‘Cultural Humility’ Key to Healing Racial Trauma, Psychiatrist Says
The widespread publicization of violent police encounters with Black people combined with the disproportionate burden of COVID-19 deaths on the Black community is “fuel for psychological trauma,” wrote psychiatrist Gowri Aragam, M.D., of Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School and colleagues in anarticle published Wednesday inJAMA Psychiatry.What can clinicians do to help people experiencing ethno-racial trauma —the individual and/or collective psychological distress and fear arising from experiencing or witnessing discrimination, threats of harm, violence, and intimidation directed at e...
Source: Psychiatr News - April 22, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Tags: 5Rs of Cultural Humility COVID-19 JAMA Psychiatry police violence trauma University of Connecticut Racial/Ethnic Stress & Trauma Scale Source Type: research

ABMS Releases New Draft Standards for Board Certification; Members Urged to Submit Comments
The American Board of Medical Specialties (ABMS) yesterday released new draftStandards for Board Continuing Certification. These standards will shape the maintenance of certification (MOC) programs for all ABMS boards, including the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology, for years to come.APA is conducting a thorough analysis regarding how the revised MOC standards will impact physicians ’ ability to practice medicine and care for patients.“APA members have sent a consistent message that they want a lifelong learning and continuing certification process that is less burdensome, less expensive, and more rel...
Source: Psychiatr News - April 21, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Tags: ABMS APA comment period continuing certification maintenance of certification Saul Levin standards Source Type: research

New Network Aims to Transform Care of First-Episode Psychosis
The National Institute of Mental Health ’s Early Psychosis Intervention Network (EPINET) aims to be a “learning health care network” continuously improving the care of patients with first episode psychosis (FEP).EPINET consists of 101 community-based early psychosis programs and eight regional hubs that coordinate the programs across 17 states. The participating clinics use the EPINET Core Assessment Battery at baseline and follow-up for gathering a wide range of clinically relevant data on FEP. Those data are collected by the National Data Coordinating Center, operated by Westat.EPINET is still young &md...
Source: Psychiatr News - April 20, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Tags: Early Psychosis Intervention Network EPINET FEP first-episode psychosis NIMH Robert Heinssen Source Type: research

Study Finds Psilocybin as Effective as Escitalopram at Reducing Depression Over Six Weeks
The psychedelic psilocybin may have antidepressant effects comparable to escitalopram, according to asmall clinical study published in theNew England Journal of Medicine. In a six-week, randomized trial, adults with a long history of depression who took psilocybin experienced similar reductions in depressive symptoms and similar levels of side effects as those taking escitalopram.Robin Carhart-Harris, Ph.D., of Imperial College London and colleagues recruited 59 adults aged 18 to 80 with moderate or severe depression (at least a score of 17 on the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale); many participants had chronic depression,...
Source: Psychiatr News - April 19, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Tags: depression escitalopram Jeffrey Lieberman New England Journal of Medicine psilocybin Source Type: research

Hospital SUD Programs, Psychiatric Hospitals Lag in Electronic Health Record Use
Hospital-based substance use disorder (SUD) programs and psychiatric hospitals are less likely than acute care hospitals to use basic electronic health record (EHR) and electronic health information exchange (HIE) technology, astudy inPsychiatric Services in Advance has found.Morgan C. Shields, Ph.D., of the University of Pennsylvania and colleagues reviewed data from the 2017 National Survey on Substance Abuse Treatment Services to determine the extent to which basic EHR functionality has been adopted by hospital-based programs. Basic EHR functionality was defined as assessment, progress monitoring, discharge, labs, and p...
Source: Psychiatr News - April 16, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Tags: 42 CFR Part 2 electronic health records health information exchange Psychiatric Services substance use disorder Source Type: research

Psycho-oncology Services May Reduce Distress, Depression in Cancer Survivors
Outpatient psycho-oncology services, including pharmacotherapy and psychotherapy, significantly reduced distress in cancer survivors up to two years after their diagnosis, according to astudy published inPsycho-Oncology.“Studies which have assessed the effectiveness of psycho-oncology interventions most often did so early in the patient’s cancer treatment course and not in later phases of survivorship,” wrote Jessica Molinaro, M.D., of the Medical College of Wisconsin and colleagues. “As distress is prevale nt throughout survivorship, it is imperative that ongoing assessment of psychosocial concerns...
Source: Psychiatr News - April 15, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Tags: cancer cancer survivor depression distress PHQ-9 psycho-oncology Source Type: research

Deaths by Suicide Drop in 2020 While Overall Deaths Soared During Pandemic
Deaths by suicide declined by almost 6% from 2019 to 2020, according to areport inJAMA based on statistics from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).The decline is one hopeful finding in an otherwise grim report that revealed a 17.7% increase in overall deaths in 2020, with most of those directly attributable to COVID-19.“The reported decrease in deaths by suicide makes us hopeful that protective mental health measures are having a positive impact amid a time of collective distress,” said Christine Moutier, M.D., chief medical officer for the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention (AFSP), in...
Source: Psychiatr News - April 14, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Tags: CDC Christine Moutier COVID-19 deaths JAMA Maria A. Oquendo pandemic suicide Source Type: research

Support for Women With Opioid Use Disorder May Be Key to Their Infants ’ Survival
Infants who were exposed to opioids in utero but not diagnosed with neonatal opioid withdrawal syndrome shortly after birth appear to be at an increased risk of death compared with those who have been diagnosed with neonatal opioid withdrawal syndrome, suggests astudy published Monday inJAMA Pediatrics.“The findings of this study suggest that programs and policies to support women with opioid use disorder and their infants are warranted, regardless of perceived severity of neonatal opioid withdrawal,” wrote JoAnna K. Leyenaar, M.D., Ph.D., M.P.H., of Children’s Hospital at Dartmouth-Hitchcoc k Medical Cen...
Source: Psychiatr News - April 13, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Tags: infant mortality JAMA Pediatrics neonatal opioid withdrawal syndrome opioid use Texas Neonatal Intensive Care Project Source Type: research

Hyperactive Delirium May Be Common Among Critically Ill COVID-19 Patients
Critically ill COVID-19 patients who develop delirium are likely to become hyperactive and agitated, suggests a smallstudy published today in theJournal of Neuropsychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences. In general, patients with delirium tend to be hypoactive, or show quiet confusion.The study by Juan D. Vel ásquez-Tirado, M.D., of Clinica Universitaria Bolivariana in Medellín and colleagues involved 20 adult inpatients with COVID-19 who had delirium diagnosed by the Liaison Psychiatry Service at a hospital in Medellín, Colombia. Eighteen of these patients were in the intensive care unit (ICU) at the star...
Source: Psychiatr News - April 12, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Tags: COVID-19 delirium hyperactive delirium Journal of Neuropsychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences organ failure systemic infection Source Type: research

Study Identifies Risk Factors for Opioid Use Disorder, Overdose in Youth
Opioid use disorder (OUD) and overdose among young people who fill an initial opioid prescription are rare but more likely to occur in those who have other substance use disorders or who have mood or anxiety disorders, astudy inAddictionhas found.Scott E. Hadland, M.D., M.P.H., M.S., of Boston University School of Medicine and colleagues analyzed data from the health insurance claims of more than 3.2 million youth aged 11 to 25 years who filled an initial opioid prescription between 2006 and 2016.Within 12 months of first filling their opioid prescriptions, 0.3% of the patients either developed OUD or overdosed. Patients w...
Source: Psychiatr News - April 9, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Tags: anxiety disorders mood disorders opioid use disorder OUD overdose prescription opioids youth Source Type: research

FDA Approves Once-Daily Nonstimulant for Treatment of ADHD
The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) hasapproved the selective norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor Qelbree (viloxazine extended-release) for the treatment of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in youth 6 to 17 years of age. The nonstimulant drug, which is to be taken once a day, can be swallowed whole or opened and sprinkled into applesauce.The efficacy of Qelbree was evaluated in three multicenter randomized, controlled trials. In the first trial, researchers randomly assigned 477 patients with ADHD aged 6 to 11 to receive Qelbree 100 mg, Qelbree 200 mg, or placebo once daily for six weeks. The patients were ...
Source: Psychiatr News - April 8, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Tags: ADHD ADHD Rating Scale ADHD-RS-5 attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder bipolar CGI-I Clinical Global Impression Improvement scale FDA Food and Drug Administration nonstimulant Qelbree suicidality Source Type: research

One-Third of COVID-19 Survivors May Develop a Neuropsychiatric Disorder Within Months of Infection
One-third of individuals diagnosed with COVID-19 developed a psychiatric or neurological problem within six months of their diagnosis, according to astudy published Tuesday inThe Lancet Psychiatry. The prevalence of a post-COVID neurologic or psychiatric diagnosis was even greater among individuals with severe illness who had required hospitalization.“Given the size of the pandemic and the chronicity of many of the diagnoses and their consequences (for example, dementia, stroke, and intracranial hemorrhage), substantial effects on health and social care systems are likely to occur,” wrote Maxime Taque, Ph.D., o...
Source: Psychiatr News - April 7, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Tags: anxiety COVID-19 electronic health records hospitalizations mood disorders neuropsychiatric disorders The Lancet Psychiatry Source Type: research

Bipolar II Disorder Associated With Higher Prevalence of Seasonal Affective Disorder
Patients with early-onset bipolar II disorder may be more likely to experience seasonal affective disorder (SAD) than those with other mood disorders, according to astudy published in Depression and Anxiety.“SAD can co-occur with several psychiatric disorders, including mood disorders,” wrote Heon-Jeong Lee, M.D., Ph.D., of the Korea University College of Medicine, and colleagues. They noted that although there have been debates on separating SAD as an independent diagnosis,DSM-5 recognizes seasonality as a specifier of major depressive disorder, bipolar I disorder, and bipolar II disorder.The authors recruited...
Source: Psychiatr News - April 6, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Tags: bipolar I disorder bipolar II disorder Heon-Jeong Lee major depression mood disorders seasonal affective disorder Source Type: research

Psychotherapy Aimed at Social Engagement Reduces Depression Associated With Loneliness
A form of psychotherapy aimed at helping older adults feel more connected to other people reduced depression and improved quality of life for those who had reported they felt lonely and/or were a burden to people around them, according to astudy in theJournal of Geriatric Psychiatry.“Social connection is essential for health and quality of life at all ages and may be an especially useful intervention target for promoting mental health in later life,” wrote Kimberly Van Orden, Ph.D., an associate professor of psychiatry at the University of Rochester, and colleagues.The researchers adapted a manualized form of b...
Source: Psychiatr News - April 5, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research

Children of Parents With Bipolar Disorder at Risk of ADHD and Early Onset Bipolar, Study Suggests
Children who have a parent with bipolar disorder are more likely to develop attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) during their preschool years than children with no family history of bipolar disorder, reports astudy inJournal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. The study also found that these children were more likely to develop symptoms of bipolar disorder as they grew older.“[Bipolar disorder] symptoms were scarce during the preschool years and increased throughout [early adolescence],” wrote Boris Birmaher, M.D., of the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine and colleag...
Source: Psychiatr News - April 2, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Tags: ADHD anxiety BD-NOS bipolar disorder children early onset Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent parents Source Type: research

Maternal Depression, Anxiety Worsened During Pandemic, Meta-Analysis Suggests
Postnatal depression and maternal anxiety appear to have increased worldwide during the COVID-19 pandemic, according to ameta-analysis published Wednesday inThe Lancet Global Health.“It is clear that pregnant individuals and babies have been subjected to harm during the pandemic, and the onus is on the academic community, health care providers, and policymakers to learn from it,” wrote Asma Khalil, M.D., of St. George’s University of London and colleagues.Khalil and colleagues searched MEDLINE and Embase for studies published from January 1, 2020, to January 8, 2021, that compared maternal, fetal, and inf...
Source: Psychiatr News - April 1, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Tags: anxiety infant health intimate partner violence Lancet Global Health maternal depression maternal health meta-analysis pandemic stress unemployment Source Type: research

Is Self-Censorship in Med School, Residency Applications Driving Burnout Among Physicians?
“From its earliest stages, a medical career unfolds within a culture of censorship of our vulnerabilities, a culture that contributes to burnout and depression.” So writes Michelle H. Silver, M.D., an internal medicine resident at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, in anarticle in theNew England Journal of Medicine describing the ways in which aspiring physicians are instructed early to censor their personal narratives in competing for medical school admission and residency slots.In Silver ’s case, this included censoring the story of her history of an eating disorder. “Like many of my ...
Source: Psychiatr News - March 31, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Tags: burnout depression eating disorder medical school New England Journal of Medicine personal statements residency stigma Source Type: research

Psychiatrists Offer 5 Strategies for Integrating Videoconferencing Into OCD Treatment
People with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) can benefit from medication and/or psychotherapy that teaches them to confront situations that trigger obsessive fears while refraining from performing compulsions. Yet, for many with OCD, these therapies may be out of reach due to therapists ’ availability, cost, location, and more.“Increasing evidence suggests that digital health technologies, including videoconferencing and other approaches (for example, online platforms, websites, and mobile applications) can circumvent these barriers,” wrote Reilly R. Kayser, M.D., of Columbia University’s Vagelos...
Source: Psychiatr News - March 30, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Tags: EX/RP exposure with response/ritual prevention in-person medication obsessive-compulsive disorder Psychiatric Services in Advance remote videoconferencing Source Type: research

Demand for Care for Depression, Suicidal Thoughts Among U.S. Youth Is Growing, Report Finds
Roughly 1 in 5 U.S. adolescents received mental health care between 2005 and 2018, with the greatest proportion receiving care for internalizing mental health conditions such as depression and suicidal ideation, astudy inJAMA Psychiatryhas found.“Trends in types of problems for which adolescents received care correspond with recent national trends of adolescent psychopathology and appear to highlight the growing importance of recognizing and managing internalizing problems across the major treatment settings,” wrote Ramin Mojtabai, M.D. , Ph.D., M.P.H., of Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and Mar...
Source: Psychiatr News - March 29, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Tags: adolescent depression externalizing problems health settings internalizing problems JAMA Psychiatry National Survey on Drug Use and Health suicide Source Type: research

Persistent Loneliness at Midlife Linked to Late-life Dementia, Alzheimer ’s Disease
People aged 45 to 64 years who are persistently lonely have nearly twice the risk of developing dementia and Alzheimer ’s disease later in life compared with their peers who do not experience persistent loneliness, astudy inAlzheimer ’s and Dementia suggests. However, transient loneliness was linked to lower risk of dementia and Alzheimer ’s disease compared with those who reported no loneliness.“[M]idlife loneliness may be an independent, modifiable risk factor for dementia and [Alzheimer’s disease],” wrote Wendy Qiu, M.D., Ph.D., of Boston University School of Medicine and colleagues.T...
Source: Psychiatr News - March 26, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Tags: Alzheimer's & Dementia Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale CES-D midlife loneliness resilience Source Type: research

Recent Diagnosis of Cognitive Impairment, Dementia May Increase Suicide Risk
People diagnosed recently with mild cognitive impairment or dementia may be more likely to attempt suicide compared with those who have not received either diagnosis, according to astudy published Wednesday inJAMA Psychiatry.The findings point to the importance of offering supportive services to people at the time of or shortly after a diagnosis of mild cognitive impairment or dementia, wrote Mia Maria G ünak, M.Sc., of Leiden University in the Netherlands, Kristine Yaffe, M.D., of the University of California, San Francisco, and colleagues.The researchers conducted a longitudinal cohort study, with a baseline period ...
Source: Psychiatr News - March 25, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Tags: dementia diagnosis JAMA Psychiatry mild cognitive impairment suicide attempt Source Type: research

Psychosocial Programs for Black Families May Mitigate Mental Health Effects of Racial Discrimination
Discussion Quality Scale.Adolescents assigned to SAAF –T and AIM who had experienced frequent discrimination exhibited fewer conduct problems at follow-up than did youth assigned to the control group in both trials. Those in the AIM program who experienced frequent discrimination also exhibited less depression and anxiety symptoms than those in the c ontrol group.“[M]ore supportive parents may be better able to establish strategies that enhance their children’s emotion regulation for coping with racial discrimination,” the researchers wrote. “This in turn may have reduced the physiological and...
Source: Psychiatr News - March 24, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Tags: adolescents anxiety conduct disorder depression family program JAMA Network Open mental health effects racism Source Type: research

Dystonia May Increase Risk of Suicide
Patients with dystonia —a movement disorder characterized by sustained or intermittent muscle contractions causing abnormal movements and postures—may be at a higher risk of suicide compared with the general population, according to a recentreport inNeurology.“[I]n addition to debilitating motor symptoms, up to 90% of patients with dystonia have comorbid psychiatric disorders, most frequently including generalized or social anxiety, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and major depression,” wrote co-authors Alexis Worthley, B.A., and Kristina Simonyan, M. D., Ph.D., Dr. Med., of Harvard Medical School.To...
Source: Psychiatr News - March 23, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Tags: anxiety depression dystonia Neurology panic attacks suicidal ideation suicide attempt suicide screen Source Type: research

Hypertension During Pregnancy May Increase Risk of Neurodevelopmental Disorders in Children
Women experiencing hypertensive disorders during pregnancy may be at a higher risk of having children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) than those without hypertensive disorders, reports astudy published today inJAMA Pediatrics.Judith S. Brand, Ph.D., of Örebro University in Sweden and colleagues analyzed health registry data of over 1 million individuals born in Sweden between 1987 and 1996 to identify associations between maternal hypertensive disorders (chronic hypertension, gestational-onset hypertension, or preeclampsia) and neurodevelopmental disorders in chi...
Source: Psychiatr News - March 22, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Tags: ADHD attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder autism cognitive function hypertension intellectual disability JAMA Pediatrics preeclampsia Source Type: research

‘Zero Suicide’ Practices at Mental Health Clinics Reduce Suicide Among Patients, Study Finds
Patients who were seen at outpatient mental health clinics were significantly less likely to attempt suicide when clinics practiced“Zero Suicide” principles, including suicide screening, safety planning, and support during care transitions with follow-up after discharge from acute care settings. These findings were published Thursday in areport inPsychiatric Services in Advance.Zero Suicide principles grew out of a 2012 partnership between the Office of the Surgeon General and the National Action Alliance for Suicide Prevention (NAASP). The NAASP Clinical Care and Intervention Taskforce developed a set of organ...
Source: Psychiatr News - March 19, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Tags: lethal means reduction mental health clinics Psychiatric Services in Advance suicide suicide attempts suicide-specific quality improvement activities Zero suicide Source Type: research

APA Condemns Violence Against Asian Americans in Georgia
In response to the shooting of eight people, including six women of Asian descent, at spas in Georgia on Tuesday, APA issued astatement condemning the act and expressing support for Asian American and Pacific Islander communities.“This year has seen a significant increase in racism and xenophobia against Asian Americans, and it is unacceptable and harmful,” said APA President Jeffrey Geller, M.D., M.P.H., in a media release. “This unspeakable tragedy can cause further fear for the AAPI [Asian American and Pacific Islan der] community, which has endured so much already. We send our condolences to the victi...
Source: Psychiatr News - March 18, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Tags: APA Asian American barriers to care bigotry discrimination harassment Jeffrey Geller mental health care Pacific Islander Saul Levin shooting violence xenophobia Source Type: research

Tailored CBT Protocol May Help Patients With Body Dysmorphic Disorder
Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) designed specifically to address body dysmorphic disorder may be more effective for treating patients with the condition than more generalized supportive psychotherapy, astudy inDepression and Anxiety suggests.Hilary Weingarden, Ph.D., of Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School and colleagues analyzed data from 120 adults with body dysmorphic disorder who received 22 one-hour therapy sessions of either CBT or supportive psychotherapy over 24 weeks. CBT consisted of skills-based treatment that specifically addressed symptoms of body dysmorphic disorder, whereas supportive...
Source: Psychiatr News - March 17, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Tags: body dysmorphic disorder CBT cognitive-behavioral therapy Depression & Anxiety remission supportive psychotherapy Source Type: research

Older Schizophrenia Patients Found More Likely to Be Diagnosed With Dementia
Older U.S. adults with schizophrenia may be more likely to be diagnosed with dementia than those who do not have a serious mental illness (SMI), according to areport inJAMA Psychiatry. The study also found that this population is more likely to receive a dementia diagnosis at an earlier age.“Approximately 28% of the group with schizophrenia had received a diagnosis of dementia before 66 years of age, indicating early-onset dementia,” wrote T. Scott Stroup, M.D., M.P.H., of Columbia University Vagelos College of Physicians and Surgeons and colleagues. “The implications of this hig h rate of comorbidity are...
Source: Psychiatr News - March 16, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Tags: Alzheimer's disease cognitive deficits dementia functional deficits JAMA Psychiatry schizophrenia serious mental illness SMI Source Type: research

More Than Half of COVID-19 Patients Report Depressive Symptoms Months Later, Study Finds
A significant number of adults who become infected with COVID-19 may report symptoms of depression months later, according to areport inJAMA Network Open.Roy Perlis, M.D., M.Sc., of Massachusetts General Hospital and colleagues analyzed data collected from U.S. adults who participated in an internet-based survey conducted by Qualtrics. Of 82,319 respondents who completed the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9) that was part of this survey, the researchers identified 3,904 adults who had previously been diagnosed with COVID-19. The respondents were asked to indicate their overall severity of illness (not at all severe, n...
Source: Psychiatr News - March 15, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Tags: COVID-19 depression headaches JAMA Network Open Patient Health Questionnaire-9 PHQ-9 psychiatric side effects survey Source Type: research

Spiritual CBT Protocol May Help Patients Integrate Their Spirituality Into Treatment
Spiritual Psychotherapy for Inpatient, Residential, and Intensive Treatment (SPIRIT) may be useful for patients in psychiatric hospitals who wish to integrate spirituality into their treatment, astudy inPsychiatric Services in Advance suggests. SPIRIT is based on cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) and includes a psychoeducation component and specific tools or skills drawn from spiritual concepts or beliefs and activities that patients can use to shape their emotional experience.David H. Rosmarin, Ph.D., of Harvard Medical School, and colleagues analyzed data from a one-year trial at McLean Hospital, an independent academic...
Source: Psychiatr News - March 12, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Tags: CBT cognitive-behavioral therapy group psychotherapy mental health Psychiatric Services religion spirituality Source Type: research

Cardiovascular Problems May Worsen Cognition in People With Schizophrenia
Risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD), such as metabolic disorders, diabetes, or hypertension, are significantly associated with cognitive deficits in patients with schizophrenia, according to astudy published inJAMA Psychiatry.The findings point to the importance of efforts to address risk factors for cardiovascular disease in these patients to help prevent further deterioration in cognition and improve functioning, wrote Katsuhiko Hagi, Ph.D., of Sumitomo Dainippon Pharma in Tokyo, Japan, Jean Pierre Lindenmayer, M.D., of the New York University School of Medicine, and colleagues.Hagi and colleagues searched data...
Source: Psychiatr News - March 11, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Tags: cardiovascular disease cognition diabetes hypertension JAMA Psychiatry learning metabolic syndrome obesity problem solving processing speed schizophrenia Source Type: research

APA Hails Passage of COVID Relief Bill Including Funds for Mental Illness and Substance Use Disorders
APA leaderspraised the inclusion of several provisions related to mental health in the American Rescue Plan Act of 2021 (HR 1319) —the $1.9 trillion coronavirus relief package, which the House of Representatives passed today by a vote of 220-211. The legislation, which is expected to be signed into law by President Biden later this week, includes approximately $4 billion in funding for programs that support the prevention of and treatment for mental and substance use disorders.“It is essential and heartening that Congress and the administration included funding for our nation’s mental health system in thi...
Source: Psychiatr News - March 10, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Tags: APA block grants COVID relief bill health workers integrated care Jeffrey Geller Medicaid mental illness Saul Levin substance use disorders suicide prevention Source Type: research

Older Adults With Dementia at Risk From Taking Multiple Psychotropics, Study Suggests
Despite the known dangers of older adults ’ being prescribed multiple medications for dementia, including death, nearly 14% of older adults with dementia in the United States were prescribed three or more psychotropic and/or opioid medications for more than 30 consecutive days in 2018, according to astudy published today inJAMA.“Although memory impairment is the cardinal feature of dementia, behavioral and psychological symptoms (for example, apathy, delusions, agitation) are common during all stages of illness and cause significant caregiver distress,” wrote Donovan T. Maust, M.D., M.S., of the Universit...
Source: Psychiatr News - March 9, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Tags: antidepressants antipsychotics dementia JAMA Medicare opioids polypharmacy Z-drugs Source Type: research

Ketamine Appears Safe and Effective for Adolescents With Treatment-Resistant Depression
A single dose of intravenous ketamine appears to reduce depressive symptoms within 24 hours in adolescents with treatment-resistant depression, suggests a smallstudy in AJP in Advance. These improvements lasted for at least two weeks.Jennifer Dwyer, M.D., of Yale University and colleagues enrolled 17 adolescents aged 13 to 17 years in a four-week trial. All the teens had a diagnosis of major depressive disorder, as determined by the Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia for School-Age Children, and had failed to respond to at least one antidepressant treatment. The participants had failed an average of 3.24 pr...
Source: Psychiatr News - March 8, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Tags: adolescents ajp in advance depression infusion ketamine MADRS midazolam treatment-resistant depression Source Type: research

Half of College Students May Have Mental Illness
More than half of college students meet the criteria for one or more mental health conditions, astudy inPsychiatric Services in Advance has found.Sarah Ketchen Lipson, Ph.D., Ed.M., of the Boston University School of Public Health and colleagues analyzed 2016-2019 data from the Healthy Minds Study, an annual web-based survey. Data were drawn from 10,089 students from 23 community colleges and 95,711 students from 133 four-year institutions. As part of the study, students completed several standard mental health measures, such as the nine-item Patient Health Questionnaire for depression, the seven-item Generalized Anxiety D...
Source: Psychiatr News - March 5, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Tags: anxiety college students community college depression eating disorders mental illness psychotropics suicide therapy use of services Source Type: research

Excessive Screen Time in Childhood Linked to Binge-Eating Disorder
Children who spend more time looking at screens, including while watching television and engaging with social media, may be at risk of developing binge-eating disorder one year later, according to astudy published in the International Journal of Eating Disorders.“Health care providers should assess for associations between excess screen time usage and binge eating, and advise about potential risks associated with excessive screen time,” wrote Jason Nagata, M.D., M.Sc., of the University of California, San Francisco, and colleagues.Nagata and colleagues analyzed data from the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Developme...
Source: Psychiatr News - March 4, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Tags: ABCD study binge eating binge-eating disorder children International Journal of Eating Disorders screen time television Source Type: research

Rewards for Behavioral Change May Be Effective for Alcohol Use Disorder in Native Populations
Contingency management, in which patients are rewarded for behavioral change, may be an effective strategy for increasing alcohol abstinence in American Indian and Alaska Native adults, astudy inJAMA Psychiatry has found.Michael G. McDonnell, Ph.D., of the Elson S. Floyd College of Medicine at Washington State University, Spokane, and colleagues analyzed data from 158 American Indian and Alaska Native adults who had at least one or more days of high alcohol use (more than three drinks) within the last 30 days and a current diagnosis of alcohol dependence. All patients in the study submitted urine samples twice per week for...
Source: Psychiatr News - March 3, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Tags: adults Alaska Native alcohol dependence American Indian contingency management JAMA Psychiatry rewards Source Type: research

Study Highlights Rising Number of Older U.S. Men Dying by Suicide
Suicide rates among men aged 65 years and older in the United States have been steadily rising since 2007, according to astudy in theAmerican Journal of Preventive Medicine. The report revealed that men who are White, aged 85 years or older, and living in rural areas may be at greatest risk.Sanae El Ibrahimi, Ph.D., of the University of Nevada and colleagues analyzed suicide data from 1999 to 2018 reported to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention ’s Wide-ranging Online Data for Epidemiologic Research (CDC WONDER) database. The authors analyzed the data according to age group (65 to 74, 75 to 84, and ≥85 y...
Source: Psychiatr News - March 2, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Tags: 85 and older American Journal of Preventive Medicine men race/ethnicity seniors suicide Source Type: research

Diversifying Academic Psychiatry Workforce Requires More Than Talk, Psychiatrists Say
Increasing diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI) in academic psychiatry requires that DEI leaders be given a voice in the highest levels of decision making and backed with resources necessary to institute an effective response for cultural change. So wrote a group of leaders from public and private psychiatry departments across the country in anarticle in the March issue of theAmerican Journal of Psychiatry.“DEI leaders are being summoned for one-on-one and programmatic consultation, antiracist curriculum development, antibias training, and skill acquisition,” wrote Ayana Jordan, M.D., Ph.D. (pictured above), ...
Source: Psychiatr News - March 1, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Tags: academia Altha Stewart American Journal of Psychiatry Ayana Jordan barriers diversity equity inclusion minority tax workforce Source Type: research

New Drug Combination Shows Promise for Schizophrenia in Phase 2 Trials
A new drug combination appears to significantly reduce symptoms of schizophrenia compared with placebo, according to theresults of a phase 2 trial published this week in theNew England Journal of Medicine.The drugs are xanomeline, which has shown promise for Alzheimer ’s disease, and trospium chloride, which is approved for overactive bladder and has been shown to reduce some of the gastrointestinal side effects of xanomeline.Steven K. Brennan, M.D., chief medical officer of Karuna Pharmaceuticals, and colleagues randomly assigned 90 adults aged 18 to 60 with schizophrenia to receive twice-daily xanomeline-trospium a...
Source: Psychiatr News - February 26, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Tags: New England Journal of Medicine PANSS Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale schizophrenia Will Carpenter xanomeline-trospium Source Type: research

Youth With ADHD May Have Increased Risk for Psychotic Disorders
Children and adolescents with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) may be at increased risk for subsequent psychotic disorders, according to areport published Wednesday inJAMA Psychiatry.Given that psychotic disorders have a major effect on functioning, “early detection and appropriate management are essential to improve the prognosis of children diagnosed with ADHD,” wrote Mikaïl Nourredine, M.D., M.Sc., of the Centre Hospitalier Le Vinatier in Bron, France, and colleagues. The findings suggest that patients with ADHD need follow-up even afte r 18 years of age, the authors noted.Nourredine and ...
Source: Psychiatr News - February 25, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Tags: ADHD adolescents attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder children JAMA Psychiatry meta-analysis psychotic disorders schizophrenia youth Source Type: research

Mental Illness, Substance Use Disorders Found Common Among Individuals Who Die Suddenly
More than half of individuals living in a large metropolitan county in North Carolina who died suddenly outside the hospital had at least one diagnosed mental illness or substance use disorder in the previous five years, and more than one-third had two or more, according to areport inPsychiatric Services in Advance.Among those with mental and/or substance use disorders, cardiovascular, respiratory, and metabolic conditions were common, wrote Jessica Ford, Ph.D., of the Department of Veterans Affairs in Greenville, N.D., and colleagues.Ford and colleagues screened for sudden deaths attended by emergency medical services in ...
Source: Psychiatr News - February 24, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Tags: cardiovascular disease mental illness Psychiatric Services respiratory disease substance use disorder sudden death Source Type: research

Connecting With Older Adults By Phone May Reduce Loneliness, Depression, Anxiety During Pandemic
Older adults who received regular phone calls from a young adult a few months into the COVID-19 pandemic experienced greater improvements in loneliness, depression, and anxiety after four weeks compared with older adults who did not receive these calls. Thefindings were published today in JAMA Psychiatry.“The use of lay callers, deliberate but brief approach on training, and the use of ubiquitous telephones made the approach easily deployable and scalable,” wrote Maninder K. Kahlon, Ph.D., of the University of Texas at Austin and colleagues.The study included 240 participants aged 27 to 101 who were homebound, ...
Source: Psychiatr News - February 23, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Tags: anxiety COVID-19 depression GAD-7 JAMA Psychiatry loneliness pandemic PHQ-8 telephone calls UCLA Loneliness scale Source Type: research

Education, Outreach, and Firearm Restrictions Offer Effective and Scalable Suicide Prevention
Educating primary care physicians on depression management, increasing awareness about mental illness and suicide among high school students, and reaching out to previously hospitalized psychiatric patients after discharge represent several of the most effective and scalable approaches to suicide prevention, according to areview inAJP in Advance.J. John Mann, M.D., and colleagues at Columbia University reviewed 97 clinical trials and 30 population-level studies published between 2005 and 2019 that explored interventions aimed at reducing suicides or suicidal behavior such as self-harm. “We focused on suicidal behavio...
Source: Psychiatr News - February 22, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Tags: ajp in advance firearm restrictions outreach primary care physicians recently discharged scalability suicide prevention Source Type: research

Gastrointestinal Symptoms Common in Major Depressive Disorder, Study Shows
Gastrointestinal symptoms are common in people who have major depressive disorder (MDD), astudy in theJournal of Affective Disorders has found.Yiru Fang, M.D., Ph.D., of Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine in China and colleagues analyzed data from 3,256 MDD patients aged 18 years and older from the National Survey on Symptomatology of Depression. As part of the survey, patients were asked how often over the last two weeks they experienced depressive symptoms and gastrointestinal symptoms. Fang and colleagues compared the occurrence of gastrointestinal symptoms with the occurrence of depressive episodes in the...
Source: Psychiatr News - February 19, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Tags: depression gastrointestinal disorders gastrointestinal symptoms insomnia Journal of Affective Disorders MDD suicidal ideation Source Type: research

APA Calls on Public Health Officials to Ensure Vaccine Access to People With SMI, SUDs
State public health officials should ensure that people with serious mental illness (SMI) and/or substance use disorders (SUDs) are prioritized along with individuals with other high-risk medical conditions in receiving the COVID-19 vaccine, APA urged today in anews release.People with SMIs and/or SUDs often have comorbid conditions, which can increase the risk of severe complications from COVID-19, stated an APAguidance document titled “The Role of the Psychiatrist in the Equitable Distribution of the COVID-19 Vaccine.” Additionally, these individuals may live in overcrowded conditions, increasing their risk o...
Source: Psychiatr News - February 18, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Tags: access to care APA COVID-19 COVID-19 vaccine Jeffrey Geller Saul Levin serious mental illness SMI state health officials substance use disorders SUDs Source Type: research

History of Mental Illness Associated With Earlier Signs of Aging
Individuals with a history mental illness are more likely to show signs of aging by age 45 —including cognitive decline and loss of motor coordination—than are people without such a history, according to areport published today inJAMA Psychiatry.This remained true even after controlling for a host of other factors that might explain early aging, such as poor health in childhood; being overweight; smoking; or a history of cancer, diabetes, or heart attack.“In this cohort study, a history of psychopathology was associated with accelerated aging at midlife, years before the typical onset of age-related disea...
Source: Psychiatr News - February 17, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Tags: accelerated aging ADHD balance cognitive function depression hearing JAMA Psychiatry mental illness middle age schizophrenia vision Source Type: research

Switching to Aripiprazole or Ziprasidone May Reduce Weight Gain in Patients Taking Antipsychotics
It is well established that a common side effect of second-generation antipsychotics is weight gain, which can influence a patient ’s attitude toward the treatment and reduce adherence, worsening symptoms and quality of life. Ameta-analysis inSchizophrenia Bulletin suggests that switching patients with serious mental illness who are taking one or more antipsychotics to aripiprazole or ziprasidone may lead to weight loss and other cardiometabolic improvements.Dan Siskind, M.B.B.S., M.P.H., Ph.D., of Metro South Addiction and Mental Health Service in Brisbane, Australia, and colleagues combed through the scientific lit...
Source: Psychiatr News - February 16, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Tags: antipsychotics aripiprazole cholesterol fasting glucose meta-analysis Schizophrenia Bulletin treatment adherence weight gain ziprasidone Source Type: research

APA Announces Results of 2021 Election
At its meeting on February 11th, APA ’s Committee of Tellers approved the following results for the 2021APA National Election. Please note that these results are considered public but not official until approved by the Board of Trustees at its meeting on March 12 and 13.President-ElectRebecca W. Brendel, M.D., J.D.SecretarySandra M. DeJong, M.D., M.Sc.Early Career Psychiatrist TrusteeElie G. Aoun, M.D., M.R.O.Minority/Underrepresented Representative TrusteeFelix Torres, M.D., M.B.A.Area 1 TrusteeEric M. Plakun, M.D.Area 4 TrusteeCheryl D. Wills, M.D.Area 7 TrusteeMary Hasbah Roessel, M.D.Resident-Fellow Member Truste...
Source: Psychiatr News - February 12, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Tags: APA 2021 election Elie G. Aoun Eric M. Plakun. Cheryl D. Wills Felix Torres M.D. Mary Hasbah Roessel Rebecca W. Brendel Sandra M. DeJong Urooj Yazdani Source Type: research

For Patients With Schizophrenia, Five Variables Associated With Everyday Functioning
Assessments targeting neurocognition, social cognition, positive symptoms, motivation, and access to resources may help to predict everyday functioning in patients with schizophrenia, suggests astudy published inJAMA Psychiatry.“Schizophrenia is no longer conceptualized as a progressive deteriorating illness,” wrote Armida Mucci, M.D., of the University of Campania Luigi Vanvitelli in Naples, Italy, and colleagues. “However, although a clinical stability with persistent symptomatic remission is now considered a reali stic outcome for affected people, the level of social, vocational, and everyday life func...
Source: Psychiatr News - February 11, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Tags: cognition functioning JAMA Psychiatry motivation schizophrenia Source Type: research