Sean J. Langenfeld, MD, FACS
Clinics in Colon and Rectal Surgery 2016; 29: 001-002DOI: 10.1055/s-0035-1568143Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.Article in Thieme eJournals:Table of contents  |  Full text (Source: Clinics in Colon and Rectal Surgery)
Source: Clinics in Colon and Rectal Surgery - February 16, 2016 Category: Surgery Authors: Steele, Scott R. Tags: Introduction to Guest Editor Source Type: research

Surveillance and Survivorship after Treatment for Colon Cancer
Clinics in Colon and Rectal Surgery 2015; 28: 262-270DOI: 10.1055/s-0035-1564435Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer diagnosed in the United States. Majority of patients have localized disease that is amenable to curative resection. Disease recurrence remains a major concern after resection. In addition, patients are at an increased risk for developing a second or metachronous colon cancer. The principal goal of surveillance following treatment of colon cancer is to improve disease-free and overall survival. Survivorship is a distinct phase following surveillance to help improve quality of life and promote lon...
Source: Clinics in Colon and Rectal Surgery - November 22, 2015 Category: Surgery Authors: Makhoul, RamiAlva, SurajWilkins, Kirsten B. Source Type: research

Chemotherapy for Stage II Colon Cancer
Clinics in Colon and Rectal Surgery 2015; 28: 256-261DOI: 10.1055/s-0035-1564430The adjuvant treatment of patients with stage II colon cancer is an area of controversy in medical oncology. Adjuvant chemotherapy aims to eradicate micrometastatic disease present at the time of surgery, preventing the development of distant metastatic disease and thereby curing those patients of their cancer. National and international guidelines for the adjuvant treatment of stage II colon cancer recommend a range of treatment options from observation to chemotherapy with single-agent or combination regimens, depending on the presence or abs...
Source: Clinics in Colon and Rectal Surgery - November 22, 2015 Category: Surgery Authors: Varghese, Anna Source Type: research

Management of Appendix Cancer
Clinics in Colon and Rectal Surgery 2015; 28: 247-255DOI: 10.1055/s-0035-1564433Primary cancers of the appendix are rare and are frequently diagnosed after surgery for appendicitis, presumed ovarian primary malignancy, or other indications. Primary appendix cancers are histologically diverse, and classification of these tumors has historically been confusing because of the nonstandardized nomenclature that is used. This review aimed to describe the epidemiology, presentation, workup, staging, and management of primary appendix cancers using current, recommended nomenclature. For this purpose, tumors were broadly classified...
Source: Clinics in Colon and Rectal Surgery - November 22, 2015 Category: Surgery Authors: Kelly, Kaitlyn J. Source Type: research

Peritoneal Carcinomatosis from Colon Cancer: A Systematic Review of the Data for Cytoreduction and Intraperitoneal Chemotherapy
Clinics in Colon and Rectal Surgery 2015; 28: 234-246DOI: 10.1055/s-0035-1564431A systematic review of the literature on the management of peritoneal carcinomatosis (PC) from colon cancer with cytoreductive surgery (CRS) and intraperitoneal chemotherapy (IPC) was undertaken using OVID Medline. Forty-six relevant studies were reviewed. Mean weighted overall morbidity following CRS and IPC was 49% (range 22–76%) and mortality was 3.6% (range 0–19%). Median overall survival ranged from 15 to 63 months, and 5-year overall survival ranged from 7 to 100%. This represents an improvement over historical treatment with ...
Source: Clinics in Colon and Rectal Surgery - November 22, 2015 Category: Surgery Authors: Nadler, AshlieMcCart, J. AndreaGovindarajan, Anand Source Type: research

Surgical Management of Complicated Colon Cancer
Clinics in Colon and Rectal Surgery 2015; 28: 228-233DOI: 10.1055/s-0035-1564621The management of complicated colon cancer (locally invasive, obstructed, or perforated cancers) can pose diagnostic and therapeutic challenges to surgical management. Adherence to traditional surgical oncologic principles must often be balanced with the patients' clinical presentation and other parameters. While the goal of an R0 (no residual microscopic disease) resection must always be kept in mind, situations sometimes arise which can make this difficult to achieve. Recognition of complicated disease and availability of varied therapeutic m...
Source: Clinics in Colon and Rectal Surgery - November 22, 2015 Category: Surgery Authors: Lee-Kong, StevenLisle, David Source Type: research

How Has the Robot Contributed to Colon Cancer Surgery?
Clinics in Colon and Rectal Surgery 2015; 28: 220-227DOI: 10.1055/s-0035-1564436Robotic surgery is an emerging field in colorectal surgery and may overcome the limitations of conventional laparoscopic surgery, such as rigid instrumentation, poor ergonomics, and assistant-dependent camera movements and retraction. In addition, robotic-assisted colectomy appears to offer comparable outcomes to laparoscopic colectomy with limited long-term outcomes data. Prolonged operating time, increased costs and learning curve are the major drawbacks of robotic colectomy for colon cancer. Although new robotic platforms promise improved in...
Source: Clinics in Colon and Rectal Surgery - November 22, 2015 Category: Surgery Authors: Isik, OzgenGorgun, Emre Source Type: research

Management of Malignant Adenomas
This article reviews the histologic characteristics and adverse risk factors that would portend a poor oncologic outcome and therefore suggest formal colonic resection. Modern endoscopic techniques such as endoscopic mucosal resection and endoscopic submucosal resection are discussed.[...]Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.Article in Thieme eJournals:Table of contents  |  Abstract  |  Full text (Source: Clinics in Colon and Rectal Surgery)
Source: Clinics in Colon and Rectal Surgery - November 20, 2015 Category: Surgery Authors: Hall, Jason F. Source Type: research

Diagnostic Approach to Hereditary Colorectal Cancer Syndromes
Clinics in Colon and Rectal Surgery 2015; 28: 205-214DOI: 10.1055/s-0035-1564432Approximately 5 to 10% of colorectal cancers develop within a known hereditary syndrome. Specific underlying genetic mutations drive the clinical phenotype and it is imperative to determine the genetic etiology to provide meaningful surveillance and intervention. Recognizing potential patients and families with a hereditary predisposition is the first step in management. Syndromes can be categorized according to polyp burden as polyposis or nonpolyposis. Clinical assessment should start with a personal and family medical history, physical exami...
Source: Clinics in Colon and Rectal Surgery - November 20, 2015 Category: Surgery Authors: Kalady, Matthew F.Heald, Brandie Source Type: research

Colon Cancer
Clinics in Colon and Rectal Surgery 2015; 28: 203-204DOI: 10.1055/s-0035-1564589Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.Article in Thieme eJournals:Table of contents  |  Full text (Source: Clinics in Colon and Rectal Surgery)
Source: Clinics in Colon and Rectal Surgery - November 20, 2015 Category: Surgery Authors: Nash, Garrett M. Tags: Preface Source Type: research

Garrett M. Nash, MD, MPH, FACS, FASCRS
Clinics in Colon and Rectal Surgery 2015; 28: 201-202DOI: 10.1055/s-0035-1564429Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.Article in Thieme eJournals:Table of contents  |  Full text (Source: Clinics in Colon and Rectal Surgery)
Source: Clinics in Colon and Rectal Surgery - November 20, 2015 Category: Surgery Authors: Beck, David E. Tags: Introduction to the Guest Editor Source Type: research

MRI Local Staging and Restaging in Rectal Cancer
Clinics in Colon and Rectal Surgery 2015; 28: 194-200DOI: 10.1055/s-0035-1555010Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with rectal protocol modification is a reliable staging modality which is rapidly replacing transrectal ultrasound for staging. The added information delivered by MRI includes wide circumferential radial margin compromise, distant lymph node metastasis in the pelvis, and level of sphincter compromise in the low rectum. As more information becomes available through ongoing studies, MRI may be able to contribute the decision to treat rectal cancer nonoperatively.[...]Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, N...
Source: Clinics in Colon and Rectal Surgery - October 5, 2015 Category: Surgery Authors: dePrisco, Gregory Source Type: research

Shifting Paradigms in Minimally Invasive Surgery: Applications of Transanal Natural Orifice Transluminal Endoscopic Surgery in Colorectal Surgery
Clinics in Colon and Rectal Surgery 2015; 28: 181-193DOI: 10.1055/s-0035-1555009Since the advent of laparoscopy, minimally invasive techniques such as single port laparoscopy, robotics, endoscopically assisted laparoscopy, and transanal endoscopic surgery continue to revolutionize the field of colorectal surgery. Transanal natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) represents a further paradigm shift by combining the advantages of these earlier techniques to reduce the size and number of abdominal incisions and potentially optimize rectal dissection, especially with respect to performance of an oncologically a...
Source: Clinics in Colon and Rectal Surgery - October 5, 2015 Category: Surgery Authors: Lee, Grace ClaraSylla, Patricia Source Type: research

Transanal Minimally Invasive Surgery
Clinics in Colon and Rectal Surgery 2015; 28: 176-180DOI: 10.1055/s-0035-1555008Transanal minimally invasive surgery (TAMIS) was first described in 2010 as a crossover between single-incision laparoscopic surgery and transanal endoscopic microsurgery (TEM) to allow access to the proximal and mid-rectum for resection of benign and early-stage malignant rectal lesions. The TAMIS technique can also be used for noncurative intent surgery of more advanced lesions in patients who are not candidates for radical surgery. Proper workup and staging should be done before surgical decision-making. In addition to the TAMIS port, instru...
Source: Clinics in Colon and Rectal Surgery - October 5, 2015 Category: Surgery Authors: deBeche-Adams, TeresaNassif, George Source Type: research

Transanal Endoscopic Microsurgery
Clinics in Colon and Rectal Surgery 2015; 28: 165-175DOI: 10.1055/s-0035-1562889Transanal endoscopic microsurgery (TEM) was developed by Professor Gerhard Buess 30 years ago at the dawn of minimally invasive surgery. TEM utilizes a closed proctoscopic system whereby endoluminal surgery is accomplished with high-definition magnification, constant CO2 insufflation, and long-shafted instruments. The end result is a more precise excision and closure compared to conventional instrumentation. Virtually any benign lesion can be addressed with this technology; however, proper patient selection is paramount when using it for cancer...
Source: Clinics in Colon and Rectal Surgery - October 5, 2015 Category: Surgery Authors: Saclarides, Theodore John Source Type: research

Enhanced Reality and Intraoperative Imaging in Colorectal Surgery
Clinics in Colon and Rectal Surgery 2015; 28: 158-164DOI: 10.1055/s-0035-1555007Colorectal surgery is one of the most common procedures performed around the world with more than 600,000 operations each year in the United States, and more than a million worldwide. In the past two decades, there has been a clear trend toward minimal access and surgeons have embraced this evolution. Widespread adoption of advanced minimally invasive procedures is often limited by procedural complexity and the need for specific technical skills. Furthermore, the loss of 3D vision, limited overview of the surgical field, and diminished tactile ...
Source: Clinics in Colon and Rectal Surgery - October 5, 2015 Category: Surgery Authors: Ris, FredericYeung, TrevorHompes, RoelMortensen, Neil J. Source Type: research

Emerging and Evolving Technology in Colon and Rectal Surgery
This article will describe the role of robotics in colorectal surgery. Room set up, port placement, and docking strategies will be described for common procedures, with emphasis on a hybrid robotic low anterior resection.[...]Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.Article in Thieme eJournals:Table of contents  |  Abstract  |  Full text (Source: Clinics in Colon and Rectal Surgery)
Source: Clinics in Colon and Rectal Surgery - October 5, 2015 Category: Surgery Authors: Bosio, Raul M.Pigazzi, Alessio Source Type: research

Colorectal Endoscopic Submucosal Dissection: Past, Present, and Factors Impacting Future Dissemination
Clinics in Colon and Rectal Surgery 2015; 28: 146-151DOI: 10.1055/s-0035-1555006First performed in the stomach for removal of localized gastric tumors, endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) has evolved into a technique that is increasingly being employed to resect colorectal lesions. As opposed to endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR), ESD allows the endoscopist to remove large specimens en bloc to provide accurate pathologic evaluation and lower local recurrence rates. ESD is an ideal technique for resection of lesions without lymph node metastases and is becoming the standard of care in Japan as outcomes data has proven it...
Source: Clinics in Colon and Rectal Surgery - October 5, 2015 Category: Surgery Authors: Ferreira, JasonAkerman, Paul Source Type: research

Combined Endoscopic and Laparoscopic Surgery
Clinics in Colon and Rectal Surgery 2015; 28: 140-145DOI: 10.1055/s-0035-1555005Benign colon polyps are best treated endoscopically. Colon polyps that are not amenable for endoscopic removals either because they are too large or situated in anatomically difficult locations can pose a clinical dilemma. Traditionally the most common recommendation for these patients has been to offer a colon resection. Although the laparoscopic approach has improved short-term outcomes, morbidities associated with bowel resection are still significant. We may be over treating majority of these patients because of the remote possibility that ...
Source: Clinics in Colon and Rectal Surgery - October 5, 2015 Category: Surgery Authors: Garrett, Kelly A.Lee, Sang W. Source Type: research

Single-Incision Laparoscopic Colon and Rectal Surgery
Clinics in Colon and Rectal Surgery 2015; 28: 135-139DOI: 10.1055/s-0035-1555004Single-incision laparoscopic surgery (SILS) was introduced to further the enhanced outcomes of multiport laparoscopy. Multiple studies have demonstrated the safety and feasibility of SILS for both benign and malignant colorectal disease. SILS provides the potential for improved cosmesis, postoperative outcomes, and patient quality of life. However, widespread use has been limited by technical demands and lack of an evidence and competency-based curriculum.[...]Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.Article in Thie...
Source: Clinics in Colon and Rectal Surgery - October 5, 2015 Category: Surgery Authors: Keller, Deborah S.Haas, Eric M. Source Type: research

Adoption of Laparoscopic Colorectal Surgery: It Was Quite a Journey
Clinics in Colon and Rectal Surgery 2015; 28: 131-134DOI: 10.1055/s-0035-1560040The adoption of laparoscopic colorectal surgery has been a slow but steady progress. The first adopters rapidly expanded the application of the technology to all colorectal pathology. Issues related to extraction and port site recurrence of cancer delayed widespread adoption until incontrovertible data from well-powered prospective randomized studies confirmed equipoise with open surgery. Since that time, the data has consistently demonstrated patient-care benefits related to reductions in both short- and long-term complications historically as...
Source: Clinics in Colon and Rectal Surgery - October 5, 2015 Category: Surgery Authors: Senagore, Anthony J. Source Type: research

Evolving and Emerging Technologies in Colon and Rectal Surgery
Clinics in Colon and Rectal Surgery 2015; 28: 129-130DOI: 10.1055/s-0035-1558643Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.Article in Thieme eJournals:Table of contents  |  Full text (Source: Clinics in Colon and Rectal Surgery)
Source: Clinics in Colon and Rectal Surgery - October 5, 2015 Category: Surgery Authors: Cataldo, Thomas E.Nagle, Deborah Tags: Preface Source Type: research

Thomas E. Cataldo, MD, FACS, FASCRS and Deborah Nagle, MD, FACS, FASCRS
Clinics in Colon and Rectal Surgery 2015; 28: 127-128DOI: 10.1055/s-0035-1555003Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.Article in Thieme eJournals:Table of contents  |  Full text (Source: Clinics in Colon and Rectal Surgery)
Source: Clinics in Colon and Rectal Surgery - October 5, 2015 Category: Surgery Authors: Beck, David E. Tags: Introduction to the Guest Editors Source Type: research

Microscopic Colitis (Lymphocytic and Collagenous), Eosinophilic Colitis, and Celiac Disease
This article focuses on microscopic colitis (MC), eosinophilic colitis (EC), and celiac disease. MC is an inflammatory condition of the colon that presents with two subtypes, only to be differentiated by histology. EC is a rare chronic inflammatory process. Depending on the extent of the disease, it can present with mild diarrhea, malabsorption, or at its worst, cause obstruction and perforation. Celiac disease affects the small bowel, but interestingly can present similarly to colitis. Both MC and EC respond to oral budesonide. Patients with celiac disease improve on gluten-free diets. These treatments are distinctly diff...
Source: Clinics in Colon and Rectal Surgery - May 25, 2015 Category: Surgery Authors: Villanueva, M. SophiaAlimi, Yewande Source Type: research

Acute Colonic Pseudoobstruction
This article discusses the epidemiology and current pathophysiologic theories of ACPO as well as the clinical presentation and diagnostic modalities utilized to identify the disease. In addition, this article describes the current treatment options for ACPO, which range from conservative medical therapy, therapeutic endoscopy, to subtotal colectomy.[...]Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.Article in Thieme eJournals:Table of contents  |  Abstract  |  Full text (Source: Clinics in Colon and Rectal Surgery)
Source: Clinics in Colon and Rectal Surgery - May 25, 2015 Category: Surgery Authors: Chudzinski, Allen P.Thompson, Earl V.Ayscue, Jennifer M. Source Type: research

Radiation Proctopathy
This article summarizes the latest knowledge relating to radiation proctopathy focusing on the vast array of treatment options.[...]Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.Article in Thieme eJournals:Table of contents  |  Abstract  |  Full text (Source: Clinics in Colon and Rectal Surgery)
Source: Clinics in Colon and Rectal Surgery - May 25, 2015 Category: Surgery Authors: Grodsky, Marc B.Sidani, Shafik M. Source Type: research

Behcet Colitis
Clinics in Colon and Rectal Surgery 2015; 28: 099-102DOI: 10.1055/s-0035-1547336Behcet disease (BD) is a chronic, multisystem, inflammatory disease characterized by variable clinical manifestations involving systemic vasculitis of both the small and large blood vessels. The majority of BD patients present with recurrent oral ulcers in combination with other manifestations of the disease, including genital ulcers, skin lesions, arthritis, uveitis, thrombophlebitis, gastrointestinal or central nervous system involvement. Gastrointestinal BD occurs in 3 to 25% of the BD patients and shares many clinical characteristics with i...
Source: Clinics in Colon and Rectal Surgery - May 25, 2015 Category: Surgery Authors: Chin, Anne B.Kumar, Anjali S. Source Type: research

Ischemic Colitis
Clinics in Colon and Rectal Surgery 2015; 28: 093-098DOI: 10.1055/s-0035-1549099Most clinicians associate ischemic colitis with elderly patients who have underlying cardiovascular comorbidities. While the majority of cases probably occur in this population, the disease can present in younger patients as a result of different risk factors, making the diagnosis challenging. While a majority of patients respond to medical management, surgery is required in approximately 20% of the cases and is associated with high morbidity and mortality.[...]Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.Article in Thi...
Source: Clinics in Colon and Rectal Surgery - May 25, 2015 Category: Surgery Authors: FitzGerald, James F.Hernandez III, Luis O. Source Type: research

Noninfectious Colitides
This article describes the presentation, endoscopic and pathological findings of six different noninfectious colitides: diversion colitis, neutropenic enterocolitis, disinfectant colitis, corrosive colitis, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug and salicylate-induced colitis, and toxic epidermal necrolysis. In addition, this article discusses the management and current treatment options for these six colitides.[...]Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.Article in Thieme eJournals:Table of contents  |  Abstract  |  Full text (Source: Clinics in Colon and Rectal Surgery)
Source: Clinics in Colon and Rectal Surgery - May 25, 2015 Category: Surgery Authors: Bayasi, MohammedQuiogue, Jose Source Type: research

Parasitic Colitis
This article highlights important aspects of parasitic infections of the colon including epidemiology, transmission, symptoms, and diagnostic methods as well as appropriate medical and surgical treatment.[...]Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.Article in Thieme eJournals:Table of contents  |  Abstract  |  Full text (Source: Clinics in Colon and Rectal Surgery)
Source: Clinics in Colon and Rectal Surgery - May 25, 2015 Category: Surgery Authors: Hechenbleikner, Elizabeth M.McQuade, Jennifer A. Source Type: research

Sexually Transmitted Proctitis
This article illustrates and discusses the clinical presentations, diagnostic pearls, and treatments of sexually transmitted proctitides.[...]Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.Article in Thieme eJournals:Table of contents  |  Abstract  |  Full text (Source: Clinics in Colon and Rectal Surgery)
Source: Clinics in Colon and Rectal Surgery - May 25, 2015 Category: Surgery Authors: Sigle, Gavin W.Kim, Rebekah Source Type: research

Persistent and Recurrent Clostridium difficile Colitis
Clinics in Colon and Rectal Surgery 2015; 28: 065-069DOI: 10.1055/s-0035-1547333 Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is the most frequent cause of nosocomial diarrhea. It has become a significant dilemma in the treatment of patients, and causes increasing morbidity that, in extreme cases, may result in death. Persistent and recurrent disease hamper attempts at eradication of this infection. Escalating levels of treatment and novel therapeutics are being utilized and developed to treat CDI. Further trials are warranted to definitively determine what protocols can be used to treat persistent and recurrent disease.[.....
Source: Clinics in Colon and Rectal Surgery - May 25, 2015 Category: Surgery Authors: Cole, Shola A.Stahl, Thomas J. Source Type: research

Miscellaneous Colitides: What the Surgeon Needs to Know
Clinics in Colon and Rectal Surgery 2015; 28: 063-064DOI: 10.1055/s-0035-1549219Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.Article in Thieme eJournals:Table of contents  |  Full text (Source: Clinics in Colon and Rectal Surgery)
Source: Clinics in Colon and Rectal Surgery - May 25, 2015 Category: Surgery Authors: Kumar, Anjali S. Tags: Preface Source Type: research

Anjali S. Kumar, MD, MPH, FACS, FASCRS
Clinics in Colon and Rectal Surgery 2015; 28: 061-062DOI: 10.1055/s-0035-1550093Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.Article in Thieme eJournals:Table of contents  |  Full text (Source: Clinics in Colon and Rectal Surgery)
Source: Clinics in Colon and Rectal Surgery - May 25, 2015 Category: Surgery Authors: Beck, David E. Tags: Introduction to the Guest Editor Source Type: research

The Molecular Basis of Rectal Cancer
Clinics in Colon and Rectal Surgery 2015; 28: 053-060DOI: 10.1055/s-0035-1545070The majority of rectal carcinomas are sporadic in nature, and relevant testing for driver mutations to guide therapy is important. A thorough family history is necessary and helpful in elucidating a potential hereditary predilection for a patient's carcinoma. The adequate diagnosis of a heritable tendency toward colorectal carcinoma alters the management of a patient disease and permits the implementation of various surveillance algorithms as preventive measures.[...]Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.Article ...
Source: Clinics in Colon and Rectal Surgery - February 18, 2015 Category: Surgery Authors: Shiller, MichelleBoostrom, Sarah Source Type: research

Pathologic Processing of the Total Mesorectal Excision
Clinics in Colon and Rectal Surgery 2015; 28: 043-052DOI: 10.1055/s-0035-1545069Total mesorectal excision (TME) is the current optimal surgical treatment for patients with rectal carcinoma. A complete TME is related to lower local recurrence rates and increased patient survival. Many confounding factors in the patient's anatomy and prior therapy can make it difficult to obtain a perfect plane, and thus a complete TME. The resection specimen can be thoroughly evaluated, grossly and microscopically, to identify substandard surgical outcomes and increased risk of local recurrence. Complete and accurate data reporting is criti...
Source: Clinics in Colon and Rectal Surgery - February 18, 2015 Category: Surgery Authors: Campa-Thompson, MollyWeir, RobertCalcetera, NatalieQuirke, PhilipCarmack, Susanne Source Type: research

Replacing Transanal Excision with Transanal Endoscopic Microsurgery and/or Transanal Minimally Invasive Surgery for Early Rectal Cancer
Clinics in Colon and Rectal Surgery 2015; 28: 038-042DOI: 10.1055/s-0035-1545068The use of local resection of rectal polyps and early rectal cancer has progressed to become the standard of care in most institutions with a colorectal surgery specialist. The use of transanal excision (TAE) with anorectal retractors and standard instrumentation has been supplanted by the application of endoscopic techniques which allow direct video augmented visualization. The transanal endoscopic microsurgery method provides a 3D view and works under a constant flow of air to keep the rectal vault open. Instruments capable of accomplishing a...
Source: Clinics in Colon and Rectal Surgery - February 18, 2015 Category: Surgery Authors: Hakiman, HekmatPendola, MichaelFleshman, James W. Source Type: research

Changing the Way We Manage Rectal Cancer—Standardizing TME from Open to Robotic (Including Laparoscopic)
This article reviews the relevant operative factors in performing a quality TME, looking at both the oncologic and nononcologic advantages and disadvantages. It supports TME as the standard of care in obtaining a negative circumferential margin for mid and lower-third rectal cancers, and discusses the role of tumor-specific mesorectal excision for upper-third rectal cancers. It discusses the new options and challenges each operative technique holds, and identifies the same standardized principles each must obey to provide the highest quality of oncologic resection. The operative documentation of these critical features fro...
Source: Clinics in Colon and Rectal Surgery - February 18, 2015 Category: Surgery Authors: Weaver, Katrina L.Grimm, Leander M.Fleshman, James W. Source Type: research

Techniques in Total Mesorectal Excision Surgery
Clinics in Colon and Rectal Surgery 2015; 28: 021-027DOI: 10.1055/s-0035-1545066Advances in the surgical management of rectal cancer have placed the quality of total mesorectal excision (TME) as the major predictor in overall survival. A standardized TME technique along with quality increases the percentage of patients undergoing a complete TME. Quality measurements of TME will place increasing demands on surgeons maintaining competence with present and future techniques. These efforts will improve the outcome of the rectal cancer patients.[...]Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.Article i...
Source: Clinics in Colon and Rectal Surgery - February 18, 2015 Category: Surgery Authors: Lichliter, Warren E. Source Type: research

Utilizing the Multidisciplinary Team for Planning and Monitoring Care and Quality Improvement
Clinics in Colon and Rectal Surgery 2015; 28: 012-020DOI: 10.1055/s-0035-1545065Multidisciplinary team management of patients with rectal cancer requires a dedicated group of surgeons, medical and radiation oncologists, pathologists, radiologists, and mid-level providers who meet to discuss every patient with rectal cancer. The data from that meeting is collected prospectively, recommendations made for case, follow-up obtained, and quality issues monitored. Improved case is the result.[...]Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.Article in Thieme eJournals:Table of contents  | &...
Source: Clinics in Colon and Rectal Surgery - February 18, 2015 Category: Surgery Authors: Patel, A.Franko, Edward R.Fleshman, James W. Source Type: research

Current Concepts in Rectal Cancer
Clinics in Colon and Rectal Surgery 2015; 28: 005-011DOI: 10.1055/s-0035-1545064The history of rectal cancer management informs current therapy and points us in the direction of future improvements. Multidisciplinary team management of rectal cancer will move us to personalized treatment for individuals with rectal cancer in all stages.[...]Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.Article in Thieme eJournals:Table of contents  |  Abstract  |  Full text (Source: Clinics in Colon and Rectal Surgery)
Source: Clinics in Colon and Rectal Surgery - February 18, 2015 Category: Surgery Authors: Fleshman, James W.Smallwood, Nathan Source Type: research

Rectal Cancer
Clinics in Colon and Rectal Surgery 2015; 28: 003-004DOI: 10.1055/s-0035-1545063Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.Article in Thieme eJournals:Table of contents  |  Full text (Source: Clinics in Colon and Rectal Surgery)
Source: Clinics in Colon and Rectal Surgery - February 18, 2015 Category: Surgery Authors: Fleshman, James W.Lichliter, Warren E. Tags: Preface Source Type: research

Dr. James W. Fleshman and Dr. Warren E. Lichliter
Clinics in Colon and Rectal Surgery 2015; 28: 001-002DOI: 10.1055/s-0035-1545062Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.Article in Thieme eJournals:Table of contents  |  Full text (Source: Clinics in Colon and Rectal Surgery)
Source: Clinics in Colon and Rectal Surgery - February 18, 2015 Category: Surgery Authors: Beck, David E. Tags: Introduction to the Guest Editors Source Type: research

Biologics in Colon and Rectal Surgery
Clinics in Colon and Rectal Surgery 2014; 27: 123-124DOI: 10.1055/s-0034-1394154Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.Article in Thieme eJournals:Table of contents  |  Full text (Source: Clinics in Colon and Rectal Surgery)
Source: Clinics in Colon and Rectal Surgery - November 10, 2014 Category: Surgery Authors: Johnson, Eric K. Tags: Preface Source Type: research

Eric K. Johnson, MD, FACS, FASCRS
Clinics in Colon and Rectal Surgery 2014; 27: 121-122DOI: 10.1055/s-0034-1395507Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.Article in Thieme eJournals:Table of contents  |  Full text (Source: Clinics in Colon and Rectal Surgery)
Source: Clinics in Colon and Rectal Surgery - November 10, 2014 Category: Surgery Authors: Beck, David E. Tags: Introduction to Guest Editor Source Type: research

The Role of Synthetic and Biologic Materials in the Treatment of Pelvic Organ Prolapse
Clinics in Colon and Rectal Surgery 2014; 27: 182-190DOI: 10.1055/s-0034-1394157Pelvic organ prolapse is a significant medical problem that poses a diagnostic and management dilemma. These diseases cause serious morbidity in those affected and treatment is sought for relief of pelvic pain, rectal bleeding, chronic constipation, obstructed defecation, and fecal incontinence. Numerous procedures have been proposed to treat these conditions; however, the search continues as colorectal surgeons attempt to find the procedure that would optimally treat these conditions. The use of prosthetics in the repair of pelvic organ prolap...
Source: Clinics in Colon and Rectal Surgery - November 10, 2014 Category: Surgery Authors: Brown, Ramon A.Ellis, C. Neal Source Type: research

Biomaterials in the Treatment of Anal Fistula: Hope or Hype?
Clinics in Colon and Rectal Surgery 2014; 27: 172-181DOI: 10.1055/s-0034-1394156Anal fistula (AF) presents a chronic problem for patients and colorectal surgeons alike. Surgical treatment may result in impairment of continence and long-term risk of recurrence. Treatment options for AFs vary according to their location and complexity. The ideal approach should result in low recurrence rates and minimal impact on continence. New technical approaches involving biologically derived products such as biological mesh, fibrin glue, fistula plug, and stem cells have been applied in the treatment of AF to improve outcomes and decrea...
Source: Clinics in Colon and Rectal Surgery - November 10, 2014 Category: Surgery Authors: Scoglio, DanieleWalker, Avery S.Fichera, Alessandro Source Type: research

Parastomal Hernia Repair and Reinforcement: The Role of Biologic and Synthetic Materials
Clinics in Colon and Rectal Surgery 2014; 27: 162-171DOI: 10.1055/s-0034-1394090Parastomal hernia is a prevalent problem and treatment can pose difficulties due to significant rates of recurrence and morbidities of the repair. The current standard of care is to perform parastomal hernia repair with mesh whenever possible. There exist multiple options for mesh reinforcement (biologic and synthetic) as well as surgical techniques, to include type of repair (keyhole and Sugarbaker) and position of mesh placement (onlay, sublay, or intraperitoneal). The sublay and intraperitoneal positions have been shown to be superior with a...
Source: Clinics in Colon and Rectal Surgery - November 10, 2014 Category: Surgery Authors: Gillern, SuzanneBleier, Joshua I. S. Source Type: research

Staple Line/Anastomotic Reinforcement and Other Adjuncts: Do They Make a Difference?
Clinics in Colon and Rectal Surgery 2014; 27: 156-161DOI: 10.1055/s-0034-1394089Since the development of the stapled intestinal anastomosis, efforts have been aimed at reducing complications and standardizing methods. The main complications associated with stapled anastomoses include bleeding, device failure, and anastomotic failure (leaks and strictures). These complications are associated with increased cost of care, increase in cancer recurrence, decreased overall survival, poor quality of life, and in some cases the need for further procedures including a diverting ostomy. Reducing these complications therefore has imp...
Source: Clinics in Colon and Rectal Surgery - November 10, 2014 Category: Surgery Authors: Betzold, RichardLaryea, Jonathan A. Source Type: research

Incisional Reinforcement in High-Risk Patients
Clinics in Colon and Rectal Surgery 2014; 27: 149-155DOI: 10.1055/s-0034-1394088Hernia formation after surgical procedures continues to be an important cause of surgical morbidity. Incisional reinforcement at the time of the initial operation has been used in some patient populations to reduce the risk of subsequent hernia formation. In this article, reinforcement techniques in different surgical wounds are examined to identify situations in which hernia formation may be prevented. Mesh use for midline closure, pelvic floor reconstruction, and stoma site reinforcement is discussed. Additionally, the use of retention suture...
Source: Clinics in Colon and Rectal Surgery - November 10, 2014 Category: Surgery Authors: Feldmann, Timothy F.Young, Monica T.Pigazzi, Alessio Source Type: research