Nonfatal Opioid Overdoses Rose During COVID-19 Pandemic, Report Suggests
Data from an emergency department in Richmond suggests that the number of nonfatal opioid-related overdoses may have risen during the first few months of the COVID-19 pandemic, particularly among people who are Black. Thefindings were published inJAMA.Taylor A. Ochalek, Ph.D., of Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU) and colleagues compared the number of nonfatal opioid overdoses recorded in electronic medical records from VCU ’s Emergency Department from March to June 2019 with those that occurred from March to June 2020—the first few months of the COVID-19 pandemic. They found nonfatal opioid overdoses incre...
Source: Psychiatr News - September 22, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Tags: black COVID-19 emergency department JAMA nonfatal overdose opioid pandemic Source Type: research

Tips on Reopening Psychiatric Practices During Pandemic
As psychiatrists begin to reopen their offices during the COVID-19 pandemic, there are many questions about how to do so safely. In the latest issue ofPsychiatric News, risk management consultant Anne Huben-Kearney, R.N., B.S.N., M.P.A., offers someadvice. “Take into consideration your health and that of your patients and whether to continue with telepsychiatry, reopen your practice to see patients in person, or have a hybrid practice,” Huben-Kearney wrote. “Safety for your patients and for yourself is paramount, now more than ever.”For psychiatrists who are preparing to resume seeing patients ...
Source: Psychiatr News - September 21, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Tags: CDC COVID-19 hand hygiene masks office pandemic risk management state guidance telemedicine Source Type: research

Researchers Warn of Post-Lockdown Influx of Alcohol-Related Emergencies Among Youth
Hospitals and emergency services should be prepared for a possible influx of adolescents and young adults with alcohol-related emergencies as their localities open up after COVID-19 lockdowns, suggests astudy in the Journal of Adolescent Health. The study found that the proportion of alcohol-related emergency department (ED) visits to two Italian hospitals jumped for this population in the weeks following the end of this spring ’s lockdown compared with the same time frame in 2019.Veronica Grigoletto, M.D., of the University of Trieste and colleagues analyzed data on ED visits of patients aged 13 to 24 years that occ...
Source: Psychiatr News - September 18, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research

To Protect Public Health, U.S. Must Prioritize Worker Safety During COVID-19 Pandemic
The COVID-19 pandemic presents an enormous worker safety crisis to those caring for patients and others providing public-facing services, according to aViewpoint article published in JAMA. Today isWorld Patient Safety Day,and the article highlights the importance of ensuring the safety of health workers, today ’s theme.U.S. employers are required under law to provide their employees with safe workplaces, and the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) is tasked with enforcing the law, wrote David Michaels, Ph.D., M.P.H., of the Milken Institute School of Public Health, and Gregory Wagner, M.D., of the Ha...
Source: Psychiatr News - September 17, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Tags: COVID-19 David Michaels Gregory Wagner Occupational Safety and Health Administration pandemic patient safety personal protective equipment public health worker safety World Patient Safety Day Source Type: research

Older Physicians Experience Less Work-Related Stress, Psychological Distress Than Younger Colleagues
Physicians experience higher rates of psychological distress and suicidal ideation than the general population, but the experience of age may act as a buffer for older physicians, astudy in theAmerican Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry suggests. The study also found that work-life conflict declined as physicians grew older.Chanaka Wijeratne, M.D., of the University of Notre Dame, Australia, and colleagues analyzed data from 10,038 physicians who responded to the National Mental Health Survey of Doctors and Medical Students, which was conducted in Australia. They divided responses into three groups according to physician age:...
Source: Psychiatr News - September 16, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Tags: anxiety Australia burnout Chanaka Wijeratne depression distress older physicians suicidal ideation suicide University of Notre Dame Source Type: research

Suicide Rates Peak Among Veterans Shortly After Transition to Civilian Life, Study Finds
Suicide rates among veterans peaked six to 12 months after they left the military, and those at higher risk included veterans who were younger, were male, had a shorter length of service, were not married, or were separated from the Marine Corps or Army, according to astudy published inJAMA Network Open.“National leaders at the highest levels of the U.S. government have been concerned about suicide rates among service members transitioning to civilian life,” wrote Chandru Ravindran, M.S., of the Center of Excellence for Suicide Prevention and colleagues. “We believe this cohort study provides much needed ...
Source: Psychiatr News - September 15, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Tags: Army Center of Excellence for Suicide Prevention Chandru Ravindran JAMA Network Open Marine Corps military Navy Soldiers suicide risk veterans Source Type: research

Sexual Minorities More Likely to Experience Comorbid SUDs, Psychiatric Disorders Than Heterosexuals
Adults who identify as gay, lesbian, or bisexual with alcohol or tobacco use disorder are more likely to have another psychiatric illness than adults who identify as heterosexual, according to areport inAJP in Advance.“[I]t is important for clinicians to know that psychiatric comorbidities are more often present than not among sexual minorities who present with an alcohol or tobacco use disorder,” wrote Rebecca Evans-Polce, Ph.D., of the University of Michigan and colleagues. “This research suggests that in tegrated substance use and mental health prevention and treatment programs are needed, particularly...
Source: Psychiatr News - September 14, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Tags: ajp in advance alcohol use disorder National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions –III sexual minorities substance use tobacco use disorder Source Type: research

E-Cigarette Use Tied to Sleep Deprivation in Young Adults
E-cigarette use, also known as vaping, may be associated with an increased risk of sleep deprivation in young adults aged 18 to 24 years even after they quit, astudy inAddictive Behaviors has found. The study also suggests that e-cigarette use is rising in this age group.Sina Kianersi, D.V.M., of the Indiana University School of Public Health and colleagues analyzed data from 18,945 young adults who participated in the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) in 2017 and 2018. The BRFSS is an annual telephone survey of adults living in the United States and its territories in which participants report on their he...
Source: Psychiatr News - September 11, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Tags: Addictive Behaviors Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance BRFSS E-cigarette nicotine sleep vaping youth Source Type: research

Suicide-Related ED Visits in United States Continue to Rise
The rate of emergency department (ED) visits related to suicidal ideation or attempt increased for all age groups between 2008 and 2017, according to aHealthcare Cost and Utilization Project statistical brief. Today isWorld Suicide Prevention Day, and the brief ’s findings highlight the need to work to prevent death by suicide.“Suicide is a major and growing public health concern in the United States, ranking among the top 10 leading causes of death.” wrote Pamela L. Owens, Ph.D., of the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality and colleagues. “From 2001 to 2017, the suicide rate increased 31%, fr...
Source: Psychiatr News - September 10, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Tags: emergency department suicide United States World Suicide Prevention Day Source Type: research

Depression Symptoms Soar During Pandemic, Study Finds
The prevalence of symptoms of depression in U.S. adults during a two-week period of the COVID-19 pandemic was more than three times higher than before the pandemic, according to areport inJAMA Network Open.Moreover, people with a lower income, savings of less than $5,000, and greater exposure to COVID-19 stressors were more likely to have depressive symptoms than people who did not fall into those categories.“These findings suggest that there is a high burden of depression symptoms in the United States associated with the COVID-19 pandemic and that this burden falls disproportionately on individuals who are already a...
Source: Psychiatr News - September 9, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Tags: COVID-19 depression JAMA Network Open life stressors mental health National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey pandemic savings socioeconomic status Source Type: research

Considering Mental Health Apps? APA App Advisor Can Help
As the number of mental health apps available for download continues to rise, psychiatrists are likely to receive questions from patients on the risks and benefits of these products. To help psychiatrists and other mental health professionals when selecting apps, APA has created theAPA App Advisor—a website that guides users through questions to consider when evaluating mental health apps.The APA App Advisor is an outgrowth of a mobile app evaluator put forth by an APA work group in 2017. Last December, APA brought together a diverse expert panel to assess the evaluation tool and consider ways to enhance it. The pane...
Source: Psychiatr News - September 8, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Tags: APA App Advisor clinical research data evaluations John Torous mental health apps privacy Source Type: research

One 20-Minute Call May Encourage Medication Treatment, Lower Overdose Risk in Patients With OUD
Receiving a 20-minute phone call from a trained peer counselor may help prompt people who have overdosed on opioids to begin medication treatment and lower their risk of another opioid overdose, suggests astudy in Drug and Alcohol Dependence.Theresa Winhusen, Ph.D., of the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine and colleagues compared the rates of medication treatment enrollment, opioid overdose, and opioid use in 80 patients who were randomized to receive either standard education or education with a personalized call. Standard education consisted of an information packet with three reports that were generated from ...
Source: Psychiatr News - September 4, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Tags: Drug and Alcohol Dependence Medication treatment naloxone opioid use disorder opioids peer support phone calls Source Type: research

Risk of Type 2 Diabetes Among Youth Who Initiate SSRI Treatment Found to Be Small
Children and adolescents who initiate treatment with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) may have a small increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes, particularly if they are publicly insured, according to astudy published Wednesday inJAMA Psychiatry.“The magnitude of association was more modest than previously reported, and the absolute risk was small,” wrote Jenny Sun, Ph.D., and Sonia Hernández-Díaz, M.D., Dr.P.H., of the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and colleagues. “This potential risk, which is much lower in magnitude t han the other known risk factors for [ty...
Source: Psychiatr News - September 3, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Tags: JAMA Psychiatry private insurance public insurance selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor SSRIs type 2 diabetes Source Type: research

APA Releases Updated Practice Guideline for Treatment of Patients With Schizophrenia
Yesterday, APA released a new evidence-based guideline on treating patients with schizophrenia.The APA Practice Guideline for the Treatment of Patients With Schizophrenia, Third Edition, replaces the previous practice guideline released in 2004. It is also the first APA guideline for an entire disorder that uses standards set forth by the Institute of Medicine in 2011 to ensure clinical guidelines meet high standards of transparency and scientific rigor.As with APA ’s previous guidelines, clinical recommendations were made by a diverse group of experts following a systematic evaluation of relevant literature. The exp...
Source: Psychiatr News - September 2, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Tags: APA Practice Guideline for the Treatment of Patients With Schizophrenia clozapine evaluation Institute of Medicine patient preference pharmacotherapy psychosocial interventions Source Type: research

Discrimination May Increase Risk of Severe Alcohol Use in Minorities
Racial and ethnic discrimination may increase the risk that members of minority groups will experience severe alcohol use disorder (AUD), according to areport inDrug and Alcohol Dependence.“Our findings [should] prompt researchers and practitioners to consider the extent to which systems of oppression can impact the pathogenesis, trajectories, and recoveries (including relapse) of AUD, and how shifting policies and practices can move toward the dismantling of oppression that give ri se to illnesses,” wrote Joseph E. Glass, Ph.D., M.S.W., of Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Research Institute and colleagues.T...
Source: Psychiatr News - September 1, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Tags: alcohol use disorder AUD discrimination Drug and Alcohol Dependence ethnicity National Epidemiological Survey on Alcohol-Related Conditions III race Source Type: research

Digital CBT May Reduce Eating Disorder Symptoms in College Women
A digital cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) intervention that includes personal coaching may help to reduce several symptoms of eating disorders in college women. Asreported today inJAMA Network Open, women who received the digital CBT had greater reductions in negative eating-related thoughts or beliefs and the frequency of binge eating compared with women who were referred to usual university care.“Current treatment delivery efforts for [eating disorders] on college campuses are hindered by factors such as limited counseling center capacity and access to evidence-based treatments. College students report additiona...
Source: Psychiatr News - August 31, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Tags: binge eating college students digital CBT Eating Disorder Examination-Questionnaire eating disorders Source Type: research

Drug Company Payments to Doctors Linked to Higher Pimavanserin Prescribing, Medicare Costs
Higher physician payments from drug manufacturer Acadia for Nuplazid (pimavanserin) are associated with increased pimavanserin prescription volume and Medicare costs, astudyin Psychiatric Services in Advance has found. Pimavanserin is approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of hallucinations and delusions associated with Parkinson ’s disease psychosis. Physician payments include payments for speaking, consulting, education, food, travel, and lodging.“Our study adds to the growing evidence of the association between pharmaceutical industry payments to physicians and physician prescrib...
Source: Psychiatr News - August 28, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Tags: Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services CMS Hemalkumar Mehta Nuplazid Open Payments Part D Prescriber Public Use Files pimavanserin Psychiatrc Services Source Type: research

Social Services Staff Found to Experience Mental Health Problems a Year After Mass Shooting
In a neighborhood where a mass shooting had occurred less than a year before, one-third of social services staff screened positive for mental health disorders, according to astudy published inJAMA Network Open.Eleven months after the shooting at the Tree of Life synagogue on October 27, 2018, in Pittsburgh, Rafael J. Engel, Ph.D., of the University of Pittsburgh and colleagues reached out to nonprofit organizations in the synagogue ’s neighborhood. Eight executives of the social service agencies and educational institutions emailed surveys to their staffs aimed at measuring mental health symptoms , comprisi...
Source: Psychiatr News - August 27, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Tags: anxiety depression gun violence JAMA Network Open mass shooting posttraumatic stress disorder Rafael Engel substance use disorder suicidal ideation Tree of Life synagogue Source Type: research

Internet Searches for 'Anxiety' Soared in First Month of COVID Pandemic
The number of internet searches on Google for information about “anxiety” or “panic” skyrocketed in the period immediately after the declaration of a national emergency in response to COVID-19, according to aresearch letter published inJAMA Internal Medicine.The number vastly exceeded the expected number of searches based on historical trends.“Although this study cannot confirm that any search was linked to a specific acute anxiety event or panic attack, it provides evidence of the collateral psychological effects stemming from COVID-19,” wrote lead author John W. Ayers, Ph.D., of the Di...
Source: Psychiatr News - August 26, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Tags: anxiety attack COVID-19 Google internet searches JAMA Internal Medicine John Ayers panic attack Source Type: research

APA Traces History of Racism in Psychiatry and the Nation in Second Member Town Hall
Just a few days before the 57th anniversary of the civil rights March on Washington, where Martin Luther King Jr. gave his “I Have a Dream Speech,” APA hosted the second in a series of town hall meetings to address structural racism in psychiatry. A distinguished panel of Black psychiatrists spoke to approximately 425 APA members about how the Black Lives Matter movement is an outgrowth of the civil rights initiativ es of the 1960s, what anti-racism is, and the impact of racial injustices within the organization, the profession, and the country.APA President Jeffrey Geller, M.D., M.P.H., described how the actio...
Source: Psychiatr News - August 25, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Tags: Aletha Maybank Altha Stewart APA Black Lives Matter Jeffrey Geller Kevin Simon Presidential Task Force to Address Structural Racism Throughout Psychiatry segregation Source Type: research

Several Antihypertensive Medications Associated With Reduced Depression
Adults who take blood pressure medications are not at an increased risk of depression, according to areport published today inHypertension. In fact, nine of the 41 medications assessed in the study were associated with a decreased incidence of depression.The medications that were found to protect against depression were amlodipine, atenolol, bisoprolol, carvedilol, enalapril, propranolol, ramipril, verapamil, and verapamil combinations.Studies have shown that about 30% of people with hypertension or other cardiovascular problems have comorbid depression. Moreover, individuals with both disorders have worse mortality and a ...
Source: Psychiatr News - August 25, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Tags: antihypertensive beta blocker depression health registry high blood pressure hypertension Lars Vedel Kessing propranolol vermapamil Source Type: research

Time Is Now for Addressing Racism in Medical Education
As APA leaders continue to work toeliminate systemic racism within psychiatry, a group of psychiatry resident leaders recognized with APA/APA Foundation Minority Fellowshipsdescribed an action plan they believe will reduce racism in medical education in the most recent issue ofPsychiatric News.“Many health care institutions and medical schools, including the AMA, have released statements condemning police brutality and racism. However, such statements ring hollow without action,” the APA/APAF Minority Fellows wrote. “We believe that one of the first steps in combating systemic racis m in the medical field...
Source: Psychiatr News - August 21, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Tags: APA/APA Foundation Minority Fellows diversity graduate medical education health disparities mentorship Psychiatric News racism research scholarship standardized testing Source Type: research

40% of U.S. Adults Reported Worsening Mental Health in Late June Due to Pandemic, CDC Finds
U.S. adults reported worsening mental health associated with the COVID-19 pandemic, according to astudy published in theMorbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. Young adults, individuals who identified as Black and/or Hispanic, essential workers, and unpaid adult caregivers reported disproportionately worse mental health outcomes.“Addressing mental health disparities and preparing support systems to mitigate mental health consequences as the pandemic evolves will continue to be needed urgently,” wrote Mark É. Czeisler of the Turner Institute for Brain and Mental Health in Melbourne, Australia; Emiko Petros...
Source: Psychiatr News - August 20, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Tags: anxiety COVID-19 depression mental health Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report substance use disorders suicide ideation Source Type: research

Brief Video Presentation Humanizing Schizophrenia Diminishes Stigma
People who watched a 90-second video of a young woman describing her experience with schizophrenia had a lower rate of stigma toward people with schizophrenia than those who did not watch this video. Thefindings were published inSchizophrenia Bulletin.“Stigma creates a huge barrier for people with psychosis to getting care, and studies show that 70% of people with serious mental illness do not seek out treatment,” lead author Doron Amsalem, M.D., of the New York State Psychiatric Institute (NYSPI) and Columbia University toldPsychiatric News. The length of time that people with psychosis go without treatment im...
Source: Psychiatr News - August 19, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Tags: first-episode psychosis schizophrenia Schizophrenia Bulletin stigma Source Type: research

Clozapine Found Most Likely of Common Antipsychotics to Reduce Risk of Suicide in Patients With Schizophrenia
Compared with other common antipsychotics, clozapine appears most likely to decrease the risk of suicidal outcomes in patients with schizophrenia, according to areport inSchizophrenia Bulletin.The findings were based on two nationwide register-based cohort studies of 61,889 patients with schizophrenia who lived in Finland and 29,823 patients with schizophrenia who lived in Sweden. Heidi Taipale, Ph.D., of the University of Eastern Finland and colleagues specifically focused on patients who took the following first- or second-generation antipsychotics: clozapine, olanzapine, quetiapine, risperidone, risperidone (long-acting...
Source: Psychiatr News - August 18, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Tags: antipsychotics benzodiazepines clozapine schizophrenia suicide suicide attempt suicide death Source Type: research

Olanzapine/Samidorphan Combo Found to Reduce Antipsychotic-Induced Weight Gain
This study was sponsored by Alkermes, maker of samidorphan.Cristoph Correll, M.D., of the Donald and Barbara Zucker School of Medicine at Hofstra/Northwell and colleagues randomly assigned 561 adult patients with schizophrenia to receive 24 weeks of olanzapine/samidorphan (10mg/10mg daily in week 1, 20 mg/10 mg daily afterward) or olanzapine (10mg daily in week one, 20 mg daily afterwards). All the participants had a body mass index between 18 and 30 at baseline and reported weight stability of at least three months.After 24 weeks, the average medication-induced weight gain was 4.21% in the olanzapine/samidorphan group and...
Source: Psychiatr News - August 17, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Tags: ajp in advance Alkermes Cristoph Correll olanzapine samidorphan schizophrenia waistline circumference wait gain Source Type: research

Yoga May Help Relieve Anxiety Symptoms, But CBT Is More Effective
Yoga may help relieve symptoms for patients with generalized anxiety disorder, but group cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) should remain a first-line treatment, suggests astudy inJAMA Psychiatry.Naomi M. Simon, M.D., M.Sc., of New York University Grossman School of Medicine and colleagues compared the six-month response rates of 155 patients who were randomized to 12 weeks of Kundalini yoga, CBT, or education about stress. Stress education included lectures on the physical and psychological impact of stress, the effects of lifestyle behaviors such as smoking or drinking alcohol on stress, and the importance of exercise an...
Source: Psychiatr News - August 14, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Tags: anxiety CBT Clinical Global Impression-Improvement Scale cognitive behavioral therapy generalized anxiety disorder JAMA Psychiatry stress education yoga Source Type: research

HHS Extends Deadline for Provider Relief Fund Applications; Learn More at Webinar This Afternoon
The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) has extended the deadline for health care professionals to apply for the second phase of distribution ofCOVID-19 Provider Relief Funds toFriday, August 28. Additionally, HHS is allowing certain health care professionals who missed the deadline for the first-phase distribution in June to apply for the new distribution.The Provider Relief Fund was created by Congress under the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act passed in March. Eligible health care professionals —including those who bill Medicare, Medicaid, Medicaid managed care, or the Children&...
Source: Psychiatr News - August 13, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Tags: Alex Azar CARES Act CHIP COVID-19 HHS Medicaid Medicare Provider Relief Fund General Distribution Source Type: research

Learning About Alzheimer ’s Risk Does Not Negatively Affect Older Adults’ Mental Health in Short Term, Study Suggests
Older individuals who are informed by health care professionals that they have elevated levels of the protein amyloid —a known risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease—do not appear to experience adverse short-term psychological responses compared with those who learn their amyloid levels are normal, according to areport inJAMA Neurology.“We found that trial participants who did not have cognitive impairment and received an elevated amyloid result were no more likely than those receiving a not elevated amyloid result to experience depression, anxiety, or catastrophic reactions in the short term,” w...
Source: Psychiatr News - August 12, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Tags: Alzheimer's disease amyloid anxiety depression JAMA Neurology suicidality Source Type: research

Follow-up Care Within 7 Days of Psychiatric Hospital Discharge Reduces Suicide Risk in Youth
Youth on Medicaid who have a follow-up mental health visit within seven days of discharge from a psychiatric hospital appear to be at lower risk of suicide in the six months following hospitalization compared with those who do not receive such timely care, reports astudy published today inJAMA Network Open.“High rates of suicide after psychiatric hospital discharge have persisted and failed to decrease for decades,” wrote Cynthia A. Fontanella, Ph.D., of the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Health at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center and colleagues. “These findings support e xisting q...
Source: Psychiatr News - August 11, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Tags: adolescent suicide Cynthia Fontanella David Brent follow-up care inpatient hospitalization JAMA Network Open Medicaid outpatient care youth Source Type: research

Cannabis Use During Pregnancy Linked to Increased Autism Risk in Children
Women who use cannabis while pregnant have an elevated risk of having children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), according to astudy published today inNature Medicine.“Children with prenatal cannabis exposure had an increase of 50% in the risk of an autism diagnosis over the study period, and these associations were robust after controlling for confounding,” wrote Daniel Corsi, Ph.D., of the University of Ottawa and colleagues.Corsi and colleagues analyzed the health outcomes of over 500,000 children born in Ontario between April 1, 2007, and March 31, 2012, by linking pregnancy data from Ontario ’s bi...
Source: Psychiatr News - August 10, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Tags: ADHD attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder autism spectrum disorder cannabis Daniel Corsi developmental risks substance use Source Type: research

Targeted Behavioral Pain Management May Improve Chronic Pain in Patients With Substance Use Disorder
Behavioral pain management techniques that focus on the interplay between chronic pain and the potential for substance abuse may improve pain tolerance and lower pain intensity in patients who have substance use disorder (SUD), suggests astudy inJAMA Psychiatry.Mark A. Ilgen, Ph.D., of the VA Center for Clinical Management Research in Ann Arbor, Mich., and colleagues compared pain tolerance and intensity of 470 adults over 12 months. All patients were in treatment for SUD and had chronic pain. Patients were randomized to receive either the Improving Pain During Addiction Treatment (ImPAT) intervention or supportive psychoe...
Source: Psychiatr News - August 7, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Tags: ImPAT JAMA Psychiatry Mark Ilgen pain pain intensity pain tolerance psychoeducation Source Type: research

Adults May Require Different Interventions for Loneliness Depending on Age
The factors impacting adults ’ feelings of loneliness change depending on their phase in life, suggesting there is no “one-size-fits-all” intervention to reduce loneliness, according to astudy published inBMC Public Health.“[T]he factors associated with loneliness vary across different age groups and therefore policymakers and intervention developers should take these factors into account in efforts to reduce loneliness among adults,” wrote Thanée Franssen, M.Sc., of Maastricht University in the Netherlands and c olleagues.The authors used data from the Adult Health Monitor Limburg 2016...
Source: Psychiatr News - August 6, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Tags: BMC Public Health loneliness Than ée Franssen Source Type: research

Adult Anxiety and Poorer Function Linked to Childhood Depression But Can Be Prevented
Children or teenagers with depression are more likely to have higher rates of anxiety and worse social functioning as adults than those without a history of depression, according to a report in theJournal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.However, children who receive specialty mental health services have a significantly reduced risk of adult psychiatric diagnoses, particularly anxiety, wrote William E. Copeland, Ph.D., a professor of psychiatry at the University of Vermont, and colleagues.“In our study, children/adolescents who had met criteria for depression and had also received ...
Source: Psychiatr News - August 5, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Tags: anxiety children depression Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry mental health services William Copeland Source Type: research

High-Dose Vitamin D Supplements Do Not Prevent Depression in Older Adults, Study Finds
Long-term use of a high-dose daily vitamin D3 supplement does not appear to be any more effective than placebo at preventing depression in adults aged 50 years or older, according to astudy appearing today inJAMA.Although observational studies have suggested individuals with lower levels of vitamin D may be at higher risk of late-life depression, “the findings do not support a role for supplemental vitamin D3 in depression prevention among adults,” wrote Olivia I. Okereke, M.D., S.M., of Massachusetts General Hospital and colleagues.  Okereke and colleagues analyzed data collected from a subset of adu...
Source: Psychiatr News - August 4, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Tags: depression JAMA Olivia I. Okereke Patient Health Questionnaire vitamin D3 Source Type: research

CBD May Help Patients With Cannabis Use Disorder Reduce Use
Cannabidiol (CBD) may be helpful at reducing cannabis use in people with cannabis use disorder, according to areportinLancet Psychiatry. Study participants who took 400 mg or 800 mg of CBD daily for four weeks reported more days of cannabis abstinence than those who took placebo.“[O]ur trial provides the first causal evidence supporting cannabidiol as a treatment for cannabis use disorders,” wrote Tom Freeman, Ph.D., of the University of Bath and colleagues. “These findings are important in light of major policy changes surrounding the production and sale of cannabis products, increases in the number of p...
Source: Psychiatr News - August 3, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Tags: CBD substance abuse substance use substance use disorder Source Type: research

House Passes $1.3 Trillion Spending Package, Including Funding for Major MH Initiatives
APA Urges Senate ActionToday the U.S. House of Representatives approved $96.4 billion in funding for the Department of Health and Human Services by passing the Labor-Health and Human Services-Education FY 2021 appropriations bill. The bill is part of HR 7617, a $1.3 trillion spending package that funds most federal agencies throughout the next fiscal year.The bill includes $6 billion for the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) for programs related to mental health and substance use, an increase of more than $100 million over the previous fiscal year. The impact of APA ’s advocacy was ev...
Source: Psychiatr News - July 31, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research

APA Mourns Loss of Rep. John Lewis, Praises Trailblazing Legacy
As civil rights leader and longtime congressman Rep. John Lewis is laid to rest today in Atlanta, APA released astatement honoring his memory and celebrating his lifelong work to end racial inequality.“We are mourning the loss of a leader who meant so much to the Black community and to all Americans who strive for equity and justice,” said APA President Jeffrey Geller, M.D., M.P.H., in APA’s statement. “For more than a half century, Rep. John Lewis showed what walking the walk truly means in promoting civil rights, even putting his own life at risk in service of the cause. His lesson to us is to con...
Source: Psychiatr News - July 30, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Tags: race racial discrimination racial equity Source Type: research

Medicare Data Show Disproportionate Effect of COVID-19 on Racial, Ethnic Minorities
Among Medicare beneficiaries, racial minorities —African Americans, Hispanics, and American Indians/Alaskan Natives—have been disproportionately affected by the global COVID-19 pandemic compared with white beneficiaries, according to a “Preliminary Medicare COVID-19 Snapshot” released this week by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS).The report was based on claims data from the Medicare Fee-for-Service (FFS) and Medicare Advantage programs received by July 17. COVID-19 cases were determined by an ICD-10 diagnosis code for COVID-19 on a claim or encounter record for any health care se...
Source: Psychiatr News - July 29, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Tags: Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services COVID-19 health disparities minorities Source Type: research

Lessons From Pandemic Could Advance Understanding of How Best to Support Vulnerable Families
The trauma and unpredictability of COVID-19 are likely to add stress in the lives of vulnerable children, including those who are abused, maltreated, and/or have a mental illness. There is much that can be learned from such stress to help vulnerable families in the future, according to anarticle published Monday inJAMA Pediatrics.“Recent advancements across disciplines relevant to early child development (for example, pediatrics, neuroscience, epigenetics, psychology, and public health) can be used to understand the consequences of this pandemic and develop and scale empirically supported interventions for adversity-...
Source: Psychiatr News - July 28, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Tags: abuse child development children COVID-19 Danielle Roubinov JAMA Pediatrics maltreatment mental illness Nicole R. Bush vulnerable families W. Thomas Boyce Source Type: research

HHS Renews Declaration of Public Health Emergency for COVID-19
Last week, U.S. Secretary of Health and Human Services (HHS) Alex Azar formallyrenewed the agency ’s determination that the COVID-19 pandemic is a public health emergency. The extension of this public health emergency keeps many regulatory changes and waivers relevant to psychiatrists—such asrelaxed telemedicine restrictions—in effect for the time being.Secretary Azar first declared COVID-19 a public health emergency in late January and subsequently renewed that status on April 21. APA and other health organizations had urged the Trump administration to authorize another extension to help combat the ongoi...
Source: Psychiatr News - July 27, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Tags: Alex Azar COVID-19 Food and Drug Administration Health and Human Services HHS public health emergency Saul Levin telehealth telemedicine Source Type: research

Psychiatrists Still Not Reimbursed on Par With Primary Care Physicians
Medicaid often reimburses psychiatrists less than primary care physicians for treating mental or substance use disorders, according to areport published today inPsychiatric Services in Advance. This disparity in reimbursement may explain why psychiatrists are less likely to participate in Medicaid than primary care physicians and why some regions face a shortage of psychiatrists, the researchers wrote.Tami L. Mark, Ph.D., M.B.A., and colleagues analyzed data from outpatient medical claims from 2014 for 11 states. The claims were for a primary behavioral health diagnosis such as a mental or substance use disorder and includ...
Source: Psychiatr News - July 24, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Tags: 99213 99214 Medicaid Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act of 2008 primary care physicians Psychiatric Services in Advance psychiatrists reimbursement Tami Mark Source Type: research

Childhood Abuse Survivors With PTSD Benefit From DBT-PTSD and CPT Therapies
Women with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) associated with childhood abuse improved significantly with both dialectical behavior therapy for PTSD (DBT-PTSD) and cognitive processing therapy (CPT), with DBT-PTSD resulting in slightly more favorable outcomes, according to astudy published Wednesday inJAMA Psychiatry.“Currently, treatment for [PTSD associated with childhood abuse] mostly relies on established treatments that were developed for survivors of adult-onset trauma,” wrote Martin Bohus, M.D., Ph.D., of Heidelberg University in Germany and colleagues. “Most treatment guidelines recommend prolon...
Source: Psychiatr News - July 23, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Tags: borderline personality disorder CAPS-5 cognitive processing therapy dialectical behavior therapy Martin Bohus physical abuse posttraumatic stress disorder sexual abuse Source Type: research

Deaths From Illicit Opioids Rise Dramatically While Deaths From Prescription Opioids Fall
Deaths involving illicit opioids, stimulants (such as methamphetamine), heroin, and cocaine rose dramatically between 2015 and the end of 2019, according to areport released Monday by the AMA ’s Opioid Task Force.The report also showed a 37.1% decrease in opioid prescribing; wider use of state Prescription Drug Monitoring Programs; and increasing numbers of doctors trained to prescribe buprenorphine (a medication used for treating opioid use disorder).The trends indicate that the nature of the nation ’s drug overdose crisis has changed. “The nation’s drug overdose epidemic is now being driven predom...
Source: Psychiatr News - July 22, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Tags: AMA AMA Opioid Task Force buprenorphine CDC cocaine fentanyl heroin medication-assisted treatment mental health parity opioid use disorder opioids Patrice Harris stimulants Source Type: research

COVID-19 Fear, Food Insecurity May Worsen Depressive Symptoms, Survey Finds
The COVID-19 pandemic has created significant fear and stress for people around the world. Areport inDepression& Anxietynow describes how COVID-19-related fear and food insecurity are likely contributing to higher levels of depression in U.S. adults.“Early reports coming out of China, Europe, and North America confirm significant mental health consequences tied to heightened levels of fear, perceived health risks, and an overwhelming sense of dread that [are] tied to dramatic increases in virus‐related morbidity and mortality around the wor ld,” wrote Kevin M. Fitzpatrick, Ph.D., of the University of Arka...
Source: Psychiatr News - July 21, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Tags: Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale COVID-19 & Anxiety food insecurity Kevin Fitzpatrick survey Source Type: research

Psychiatrists Experience Substantial Burnout, APA Survey Finds
Nearly 80% of North American psychiatrists responding to an online survey reported burnout, and 16% reported symptoms consistent with major depression, according to areport inAJP in Advance.“We believe that these findings have an important workforce policy implication,” wrote Richard Summers, M.D., of the University of Pennsylvania and colleagues. “Because burnout has been associated with a move to part-time status, increased leaves of absence, job change, and early retirement, i nterventions to decrease burnout are also interventions to enhance the psychiatric workforce.”The survey was created by t...
Source: Psychiatr News - July 20, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Tags: ajp in advance Board of Trustees Workgroup on Psychiatrist Well-Being and Burnout depression psychiatrists Richard Summers suicidality Source Type: research

FCC Approves 988 as Suicide Prevention, Mental Health Crisis Number
Yesterday the Federal Communications Commission (FCC)unanimously approved988 as a nationwide, three-digit phone number that people in crisis can call to speak with suicide prevention and mental health crisis counselors. All phone service providers are required to direct all 988 calls to the existing National Suicide Prevention Lifeline (1-800-273-TALK) by July 16, 2022. This includes all telecommunications carriers and interconnected and one-way Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP) service providers. The National Suicide Prevention Lifeline will remain operational during and after the two-year transition to 988.“If an...
Source: Psychiatr News - July 17, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Tags: 988 APA crisis Elinore McCance-Katz FCC Federal Communications Commission National Suicide Prevention Lifeline Source Type: research

APA, AACAP Outline Plan for School Reopening That Emphasizes Safety, Optimizes Mental Health
APA and the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (AACAP) on Wednesdayissued recommendations for schools and communities as they move to safely reopen schools in the COVID-19 era. APA members may want to share these recommendations with their local school boards or other government entities.“In these uncertain times, making educational decisions based on science and community circumstances ensures the mental health needs of our children and adolescents are being addressed, allowing them to feel engaged, safe, secure, supported, and loved,” APA and AACAP stated in a news release.The organizations u...
Source: Psychiatr News - July 16, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Tags: AACAP American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry APA children classrooms COVID-19 education mental health science Source Type: research

How Psychiatrists Can Support Maternal Mental Health During Pandemic
Pregnant and postpartum women are likely to face significant challenges due to COVID-19 that may increase their risk of mental health problems. In anarticle appearing today inJAMA Psychiatry, several psychiatrists describe strategies for helping both women in treatment for psychiatric disorders and those not in treatment.“Pregnant and postpartum women, already vulnerable owing to mood and anxiety disorders, have faced intensified harms as public health measures have interfered with crucial psychosocial needs specific to the peripartum period,” wrote Alison Hermann, M.D., Elizabeth M. Fitelson, M.D., and Veerle ...
Source: Psychiatr News - July 15, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Tags: Alison Hermann anxiety disorders COVID-19 Elizabeth M. Fitelson JAMA Psychiatry mood disorders postpartum pregnancy psychoactive medications psychotherapy Veerle Bergink Source Type: research

Rules on Confidentiality of SUD Treatment Records Updated to Enhance Coordination of Care
The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA)announced yesterday that it hasrevised regulations governing the disclosure of information about a patient ’s history of substance use disorders (SUDs). The changes are intended to help advance coordination of treatment of patients under the care of multiple health care professionals.The regulations that were revised fall under 42 CFR Part 2 and govern confidentiality of SUD treatment records.The 42 CFR Part 2 regulations were designed to protect patient records created by federally assisted programs ( “Part 2 programs”) for the treatme...
Source: Psychiatr News - July 14, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Tags: 42 CFR Part 2 CARES Act confidentiality Elinore F. McCance-Katz HIPAA samhsa Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration substance use disorders SUD Source Type: research