Antipsychotics May Increase Risk of Pneumonia, Meta-Analysis Suggests
Patients who take antipsychotics may be at an increased risk of pneumonia, according to asystematic review and meta-analysis published in theJournal of Psychopharmacology.After performing a search of several databases, Olubanke Dzahini, B.Pharm., M.Sc., of the Institute of Pharmaceutical Science at King ’s College London and colleagues included 14 studies with a total of 206,899 patients in the meta-analysis. By compiling, comparing, and contrasting data from these studies, the researchers sought to assess the overall risk of pneumonia in patients who took first- or second-generation antipsychoti cs compared with tho...
Source: Psychiatr News - November 13, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Tags: first-generation antipsychotics Journal of Psychopharmacology Olubanke Dzahini pneumonia second-generation antipsychotics Source Type: research

APA Speaks Out Against Trump Administration ’s Efforts to Undercut Women’s Preventive Care
APA joined four other medical specialty organizations on Thursday to urge the Trump administration to reverse actions taken this week that will limit women ’s access to contraception.The organizationsspoke out just one day after the Trump administration issued a pair of federal rules that allow some employers to opt out of a requirement under the Affordable Care Act to provide birth control coverage for their employees. The new rules allow some employers to deny coverage on religious or moral grounds.“By undercutting women’s access to contraception, a key preventive service, at no out-of-pocket cost in pr...
Source: Psychiatr News - November 9, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Tags: Affordable Care Act APA contraception moral objections preventive service religious objections Trump administration Source Type: research

Psychiatrists May Have Greater Obligation to Warn in States With Gun Restraining Order Laws
Psychiatrists practicing in one of the many states that have enacted gun violence restraining order laws may have a greater obligation to warn family members or law enforcement in cases of suicidal patients who own firearms, according to anarticle published inPsychiatric Services.In the wake of mass shooting tragedies around the country, 13 states have enacted gun violence restraining order laws, also known as extreme risk protective orders (ERPOs). The first five states to put such laws into effect were Connecticut, followed by Indiana, California, Washington, and Oregon, with the remaining states enacting them in 2018.Th...
Source: Psychiatr News - November 8, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Tags: duty to warn firearms gun violence Joseph Chien Psychiatric Services suicide William Frizzell Source Type: research

College Students Seeking Mental Health Care Nearly Doubles Over Decade
This study provides the most comprehensive evidence to date regarding upward trends in mental health service utilization on U.S. campuses over the past 10 years,” wrote Sarah Ketchen Lipson, Ph.D., Ed.M., of Boston University School of Public Health and colleagues. “To better meet the mental health care demand from students and reduce strain on existing services, campuses may wish not only to expand capacity but also to increase the use of preventive and digital mental health services, such as those delivered via mobile apps.”For the study, Lipson and colleagues analyzed 10 years of data collected for the...
Source: Psychiatr News - November 7, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Tags: college students depression diagnosis Healthy Minds Study mental health services Psychiatric Services Sarah Ketchen Lipson suicidal ideation Source Type: research

Negative Thoughts, Fears Linked to Risk of Suicide in Patients With Psychosis
Negative thoughts about psychotic experiences and fears of losing mental control may heighten the risk of suicide in patients with psychosis who were not taking antipsychotics, suggests areport inSchizophrenia Bulletin.“Overall, our findings emphasize the importance of clinicians promoting a recovery-focused and appropriately optimistic outlook when working with people with psychosis, taking care to avoid providing information that might heighten negative illness appraisals and/or fears of losing mental control, ” wrote Paul Hutton, Ph.D., of the Edinburgh Napier University in the United Kingdom and colleagues....
Source: Psychiatr News - November 6, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Tags: metacognition negative thoughts and beliefs Paul Hutton psychosis schizophrenia Schizophrenia Bulletin suicidal thinking suicidality suicide Source Type: research

Gene Risk Scores May Predict Antipsychotic Response in Patients With First-Episode Psychosis
Astudy published today inAJP in Advance suggests that calculating the polygenic risk score (PRS) of a patient with first-episode psychosis can offer clues as to whether he or she will respond to antipsychotics. A PRS involves adding up the total number of genetic variants associated with schizophrenia risk in an individual ’s DNA.“Polygenic risk scores represent the combined effects of many thousands of genetic variants across the entire genome, and better represent the very complex genetic nature of schizophrenia,” said lead study author Jian-Ping Zhang, M.D., Ph.D., an assistant professor at the Feinste...
Source: Psychiatr News - November 5, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Tags: antipsychotic biomarker first-episode psychosis genetic risk genetic variant polygenic risk score precision medicine schizophrenia Source Type: research

Meta-Analysis Finds Group CBT Optimal Psychotherapy for Children, Adolescents With Anxiety
Group therapy may work best for children and adolescents with anxiety, a meta-analysis of various psychotherapies found, with group cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) showing the greatest effectiveness in reducing anxiety symptoms. Thereport was published this week inJAMA Psychiatry.“The results of our analysis suggest that psychotherapy delivered in a group format may generally result in better outcomes than when delivered individually,” wrote Xinyu Zhou, Ph.D., of Chongqing Medical University in China and colleagues. The benefit “may be attributed to the additional expo sure of social stimuli and intera...
Source: Psychiatr News - November 2, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Tags: adolescents anxiety CBT children cognitive-behavior therapy JAMA Psychiatry meta-analysis psychotherapy Xinyu Zhou Source Type: research

APA Honors Psychiatrists Who Served in Vietnam
APA today honored psychiatrists who served in the Vietnam War with a special ceremony at the Vietnam Veterans Memorial Wall on the grounds of the National Mall in Washington, D.C.A wreath was laid at the foot of the memorial wall for U.S. Army Capt. Peter Livingston, M.D., the only known psychiatrist to die in the war. The wreath was placed beneath the section of the wall where Livingston ’s name is etched on the marble wall. Laying the wreath were Livingston’s widow, Cynthia; APA CEO and Medical Director Saul Levin, M.D., M.P.A.; APA President Altha Stewart, M.D.; and APA Assembly Speaker Bob Batterson, M.D. M...
Source: Psychiatr News - November 1, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Tags: Altha Stewart Bob Batterson Peter Livingston Saul Levin traumatic stress Vietnam wreath-laying ceremony Source Type: research

APA Announces Candidate Changes for President-Elect in 2019 Election
There has been a change in the line-up of candidates running for president-elect in APA ’s 2019 election. Philip Muskin, M.D., M.A., APA’s current secretary, has withdrawn his candidacy. Appearing on the ballot for that race will be Jeffrey Geller, M.D., M.P.H., of Worcester, Mass., and Theresa Miskimen, M.D., of Piscataway, N.J.Geller is a professor at UMASS Medical School and medical director of a 290-bed public psychiatric hospital. He has served in the Assembly and on components for 26 years and on the Board of Trustees for 11 years. He has been an on-site consultant to 26 states. He ’s received the H...
Source: Psychiatr News - November 1, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Tags: APA 2019 election Jeffrey Geller Philip Muskin Theresa Miskimen Source Type: research

Specialized Psychotherapy Found to Reduce Severity of Delusions in Patients With Schizophrenia
In conclusion, the authors wrote, “While larger multisite trials investigating MCT+ [metacognitive training] are warranted, the present study adds to the growing literature that psychological interventions can be effective in people with psychosis.”For related information, see theAmerican Journal of Psychotherapy article “Application of Integrative Metacognitive Psychotherapy for Serious Mental Illness. ”(Image: iStock/Squaredpixels)FollowPsychiatric News on Twitter!For previous news alerts,click here. (Source: Psychiatr News)
Source: Psychiatr News - October 31, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Tags: cognitive remediation delusions metacognitive training positive symptoms problem solving Ryan Balzan schizophrenia Schizophrenia Bulletin Source Type: research

What Can Physicians Do to Prevent Firearm Violence?
Physicians should routinely ask patients about firearms in their home and whether guns are locked and safely stored, writes James S. Kahn, M.D., a professor of medicine at Stanford University, in aneditorial published today in theAnnals of Internal Medicine. The editorial was published alongside aposition paper from the American College of Physicians on reducing firearm injuries and deaths in the United States.“Firearm-related violent death is an extraordinary problem made even more alarming by the prevalence of guns in the households of persons with dementia and the variation in firearm injuries related to racial di...
Source: Psychiatr News - October 30, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Tags: Annals of Internal Medicine firearm violence gun safety guns James S. Kahn Source Type: research

Augmenting Interpersonal Therapy Early May Speed Improvement in Youth With Depression
Psychiatrists who treat adolescents with depression with interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT-A) should consider augmenting the treatment if there is no significant response to therapy within four weeks, suggests a smallstudy published in theJournal of American Academy of Child& Adolescent Psychiatry.“Waiting too long to decide whether to change treatment for an insufficient responder could mean prolonged experience of depressive symptoms and associated functional impairments,” wrote Meredith Gunlicks-Stoessel, Ph.D., of the University of Minnesota and colleagues. “On the other hand, augme nting treatment...
Source: Psychiatr News - October 29, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Tags: clinical decision depression depression in adolescents fluoxetine interpersonal therapy Meredith Gunlicks-Stoessel psychotherapy treatment augmentation Source Type: research

Cardioprotective Treatments After Heart Attack Increase Lifespan of Patients With Schizophrenia
The increased risk of mortality in patients with schizophrenia can be reduced with cardioprotective medication, such as antiplatelets, β-blockers, and statins, after a heart attack, suggests astudy published inJAMA Psychiatry.Previous studies have found that patients with schizophrenia die 10 to 15 years younger and have worse outcomes from coronary artery disease than those in the general population.“Our study suggests that patients with schizophrenia who are treated with cardioprotective treatment after MI [myocardial infarction] have a lower mortality risk compared with patients who are not treated, similar t...
Source: Psychiatr News - October 26, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Tags: antiplatelets Benjamin Druss Denmark heart attack JAMA Psychiatry Pirathiv Kugathasan schizophrenia statins β-blockers Source Type: research

Children With Anxiety Disorders Face Higher Risk for Self-Harm, ER Visits, Hospitalization
Children with newly diagnosed anxiety disorders were significantly more likely to experience serious medical events requiring treatment in the emergency room (ER) or inpatient hospitalization than children who did not have these disorders, according to astudy published inDepression and Anxiety.“Within two years following a new anxiety disorder diagnosis, a significant proportion of children have a mental health–related hospitalization, inpatient treated self-harm event, or ER visit, which translates to a sizable number of children, given the prevalence of anxiety disorders,” wrote a uthor Greta A. Bushnel...
Source: Psychiatr News - October 25, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Tags: anxiety children Depression & emergency room Greta Bushnell hospitalization self-harm suicidal ideation Source Type: research

Support at Home, in Community May Protect Against Emotional Distress, Substance Use in Transgender Youth
Transgender and gender-diverse youth who feel close with their parents are less likely to experience emotional distress and engage in substance use compared with those reporting less connected relationships with parents, according to astudy in theAmerican Journal of Preventive Medicine. The study also found that youth who feel safe at school and have stronger relationships with teachers and other adults are less likely to experience depression, suicidality, and engage in substance use.“Given that transgender and gender-diverse [TGD] youth report lower levels of connectedness and safety, bolstering an explicitly trans...
Source: Psychiatr News - October 24, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Tags: American Journal of Preventive Medicine Amy Gower depression gender diverse Patient Health Questionnaire substance use suicide transgender Source Type: research

Haloperidol, Ziprasidone Found Ineffective in Treating Patients With Delirium in the ICU
Neither haloperidol nor ziprasidone, medications commonly used to treat psychosis, had any benefit over placebo in treating patients for delirium in the intensive care unit (ICU), according to astudy published Monday in theNew England Journal of Medicine.“For more than 40 years, intravenous antipsychotic medications have been used to treat delirium in hospitalized patients,” wrote E.W. Ely, M.D., of the Vanderbilt University Medical Center and colleagues. “In this double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial of intravenous antipsychotic medications for the treatment of delirium in the ICU, there was...
Source: Psychiatr News - October 23, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Tags: delirium haloperidol New England Journal of Medicine ziprasidone Source Type: research

Patients With OUD Who Receive Extended-Release Naltrexone May Be More Likely to Stay in Treatment
Naltrexone is a proven treatment for opioid use disorder (OUD), but its clinical usefulness, when taken orally, has been limited by poor adherence among patients, according to several studies. Astudy inAJP in Advance now suggests that patients with OUD may be twice as likely to stay in therapy if they receive monthly injections of extended-release naltrexone (XR-naltrexone) following opioid withdrawal compared with daily oral naltrexone.“These study findings have immediate clinical relevance for treatment of opioid use disorder at a time when an opioid epidemic continues unabated in the United States,” wrote Ma...
Source: Psychiatr News - October 22, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Tags: extended-release naltrexone Maria Sullivan opioid use disorder opioid withdrawal OUD Source Type: research

Giving Patients Choice of PTSD Treatment Yields Significant Benefit, Study Finds
Adults with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) given a choice between sertraline or prolonged exposure therapy opted for prolonged exposure almost two to one; and while both treatments conferred significant benefits, prolonged exposure provided some advantage over sertraline, reports astudy published today inAJP in Advance.The study aimed to determine whether giving patients diagnosed with PTSD their choice of treatment would affect patient outcomes, wrote Lori A. Zoellner, Ph.D., of the Department of Psychology at the University of Washington and colleagues. According to the authors, the study was the first large-scale ...
Source: Psychiatr News - October 19, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Tags: ajp in advance exposure therapy Lori A. Zoellner patient preference posttraumatic stress disorder PTSD sertraline Source Type: research

Several Symptoms May Point to Suboptimal Medication Adherence in Patients With Depression
Despite the proven efficacy of antidepressants, a significant number of patients with depression fail to take these medications as prescribed, which can increase the risk of depression relapse, hospitalization, and more. Astudy inDepression& Anxiety now suggests that patients with major depression who have more severe symptoms, suicidal thoughts, and/or report physical pain may be most likely to report not taking their medications as prescribed.Carolina Baeza-Velasco, Ph.D., of the University of Paris Descartes and colleagues examined data extracted from hospital admissions at the Department of Emergency Psychiatry and...
Source: Psychiatr News - October 18, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Tags: Carolina Baeza-Velasco depression & Anxiety medication adherence Medication Adherence Rating Scale pain suicidal thoughts Source Type: research

Older Adults Who Engage in Self-Harm Are Often Not Referred to Mental Health Services, Study Finds
Most older adults who engage in self-harm are not referred to mental health services, according to the results of astudy conducted in the United Kingdom. The findings, which were published inLancet Psychiatry, suggest these patients are 20 times more likely to die from unnatural causes within a year compared with older adults who do not engage in self-harm.“We have identified a group at high risk of premature unnatural death and identified areas of improvement for clinical management of older-aged adults in primary care,” wrote Catherine Morgan, M.D., of the University of Manchester, U.K., and colleagues. &ldqu...
Source: Psychiatr News - October 17, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Tags: antidepressants Catherine Morgan Lancet Psychiatry older adults self-harm suicide tricyclic antidepressant Source Type: research

Methylphenidate May Lead to Improvements in Youth With Disruptive Behavior Disorder, Study Suggests
Methylphenidate (MPH) may be a potential treatment option for youth with disruptive behavior disorder, suggests astudy published in theJournal of the American Academy of Child& Adolescent Psychiatry.Research has shown that youth with disruptive behavior disorder are less likely than others to anticipate the negative consequences of their behaviors, which may contribute to behavioral problems. Studies also show that people with disruptive behavior disorder tend to have lower activity in the amygdala —a brain region known to be involved in emotional learning, including fear response.Koen Van Lith, M.D., of the Vrij...
Source: Psychiatr News - October 16, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Tags: amygdala antisocial behavior child and adolescent psychiatry conduct disorder disruptive behavior fear conditioning methylphenidate oppositional defiant disorder Source Type: research

Candidates Announced for APA's 2019 Election
The APA Nominating Committee, chaired by APA Immediate Past President Anita Everett, M.D., today announced the candidates for the Association's 2019 election.President-ElectJeffrey Geller, M.D., M.P.H.Philip Muskin, M.D., M.A.SecretaryJeffrey Akaka, M.D.Sandra DeJong, M.D., M.Sc.Ramaswamy Viswanathan, M.D., D.M.Sc.Minority/Underrepresented (M/UR) TrusteeRahn Bailey, M.D.Robert Cabaj, M.D.Area 3 TrusteeKenneth Certa, M.D.Barry Herman, M.D.Roger Peele, M.D.Area 6 TrusteeBarbara Weissman, M.D.Melinda Young, M.D.Resident-Fellow Member Trustee-ElectLisa Harding, M.D.Daniel Hart, M.D.Michael Mensah, M.D., M.P.H.The deadline for ...
Source: Psychiatr News - October 15, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Tags: Akaka American Psychiatric Association 2019 election Bailey Cabaj Certa DeJong Geller Harding Hart Herman Mensah Muskin Peele Viswanathan Weissman Young Source Type: research

Heart Valve Surgery May Lead to Postoperative Cognitive Deficits
Patients who undergo heart valve surgery are at a heightened risk of cognitive decline in the first few months after surgery, suggests apaper published yesterday in theJournal of the American Geriatrics Association.“Aortic valve surgery, which is performed more commonly in older adults, entails greater risk of early cognitive dysfunction within the first month after surgery than mitral valve surgery, but cognition in both groups appears to converge by six months,” wrote Mark Oldham, M.D., of the University of Rochester Medical Center and colleagues.Oldham and colleagues conducted a meta-analysis of 12 clinical ...
Source: Psychiatr News - October 12, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Tags: cognition cognitive decline cognitive deficits geriatric psychiatry heart surgery heart valve Journal of the American Geriatrics Association Mark Oldham postoperative Source Type: research

Shared Decision Making With Patients Can Improve Treatment Engagement, Medication Adherence
This study focused on a specific tool called CommonGround, an offering on the My Collaborative Health Outcomes Information System (MyCHOIS), a web-based platform developed by the New York State Office of Mental Health (NYSOMH). Molly T. Finnerty, M.D., of NYSOMH and colleagues examined the effects of MyCHOIS-CommonGround on treatment engagement, and for patients with schizophrenia, adherence to antipsychotic medication regimens.Some 472 Medicaid patients completed shared decision-making reports using MyCHOIS-CommonGround, summarizing their symptoms, functioning, and concerns, with the help of peer staff. Later, during a me...
Source: Psychiatr News - October 11, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Tags: antipsychotics CommonGround Molly T. Finnerty Psychiatric Services in Advance schizophrenia shared decision making substance use disorder treatment engagement Source Type: research

Shared Decision Making With Clients Can Improve Treatment Engagement, Medication Adherence
This study focused on a specific tool called CommonGround, an offering on the My Collaborative Health Outcomes Information System (MyCHOIS), a web-based platform developed by the New York State Office of Mental Health (NYSOMH). Molly T. Finnerty, M.D., of NYSOMH and colleagues examined the effects of MyCHOIS-CommonGround on treatment engagement, and for patients with schizophrenia, adherence to antipsychotic medication regimens.Some 472 Medicaid patients completed shared decision-making reports using MyCHOIS-CommonGround, summarizing their symptoms, functioning, and concerns, with the help of peer staff. Later, during a me...
Source: Psychiatr News - October 11, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Tags: antipsychotics CommonGround Molly T. Finnerty Psychiatric Services in Advance schizophrenia shared decision making substance use disorder treatment engagement Source Type: research

Mental Health Problems Predict Tobacco Use in Youth
This study demonstrates that mental health problems predict the onset of tobacco use among youth and young adults in a nationally representative sample, and across a wide range of tobacco products beyond cigarettes. … In addition to screening for tobacco product use, health care providers shoul d screen for a range of mental health problems as a predictor of tobacco use.”For related information, see thePsychiatric News article “FDA ’s ‘Real Cost’ Campaign Cuts Cigarette Smoking by Teens. ”(Image: iStock/prudkov)FollowPsychiatric News on Twitter!For previous news alerts,click here....
Source: Psychiatr News - October 10, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Tags: externalizing problems internalizing problems Journal of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry PATH Study smoking tobacco use Wilson Compton young adults youth Source Type: research

Women ’s Psychiatry Expert Discusses Importance of Addressing Patients’ Sexual Harassment
Asking patients about their history with sexual harassment and abuse should be a routine part of psychiatric care, said APA Past President Nada Stotland, M.D., during her presentation at this year ’s IPS: The Mental Health Services Conference. The comments were part of a wide-ranging lecture about important social issues facing women psychiatrists today.Stotland, who is an expert on reproductive psychiatry and women ’s issues, told the audience that psychiatrists can play key roles in helping people deal with and recover from their experiences of sexual harassment and/or sexual abuse. While she noted that ident...
Source: Psychiatr News - October 9, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Tags: IPS mental health Nada Stotland sexual abuse sexual harassment women psychiatrists Source Type: research

More African Americans With Schizophrenia Could Receive Clozapine Despite Lower White Blood Cell Counts
More African Americans with schizophrenia who are not prescribed the antipsychotic clozapine because of low white blood cell counts could potentially use the drug safely, according to Deanna Kelly, Pharm.D., and Gopal Vyas, D.O.Kelly is the director of the Treatment Research Program at the Maryland Psychiatric Research Center (pictured left), and Vyas is a psychiatrist at the Treatment Research Center. They spoke yesterday at APA ’s IPS: The Mental Health Services Conference in Chicago.Clozapine has been shown repeatedly to be the best medication for treatment-resistant schizophrenia. Yet Kelly and Vyas explained tha...
Source: Psychiatr News - October 5, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Tags: African Americans BEN benign ethnic neutropenia clozapine low blood cell counts. Source Type: research

APA Praises Congressional Passage of Opioid Treatment and Prevention Package
A bipartisan legislative package passed yesterday by Congress takes many important steps toward combating the opioid crisis with a broad range of opioid treatment and prevention programs, said APA in astatement.“Opioid use disorder has taken a heavy toll on the health and well-being of Americans,” commented APA President Altha J. Stewart, M.D. “APA is grateful to see bipartisan support for increased access to treatment for substance use disorders [SUD], including expanded access to residential treatm ent and medication-assisted treatment.”APA was disappointed, however, that the bill failed to includ...
Source: Psychiatr News - October 4, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Tags: Altha Stewart confidentiality HIPAA HR 6 HR 6082 opioid use disorder substance use disorder Support for Patients and Communities Act Source Type: research

EEG Readings Not Recommended for Predicting Depression-Treatment Response
Quantitative electroencephalography (QEEG) does not appear to be a reliable tool to predict how a person with major depression will respond to treatment, according to a meta-analysis published today inAJP in Advance.QEEG recordings —which are direct measures of the brain’s electrical waves—have been considered promising biomarkers in psychiatry. Taking a QEEG is easier and less expensive than conducting a full brain scan, another tool being used to find biomarkers for depression. But in their analysis, Alik Widge, M.D., Ph.D., of the University of Minnesota and colleagues indicated that while QEEG is bett...
Source: Psychiatr News - October 3, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Tags: biomarker brain activity depression depression treatment EEG electroencephalography prediction of response treatment response Source Type: research

Machine Learning Can Help Predict Social Outcomes in Patients at Risk of Psychosis
Brain imaging combined with baseline data about social functioning —such as how well one performs in school, at work, or in relationships—successfully predicted how well patients at high risk of psychosis and patients with recent-onset depression would be functioning one year later. Thefindings were reported inJAMA Psychiatry.If replicated, these results could help clinicians identify patients most at risk for poor outcomes and initiate treatment to prevent it. “[T]hese predictive models could inform the personalized prevention of functional impairment in patients with clinical high-risk states and patien...
Source: Psychiatr News - October 2, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Tags: brain imaging clinical high risk for psychosis JAMA Psychiatry machine learning Nikolaus Koutsouleris predicting social functioning recent-onset depression Source Type: research

Medicare Beneficiaries With Mental Illness May Be More Likely to Seek Care at Emergency Department
Studies show that a relatively small proportion of the population accounts for most health spending in the United States. By some estimates, 25% of Medicare beneficiaries account for 85% of Medicare costs. Astudy inPsychiatric Services in Advance now suggests that high-cost Medicare patients with mental health problems may be more likely to seek help at the emergency department (ED) than patients without mental conditions.Jeffrey B. Weilburg, M.D., of Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) and colleagues focused their analysis on high-cost Medicare patients who were enrolled in a Medicare Case Management for High-Cost Benefi...
Source: Psychiatr News - October 1, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Tags: adjustment disorders ED emergency department Jeffrey B. Weilburg Medicare neuropsychiatric disorders Psychiatric Services in Advance psychosis sleep disorders Source Type: research

APA Praises Congress for Funding Mental Health Programs for FY 2019
APA today praised Congress for funding several mental health programs through the passage ofHR 6157, a bill which includes funding for the departments of Defense, Labor, Education, and Health and Human Services through the end of September 2019.The spending package includes funding for the following:Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA): $5.7 billion ($584 million increase)National Institutes of Health (NIH): $39.1 billion ($2 billion increase), including $429 for the BRAIN Initiative (Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies)Curbing the opioid epidemic: $3.8 billion ($206 ...
Source: Psychiatr News - September 28, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Tags: Altha Stewart and Health and Human Services BRAIN Initiative Congress Defense education House Labor NIH opioid epidemic samhsa SAMHSA Minority Fellowship Program Saul Levin Senate Source Type: research

Online Resources Could Help Bridge the Pathway to Care for Patients With First-Episode Psychosis
Social media and the internet could play an important role in reaching young people who are experiencing first-episode psychosis but have not yet sought treatment, according to astudypublished today inPsychiatric Services in Advance.The researchers recruited 112 study participants between the ages of 15 and 35 years who had experienced first-episode psychosis within the past two years. Researchers interviewed the subjects using aquestionnaire designed to explore their online activity during symptom emergence. Nine out of 10 reported using the internet and social media daily, and on average checked social media nine times d...
Source: Psychiatr News - September 27, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Tags: digital mental health first-episode psychosis Internet Michael L. Birnbaum Psychiatric Services in Advance social media Source Type: research

Key Words in Patient Complaints May Point to Physicians With Neurocognitive Disorders
As the number of practicing physicians in the United States over the age of 60 continues to grow, so, too, do the number of questions on how best to identify physicians who may experience neurocognitive disorders. Astudy in the September issue of theAmerican Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry suggests that the language used in complaints by patients may offer clues about those physicians with probable or possible neurocognitive disorders.William O. Cooper, M.D., M.P.H., of Vanderbilt University and colleagues analyzed data on 33,814 physicians who practiced in 144  U.S. hospitals, health care systems, and medical group...
Source: Psychiatr News - September 26, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Tags: American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry neurocognitive disorders patient complaints Vanderbilt Patient Advocacy Reporting System William O. Cooper Source Type: research

Study Points to Need for School-Based MH Care for Gender-Nonconforming Students
High school students who view their gender expression as nonconforming to societal expectations for feminine or masculine appearance and behavior may be more likely to experience mental distress and suicidal thoughts/behaviors, according to astudy inJAMA Pediatrics. The study also found that among males, gender nonconformity is associated with substance use.The findings “underscore the importance of implementing school-based programs to prevent substance use and promote mental health that are inclusive of gender-diverse students,” Richard Lowry, M.D., M.S., of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and ...
Source: Psychiatr News - September 25, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Tags: Ellen Selkie gender gender diversity gender nonconformity JAMA Pediatrics mental distress Richard Lowry substance use suicide Youth Risk Behavior Survey Source Type: research

Long-Term Use of Antidepressants Doesn ’t Increase Dementia Risk, Study Finds
While the long-term use of most antidepressants does not appear to increase the risk of dementia, long-term use of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) paroxetine may, suggests astudy in theJournal of the American Geriatrics Society.Laura Heath, Ph.D., of the University of Washington and colleagues examined the health data of 3,059 older adults who were part of Kaiser Permanente Washington ’s Adult Changes in Thought (ACT) study, a longitudinal study tracking brain changes prior to the onset of dementia.The investigators used this longitudinal data to compare dementia rates in patients with cumulative an...
Source: Psychiatr News - September 24, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Tags: anticholinergic antidepressant dementia dementia risk paroxetine SSRIs trazodone Source Type: research

APA Awarded CMS Funding to Develop Quality Measures
APA has received an award from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) to help develop mental health and substance use quality measures for CMS ’s Quality Payment Program (QPP).The QPP is the updated reimbursement system for CMS that was established under the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act of 2015 (MACRA). MACRA authorized CMS to provide incentives that encourage physicians to focus on quality, value of care, and patient health.APA is working with the National Committee for Quality Assurance (NCQA), a nonprofit organization that is experienced at developing quality measures. APA will use th...
Source: Psychiatr News - September 21, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Tags: APA CMS CMS award MACRA mental health and substance use quality measures National Committee for Quality Assurance PsychPRO Saul Levin Source Type: research

Arthritis Found Highly Prevalent in Older Individuals With Depression
More than half of individuals over age 50 who have depression and more than two-thirds of those with severe depression also have arthritis, according to areport in the International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry.“[I]t may be critical for mental health care providers to provide regular arthritis‐related pain assessments and evidence‐based treatments for co‐occurring arthritis in older adults with or at risk for depression,” wrote lead author Jessica Brooks, M.D., a professor of psychiatry at the Ge isel School of Medicine and Centers for Health and Aging at Dartmouth College, and colleagues.The researche...
Source: Psychiatr News - September 20, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Tags: arthritis depression International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry Jessica Brooks National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey older adults Source Type: research

Anxiety Linked to Cognitive Decline in Older Adults, Study Shows
Symptoms of anxiety in women appear to be associated with a decline over time in executive function —the ability to plan ahead and organize one’s thoughts, according to areport inThe American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry.Among both men and women 65 years and older, anxiety appears to predict a decline in verbal memory, which refers to the ability to remember words.“Adequate treatment of anxiety symptoms could potentially beneficially influence the risk for developing neurodegenerative disease,” wrote Sebastian Köhler, Ph.D., an associate professor of psychiatry at Maastricht University, and ...
Source: Psychiatr News - September 19, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Tags: anxiety cognitive decline executive function memory processing speed Sebastian Kohler sex differences The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry verbal memory Source Type: research

Burnout Found to Be Common Among U.S. Resident Physicians
Symptoms of burnout and regret over career choice are common among second-year resident physicians (PGY-2) in the United States, but these symptoms vary according to specialty, reports astudy published today inJAMA. Overall, 45% of PGY-2 residents reported symptoms of burnout and 14% reported career choice regret.“The findings suggest the prevalence of burnout symptoms among resident physicians may be similar to that of practicing physicians (48.8%) and higher than other U.S. workers (28.4% as assessed in 2014 using the same single-item measures adapted from the MBI [Maslach Burnout Inventory]),” wrote L iselot...
Source: Psychiatr News - September 18, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Tags: burnout JAMA Lisa S. Rotenstein Liselotte N. Dyrbye Maslach Burnout Inventory PGY-2 resident physicians systematic review Source Type: research

Mental Health Needs of Blacks Are Not Being Met, Says APA President
There is a mental health crisis in the black community, which calls for improved cultural competency training for all psychiatrists as well as more openness among blacks to talk about these issues, said APA President Altha Stewart, M.D. She spoke on Thursday at a session on mental health at the 48th legislative conference of the Congressional Black Caucus Foundation (CBCF), an organization aimed at advancing the global black community by developing leaders, informing policy, and educating the public.Cultural competency training is aimed at helping health care providers understand patients ’ values, beliefs, and behav...
Source: Psychiatr News - September 17, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Tags: Altha Stewart Congressional Black Caucus Foundation cultural competency depression mental health Patricia Newton psychiatrists psychosis Source Type: research

APA Joins Health Organizations in Lawsuit Against Expansion of Short-Term Health Plans
Joining a coalition of seven mental health and health advocacy groups, APA filedsuit today in federal court to invalidate a Trump administration rule on short-term, limited duration health plans.The coalition argued in its complaint that thefinal rule, issued last month by three federal agencies, violates the plain-English meaning of “short-term” by allowing the sale of the plans for up to 364 days at a time (up from three months) and “limited duration” by allowing renewals for up to three years (up from 12 months). The plans are sold in the individual market to those without employment-based or gov...
Source: Psychiatr News - September 14, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Tags: ACA Altha Stewart essential health benefits lawsuit preexisting conditions short-term health plans Source Type: research

Mindfulness Treatment Effective for Veterans With PTSD, Study Finds
Two complementary treatments —mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) and present-centered group therapy (PCGT)—appeared to benefit U.S. military veterans with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), according to astudy published today in Psychiatric Research and Clinical Practice.Complementary and integrative health approaches, such as mindfulness meditation, are intended to be integrated with evidence-based treatment, such as trauma-focused psychotherapy and antidepressant medications, wrote Lori L. Davis, M.D., the associate chief of staff for Research and Development Service at the Veterans Affairs Medical ...
Source: Psychiatr News - September 13, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Tags: Lori Davis mindfulness posttraumatic stress disorder present-centered group therapy Psychiatric Research and Clinical Practice PTSD U.S. military veterans Source Type: research

Sleep Disorders May Be Missed in Patients With Psychosis
Sleep disorders appear to be common in patients with psychosis, but few appear to be receiving sleep assessments or treatment for such disorders, suggests areport inSchizophrenia Bulletin.“Taking sleep disorders in psychosis seriously may have important benefits,” Sarah Reeve, D.Phil., of the University of Oxford and colleagues wrote. “Recent manipulation studies have demonstrated that simulating insomnia increases psychotic experiences, and, conversely, treating insomnia reduc es psychotic experiences. … [B]y improving sleep it may be possible to improve psychosis, representing an exciting new tre...
Source: Psychiatr News - September 12, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Tags: anxiety depression hallucinations insomnia nightmare disorder paranoia psychosis Sarah Reeve Schizophrenia Bulletin sleep disorders Source Type: research

Intervention Found to Slow Cognitive Decline in Older Blacks With MCI
Encouraging older black adults with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) to set goals and develop plans to increase cognitive, physical, and/or social activities may help to slow cognitive decline, according to astudy published Monday inJAMA Neurology.MCI is known to increase the risk of progressive cognitive decline. While some observational studies have suggested that engaging in cognitive, physical, and/or social activity may prevent cognitive decline, “these studies have included few black individuals who may differ from white individuals in risk profile (e.g., cognitive reserve, hypertension, diabetes), mechanisms of...
Source: Psychiatr News - September 11, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Tags: Barry Rovner behavioral activation blacks health equity JAMA Neurology MCI mild cognitive impairment supportive therapy Source Type: research

Guidelines for Treating Perimenopausal Depression Released
Studies suggest women are at an increased risk of depression during perimenopause —the time right before menopause when female hormones start to decline. A multi-institute expert panel convened by the North American Menopause Society and the National Network on Depression Centers Women and Mood Disorders Task Group has now developed and published the first-everguidelines for the evaluation and treatment of perimenopausal depression.The guidelines were jointly published in the journalsMenopause and theJournal of Women's Health.“The notion of a menopause-associated depression … has been the focus of clinic...
Source: Psychiatr News - September 7, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Tags: estrogen replacement therapy guidelines hormonal contraception menopause perimenopausal depression women's health Source Type: research

Occupational Injury Raises Long-Term Suicidality Risk, Study Finds
Occupational injury, particularly an injury which leaves workers severely harmed or results in work instability, may increase the long-term risk of suicidality, according tostudy in theJournal of Clinical Psychiatry.For the study, Wei-Shan Chin, Ph.D., a postdoctoral research fellow at the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences in Taiwan, and colleagues recruited workers from Taiwan who sustained occupational injuries requiring hospitalization for three days or longer. Some 2,300 workers responded to questionnaires sent by mail at three months and 12 months after the injury; the questionnaires collected inform...
Source: Psychiatr News - September 6, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Tags: Brief Symptom Rating Scale Journal of Clinical Psychiatry Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview occupational injury Posttraumatic Symptom Checklist suicide Wei-Shan Chin Source Type: research

Parents of Schizophrenia Patients Found More Likely to Seek Psychiatric Care
The demands of providing long-term care to a family member with severe, chronic illness have been shown to have a negative effect on the health of caregivers. Astudy published Monday inSchizophrenia Bulletin now suggests that parents of patients with schizophrenia are more likely to seek care for mental illness than parents of patients with other chronic diseases and healthy controls.Ellenor Mittendorfer-Rutz, Ph.D., of Karolinska Institutet and colleagues analyzed data derived from Swedish nationwide registers to compare health care resource use, adverse health status, and more of 18,215 parents of patients with schizophr...
Source: Psychiatr News - September 5, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Tags: caregiver burden chronic illness Ellenor Mittendorfer-Rutz epilepsy multiple sclerosis parents psychiatric care rheumatoid arthritis Schizophrenia Bulletin Source Type: research

Physician Burnout Poses Risks to Patient Safety
Burnout can have profound physical and emotional consequences on physicians. A largemeta-analysis published today inJAMA Internal Medicine now clarifies the adverse effects of physician burnout on patient care. The meta-analysis found that physicians with burnout are twice as likely to be involved in patient safety incidents, more than twice as likely to deliver suboptimal care due to low professionalism, and more than twice as likely to receive low satisfaction ratings from patients.“We found that physician burnout is associated with a reduced efficiency of health care systems to deliver high quality, safe care to p...
Source: Psychiatr News - September 4, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Tags: burnout depersonalization Maria Panagioti patient safety patient satisfaction physician burnout professionalism residency training Source Type: research