Brain Activity Patterns After Trauma May Predict Long-Term Mental Health, Likelihood of Stress Disorders
How people ’s brains respond to stress following a traumatic event may help to predict their long-term mental health outcomes, suggests astudy published Thursday in AJP in Advance.Jennifer Stevens, Ph.D., of Emory University and colleagues analyzed data from 69 participants in the AURORA study, a large-scale, multisite study funded by the National Institute of Mental Health that follows patients for a full year after exposure to trauma. The 69 patients in the current study received treatment in an emergency department following a car accident.Two weeks after their accidents, the participants had their brain activity ...
Source: Psychiatr News - October 15, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Tags: ajp in advance anxiety AURORA brain activity patterns inhibition posttraumatic stress disorder reward Source Type: research

Candidates for APA's 2022 Election Announced
The APA Nominating Committee, chaired by Immediate Past President Jeffrey Geller, M.D., M.P.H., has reported the following slate of candidates (in alphabetical order) for APA ’s 2022 election. This slate has been approved by the Board of Trustees and is considered official.The deadline for candidates who wish to run by petition is November 10. APA voting members may cast their ballots from January 3, 2022, to January 31, 2022.APA ’s election guidelines have been changed as part of a pilot test for the 2022 and 2023 elections. All campaigning is prohibited except through APA-managed activities and other activiti...
Source: Psychiatr News - October 14, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research

APA Joins Amicus Brief Against Texas Abortion Law
A Texas law to prohibit abortions after six weeks ’ gestation threatens the health of pregnant women, runs counter to settled constitutional law, and offends core principles of medical ethics. So said APA and 18 other medical organizations in anamicus brief submitted to the United States Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit.The brief, written by the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, urges the court to uphold a lower court ’s temporary restraining order against the law. The Texas law (SB 8) prohibits abortions after a fetal heartbeat is detected, usually around six weeks’ gestation&mda...
Source: Psychiatr News - October 13, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Tags: abortion American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists amicus brief APA patient-clinician relationship SB 8 six weeks' gestation Texas women Source Type: research

Symptoms of Avoidant/Restrictive Food Intake Disorder Vary by Sex, Age
This study also illustrates substantial medical and psychological complications associated with ARFID, underscoring the need for pediatric health care professionals to be familiar with the id entification and clinical management of this disorder,” Katzman and colleagues concluded.“In this issue, Katzman et al offer one of the largest, most comprehensive, and nuanced community-based prospective studies on ARFID demographic characteristics,” wrote Laura K. Grubb, M.D., M.P.H., of Tufts Children’s Hospital in Boston in anaccompanying editorial. “The study … provides crucial information to ...
Source: Psychiatr News - October 12, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Tags: age anxiety appetite avoidant/restrictive food intake disorder depression DSM-5 food avoidance JAMA Pediatrics lack of interest in food not eating enough sex Source Type: research

APA Foundation Launches ‘Mentally Healthy Nation’ Podcast to Educate Public
On Sunday, October 10,World Mental Health Day, the American Psychiatric Association Foundation (APAF) will launch a monthly podcast to engage the public in conversations about the current mental health crisis. Each episode of “Mentally Healthy Nation” will focus on an aspect of mental health that affects people in their communities, where they live, learn, work, and worship.“One of the most important things we can do to help ease the stigma of mental illness and to reach a more mentally healthy nation is to turn up the volume on the issue,” said APAF Executive Director Rawle Andrews Jr., Esq. &ldquo...
Source: Psychiatr News - October 8, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Tags: APA Foundation criminal justice system CURED documentary Mentally Healthy Nation National Coming Out Day PBS podcast Rawle Andrews Jr. Saul Levin trauma World Mental Health Day Source Type: research

Eating Problems Common in Youth, Young Adults With Intracranial Hypertension
Young people with idiopathic intracranial hypertension (a condition that occurs when pressure inside the skull increases for no obvious reason) were more than four times more likely to report disordered eating behaviors and more than five times as likely to report depression, anxiety, and stress than those without the condition, according to astudy inPediatric Neurology.“[Medical] caregivers should have increased awareness and implement active screening of [disordered eating behaviors] both at the time of the initial management and as part of the ongoing follow-up. This is of paramount importance to potentially preve...
Source: Psychiatr News - October 7, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Tags: and Stress Scale-21 anxiety depression disordered eating behaviors Eating Attitude Test eating problems intracranial hypertension Pediatric Neurology Source Type: research

Patients With SUDs Have Higher Risk of Breakthrough COVID-19 Infection
People who are fully vaccinated against COVID-19 and have a substance use disorder (SUD) appear to be at higher risk for breakthrough infections than people without an SUD, according to areport inWorld Psychiatry.The risk of breakthrough infection for people with SUDs ranged from 6.8% for tobacco use disorder to 7.8% for cannabis use disorder. The risk of breakthrough infections in vaccinated people without an SUD was 3.6%.“[T]he overall risk of COVID-19 among vaccinated people with substance use disorders is very low,” NIDA Director Nora D. Volkow, M.D., one of the study authors, said in anews release. “...
Source: Psychiatr News - October 6, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Tags: breakthrough infections comorbid disorders COVID-19 death hospitalization NIDA Nora Volkow substance use disorders World Psychiatry Source Type: research

More Adults Reporting Elevated Depressive Symptoms More Than Year Into Pandemic
The percentage of U.S. adults reporting symptoms of depression has not stopped rising since the pandemic began, according tosurvey data published Monday inThe Lancet Regional Health – Americas. Those most likely to report elevated depressive symptoms tended to have less income and a greater number of COVID-related stressors, including the death of someone close to COVID-19, loss of employment, and/or challenges securing childcare.“Typically, we would expect depression to peak following the traumatic event and then lower over time,” senior author Sandro Galea M.D., M.P.H., Dr.P.H., of Boston University Sch...
Source: Psychiatr News - October 5, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Tags: COVID-19 COVID-19 and Life Stressors Impact on Mental Health and Well-being study depression income pandemic The Lancet Regional Health – Americas Source Type: research

Wide Racial and Geographic Disparities Found in Clozapine and LAI Prescriptions
Regional and racial variations in the prescribing of psychotropic medications to patients with schizophrenia may underlie some of the health inequities associated with these disorders, reports astudyin Psychiatric Services in Advance.“The most dramatic interstate differences were in prescription of clozapine and LAIs [long-acting injectable antipsychotics], which have distinctive roles in medication management,” wrote Natalie Bareis, L.M.S.W., Ph.D., of Columbia University and colleagues. “[C]lozapine has efficacy in manag ing treatment-resistant schizophrenia and reducing suicidal behaviors and has low r...
Source: Psychiatr News - October 4, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Tags: clozapine health care inequities LAIs Natalie Bareis psychotropic medications schizophrenia Source Type: research

Genetic Risk of Some Mental Illnesses Tied to Increased Hospitalizations in Bipolar Disorder
Patients with bipolar disorder who have a high genetic risk for the condition or for schizophrenia may have a higher risk of hospitalization compared with those who have a lower genetic risk for either of these conditions, astudy in theJournal of Affective Disorders has found.Janos L. Kalman, M.D., of the Ludwig Maximillian University of Munich and colleagues analyzed the polygenic risk scores of 954 patients who had bipolar disorder for at least five years to determine if the patients ’ genetic risk of bipolar disorder, major depressive disorder, or schizophrenia was associated with severe bipolar disorder. (The pol...
Source: Psychiatr News - October 1, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Tags: bipolar disorder genetic risk hospitalization Journal of Affective Disorders polygenic risk scores schizophrenia Source Type: research

Stopping Antidepressants Doubles Relapse Risk, Study Finds
Patients with depression treated in primary care practices in the United Kingdom who felt well enough to consider stopping their antidepressants were twice as likely to relapse within 52 weeks if they discontinued their medication as those who continued to take it, according to astudy published today inThe New England Journal of Medicine.The study, led by Gemma Lewis, Ph.D., of University College London and colleagues, involved 478 patients aged 18 to 74 years who had at least two prior episodes of depression or had been taking antidepressants for more than two years. “All the patients had been receiving and adhering...
Source: Psychiatr News - September 30, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Tags: antidepressants citalopram depression discontinuation fluoxetine mirtazapine New England Journal of Medicine relapse sertraline Source Type: research

History of Anger Attacks May Point to Soldiers at Greatest Risk of Anxiety Disorder, Suicidal Ideation
New Army soldiers with a history of impairing anger attacks were twice as likely to later develop major depressive disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, panic disorder, or suicidal ideation, according to astudy published this week inJAMA Network Open.When anger attacks, or sudden outbursts of verbal or physical aggression, cause substantial life impairment, they are a hallmark of intermittent explosive disorder (IED). IED is estimated to effect 4% to 7% of the U.S. population.Diana M. Smith, A.B., and Murray B. Stein, M.D., M.P.H., of the University of California, San Diego, and colleagues analyzed data collected as part...
Source: Psychiatr News - September 29, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Tags: anger attacks Army STARRS generalized anxiety disorder intermittent explosive disorder JAMA Network Open major depressive disorder panic disorder suicidal ideation Source Type: research

Methylphenidate May Reduce Symptoms of Apathy in Patients With Alzheimer ’s Disease
Methylphenidate may be able to help reduce symptoms of apathy in people with Alzheimer ’s disease, according to areport published Monday inJAMA Neurology.“Apathy, characterized by diminished will or initiative and one of the most prevalent neuropsychiatric symptoms in individuals with Alzheimer disease, is associated with significant caregiver burden, excess disability, increased medical costs, and mortality,” wrote Jacobo Mintzer, M.D., M.B.A., of the Medical University of South Carolina and colleagues. “Methylphenidate offers a treatment approach providing a modest but potentially clinically signi...
Source: Psychiatr News - September 28, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Tags: Alzheimer's disease apathy cognitive impairment JAMA Neurology methylphenidate Neuropsychiatric Inventory Source Type: research

Lumateperone Found to Be Effective in Treating Bipolar Depression
Patients with bipolar disorder who are experiencing a major depressive episode may benefit from taking the antipsychotic lumateperone, suggests astudy inAJP in Advance. The phase 3 trial, which was funded by Intra-Cellular Therapies (maker of lumateperone), revealed that adults taking lumateperone daily reported significantly greater improvements in their depressive symptoms and overall functioning after six weeks than those taking placebo. Lumateperone was also well tolerated, and participants experienced minimal changes in weight or other metabolic parameters.“Approved antipsychotics for bipolar depression are asso...
Source: Psychiatr News - September 27, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Tags: ajp in advance antipsychotics Bipolar I bipolar II depression lumateperone MADRS Montgomery- Åsberg Depression Rating Scale response Source Type: research

Methamphetamine Use, Overdose Deaths From Psychostimulants Soar
Methamphetamine use in adults aged 18 to 64 years increased 43% between 2015 and 2019, astudy in JAMA Psychiatry has found. The study also found that overdose deaths involving psychostimulants other than cocaine, mostly methamphetamine, increased 180% during the same period.Beth Han, M.D., Ph.D., M.P.H., of the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) and colleagues examined data from 195,711 people who responded to the annual National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH) between 2015 and 2019. The NSDUH, published by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, is a comprehensive survey of approximately ...
Source: Psychiatr News - September 24, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research

Insulin Resistance Linked to Major Depressive Disorder, Dutch Study Finds
Insulin resistance predicted the development of major depressive disorder in adults over the course of nine years, according to astudy published today inAJP inAdvance.“Several studies have shown an association between insulin resistance and depression, including our previous work,” Katie Watson, Ph.D., a postdoctoral scholar in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Health at Stanford School of Medicine, toldPsychiatric News. “We did not know whether being insulin resistant first could lead to new cases of depression in the future. Here we see that insulin resistance, a highly prevalent condition tha...
Source: Psychiatr News - September 23, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Tags: ajp in advance diabetes HDL insulin resistance Kathleen Rasgon Katie Watson prediabetes triglycerides Source Type: research

Report Finds No Link Between Antipsychotics, COVID-19 Deaths in SMI Patients
Several months into the COVID-19 pandemic data suggested thatindividuals with schizophrenia spectrum disorders are more likely to die from illnesses related to COVID-19 than those without schizophrenia. More than a year later, why this population appears to be at increased risk of death from COVID-19 continues to remain unclear. Aresearch letter appearing today inJAMA Psychiatry found no association between antipsychotic use and mortality in adults with a serious mental illness (SMI) who were diagnosed with COVID-19.“An association between antipsychotic medication and increased risk of COVID-19 mortality has been rep...
Source: Psychiatr News - September 22, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Tags: antipsychotics bipolar disorder COVID-19 JAMA Psychiatry pandemic schizophrenia Source Type: research

Youth ’s Online Activity May Point to Subsequent Suicidal Behaviors
The types of online content that youth explore and the messages they share with others may help identify those most likely to be at high risk of a suicide attempt or self-harm, astudy inJAMA Network Open suggests. The greatest risk was found among youth who engaged in multiple types of online risk factors, such as expressing feelings of prolonged hopelessness and participating in cyberbullying.“The findings of this study suggest that many discrete types of risk factors are identifiable from online data and associated with subsequent youth suicide-related behavior,” wrote Steven A. Sumner, M.D., M.Sc., of the Ce...
Source: Psychiatr News - September 21, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Tags: Bark cyberbullying depression hopelessness JAMA Network Open online behaviors self-harm suicide youth Source Type: research

Intervening Before 18 Months May Reduce Odds of Autism Diagnosis in Babies Identified at High Risk
A program that teaches parents how to engage with babies identified to be at high risk of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) may reduce the likelihood of the children ’s developing the disorder. This finding comes from astudy published today inJAMA Pediatrics.“Autism spectrum disorder is emergent in early development but is not typically diagnosed until age 3 years,” wrote Andrew J. O. Whitehouse, Ph.D., of the University of Western Australia in Nedlands and colleagues. “[I]nterventions beginning during the first 2 years of life, when the first sig ns of atypical development are observed and the brain i...
Source: Psychiatr News - September 20, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Tags: autism Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule DSM-5 iBASIS –Video Interaction to Promote Positive Parenting JAMA Pediatrics prevention Source Type: research

Residency Experience Treating Patients With Buprenorphine Boosts Prescribing Down the Road
The United States has a dearth of physicians who are trained to offer medication treatment with buprenorphine to patients with opioid use disorder (OUD). One community-based family medicine residency program in Massachusetts has shown that integrating patients treated with buprenorphine directly into resident training can help increase the number of graduates prescribing buprenorphine. Layla Cavitt, M.D., of the Tufts University School of Medicine Lawrence Family Medicine Residency and colleaguesoutlined the program ’s steps and success in theJournal of Substance Abuse Treatment.In 2011, the Lawrence residency progra...
Source: Psychiatr News - September 17, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Tags: buprenorphine DEA family medicine Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment Medication treatment opioid use disorder OUD residency X-waiver Source Type: research

Emergency Department Staff More Likely to Restrain Black Children Than White Children, Report Finds
Black children are almost twice as likely to be physically restrained in the emergency department compared with White children, according to aresearch letter published this week inJAMA Pediatrics. Use of physical restraints is an uncommon but serious intervention that has been found to increase the risk of injury, trauma, and death.“Racial and ethnic disparities in restraint use likely reflect racism at multiple levels within and beyond the emergency care continuum,” wrote Katherine A. Nash, M.D., of Yale University School of Medicine and colleagues. “Potential drivers include interpersonal racism in the ...
Source: Psychiatr News - September 16, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Tags: Black children emergency department health disparities JAMA Pediatrics physical restraints racism White children Source Type: research

CMS Proposes Adding Payment for Telehealth Services by Mental Health Professionals
The federal government is proposing to permanently allow payment under the Medicare program for “audio-only” telehealth mental health services. These services have been temporarily reimbursed as part of the government’s response to the COVID-19 public health emergency. The government also would retain other temporarily reimbursed telehealth services through 2023 in order to evaluate whet her those services should be permanently added to the list of covered Medicare services.The recommended changes are part of theproposed 2022 Physician Fee Schedule by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS). ...
Source: Psychiatr News - September 15, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Tags: 2022 Physician Fee Schedule APA audio only Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services CMS COVID-19 physician payment formula Saul Levin telehealth Source Type: research

ECT May Reduce Risk of Death in Older Patients Hospitalized for Psychiatric Disorders
This report adds to a growing body of research suggesting a positive effect of ECT from a population health perspective,” wrote Taeho Greg Rhee, Ph.D., of the University of Connecticut and colleagues. “Future efforts should focus on ways to ensure broader implementation of this treatment and to improve the maintenance therapy of severely ill patients who receive ECT.”In this observational study, Rhee and colleagues used Medicare claims data to compare the mortality of Medicare beneficiaries 65 and up who received at least one ECT session during a psychiatric hospitalization between 2011 and 2015 with thos...
Source: Psychiatr News - September 14, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Tags: ajp in advance death depression electroconvulsive therapy hospitalization Medicare mortality older adults suicide Source Type: research

APA Joins Other Health Organizations in Support of Collaborative Care Bill
APA has joined 17 other health organizations insupporting the Collaborate in an Orderly and Cohesive Manner (COCM) Act. The COCM Act was introduced by Reps. Lizzie Fletcher (D-Texas) and Jaime Herrera Beutler (R-Wash.) in the House of Representatives on Friday. If enacted, this legislation would improve access to evidence-based mental health care and substance use treatment by supporting and investing in the implementation of the Collaborative Care Model in primary care offices.In the Collaborative Care Model, a primary care physician, a psychiatric consultant, and a care manager work as a team to identify and provide evid...
Source: Psychiatr News - September 13, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Tags: APA Collaborate in an Orderly and Cohesive Manner collaborative care House of Representatives startup funds technical assistance Vivian Pender Source Type: research

APA Reflects on 20th Anniversary of 9/11
To mark the 20th anniversary of the terror attacks on September 11, 2001, APA released astatement today in honor of the thousands of men and woman who perished and the first responders who put their own lives on the line.“We salute the first responders in New York, Washington, D.C., and Pennsylvania who bravely put themselves into harm’s way to rescue as many people as they could. We think of the efforts of psychiatrists and mental health clinicians in those regions, who from the very beginning treated many who suffered from trauma, from substance use disorders, and from other mental illness as a result of this...
Source: Psychiatr News - September 10, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Tags: 9/11 anniversary APA D.C. disaster psychiatry first responders New York Pennsylvania September 11 terror attacks Source Type: research

Survey Finds Marijuana Use Soared Among College Students, While Alcohol Use Dropped
Drug use trends among young adults have shifted dramatically in recent years, with 44% of college students reporting past-year marijuana use in 2020, according to the2020 Monitoring the Future (MTF) study issued yesterday. Marijuana use was similar among young adults not enrolled in college, with 43% reporting past-year use.“The pandemic has caused fundamental changes in the daily lives of teens and adults,” John E. Schulenberg, Ph.D., of the University of Michigan Institute for Social Research and colleagues wrote. “This endemic disruption is likely to affect substance use, and MTF is uniquely designed t...
Source: Psychiatr News - September 9, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Tags: alcohol binge drinking college Elie Auon hallucinogens marijuana Monitoring the Future pandemic youth Source Type: research

Study Reveals Patterns of Youth Emergency Visits for Suicide During the Pandemic
Youth aged 5 to 17 were more likely to present to an emergency department (ED) for suicidal thoughts and behaviors in the second half of 2020 compared with the same period in 2019, astudy inJAMA Psychiatry has found.Specifically, suicide-related ED visits among female youth from June 1 to December 15, 2020, were significantly higher than in the corresponding months in 2019. Youth with no history of outpatient mental health or suicide visits and those with comorbid psychiatric conditions documented at the ED visit also had a higher risk of presenting with suicide-related problems from September to December 2020 compared wit...
Source: Psychiatr News - September 8, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Tags: COVID-19 JAMA Psychiatry pandemic shelter-in-place orders suicidal behaviors suicidal thoughts youth Source Type: research

Irritability at Age 3 May Predict Psychiatric Disorders in Adolescence
Irritability in preschool-aged children may point to youth at risk of developing psychiatric disorders in adolescence, according to astudy in theJournal of the American Academy of Child& Adolescent Psychiatry.“[O]ur findings underscore the clinical significance and predictive validity of early childhood irritability,” wrote Leah K. Sorcher and Lea Dougherty, Ph.D., of the University of Maryland and colleagues. “Preschool irritability predicted internalizing and externalizing disorders in adolescenc e, parent-reported anxiety and depressive symptoms [in the youth], and greater functional impairment, ev...
Source: Psychiatr News - September 7, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Tags: ADHD adolescents anxiety depression functional impairment irritability preschool-aged children psychiatric disorders suicide youth Source Type: research

APA, Five Other Physicians Groups Condemn Texas Law Restricting Access to Abortion
Yesterday APA joined five other leading physician groups in opposing a Texas state law that took effect Wednesday banning abortions, medical counseling, and support related to abortion after six weeks of pregnancy.“Our organizations, which represent nearly 600,000 physicians and medical students, strongly oppose any laws and regulations that interfere in the confidential relationship between a patient and their physician. This new law will endanger patients and clinicians, putting physicians who provide nec essary medical care, or even offer evidence-based information, at risk, by allowing private citizens to interfe...
Source: Psychiatr News - September 3, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Tags: abortion abortions courts Group of Six medical counseling mental health physician-patient relationship reproductive health Texas Source Type: research

Telepsychiatry-Based Collaborative Care Approach as Effective as Traditional Referrals
This study expands the evidence base for CoCM in two ways: First, it demonstrates that the CoCM can effectively manage more complex [psychiatric] disorders just as well as referring to a specialist,” lead author John C. Fortney, Ph.D., the director of the Division of Population Health and profe ssor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at University of Washington’s School of Medicine, toldPsychiatric News. “Second, it adds to the small evidence base that CoCM can be delivered through a virtual care team using video visits. In other words, members of the CoCM team do not need to be physically located toge...
Source: Psychiatr News - September 2, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Tags: bipolar disorder collaborative care JAMA Psychiatry PTSD referrals telepsychiatry Source Type: research

Study Points to Soldiers Most Likely to Attempt Suicide Within 30 Days of Suicidal Thoughts
About 3.5% of U.S. Army soldiers who were diagnosed with suicidal thoughts attempted suicide within 30 days of reporting these thoughts, according to areport inAJP in Advance. Those most likely to attempt suicide within 30 days of reporting suicidal thoughts were women, combat medics, individuals with a pre-existing anxiety disorder, and those with a sleep disorder.“Although the majority of soldiers who attempt suicide have no history of administratively documented ideation, there is a significant minority whose suicidal thoughts are diagnosed prior to their attempt,” wrote Holly B. Herberman Mash, Ph.D., and R...
Source: Psychiatr News - September 1, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Tags: ajp in advance Army Army STARRS screening tools suicidal ideation suicide attempt Source Type: research

People With Disabilities at Elevated Risk of Suicidal Behavior, Study Suggests
People with disabilities appear to be significantly more likely to think about, plan, and/or attempt suicide than people without disabilities, according to areport in theAmerican Journal of Preventive Medicine. Individuals with multiple disabilities were found to be at a particularly heightened risk of suicidal behavior.The findings highlight the need to consider functional disability when implementing suicide prevention strategies, “particularly the presence of complex activity limitations or multiple disabilities,” wrote Nicole M. Marlow, Ph.D., M.S.P.H., of the University of Florida and colleagues.Marlow and...
Source: Psychiatr News - August 31, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Tags: American Journal of Preventive Medicine cognition disabilities emotional problems hearing mobility issues National Survey on Drug Use and Health plan suicidal ideation suicide suicide attempt vision Source Type: research

Integrative Oncology Care May Reduce Emotional Distress in Cancer Patients
Cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy who regularly attended a weekly integrative oncology program had lower levels of depression, anxiety, and sleep problems than patients who did not regularly attend the program, according to areport inPsycho-Oncology.“Emotional distress is one of the leading challenges facing supportive and palliative oncology care,” wrote Eran Ben‐Arye, M.D., of Technion‐Israel Institute of Technology in Haifa, Israel, and colleagues. Several studies have suggested that integrative oncology care—which combines complem entary therapies with conventional cancer treatments—ma...
Source: Psychiatr News - August 30, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Tags: anxiety cancer care depression integrative oncology Psyco-Oncology quality of life sleep Source Type: research

People Experiencing Mental Crisis Less Likely to Face Arrest When Police Pair With MH Professionals
Individuals experiencing a mental health crisis were less likely to be arrested following a 911 call if a police officer and mental health professional responded to the call together compared with if the police responded alone, according to areport published Thursday in Psychiatric Services in Advance.Katie Bailey, M.P.A., and Bradley Ray, Ph.D., of Wayne State University in Indiana and colleagues analyzed data collected as part of a co-response team (CRT) pilot in an Indianapolis Metropolitan Police Department from August 1 through December 31, 2017. The team —involving a police officer trained in crisis interventio...
Source: Psychiatr News - August 27, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Tags: arrest booking co-response team crisis intervention emergency medical services EMS Indianapolis jail mental crisis Psychiatric Services Source Type: research

Stanford Initiative Aims to Educate Media About Responsible Suicide Reporting
In 2017, the popular Netflix drama “13 Reasons Why” became one of the most controversial series of the year because of its depiction of the fictional suicide of a 17-year-old girl. After its release, Google searches for “how to commit suicide” and “how to kill yourself”increased dramatically, and a 2020study reported that the suicide rate among youth spiked 29% above historical trends in the month after the release of “13 Reasons Why.”It is not surprising: An enormous body of research from American and international researchers —some of it dating back to the 1980s&mdash...
Source: Psychiatr News - August 26, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Tags: Media and Mental Health Initiative Netflix 13 Reasons Why Stanford University Steven Adelsheim Source Type: research

APA Urges Attention to Veteran and Refugee Mental Health During Evacuation From Afghanistan
The news and images coming out of Afghanistan over the last several days have been difficult to watch. APAextends sympathy to the people of Afghanistan and to the U.S. and allied service members who worked to establish peace in the country over the past 20 years.“The needs of returning soldiers, Americans and allies stationed in Afghanistan, and Afghan refugees are liable to be profound," said APA President Vivian Pender, M.D. "We know that the effects of trauma are long-lasting and take many forms. The APA wants to extend its knowledge and resources arou nd trauma-based care, grounded in years of research,...
Source: Psychiatr News - August 25, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research

Rawle Andrews Jr. Esq. Named Executive Director of APA Foundation
Rawle Andrews Jr., Esq., has been named executive director of the American Psychiatric Association Foundation (APAF) and will assume his new post on September 27.Andrews comes to APAF from AARP (American Association of Retired Persons), where he served for 15 years, most recently as vice president. He was a member of the national leadership team overseeing the organization ’s field operations in the seven largest and most diverse states in the country, including California, Florida, New York, and Texas.The APAF is APA ’s charitable foundation. As executive director, Andrews will oversee APAF’s efforts to ...
Source: Psychiatr News - August 24, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Tags: AARP Amy Porfiri APA Foundation Howard Law Rawle Andrews Saul Levin Thurgood Marshall Center Trust Source Type: research

Lower Antipsychotic Doses May Still Prevent Schizophrenia Relapse, Study Suggests
Patients on maintenance antipsychotic treatment may not require more than 5 mg of risperidone daily (or equivalent) to keep their risk of schizophrenia relapse low, according to ameta-analysis published inJAMA Psychiatry. Doses higher than this amount may provide a little additional protection but also cause more adverse events.“Because patients often need to use antipsychotics for many years, adverse events, such as movement disorders and weight gain, can accumulate and result in even more severe problems, such as tardive dyskinesia or cardiovascular problems,” wrote Stefan Leucht, M.D., of the Technical Unive...
Source: Psychiatr News - August 23, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Tags: antipsychotics aripiprazole fluphenazine haloperidol JAMA Psychiatry lurasidone oral olanzapine oral ziprasidone paliperidone quetiapine risperidone Stefan Leucht zotepine Source Type: research

Telehealth Finds Favor Among Patients With Substance Use Disorders
Patients with substance use disorders (SUDs) who have used telehealth services during the COVID-19 pandemic are largely satisfied with the quality of care they receive, suggests asmall study in theAmerican Journal on Addictions.Dawn E. Sugarman, Ph.D., of McLean Hospital in Belmont, Mass., and colleagues analyzed data from a 23-item online survey taken by 58 adult patients with SUDs who used telehealth through the hospital ’s outpatient Alcohol, Drug, and Addiction Treatment Program during the pandemic. The survey assessed the frequency and type of services the patients received via telehealth, as well as the patient...
Source: Psychiatr News - August 20, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Tags: American Journal on Addictions COVID-19 group therapy individual therapy medication management pandemic substance use disorder SUD survey telehealth Source Type: research

Most Adolescents Have Tried or Want to Quit Vaping, Study Reports
More than half of adolescents who vape said that they intend to quit and about two-thirds had tried to quit during the past year, according to astudy of middle and high school students published online inPediatrics. These numbers reflect a significant increase in the intention and number of attempts to quit compared with the results of a similar survey of adolescents in 2017. That survey found that 44% of the respondents had thought seriously about quitting and 25% had tried.The study inPediatrics also revealed that adolescents ’ perceived harm from vaping is strongly associated with their intention to quit and attem...
Source: Psychiatr News - August 19, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Tags: attempt E-cigarettes intent National Youth Tobacco Survey pediatrics vaping Source Type: research

Escitalopram Found to Reduce Anxiety in Patients With Coronary Heart Disease
Escitalopram appears to be more effective than exercise at reducing anxiety in patients with coronary heart disease, astudy published today inJAMA Psychiatry has found.“To our knowledge, [this study] is the first randomized clinical trial to evaluate the efficacy of a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor or aerobic exercise in the treatment of anxiety in patients with [coronary heart disease] and high levels of anxiety,” wrote James A. Blumenthal, Ph.D., of Duke University Medical Center and colleagues. “Escitalopram produced clinically meaningful reductions in anxiety, as well as significant reductions...
Source: Psychiatr News - August 18, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Tags: anxiety coronary heart disease depression escitalopram exercise JAMA Psychiatry Source Type: research

MH Professionals in Correctional Systems Urged to Treat Sleep Issues, Advocate for Solutions
Disrupted and deprived sleep —known to increase the risk of psychiatric symptoms such as depression and anxiety and other health problems—is a common experience lived by inmates in U.S. jails and prisons. Apaper inPsychiatric Services in Advance describes lawsuits by inmates that have attempted to address this problem and discusses clinicians ’ responsibility to evaluate and treat inmates for sleep-related problems.APA past President Ren ée L. Binder, M.D., Nathaniel Morris, M.D., and Jessica Holliday, M.D., M.P.H., of the University of California, San Francisco, outlined five conditions that have ...
Source: Psychiatr News - August 17, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Tags: correctional systems incarcerated jail prison psychiatric disorders Psychiatric Services in Advance Renee Binder sleep sleep deprivation Source Type: research

Exposure to Antipsychotics in Womb Not Found to Increase Risk of ADHD, Autism in Offspring
Children whose mothers took antipsychotics during pregnancy do not appear to be at a heightened risk of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), autism spectrum disorder (ASD), or low birth weight, reports astudy published today inJAMA Internal Medicine. While there was a small increased risk of preterm birth of children exposed to prenatal antipsychotics, additional analysis suggested this may be due to maternal psychiatric illness and not the medication.“Our study results suggest that if pregnant women have a clinical need for antipsychotics (including first-generation and second-generation antipsychotics),...
Source: Psychiatr News - August 16, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Tags: ADHD antipsychotics autism birth outcomes JAMA Internal Medicine low birth weight pregnancy preterm birth psychiatric illness Source Type: research

Nine in Ten Children With ADHD May Experience Symptoms Into Young Adulthood
Up to 90% of children who have attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) may continue to experience residual symptoms of the disorder into young adulthood even though many have periods of remission along the way, astudy published online today inAJP in Advancesuggests.“The study findings emphasize that childhood-onset ADHD is a chronic but waxing and waning disorder with periods of full remission that are more often temporary than sustained,” wrote Margaret H. Sibley, Ph.D., of the University of Washington School of Medicine and Children’s Research Institut e in Seattle and colleagues. “[Health...
Source: Psychiatr News - August 13, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Tags: ADHD adult ajp in advance attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder children fluctuating symptoms remission Source Type: research

Physical Activity Linked to Slower Cognitive Decline in Adults With Elevated Tau Levels
Older adults who were physically active reported significantly slower cognitive decline compared with sedentary adults, reports astudy published Wednesday inJAMA Network Open. The association between physical activity and cognitive function was most dramatic among adults who had elevated levels of the Alzheimer ’s-associated tau protein in their blood.“Although we know that physical activity can positively impact cognitive function, much less is understood about the role of sedentary behavior and its association with the same,” wrote Pankaja Desai, Ph.D., of Rush University Medical Center in Chicago and c...
Source: Psychiatr News - August 12, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Tags: Alzheimer's disease Chicago Health and Aging Project cognitive decline JAMA Network Open physical activity sedentary tau Source Type: research

Criteria for Identifying Youth at High Risk for Psychosis Called Into Question
Sixteen percent of youth under age 18 identified at risk for schizophrenia based on criteria for “at-risk mental state” (ARMS) converted to psychosis within five years, according to ameta-analysis in the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. This rate is considerably lower than the rate reported for individuals over 18.“Our findings indicate a need for caution in applying ARMS methodology to children and adolescents and highlight the need for developmentally sensitive approaches when considering psychosis risk,” wrote senior author Ian Kelleher, M.D., Ph.D., of the Roya...
Source: Psychiatr News - August 11, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Tags: adults early identification Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry prevention psychosis schizophrenia transition rates youth Source Type: research

Older Adults Less Likely Than Younger to Report Psychiatric Symptoms After Suicide Attempt
Adults aged 65 years and older who are suicidal appear to report higher levels of intent compared with younger adults who are suicidal, but they are less likely to meet the criteria for major depression and several other mental disorders. Thesefindings were published Monday in theAmerican Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry.Older adults ’ lower scores on ratings of psychiatric symptoms “may cloud the clinician’s assessment of the serious nature of suicide attempts in older patients,” wrote Stefan Wiktorsson, Ph.D., of the University of Gothenburg in Sweden and colleagues. “If this is the case, saf...
Source: Psychiatr News - August 10, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Tags: American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry anxiety depression older adults pain physical impairment substance use disorders suicidal intent suicide younger adults Source Type: research

Mental Health Patients Found Willing to Answer Routine Question on Firearm Access
When patients receiving mental health care were asked to complete a standardized questionnaire that asked whether they had access to guns, most provided a response, reports astudy inJAMA Health Forum. A positive response can help clinicians identify and provide appropriate follow-up care for patients at risk of suicide.“Firearms are the most common method of suicide, one of the ‘diseases of despair’ driving increased mortality in the U.S. over the past decade,” wrote Julie E. Richards, Ph.D., M.P.H., of Kaiser Permanente Washington in Seattle and colleagues. “However, routine standardized ques...
Source: Psychiatr News - August 9, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research

APA Foundation Offers Advice to Employers to Help Workers Ease Transition Back to Workplace
Returning to a workplace after telecommuting for more than a year can be stressful for employees. They may need to establish new routines for commuting and family caregiving, they may have concerns about COVID-19 variants, and some may still be processing grief from losing loved ones to the pandemic. To help employers assist their employees with the transition, theCenter for Workplace Mental Health, a program of the APA Foundation, has developed aguide for returning to the workplace.The guide offers insight into the concerns employees may have and tips on communicating with employees throughout the transition. The key reco...
Source: Psychiatr News - August 6, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Tags: APA Foundation Center for Workplace Mental Health communication COVID-19 employees flexibility guide mental health resources return to workplace Saul Levin transparency Vivian Pender Source Type: research

Rewards Improve Abstinence, Adherence in Medication Treatment for Opioid Use Disorder
Patients with opioid use disorder (OUD) who receive monetary rewards for completing goals within a medication-assisted treatment program have better outcomes than those who do not, according to asystematic review and meta-analysis published Wednesday inJAMA Psychiatry.“This systematic review and meta-analysis provides support for the efficacy of contingency management for addressing a wide range of substantive clinical problems common among people receiving [medication-assisted treatment for OUD], including the current crisis of comorbid stimulant use disorder, ” wrote Hypatia A. Bolivar, Ph.D., of the Universi...
Source: Psychiatr News - August 5, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Tags: abstinence cigarettes contingency management JAMA Psychiatry medication-assisted treatment opioid use disorder rewards stimulants treatment adherence Source Type: research