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Duke Team Identifies Blood Biomarkers in Drug-Resistant Cancer Tumor Cells
Contact: Sarah Avery Phone: 919-660-1306 Email:sarah.avery@duke.eduhttps://www.dukehealth.orgFOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE on Wednesday, Sept. 21, 2016Duke Team Identifies Blood Biomarkers in Drug-Resistant Cancer Tumor Cells  DURHAM, N.C. -- While searching for  a non-invasive way to detect prostate cancer cells circulating in blood,Duke Cancer Instituteresearchers have identified some blood markers associated with tumor resistance to two common hormone therapies.In a study published online this month in the journalClinical Cancer Research, the Duke-led team reported that they isolated multiple key gene alterations in t...
Source: DukeHealth.org: Duke Health Features - September 21, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Tags: Duke Medicine Source Type: news

Hormone therapy for endometrial cancer targets connective tissue, not tumor cells
In this study, we found that all of the progesterone anti-tumor effects are in fact mediated through the stroma, even though it makes up a minor fraction of the tumor. I believe these exciting findings are going to surprise the clinical community and change the way people look at patterns of hormone-receptor expression in endometrial tumors."   The results of the three-year study, done using a specially developed laboratory model created by Memarzadeh's team that closely mimics human endometrial cancer, appear in the early online edition of Cancer Research, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Association for ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - June 13, 2013 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Study Finds Bird Virus Promising For Prostate Cancer Treatment
A study at the Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine has identified a chicken-killing virus as a promising treatment for prostate cancer in humans. Researchers have discovered that a genetically engineered Newcastle disease virus, which harms chickens but not humans, kills prostate cancer cells of all kinds, including hormone-resistant cancer cells. The work of Dr. Elankumaran Subbiah, associate professor of virology in the Department of Biomedical Sciences and Pathobiology, along with Dr... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - April 11, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Prostate / Prostate Cancer Source Type: news

Researchers find avian virus may be harmful to cancer cells
(Virginia Tech) Researchers have discovered that a genetically engineered Newcastle disease virus, which harms chickens but not humans, kills prostate cancer cells of all kinds, including hormone-resistant cancer cells. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 8, 2013 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Promising Viral Treatment For Prostate Cancer Without Unpleasant Side Effects
A recombinant Newcastle disease virus kills all kinds of prostate cancer cells, including hormone resistant cells, but leaves normal cells unscathed, according to a paper published online ahead of print in the Journal of Virology. A treatment for prostate cancer based on this virus would avoid the adverse side effects typically associated with hormonal treatment for prostate cancer, as well as those associated with cancer chemotherapies generally, says corresponding author Subbiah Elankumaran of Virginia Polytechnic Institute, Blacksburg... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - February 27, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Prostate / Prostate Cancer Source Type: news

Virus shows promise as prostate cancer treatment
(American Society for Microbiology) A recombinant Newcastle disease virus kills all kinds of prostate cancer cells, including hormone resistant cells, but leaves normal cells unscathed, according to a paper published online ahead of print in the Journal of Virology. A treatment for prostate cancer based on this virus would avoid the adverse side effects typically associated with hormonal treatment for prostate cancer, as well as those associated with cancer chemotherapies generally. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 25, 2013 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news