Avatar-Guided Virtual Reality Therapy Found to Reduce Fear of Heights
A brief psychological therapy using virtual reality (VR) can help people overcome their fear of heights, reports a randomized, clinical studypublished this week inThe Lancet Psychiatry. The VR therapy used a digital avatar as the coach; there was no human therapist involved.“Immersive virtual reality therapies that do not need a therapist have the potential to dramatically increase access to psychological interventions,” said lead author Daniel Freeman, Ph.D., of the University of Oxford in a press release. “We need a greater number of skilled therapists, not few er, but to meet the large demand for menta...
Source: Psychiatr News - July 13, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Tags: acrophobia fear of heights Heights Interpretation Questionnaire virtual reality VR Source Type: research

APA Awarded $14.2 Million Grant to Improve Treatment for Serious Mental Illness
APA has been awarded a five-year, $14.2 million grant to create an educational and support system to expand access to care for the 11 million adults in this country who have serious mental illness.The funding for the project, known as the Clinical Support System for Serious Mental Illness (CSS-SMI), was awarded by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. Serious mental illnesses are those that substantially interfere with major life activities and include schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and major depressive disorder. At least one-third of people with these diagnoses do not receive treatment.“Th...
Source: Psychiatr News - July 12, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research

Highlights From APA ’s 2018 Annual Meeting: Issue #3
As ECT Marks 80th Birthday, Experts Reflect on Its FutureResearchers are using neuroimaging to determine additional ways to make this proven treatment for treatment-resistant depression even safer and more effective.Read More>Assembly Seeks Help for Members Appealing Insurance DenialsAt its meeting in May, the APA Assembly took action on a number of issues important to the Association, the field of psychiatry, and its patients. Among them was a proposal to help members appeal denied insurance claims.Read More>Equine Therapy Helps Patients Overcome Range of Psychiatric DisordersIn this millennia-old practice, equine-a...
Source: Psychiatr News - July 12, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research

ED-Administered Safety Planning Intervention Reduces Suicidal Behaviors
A brief clinical intervention in the emergency department (ED) along with structured follow-up phone calls can reduce suicidal behaviors in patients and  encourage them to use mental health services, according to a study published today inJAMA Psychiatry.Barbara Stanley, Ph.D., of Columbia University and colleagues enrolled 1,640 adults who had been admitted to one of nine Veterans Administration EDs who had had a suicidal crisis (but who did not subsequently require inpatient hospitalization) between 2010 and 2015. Four of the EDs continued to provide their usual care for the patients, while the other five implemente...
Source: Psychiatr News - July 11, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Tags: emergency department safety plan suicidal behavior suicide risk Veterans Health Administration Source Type: research

Opioid Prescribing for Teens Exceeded CDC 2016 Guidelines for Adults
Between 2005 and 2016, opioid prescriptions for adolescents generally were written for longer than three days, and the number of prescriptions filled for four and five day supplies increased, according to a report inPsychiatric Services in Advance.These trends occurred prior to the issuance of guidelines for opioid prescribing by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in 2016 but during a period of increasing national awareness of the opioid epidemic, according to lead author Mir M. Ali, Ph.D., of the Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality at the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Adminis...
Source: Psychiatr News - July 10, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Tags: adolescents CDC guidelines opioid prescribing Psychiatric Services in Advance Source Type: research

Rates of Routine Depression Screening on Rise but Still Low
This study observed that more time spent by the patient in the physician’s office led to higher screening rates,” wrote the researchers. “Since increasing the length of time of the actual visit to the physician may be difficult, it is recommended that other health care providers in these se ttings be trained to provide screening.”To read more on this topic, see thePsychiatric News article “New Primary Care Guidelines Recommend Routine Screening for Depression in Adolescents. ”(Image: Alexander Raths/shutterstock)FollowPsychiatric News on Twitter!For previous news alerts,click here. (Source: Psychiatr News)
Source: Psychiatr News - July 9, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Tags: Affordable Care Act depression depression screening U.S. Preventive Services Task Force Source Type: research

Active Participation in Health Care Governance Said to Combat Physician Burnout
The loss of autonomy for physicians —as many have begun working in large health systems rather than as solo or small group practitioners—has been a key driver of physician burnout, according to the authors of aViewpoint article in the July issue of JAMA Psychiatry.While efforts to improve self-care have been moderately effective in addressing burnout, they fail to address its underlying cause —namely, the lack of physician autonomy in today’s large health care systems, write Frederick S. Southwick, M.D., a professor of medicine at the University of Florida College of Medicine, and Steven M. Sou...
Source: Psychiatr News - July 6, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Tags: burnout control Frederick S. Southwick health care systems JAMA Psychiatry regulations Steven M. Southwick stress Well-Being Source Type: research

Prenatal Exposure to Folic Acid Appears to Promote Healthy Brain Development
Increased prenatal exposure to folic acid, which is known to reduce the risk of neural tube defects, may also promote healthy brain development through adolescence, reports astudy published inJAMA Psychiatry. According to the study authors, prenatal exposure to folic acid may protect against psychosis through altered postnatal cortical development. Some studies suggest poor maternal nutrition during pregnancy increases subsequent risks for conditions like schizophrenia in offspring; other studies have suggested that prenatal exposure to folic acid may lower the risk of language delay and autism in children. In 1996, t...
Source: Psychiatr News - July 5, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Tags: brain development cortex folic acid Hamdi Eryilmaz JAMA Psychiatry maternal nutrition pregnancy prenatal care schizophrenia Source Type: research

Retinal Nerve Fiber Thickness May Offer Clues to Predict Cognitive Decline
Identifying people at greatest risk for cognitive decline as early as possible is important for developing treatments that can prevent or slow dementia. Astudy inJAMA Neurology suggests assessing the thickness of the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) —the inner most layer of the retina—may offer some clues about those at greatest risk of future cognitive decline.Fang Ko, M.D., of the University College of London Institute of Ophthalmology and colleagues analyzed data from UK Biobank, a large epidemiological study of UK residents aged 40 to 69. As part of this study, between September 2009 and June 2010 67,321 pe...
Source: Psychiatr News - July 3, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Tags: cognitive testing JAMA Neurology optical coherence tomography retinal fiber thickness and cognition Source Type: research

FDA Approves Aristada Initio to Allow Immediate Initiation of the Long-Acting Atypical Antipsychotic
Clinicians will soon be able to offer patients with schizophrenia who are initiating the long-acting injectable atypical antipsychotic Aristada (aripiprazole lauroxil) the option of an alternative to three weeks of oral aripiprazole supplementation following the first injection. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved Aristada Initio for the initiation of Aristada, manufacturer Alkermesannounced today.This approval now makes it possible for patients to receive Aristada Initio, in combination with a single 30 mg dose of oral aripiprazole, along with their first dose of Aristada (441 mg, 662 mg, or 882 mg monthly...
Source: Psychiatr News - July 2, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Tags: Alkermes aripiprazole Aristada Aristada Initio Craig Hopkinson FDA Food and Drug Administration long-acting injectable schizophrenia Source Type: research

Clinicians Develop New Rating Scale for Perimenopausal Depression
Key differences in depressive symptoms that arise during perimenopause (the period immediately before menopause) suggest that perimenopausal depression may be a distinct subtype of depression, but scales to measure or monitor symptoms of perimenopausal depression are lacking. Areport published yesterday inTranslational Psychiatry describes the development and validation of a questionnaire that clinicians or patients can use to rate the severity of perimenopausal depression symptoms.“Having a reliable tool to aid in the diagnosis of perimenopausal depression is very important in research of this relatively neglected a...
Source: Psychiatr News - June 29, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Tags: anxiety concentration energy irritability isolation Jayashiri Kulkarni memory Meno-D paranoia perimenopausal depression sexual interest sleep Translational Psychiatry weight Source Type: research

Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Appears No Better Than Sham in Veterans With Depression
Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) helped more than 40% of veterans with treatment-resistant depression (TRD) to reach remission, but this remission rate was about the same as the benefit seen in veterans who received sham treatments, according to astudy published yesterday inJAMA Psychiatry.Jerome A. Yesavage, M.D., of the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) and colleagues recruited 164 veterans with TRD (defined as failure to respond to two prior antidepressants) from nine VA medical centers. The study participants had a mean age of 55 years, 81% were men, and 77% were white. These participants were rand...
Source: Psychiatr News - June 28, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Tags: brain stimulation JAMA Psychiatry repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation rTMS TRD treatment-resistant depression veterans Source Type: research

Depression Severity May Predict Akathisia Risk With Aripiprazole Augmentation in Older Adults
Adding the antipsychotic aripiprazole to an antidepressant regimen can benefit older patients with treatment-resistant depression, but the strategy comes with risks: aripiprazole augmentation can cause extrapyramidal symptoms, such as akathisia and parkinsonism, according to astudy in theJournal of Clinical Psychiatry. Thus, clinicians need to pay close attention when prescribing aripiprazole to older patients with more severe depressive symptoms.Jonathan H. Hsu, M.D., of the University of Toronto, and colleagues analyzed data collected during arandomized, controlled trial evaluating the efficacy and safety of aripiprazole...
Source: Psychiatr News - June 27, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Tags: akathisia aripiprazole depression extrapyramidal symptoms Jonathan H. Hsu Journal of Clinical Psychiatry older adults Parkinsonism Source Type: research

Mobile App May Improve Mood, Motivation in Young People With Schizophrenia
Regular use of a mobile-based intervention may benefit young people with recent-onset schizophrenia spectrum disorders by improving their mood and motivation, according to a smallstudy published inSchizophrenia Bulletin.For the study, Danielle A. Schlosser, Ph.D., of the University of California, San Francisco, and colleagues recruited people aged 16 to 36 who had received a diagnosis of schizophrenia, schizophreniform, or schizoaffective disorder within the past five years. A total of 43 participants were randomly assigned to use a mobile intervention called PRIME (personalized real-time intervention for motivational enha...
Source: Psychiatr News - June 26, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Tags: Danielle A. Schlosser mobile app mobile phone PRIME schizophrenia Schizophrenia Bulletin Source Type: research

Mantram Therapy Found to Benefit Veterans With PTSD
A mindfulness-based therapy in which individuals learn to repeat personalized mantras to relax their thoughts appears to be more effective at reducing posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms than a problem-solving psychotherapy known as present-centered therapy, reports astudy inAJP in Advance.Mantram therapy is based on the premise that silently repeating a personally meaningful word or phrase (mantra) promotes relaxation, increases emotional regulation, and reduces stress. Present-centered therapy is a psychotherapy that focuses patients on the present to help them actively target daily challenges related to their ...
Source: Psychiatr News - June 25, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Tags: ajp in advance insomnia Jill Bormann mantram therapy patient-centered therapy psychotherapy PTSD veterans Source Type: research

Police Shootings of Unarmed Blacks Adversely Impact Mental Health in Black Community
Police shootings of unarmed black Americans have adverse effects on the mental health of other black Americans in the general population, according to astudy published Thursday inThe Lancet. The report was released just two days after a police officer shot and killed Antwon Rose, an unarmed black teen who was fleeing a traffic stop in Pittsburgh.Exposure to one or more police killings within a three-month period was associated with a 0.35 day increase in poor mental health days, according to the report, which combined data on police shootings with individual-level data from a nationally representative self-report survey on...
Source: Psychiatr News - June 22, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Tags: adverse mental health effects Antwon Rose Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System black Americans BRFSS Jacob Bor Mapping Police Violence database police shootings Rahn Bailey The Lancet Source Type: research

APA Urges Members to Maintain Pressure on Administration Regarding Child Detentions
In an about-face, President Donald J. Trump signed anExecutive Order yesterday halting his administration ’s policy of separating migrant children from their parents who illegally cross the U.S. southern border. But Trump’s decision to continue his “zero tolerance” policy of border crossing will still place families into prison-like detention centers, perhaps long term.It remains unclear what will happen to the more than 2,300 migrant children who have been separated from their parents since mid-May. Images of young children confined in steel cages and sleeping en masse on thin pads on concrete floo...
Source: Psychiatr News - June 21, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Tags: Altha Stewart anxiety APA letter depression Donald Trump executive order immigration migrant children posttraumatic stress disorder violence Source Type: research

Highlights From APA ’s 2018 Annual Meeting: Issue #2
Stewart to Focus on APA ’s Being a Leader on Issues of Diversity and InclusionDiscrimination and implicit bias affect the psychological and physical health of not only psychiatry ’s patients but also psychiatrists.Read More>Schatzberg Honored for Research Connecting Cortisol and Psychotic DepressionOne of psychiatry ’s leading researchers recounts the biopsychosocial work with which he has been involved in the search for more effective treatments.Read More>Most Americans Agree That Gun Violence Is Public Health Problem, Call for ActionRegardless of whether they are Democrats or Republicans, American...
Source: Psychiatr News - June 21, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research

Parent-Child Psychotherapy Leads to Improvements in Young Children With Depression
An adapted parent-child psychotherapy proven to help children with disruptive disorders may also reduce symptoms of depression in very young children, according to astudy published today inAJP in Advance.“The study provides very promising evidence that an early and brief psychotherapeutic intervention that focuses on the parent-child relationship and on enhancing emotion development may be a powerful and low-risk approach to the treatment of depression,” lead author Joan L. Luby, M.D., of Washin gton University School of Medicine in St. Louis said in apress release.In standard parent-child interaction therapy (...
Source: Psychiatr News - June 20, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Tags: ajp in advance children comorbid disorders depression disruptive disorders emotion regulation Joan Luby parent-child interaction therapy parental depression psychotherapy Source Type: research

Methadone, Buprenorphine After Opioid Overdose Associated With Lower Risk of Death
Treating patients who survive an opioid overdose with either methadone or buprenorphine appears to significantly reduce their risk of death for at least 12 months, but only a third of opioid overdose survivors may be receiving these medications, according to areport in theAnnals of Internal Medicine.“These findings suggest meaningful opportunities to improve engagement and retention in treatment of opioid use disorders after a nonfatal overdose,” wrote Marc Larochelle, M.D., M.P.H., of Boston Medical Center and colleagues.Using the Massachusetts All-Payer Claims Database and several other linked Massachusetts s...
Source: Psychiatr News - June 19, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Tags: all-cause death Annals of Internal Medicine buprenorphine Eric Wargo Marc Larochelle methadone naltrexone Nora Volkow opioid overdose opioid-related death risk of death Source Type: research

Autistic Traits Associated With Elevated Depression in Youth Aged 10 to 18
At age 10, children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and those with high levels of autistic traits have more depressive symptoms than children in the general population, reports astudy published inJAMA Psychiatry. These elevated depressive symptoms persist in the children until they are 18 and are significantly influenced by bullying.“[F]urther research into the role of traumatic experiences, such as bullying, and the utility of interventions to reduce bullying or address its adverse effects could have the potential to reduce the burden of depression in this population,” wrote lead author Dheeraj Rai, Ph.D.,...
Source: Psychiatr News - June 18, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Tags: ASD autism autistic traits bullying child depression social communication Source Type: research

Highlights From APA ’s 2018 Annual Meeting: Issue #1
Everett Sums Up State of Psychiatry in America and Where Profession Is HeadedOne of the keys to psychiatry ’s future is the development of innovative technologies that will reduce administrative burdens and improve patient care.Read More>Talking About Firearms With Patients Necessary, But Examine Your Beliefs FirstWhen talking with patients about gun ownership and storage issues, proceed with respect and neutrality.Read More>APA Poll Finds Americans ’ Anxiety Is Increasing, Especially About Health, Safety, and FinancesMany Americans are dealing with stress and anxiety in various areas of their lives, espe...
Source: Psychiatr News - June 15, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research

Rapid Weight Gain, Decreased Insulin Sensitivity Found in Youth Taking SGAs for First Time
Within 12 weeks of starting treatment with low-dose aripiprazole, olanzapine, or risperidone, youth with disruptive behavioral disorders experienced significant increases in total body fat, according to astudy published today inJAMA Psychiatry. The study also found that youth treated with these second-generation antipsychotics (SGAs) experienced decreases in insulin sensitivity over the 12-week period.The findings point to the importance of continued monitoring for metabolic abnormalities when treating youth with antipsychotics.For the study, Ginger E. Nicol, M.D., of the Department of Psychiatry at Washington University S...
Source: Psychiatr News - June 13, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Tags: antipsychotic medications aripiprazole fat Ginger E. Nicol insulin sensitivity JAMA Psychiatry Johan Detraux Marc De Hert olanzapine risperidone weight gain Source Type: research

Psychiatrist Patrice Harris, M.D., M.A., Elected President-Elect of the AMA
APA member Patrice Harris, M.D., M.A., a former APA board member and AMA board member, was elected today as president-elect of the AMA during the AMA ’s House of Delegates meeting in Chicago. “I believe our American Medical Association has well-crafted policy concerning the changing health care environment in this country,” Harris said in an address to the House following her election. “It will be my honor to represent our AMA in the venues where important issues will be debated. I am committed to preserving the central role of the physician-patient relationship in our healing art.”Harris...
Source: Psychiatr News - June 12, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Tags: 2018 AMA House of Delegates Altha Stewart AMA Board of Trustees child/adolescent and forensic psychiatry Patrice Harris physician-patient relationship Saul Levin Task Force to Reduce Opioid Abuse Source Type: research

APA Calls on Administration to Defend Patient Protections in ACA
APA has strongly condemned the recent decision by the Department of Justice to not defend the patient protections provided in the Affordable Care Act (ACA) in the caseTexas v United States.Since the ACA took effect in 2013, the uninsured rate among nonelderly adults has dropped 40 percent (from 20.5% in 2013 to 12.2% in 2016), according to theKaiser Family Foundation. The Justice Department ’s decision opens the door for insurers to deny health care coverage to the 130 million individuals with preexisting conditions and allows insurers to raise the premiums for Americans with disabilities, senior citizens, and those ...
Source: Psychiatr News - June 11, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Tags: ACA Altha Stewart Department of Justice individual mandate pre-existing conditions Tax Cut Jobs Act Texas v United States Source Type: research

APA Reacts to CDC Report on Uptick in Suicides Across United States
Areport released yesterday by the CDC found suicides rates increased significantly in most states between 1999 and 2016, with 25 states experiencing increases of greater than 30%. The report also suggested that more than half of people who died by suicide did not have a known mental health condition.“Suicide is a critical issue for all of us who work in health care,” APA President Altha Stewart, M.D., said instatement released today. “We know from other research that most people who die by suicide have mental health conditions, though they may not have been formally diagnosed or treated. People should kno...
Source: Psychiatr News - June 8, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Tags: Altha Stewart CDC Deborah Stone firearms Liza Gold mental illness National Suicide Prevention Hotline Saul Levin Source Type: research

Alcohol Use Intervention in ED Shows Promise in Reducing Dating Violence, Depression
A single motivational interviewing-based brief intervention used in the emergency department to curb underage drinking may also reduce short-term dating violence and depression, according to astudy in the June issue ofPediatrics.For this study, Quyen M. Ngo, Ph.D., of the University of Michigan Medical School and colleagues analyzed data collected as part of theU-Connect trial. A total of 836 adolescent patients in the emergency department (aged 14 to 20) who screened positive for risky drinking on the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test were randomly assigned to a computer-led brief intervention, a therapist-led bri...
Source: Psychiatr News - June 7, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Tags: depression drinking motivational interviewing pediatrics Quyen M. Ngo underage drinking violence Source Type: research

Internet Addiction May Increase Risk of Suicidality, Meta-Analysis Finds
People with internet addiction appear to be at a higher risk of suicidal behaviors than those with healthy internet use, according to ameta-analysis in the Journal of Clinical Psychiatry.“We suggest screening individuals with internet addiction for the risk of suicide even if they do not have depression, as other factors may increase the risk of suicide in those with internet addiction,” Yu-Shian Cheng, M.D., of Tsyr-Huey Mental Hospital in Kaohsiung, Taiwan, and colleagues wrot e.While internet addiction disorder is not included as a formal diagnosis inDSM-5, the consequences of pathological internet use conti...
Source: Psychiatr News - June 6, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Tags: AJP Residents ’ Journal depression internet addiction internet gaming disorder Journal of Clinical Psychiatry suicide suicide attempts suicide ideation Yu-Shian Cheng Source Type: research

Firearm Seizure Laws Appear to Reduce Firearm-Related Suicides, Study Shows
States that have laws allowing police to temporarily seize firearms from people deemed to be at risk of danger to self or others have experienced a decrease in the number of suicides involving firearms, according to areport inPsychiatric Services in Advance.In recent years, several states have enacted laws allowing time-limited seizure of firearms, with a level of judicial oversight and due process, from people deemed to be at risk. In 1999, Connecticut became the first state to do so following a mass shooting at the state lottery headquarters. Indiana followed suit in 2005 after the fatal shooting of a police officer in I...
Source: Psychiatr News - June 5, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Tags: aggregate suicides Connecticut firearm seizure laws firearm suicides Indiana firearm seizure laws Source Type: research

Data Contained in Electronic Health Records May Help Identify Short-Term Suicide Risk
Combining patient responses to the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) with clinical information available on electronic health records (EHRs) may someday help clinicians better predict which patients are most likely to attempt suicide, reports astudy published inAJP in Advance.Multiple studies have shown that health data can be helpful in identifying at-risk patients, but most patients do not show any obvious warning signs. Gregory Simon, M.D., M.P.H., of Kaiser Permanente and colleagues tested whether a comprehensive EHR analysis that includes data from the PHQ-9 —a simple but effective depression screening tool&m...
Source: Psychiatr News - June 4, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Tags: ajp in advance EHRs electronic health records Gregory Simon Patient Health Questionnaire PHQ-9 substance use suicide suicide attempts Source Type: research

Irregular Hospital Discharge in VA Facilities May Increase Suicide Risk
Patients who leave the hospital against medical advice and/or self-initiate discharge may be at a greater risk of suicide in the year following discharge compared with those who leave the hospital under different circumstances, suggests areport published today inPsychiatric Services in Advance.Using national Veterans Affairs (VA) administrative data, Natalie Riblet, M.D., M.P.H., and colleagues identified all inpatient discharges and discharge types from 2001 through 2014. The authors used mortality and cause of death data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Death Index to calculate suicide risk within the ...
Source: Psychiatr News - June 1, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Tags: hospital discharge Natalie Riblet Psychiatric Services in Advance suicide Veterans Affairs Source Type: research

APA Cautions Against Policy Separating Children From Parents at Border
APA is urging an immediate halt to a new Trump administration policy that separates children from their parents at the U.S. border.“As physician experts in mental health, the American Psychiatric Association opposes any policy that separates children from their parents at the United States border,” APA President Altha Stewart, M.D., said in astatement released on Wednesday. “Children depend on their parents for safety and support. Any forced separation is highly stressful for children and can cause lifelong trauma, as well as an increased risk of other mental illnesses, such as depression, anxiety, and po...
Source: Psychiatr News - May 31, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Tags: Altha Stewart and posttraumatic stress disorder anxiety APA children depression Justice Department Source Type: research

Comorbid Medical Conditions May Point to Patients Most Likely to Develop Treatment-Resistant Depression
It is well known that some patients with depression will fail to respond to medications, but clinicians currently have few ways to predict those most likely to develop treatment-resistant depression (TRD). If clinicians could predict whether patients who are diagnosed with depression for the first time would develop TRD, they could monitor these patients more closely and adjust treatment more quickly.Aretrospective cohort study published inDepression and Anxiety found that more than 10% of adults newly diagnosed and treated for depression developed TRD within a year. Those who developed TRD tended to be younger and more co...
Source: Psychiatr News - May 30, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Tags: anxiety depression Depression and Anxiety insomnia Soledad Cepeda substance use disorders treatment-resistant depression Source Type: research

Financial Incentives More Likely to Get People to Quit Smoking
Financial incentives are a more effective way to get employees to quit smoking than offering free deterrents such as nicotine patches or e-cigarettes, according to astudy in theNew England Journal of Medicine. The trial also provided large-scale, randomized evidence that the offer of free e-cigarettes does not result in higher rates of sustained abstinence than traditional smoking-cessation aids.The findings “suggest that employers could make their wellness programs more effective by offering money to get their employees to stop smoking instead of or in addition to cessation aids,” Scott D. Halpern, M.D., Ph.D....
Source: Psychiatr News - May 29, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Tags: E-cigarettes FDA financial incentives New England Journal of Medicine nicotine patch Scott Halpern smoking cessation Source Type: research

Women Who Receive Abortion No More Likely to Have Suicidal Thoughts Than Those Denied Abortions
Astudy published Thursday inAJP in Advance found that having an abortion does not place women at higher risk of experiencing suicidal thoughts than being denied an abortion. In fact, the rates of suicidal ideation were low across groups, when compared with other studies of pregnant and postpartum women.“The study adds to the growing body of evidence that having an abortion does not lead to negative mental health outcomes,” study co-author M. Antonia Biggs, Ph.D., of the University of California, San Francisco, toldPsychiatric News. “Therefore, policies requiring that women be warned that they are at incre...
Source: Psychiatr News - May 25, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Tags: abortion Brief Symptom Interview M. Antonia Biggs mental illness Patient Health Questionnaire suicidal thoughts Turnaway Study Source Type: research

APA President Goes to Hill to Urge Provision of MH Services to Incarcerated Individuals
More than 2 million times every year, individuals with serious mental illness are arrested. Moreover, more than half a million people with serious mental illness are incarcerated at any given time. In fact, 44% of jail inmates and 37% of state and federal prisoners have a history of a mental illness.“Those numbers are staggering no matter how you look at them,” said APA President Altha Stewart, M.D., at congressional briefing titled “Innovations and Challenges in Providing Mental Health Services to People in Prison and Those Reentering the Community.” APA was one of the sponsors of the briefing.Driv...
Source: Psychiatr News - May 24, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Tags: Altha Stewart APA President criminal justice system HR 4005 incarceration Medicaid Rep. Paul Tonko Robert Morgan serious mental illness Source Type: research

Extending Weekend Sleep May Reduce Risk of Death in Some Adults Under 65
In conclusion, our findings indicate that mortality is increased when both weekday and weekend sleep is short or when both are long in subjects below the age of 65 years. However, when weekend sleep is extended after short weekday sleep, no association with mortality is seen,” the authors wrote . “We suggest that this may reflect positive effects of compensatory sleep. However, this issue needs to be addressed in longitudinal studies of changes in sleep duration and their link to mortality.”For related information on this topic, see the APA Publishing bookSleep Disorders and Psychiatry, edited by Daniel J...
Source: Psychiatr News - May 23, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Tags: adults Journal of Sleep Research long sleep mortality short sleep Sleep Disorders and Psychiatry Torbj örn Åkerstedt weekday sleep weekend sleep Source Type: research

Social Communication Impairments in Childhood Sometimes Linked to Later Suicidal Behavior
Children who have difficulty communicating in social situations —a trait common in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD)—may be at higher risk for suicidal ideation and behavior in late adolescence compared with those without these problems, according to areportin theJournal of the American Academy of Child& Adolescent Psychiatry.“Suicidal behavior in individuals with autism is often underreported, particularly in those with impaired communicative abilities and comorbid self-injurious behavior,” Iryna Culpin, Ph.D., of the University of Bristol and colleagues wrote. “Our findings em...
Source: Psychiatr News - May 22, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Tags: autism autism spectrum disorder communication Iryna Culpin Jeremy Veenstra-VanderWeele Journal of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry self-harm suicide Source Type: research

Depression in Men May Impact Pregnancy Chances in Couples Seeking Treatment for Infertility
Among couples being treated for infertility, depression in the male partner was linked to lower pregnancy chances, according to astudy inFertility and Sterility. In contrast, depression in the female partner was not found to influence the rate of pregnancy or live birth.Depression rates are known to be high among couples seeking fertility treatments, with previous research finding 41% of women and nearly 50% of men in such couples show signs of depression, wrote Emily A. Evans-Hoeker, M.D., of Virginia Tech Carilion, and colleagues.To investigate the role of depression on pregnancy outcomes in couples seeking non-IVF treat...
Source: Psychiatr News - May 21, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Tags: antidepressants depression Emily A. Evans-Hoeker Esther Eisenberg infertility pregnancy SSRIs Source Type: research

Coordinated Specialty Care Program in NY Shows Promise in Early Treatment of Psychosis
This study] helps to further solidify CSC [coordinated specialty care] as a standard of care for young people with the recent onset of a psychotic illness,” Nossel toldPsychiatric News. “Often young people with psychosis or schizophrenia may be hesitant to engage in treatment or may not believe they have an illness. The CSC approach is to meet people where they are, use a shared decision-making approach, and help people achieve the goals that are important to them.”For related information, see thePsychiatric News article “Participation in Early Psychosis Program May Reduce Risk of Death. ”(Ima...
Source: Psychiatr News - May 18, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Tags: coordinated specialty care early intervention Global Assessment of Functioning Ilana Nossel OnTrackNY Psychiatric Services in Advance psychosis Source Type: research

First Non-Opioid Medication Approved to Reduce Opioid Withdrawal Symptoms in Adults
The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) on Wednesdayannounced the approval of Lucemyra (lofexidine hydrochloride) for the treatment of symptoms associated with opioid withdrawal in adults 18 and older. These can include anxiety, agitation, drug craving, muscle aches, sleep problems, stomach cramps, and more. Lucemyra —an oral, selective alpha 2-adrenergic receptor agonist—is approved for treatment up to 14 days.This medication “provides a new option that allows providers to work with patients to select the treatment best suited to an individual’s needs,” said Sharon Hertz, M.D., director of the...
Source: Psychiatr News - May 17, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Tags: alpha 2-adrenergic receptor agonist FDA Food and Drug Administration lofexidine hydrochloride Lucemyra opioid taper opioid withdrawal US WorldMeds Source Type: research

Visits for Suicide Ideation, Attempts More Than Doubled at U.S. Children ’s Hospitals Since 2008
Surveillance studies have reported that the number of suicide ideation and suicide attempts have been increasing among children in the United States over the last decade. Astudy published inPediatrics now shows that from 2008 to 2015 emergency department (ED) visits and hospitalizations for suicide ideation/attempts more than doubled at U.S. children ’s hospitals and accounted for an increasing percentage of all children’s hospital encounters.“Our findings that ED and inpatient children’s hospital encounters for SI [suicide ideation] or SA [suicide attempts] have increased over the past decade under...
Source: Psychiatr News - May 16, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Tags: children children's hospitals Gregory Plemmons Pediatric Health Information System database pediatrics suicide suicide attempt suicide ideation youth Source Type: research

Resistance Exercise Training May Reduce Symptoms of Depression
Resistance exercise training appears to significantly reduce depressive symptoms among adults regardless of health status, the time spent exercising, or whether the training resulted in significant improvements in strength, according to ameta-analysis in JAMA Psychiatry. The best results were found among those with mild to moderate depression scores —as opposed to no depression—suggesting that resistance training should be considered as an adjuct treatment for depression. Brett R. Gordon, M.Sc., of the University of Limerick, Ireland, and colleagues performed a literature search for clinical trials in...
Source: Psychiatr News - May 15, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Tags: depressive symptoms JAMA Psychiatry resistance exercise training Source Type: research

Reducing Job Strain May Reduce Mental Health Risks in Midlife
Exposure to high job strain —a combination of high job demands (such as work pace and intensity) and low job control (such as one’s ability to make work-related decisions)—in midlife may increase the risk of mental health problems, according to astudy inLancet Psychiatry.While previous studies have suggested an association between job strain and mental illness, this study provides some of the first evidence of causality on the part of the workplace.For the study, Samuel Harvey, Ph.D., of the University of New South Wales in Sydney, Australia, analyzed data from the National Child Development Study —...
Source: Psychiatr News - May 14, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Tags: anxiety depression job control job demands job strain midlife workplace workplace stress Source Type: research

Third-Line Electroconvulsive Therapy May Be Best for Patients With Treatment-Resistant Depression
Clinicians may want to consider electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) for patients with major depressive disorder who have failed to respond to two trials of pharmacotherapy and/or psychotherapy, according to the authors of astudy published this week inJAMA Psychiatry.“As clinicians we always worry about patients getting routed through treatment after treatment, at which point they become more treatment resistant,” senior author Daniel Maixner, M.D., who directs the ECT program at Michigan Medicine, toldPsychiatric News. Decades of research have shown that ECT is the most effective way of achieving remission in patie...
Source: Psychiatr News - May 11, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Tags: Charles Kellner cost-effectiveness Daniel Maixner electroconvulsive therapy Eric Ross Kara Zivin treatment-resistant depression Source Type: research

Disputes on Your Sunshine Act 2017 Payments Must Be Resolved by May 15
Physicians have less than one week to review and, if necessary, dispute data on 2017 payments or other transfers of value from manufacturers of drugs, medical devices, and biologicals that were reported to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) as part of the Open Payments program. All disputes must be resolved directly with manufacturers by Tuesday, May 15.CMS willrelease this information to the public beginning June 30. After the review period closes on May 15, physicians can still initiate disputes, but updated data will not be displayed until the next reporting cycle.The collection and reporting of these ...
Source: Psychiatr News - May 10, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Tags: Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services CMS Physician Payment Sunshine Act Source Type: research

Novel Treatments for BPD, Gun Talk, and More From APA ’s 2018 Annual Meeting: Day Five
Highlights of day five coverage from APA ’s Annual Meeting include novel interventions for treating patients with borderline personality disorder, tips on how to talk with your patients about firearms, and reflections on how identifying neural circuit dysfunction could transform psychiatry.Look for future coverage of APA ’s 2018 Annual Meeting in upcoming issues ofPsychiatric News.Nora Volkow, M.D., Outlines NIDA ’s Marijuana, Opioid Research GoalsAmong other areas of focus, the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) is paying close attention to what the decision to legalize marijuana in many states acro...
Source: Psychiatr News - May 10, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Tags: adolescence Alan Schatzberg Amit Etkin borderline personality disorder cortisol firearms gun storage Judd Marmor Award marijuana NIDA Nora Volkow opioids psychotic depression Source Type: research

First Chester M. Pierce Human Rights Award, Antipsychotic Use and Gestational Diabetes Risk, and More From APA ’s 2018 Annual Meeting: Day Four
Highlights of day four coverage from APA ’s Annual Meeting include the presentation of the first Chester M. Pierce Human Rights Award, a study that suggests a link between antipsychotic use during pregnancy and gestational diabetes, and a resident’s efforts to help Haitians and other foreign nationals in the United States residing unde r Temporary Protected Status.Through tomorrow,Psychiatric News is delivering an evening digest of some of the day ’s highlights. Whether you are here in New York or at home, these reports will convey the excitement and outstanding scientific program being presented at this ...
Source: Psychiatr News - May 9, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Tags: APA annual meeting APA Assembly Chester M. Pierce Human Rights Award computational psychiatry gestational diabetes heroin Jennifer Severe opioid Paul O ’Leary pregnancy Seeth Vivek Source Type: research

Americans ’ Anxiety on Rise, Postpartum Depression Findings, and More From APA’s 2018 Annual Meeting: Day Three
Day three of APA ’s Annual Meeting included an address by the first assistant secretary for mental health and substance use in HHS; the release of a study in theAmerican Journal of Psychiatry, which found a family history of psychiatric disorders increases the risk of postpartum depression; and the results of an APA poll, which found Americans are concerned about gun violence and the opioid crisis.From now through May 9,Psychiatric News will deliver an evening digest of some of the day ’s highlights. Whether you are here in New York or at home, these reports will convey the excitement and outstanding scientific...
Source: Psychiatr News - May 8, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Tags: AJP APA annual meeting APA Gives Back Bolivar Award Elinore McCance-Katz gun violence Juan Bustillo national poll opioid crisis Patricia Newton postpartum depression Solomon Carter Fuller Award Source Type: research

What Is State of Psychiatry Today? And More From APA ’s 2018 Annual Meeting Day Two
Day two of APA ’s Annual Meeting included a reflection on the state of psychiatry by APA President Anita Everett, M.D.; a pledge by incoming APA President Altha Stewart, M.D., to see APA take a leading role on issues of diversity and inclusion; and a discussion of the role clinicians, researchers, and members of the public have in makingDSM a “living document.”From now through May 9,Psychiatric News will deliver an evening digest of some of the day ’s highlights. Whether you are here in New York or at home, these reports will convey the excitement and outstanding scientific program being presented a...
Source: Psychiatr News - May 7, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Tags: Altha Stewart Anita Everett APA's Annual Meeting burnout diversity DSM equine therapy immunotherapies inclusion innovation Leonard Bernstein mentors Minority Mental Health Awards Richard Kogan Source Type: research