NICU stay.“Clinicians must understand how different populations are at risk for [postpartum depression] to ensure optimal child outcomes,” wrote Craig Garfield, M.D., of Northwestern University Feinberg School of Med...
Source: Psychiatr News - June 22, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Tags: depression depression trajectory Edinburgh Postpartum Depression Scale fathers mothers neonatal intensive care unit NICU pediatric Source Type: research

Supreme Court Rejects Texas-Led Claim to Invalidate Affordable Care Act
The U.S. Supreme Court last weekupheld the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and ruled against the state of Texas and other plaintiffs in its challenge to the ACA, saying the plaintiffs had no legal standing to bring the case.The ruling puts to rest the latest legal challenge to the ACA brought by Republican activists and lawmakers seeking to weaken or invalidate altogether the landmark health care reform signed by President Barack Obama in 2010.The suit,California et al. v. Texas et al., was brought by the state of Texas and 19 other states. It revolved around the “severability” of one component of the ACA—the i...
Source: Psychiatr News - June 21, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Tags: ACA Affordable Care Act individual mandate Marvin Swartz Obama Saul Levin Stephen Breyer Supreme Court Texas Source Type: research

Many Substance Use Treatment Facilities Fail to Offer HIV Testing, Study Finds
Only about 3 in 10 substance use treatment facilities in the United States offered HIV testing in 2018, and fewer than half of facilities treating people with medication for opioid use disorder (OUD) offered HIV testing, according to astudy published inPsychiatric Services in Advance.“Substance use treatment facilities are uniquely positioned to improve early identification, treatment, and prevention of HIV,” wrote Nicholas Riano, M.A.S., of the Weill Institute for Neurosciences; Mark Olfson, M.D., M.P.H., of the New York State Psychiatric Institute; and colleagues. “These facilities could play an importa...
Source: Psychiatr News - June 17, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Tags: HIV counseling HIV testing medication-assisted treatment mental health services opioid use disorder OUD Psychiatric Services in Advance substance use treatment Source Type: research

Pharmacogenetic-Guided Treatment Shows No Benefit Over Standard Treatment for Adolescents With MDD
This study found that participants in both the GENE and TAU arms improved throughout the duration of the study, and there was no statistical difference in improvement between the two arms on the CDRS-R, QIDS, and CGAS,” the authors reported. “In addition, there was no statistical difference i n YMRS scores or the number of adverse events/side effects between the GENE and TAU arms throughout the duration of the study.”The authors noted that although selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) were the most frequently prescribed medications for participants in both treatment arms, the TAU arm had nearly...
Source: Psychiatr News - June 16, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Tags: adolescents Journal of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry major depressive disorder MDD pharmacogenetics selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors Source Type: research

AMA Opposes Administration of Ketamine, Use of ‘Excited Delirium’ for Law Enforcement Purposes
The AMA opposes the use of ketamine and other sedative/hypnotic agents as a pharmacological intervention for agitated individuals in out-of-hospital settings to chemically restrain an individual solely for law enforcement purposes and not for legitimate medical reasons.In addition, the AMA opposes the use of the term “excited delirium” as a medical diagnosis until a clear set of diagnostic criteria for the term is validated.With strong support from APA and the Section Council on Psychiatry, the AMA House of Delegates yesterday approved a report by the AMA ’s Council on Science and Public Health (CSAPH) ad...
Source: Psychiatr News - June 15, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Tags: AMA American Medical Association excited delirium Source Type: research

Anti-inflammatory Drug May Reduce Heavy Drinking in People With Alcohol Use Disorder
Ibudilast —a drug that suppresses the production of inflammatory molecules in the brain—can significantly reduce heavy drinking in adults with alcohol use disorder (AUD), suggests asmall study inTranslational Psychiatry.“A growing body of literature indicates that the neuroimmune system may play a critical role in the development and maintenance of AUD, termed the neuroimmune hypothesis of alcohol addiction,” wrote Erica Grodin, Ph.D., of the University of California, Los Angeles, and colleagues. Both the blood samples and postmortem brain samples of people with AUD have shown elevated biomarkers of...
Source: Psychiatr News - June 14, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Tags: alcohol alcohol use disorder AUD heavy drinking ibudilast inflammation MRI Translational Psychiatry ventral striatum Source Type: research

Lybalvi Approved for Schizophrenia, Bipolar I Disorder in Adults
The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approvedLybalvi (olanzapine and samidorphan) for the treatment of schizophrenia in adults, Alkermesannounced. The agency also approved Lybalvi for the treatment of bipolar I disorder in adults, as a monotherapy for maintenance, and as a monotherapy or an adjunct to lithium or valproate for the acute treatment of manic or mixed episodes.Olanzapine is an antipsychotic, and samidorphan is a new chemical agent and an opioid antagonist. Lybalvi is taken once a day and may be taken with or without food. It will be available in fixed dosage strengths composed of 10 mg of samidorphan and ...
Source: Psychiatr News - June 11, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Tags: Alkermes Bipolar I ENLIGHTEN FDA Lybalvi olanzapine Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale samidorphan schizophrenia weight gain Source Type: research

N.Y. State Program for First-Episode Psychosis Reduces Hospitalization, ER Use
Medicaid patients in New York state with a first episode of psychosis visited the emergency room and hospital significantly less after enrollment in the coordinated specialty care program OnTrackNY than prior to enrollment, according to areport inPsychiatric Services in Advance.OnTrackNY is New York state ’s early intervention program for individuals aged 16 to 30 who have experienced nonaffective psychosis for less than two years. With 23 sites throughout the state, OnTrackNY offers psychotherapy, medication management, family education and support, case management, and work and education support, depending on each ...
Source: Psychiatr News - June 10, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Tags: emergency room first-episode psychosis hospitalization OnTrackNY Psychiatric Services in Advance specialty care Source Type: research

Matching Patients to Therapists ’ Strengths Found to Improve Mental Health Outcomes
Patients who were matched to therapists with proven effectiveness in addressing the patients ’ top areas of concern experienced greater improvements following treatment than those paired with therapists randomly, according to astudy published today inJAMA Psychiatry.“Mental illness is a major public health problem, and even among people who engage mental health care, more than 60% do not benefit meaningfully from care received,” wrote Michael Constantino, Ph.D., of the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, and colleagues. “These results suggest that measu rement-based therapist report cards can help...
Source: Psychiatr News - June 9, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Tags: impairment JAMA Psychiatry mental health outcomes patients psychological distress Symptom Checklist-10 therapists Treatment Outcome Package Source Type: research

Alzheimer ’s Antibody Therapy Receives Accelerated Approval Amid Controversy
The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) yesterdaygranted accelerated approval to the monoclonal antibody aducanumab for the treatment of Alzheimer ’s disease.Alzheimer ’s disease is characterized by changes in the brain—which include beta-amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary, or tau, tangles—that result in the loss of neurons and their connections.“Currently available therapies only treat symptoms of the disease; this treatment option is the first therapy to target and affect the underlying disease process of Alzheimer’s,” said Patrizia Cavazzoni, M.D., director of the FDA’s Ce...
Source: Psychiatr News - June 8, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Tags: accelerated approval aducanumab Alzheimer's disease Biogen Caleb Alexander cognitive effects FDA Malaz Boustani Source Type: research

APA Honors Rep. Bonnie Watson Coleman for Her Work to Improve Mental Health Care
APA has selectedRep. Bonnie Watson Coleman (D-N.J.) as this year ’s winner of its Jacob K. Javits Award for Public Service for her commitment and dedication to increase patient access to mental health and substance use disorder services.The Javits Award recognizes a federal and/or state public servant who has made outstanding contributions to the mental health community. It honors the legacy of Sen. Jacob K. Javits of New York, who achieved many successes on behalf of those with mental illness. The award was presented this past weekend during APA ’s online federal advocacy conference.“Rep. Watson Coleman&...
Source: Psychiatr News - June 7, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Tags: Black youth Emergency Taskforce on Black Youth Suicide and Mental Health Javits Award Pursuing Equity in Mental Health Act Rep. Bonnie Watson Coleman Saul Levin Vivian Pender Source Type: research

Medical Students Often Perceive Lack of Respect for Diversity Among Faculty
Nearly 18% of graduating medical students who responded to a survey in 2016 and 2017 perceived that medical school faculty show a lack of respect for diversity, astudy published today inJAMA Network Open has found.“Our observation that a perceived lack of respect was prevalent among medical students may reflect students’ perceptions regarding faculty-patient interactions, their experiences within the overall learning environment, and the direct social interaction or lack thereof between students and facul ty,” wrote Jasmine Weiss, M.D., of Yale School of Medicine and colleagues. “During each clinica...
Source: Psychiatr News - June 4, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Tags: academia diversity faculty JAMA Network Open Medical School Graduation Questionnaire medical students Source Type: research

FDA Authorizes Marketing of New Aid to Diagnose Autism
Yesterday, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) authorized marketing of a new device meant to help in the diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder (ASD), according to anews release. The Cognoa ASD Diagnosis Aid uses a machine learning algorithm to aid physicians when evaluating patients from 18 months through 5 years of age who are at risk of ASD.According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, ASD is estimated to affect 1 in 54 children in the United States. The disorder can be difficult to diagnose as symptoms can vary, which can delay treatment and early interventions. The average age of diagnosis is 4.3 year...
Source: Psychiatr News - June 3, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Tags: autism autism spectrum disorder CDC Cognoa ASD Diagnosis Aid diagnostics FDA Source Type: research

ECT, Medication Combo Found as Safe as Medication Alone to Maintain Remission From MDD
Older adults being treated for depression with a combination of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) and medication appear to have similar cognitive improvements over time as those treated with medication only, according to areport in theAmerican Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry.Sarah Lisanby, M.D., director of the Noninvasive Neuromodulation Unit at the National Institute of Mental Health, and colleagues looked at neurocognitive outcomes in adults aged 60 and over enrolled in the multicenter Prolonging Remission in Depressed Elderly (PRIDE) study. A2016 analysis of that study, which appeared in the American Journal of Psychiatr...
Source: Psychiatr News - June 2, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Tags: American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry depression ECT lithium older adults PRIDE study Venlafaxine Source Type: research

U.S. Youth Increasingly Aware of Dangers of E-Cigarettes
U.S. youth appear more aware of the dangers of e-cigarettes than they were just five years ago, according to areport in theAmerican Journal of Preventive Medicine. The findings suggest that efforts to educate adolescents about e-cigarettes may be working and point to groups of adolescents who may need additional support.Joseph L. Rapp, M.P.H., Karen M. Wilson, M.D., Ph.D., and colleagues at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai analyzed data collected between 2015 and 2019 from the National Youth Tobacco Survey. This survey is given to U.S. middle- and high-school students annually.In addition to assessing the number...
Source: Psychiatr News - June 1, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Tags: addictiveness American Journal of Preventive Medicine cigarettes E-cigarettes harm National Youth Tobacco Survey smoking vaping Source Type: research

Popularity of Telehealth Services Has Been Rising Since Start of Pandemic, Survey Finds
Nearly 4 in 10 Americans —38%—have used telehealth services to meet with a medical or mental health professional, up from 31% in the fall of 2020, an APA-sponsoredonline survey has found. The survey was conducted between March 26 and April 5 and included 1,000 adults 18 years old and older.Among survey respondents who reported using telehealth services, 82% used the services since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic; 69% used a video platform, and 38% used only phone calls.Other key findings of the survey include the following:45% of respondents said that telehealth services can offer the same quality of care as...
Source: Psychiatr News - May 28, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Tags: APA poll COVID-19 in-person visits mental health services pandemic Saul Levin telehealth telephone video Vivian Pender Source Type: research

Patients With Social Anxiety Disorder Treated for Sleep Problems May Have Better Outcomes
For patients with social anxiety disorder who received exposure therapy, poor sleep quality was associated with slower symptom improvement over time, according to astudy published inDepression& Anxiety.“Social anxiety disorder, a prevalent psychiatric diagnosis, is often associated with sleep disturbance,” wrote Christina D. Dutcher, M.Ed., of the University of Texas at Austin; Sheila Dowd, Ph.D., of the Rush University Medical Center; and colleagues. “Sleep difficulties may prove an obstacl e for optimizing therapeutic gains; thus, clinicians should consider assessing for sleep difficulties and incor...
Source: Psychiatr News - May 27, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Tags: Depression & Anxiety exposure therapy group therapy sleep sleep duration sleep quality Social anxiety disorder Source Type: research

Cognitive Therapy While Tapering Antidepressants May Be Alternative to Maintenance Medication
Treating patients whose depression is in remission with preventive cognitive therapy (PCT) or mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) as they taper an antidepressant medication appears to be a safe alternative to maintenance antidepressant therapy, suggests areport inJAMA Psychiatry.“Current clinical guidelines recommend the continued use of antidepressant medication for patients at high risk for depressive relapse,” wrote Claudi L. Bockting, Ph.D., of Amsterdam University Medical Center and colleagues. “These results suggest that even for patients with a poor clinical pr ognosis, it may be possible to...
Source: Psychiatr News - May 26, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Tags: antidepressants depression JAMA Psychiatry mindfulness-based cognitive therapy preventive cognitive therapy relapse tapering medication Source Type: research

How to Incorporate Anti-Racism Into Psychiatric Practice
The murder of George Floyd by a police officer one year ago today “forced overdue conversations about the structural racism in the very roots of our nation. It also caused many to examine what was once considered business as usual,” APA wrote in astatement released today. “The American Psychiatric Association and psychiatry were forced toconfront our own past [as well as] toexamine how racism had entwined itself into our current operations and how racism was impacting our patients on a daily basis. ”“We recommit as an organization and a field to staying vigilant to injustices that impact our p...
Source: Psychiatr News - May 25, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research

Off-Label Psychiatric Use of Gabapentin Found to Be Frequent, Risky
Ananalysis inPsychiatric Services in Advance reports that over 99% of prescriptions for the anticonvulsant gabapentin are off label, including many prescriptions for psychiatric disorders. In addition, nearly 60% of the patients prescribed gabapentin were also found to be taking central nervous system depressants (CNS-D) such as benzodiazepines, a combination that the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently warned against.To better understand gabapentin prescribing for psychiatric disorders, Brianna Costales, B.S., and Amie J. Goodin, Ph.D., M.P.P., of the University of Florida analyzed data from the National Ambulator...
Source: Psychiatr News - May 24, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Tags: antidepressants anxiety bipolar disorder CNS depressants depression gabapentin off label Psychiatric Services in Advance Source Type: research

Youth Who Seek Hospital Care for Self-Harm May Be at Increased Risk of Psychotic, Bipolar Disorders
Adolescents and young adults who go to a hospital for treatment of self-harm may have an increased risk of developing a psychotic or bipolar disorder by the time they are 28 years old, astudy inSchizophrenia Bulletin has found.Koen Bolhuis, M.D., Ph.D., of the Royal College of Surgeons in Dublin, Ireland, and colleagues analyzed data from 59,476 people in the 1987 Finnish Birth Cohort study. The study comprises information from nationwide registers for all children who were born in Finland that year and includes data on inpatient care and outpatient visits at public hospitals. Bolhuis and colleagues followed individuals in...
Source: Psychiatr News - May 21, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Tags: bipolar disorder hospital psychosis psychotic disorder Schizophrenia Bulletin self-harm young people youth Source Type: research

Court Ruling in Wit v. UBH Should be Upheld, Urges APA
Managed care organizations must use medical necessity criteria and assessment tools developed by nonprofit mental health and substance use disorder specialty organizations when making coverage-related determinations.That ’s what APA and seven other medical organizations told the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit in afriend-of-the-court brief filed yesterday in the caseDavid Wit, et. al., v. United Behavioral Health (UBH). The brief is informed by a 2020APA Position Statement on Level of Care Criteria for Acute Psychiatric Treatment.UBH is appealing anOctober 2020 ruling by Judge Joseph Spero of the...
Source: Psychiatr News - May 20, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Tags: APA friend-of-the-court brief insurance companies Judge Joseph Spero medical necessity mental health and substance use disorders Saul Levin United Behavioral Health Vivian Pender Wit v. UBH Source Type: research

HHS to Establish Behavioral Health Coordinating Council, Distribute $3 Billion in MH, SUD Funding
The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) on Tuesday announced plans to establish a Behavioral Health Coordinating Council focused on collaboration and strategic planning across the department. The council will “ensure that millions of Americans receive prevention, early intervention, treatment, and recovery services for mental illness and substance use disorders,” an APAnews release stated.APA applauded the Biden-Harris administration for creating the council, which will be composed of senior leadership from across HHS. It will be co-chaired by Assistant Secretary for Health Rachel Levine, M.D., and Ac...
Source: Psychiatr News - May 19, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Tags: Behavioral Health Coordinating Council HHS mental illness Saul Levin substance use disorder Vivian Pender Source Type: research

ABCD Study Asks Children About Experiences With Racism
There is ample evidence that racism has negative effects on the health of youth, but few studies have examined the numbers of children in the United States who experience racism and discrimination directly. Data from theAdolescent Brain Cognitive Development (ABCD) Study—a national NIH-funded study tracking the biological and behavioral development of nearly 12,000 U.S. children beginning at age 9 and 10 through adolescence into young adulthood—may point to those at greatest risk and suggest ways to mitigate the effects of racism.“Identifying the prevalence of racism and discrimination among a crucial dev...
Source: Psychiatr News - May 18, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Tags: ABCD study Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development (ABCD) Study child development JAMA Pediatrics NIH racism social determinants of health Source Type: research

Study Examines Cognitive Effects of Schizophrenia Medications
People with schizophrenia often experience problems with learning, memory, attention, and social cognition. Astudy published inAJP in Advanceexamines how the cumulative effects of medications with anticholinergic properties (decrease the activity of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine) may contribute to worse cognitive outcomes.“Psychotropic medications, especially antipsychotics, are critically important therapeutics for schizophrenia, have substantially improved the lives and outcomes for countless patients living with schizophrenia, and represent an essential staple of comprehensive treatment,” wrote Yash Jos...
Source: Psychiatr News - May 17, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Tags: ajp in advance anticholinergic Anticholinergic Cognitive Burden scale cognition schizophrenia Source Type: research

Overweight, Obesity in Early Adulthood Linked to Late-Life Dementia
People who are overweight or obese in early adulthood may have a higher risk of dementia later in life, astudy inAlzheimer ’s and Dementiasuggests.Adina Zeki Al Hazzouri, Ph.D., of Columbia University and colleagues analyzed data from 5,104 older adults from the Cardiovascular Health Study and the Health, Aging, and Body Composition study. The participants were between 69 and 78 years old at enrollment and were followed for roughly eight years on average. Hazzouri and colleagues estimated the participants ’ BMIs in early adulthood (aged 20 to 49 years) based on trends among their peers in the Coronary Artery Ri...
Source: Psychiatr News - May 14, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Tags: Alzheimer's & Dementia body mass index obese overweight Source Type: research