The Critical Role EMS Plays in Fighting the Flu
Influenza has been impacting public health on a global scale since the beginning of recorded history. Influenza, also known as the “flu,” has numerous organizations committed to public health research, developing vaccines, and educating on best practices to prepare for the upcoming flu season. By gaining an understanding of the flu through history, virology, and how it impacts our society, we can have a better appreciation for the commitment that’s involved with combating the flu. What Is Influenza (and What’s Not)? The eyes of an epidemiologist can twitch for a variety of reasons, one of them being...
Source: JEMS Special Topics - November 8, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Morgan K. Anderson, MPH Tags: Exclusive Articles Operations Source Type: news

'Suicide rates in Crete, Greece during the economic crisis: the effect of age, gender, unemployment and mental health service provision' - Basta M, Vgontzas A, Kastanaki A, Michalodimitrakis M, Kanaki K, Koutra K, Anastasaki M, Simos P.
BACKGROUND: Recently, suicides in Greece have drawn national and international interest due to the current economic crisis. According to published reports, suicides in Greece have increased up to 40% and Crete has been highlighted as an area with the sharp... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - November 6, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Suicide and Self-Harm Source Type: news

Storms, Floods in Sicily Kill at least 12 People
ROME (AP) — Storm-related floods killed at least 12 people in Sicily, Italian authorities said Sunday, including nine members of two families who were spending a long weekend together when water and mud from a swollen river overran their rented villa. After surveying the stricken Mediterranean island by helicopter, Italian Premier Giuseppe Conte identified two more of the victims as a German couple whose car was swept away by flood waters near Agrigento, a tourist town known for its ancient Greek temples. Italian news reports said a 1-year--old, a 3-year-old and a teenager were among the flood victims from the family...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - November 5, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Frances D'Emilio, Associated Press Tags: Major Incidents News International Source Type: news

The ancient Greeks warned us about AI: Chips with Everything podcast
Author Adrienne Mayor discusses the myths that contained the first blueprints for artificial intelligencePhilosopher Ren é Descartes’ quote “cogito, ergo sum” became well known after being translated into English as “I think, therefore I am.” It was the result of his attempt to figure out which of the things he thought he knew were impervious to doubt.Long before Descartes uttered these words, however, humans were telling stories about artificial beings and thinking about what defines humanity. A new book by Adrienne Mayor, entitled Gods and Robots: Myths, Machines, and Ancient Dreams o...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - November 2, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Presented by Jordan Erica Webber and produced by Danielle Stephens Tags: Artificial intelligence (AI) Robots Computing Consciousness Philosophy Psychology Technology Books Science Culture Source Type: news

EU border 'lie detector' system criticised as pseudoscience
Technology that analyses facial expressions being trialled in Hungary, Greece and LatviaThe EU has been accused of promoting pseudoscience after unveiling plans for a “smart lie-detection system” at its busiest borders in an attempt to identify illegal migrants.The “lie detector”, which is to be trialled in Hungary, Greece and Latvia, involves the use of a computer animation of a border guard, personalised to the traveller’s gender, ethnicity and language, asking questions via a webcam.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - November 2, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Daniel Boffey in Brussels Tags: Migration Refugees European Union Artificial intelligence (AI) Science Computing Technology World news Source Type: news

Prevalence and forms of workplace bullying among health-care professionals in Cyprus: Greek version of "Leymann Inventory of Psychological Terror" instrument - Zachariadou T, Zannetos S, Chira SE, Gregoriou S, Pavlakis A.
BACKGROUND: Workplace bulling is a pervasive phenomenon with negative consequences for the health of victims and the productivity of organizations. The aim of this study was to measure the prevalence and forms of workplace bullying among employees working ... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - November 2, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news

Medical News Today: What was Medieval and Renaissance medicine?
The Greeks and Romans made important medical discoveries and Islamic scholars in the Middle East were building on these. But, from the Dark Ages on, Europe saw little progress in medicine until the beginning of the Renaissance, when Plague, herbs, and incantations started to give way to new methods. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - November 2, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Medical Students / Training Source Type: news

Economic burden of COPD high in  Greece
(Source: PharmacoEconomics and Outcomes News)
Source: PharmacoEconomics and Outcomes News - November 1, 2018 Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: news

Here ’s the Healthiest Way to Gain Weight
For most Americans with weight issues, the problem is carrying around too much , not too little. While obesity rates have surged in North America since the 1970s, the proportion of underweight people has remained low—less than 5% of the population, according to a study in The Lancet. These bodyweight trends mean that most health experts are focused on helping people lose weight to avoid disease. But there are also some potentially serious health consequences associated with being clinically underweight, which is usually defined as having a body mass index (BMI) of 18.5 or below. “There are many epidemiologic st...
Source: TIME: Health - October 31, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Markham Heid Tags: Uncategorized Diet/Nutrition Source Type: news

Is Granola Healthy? Here ’s What Experts Say
Granola, beloved by hikers and outdoorsy types, certainly seems healthy. You can buy it in health food stores and organic supermarkets, with words like “pure” and “natural” stamped right on the label. Is granola healthy? It absolutely can be. But products vary greatly, and knowing whether or not the nutty snack lives up to its nutritional claims can take a little bit of digging. Here’s what dietitians say you should know about granola before crunching down. What is granola made of? “There is no one standard formula for granola, so whether it’s healthy really depends on the ingredie...
Source: TIME: Health - October 29, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Cassie Shortsleeve  Tags: Uncategorized Diet/Nutrition Source Type: news

I can see Odysseus lashed to the mast of this ship, struggling to resist the Sirens ’ song | Natalie Haynes
The eerily beautiful wreck discovered in the Black Sea takes us right back to Homer ’s GreeceIn 399BC, Socrates drank hemlock to fulfil the orders of the Athenian law court, which had sentenced him to death for impiety and corrupting the young.His friends begged him to leave Athens instead, accompanying them into banishment. He refused and died as he had lived for 70 years, arguing the ethical superiority of his own decision. The scene was immortalised by Plato in his dialoguePhaedo and later by artists such as Jacques Louis David,whose paintinghangs in New York ’s Metropolitan Museum.Continue reading... (Sourc...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 27, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Natalie Haynes Tags: Archaeology Homer Science Classics and ancient history Education Books Bulgaria Europe World news Heritage Culture Greece British Museum Source Type: news

Three herbs from Crete, Greece show potential in treating upper respiratory tract infections
(Natural News) For thousands of years, the natives of the Greek island of Crete used local aromatic plants as herbal remedies for the common cold. Three of those herbs – dictamnus, sage, and thyme – have drawn attention for their antioxidant properties. The three herbs were used to make a new herbal extract that could treat... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - October 27, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The Idea of a ‘DNA Test’ for Transgender People Is Part of a Long, Dark History
Science is too busy holding the universe together to care about politics. Greenhouse gases will continue contributing to climate change and vaccines will continue not causing autism, whether you believe it or not. None of that means that politicians and ideologues won’t keep trying to drag science into their fights. The latest example of this unlovely truth occurred just this week, when the New York Times reported the existence of a memo drafted by the Department of Health and Human Services that would, if the changes it details were implemented, effectively roll back civil protections for transgender people by defin...
Source: TIME: Science - October 25, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized LGBTQ onetime Science sexism Source Type: news

The Guardian view on Black Sea shipwrecks: discovering our past | Editorial
Three years of research have produced astonishing results, including the remains of 65 vessels, one thought to be ancient Greek. This should be only the startThe seabed produces archaeological wonders. TheMary Rose, which sank in the Solent in 1545, and theVasa, which capsized in 1633 in the harbour of Stockholm, are just two of the famous ships that have been lifted from the deep. There is a long history of fishermen finding classical bronzes in the Mediterranean: the great statue of Zeus (or Poseidon) in the Athens Archaeological Museum was chanced upon in 1928 off Cape Artemision. Still entrancing and puzzling researche...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 25, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Editorial Tags: Archaeology Science Oceans Environment Bulgaria Europe World news Source Type: news

Ditch the Machine to Improve Accuracy in Blood Pressure Measurement and Diagnostics
Conclusion For the patient in this case, the decision to forego the convenience of a machine in favor of the skills of a knowledgeable paramedic was lifesaving. Much like the comparison often drawn between the old-fashioned barbell and more sophisticated exercise machines, newer, more complex, and more expensive might make a process more comfortable, but doesn’t always equate to superior results. As we surrender more and more of our hands-on skills to the ease of automated technology, we risk more than the loss of the aptitudes that form the foundation of sound patient assessment—we place our patients in jeopar...
Source: JEMS Special Topics - October 24, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Mark Rock, NRP Tags: Exclusive Articles Cardiac & Resuscitation Source Type: news

'Oldest Intact Shipwreck Known To Mankind' Found In Depths Of Black Sea
The vessel dates back 2,400 years to the days of ancient Greece. "This will change our understanding of shipbuilding and seafaring in the ancient world," says archaeologist Jon Adams.(Image credit: Black Sea MAP/EEF Expeditions) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - October 23, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Colin Dwyer Source Type: news

Scientists Discovered the World ’s Oldest Intact Shipwreck. It’s 2,400 Years Old
(LONDON) — A team of maritime archaeologists, scientists and surveyors has discovered what it believes to be the world’s oldest intact shipwreck — a Greek trading vessel whose design had previously been seen only on ancient pottery. The Black Sea Maritime Archaeology project says it found the wreck off the Bulgarian coast at a depth of 2 kilometers (1.2 miles) in oxygen-free conditions that preserved its components. The group says the vessel has been carbon dated to more than 2,400 years ago. The project has spent three years surveying the area using technology previously available largely to oil companie...
Source: TIME: Science - October 23, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Associated Press Tags: Uncategorized archeology london onetime Science U.K. Source Type: news

6.4 million Euros for research into the birth of agriculture in Europe
(University of Bern) An interdisciplinary team from the universities of Bern, Oxford and Thessaloniki was awarded a 'ERC Synergy Grant' grant of 6.4 million euros from the European Research Council (ERC). The team included researchers from the fields of archeology and biology. Aided by studies conducted in the lakes in Greece and in the south of the Balkans, the project should show how the climate, environment and agriculture have developed over the last 10,000 years. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - October 23, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Post-fire attitudes and perceptions of people towards the landscape character and development in the rural Peloponnese, a case study of the traditional village of Leontari, Arcadia, Greece - Paraskevopoulou AT, Nektarios PA, Kotsiris G.
Fires played an integral role in shaping the rural Mediterranean landscape. However, the decoupling of social-ecological systems of landscapes led to rural degradation and rendered traditional settlements vulnerable to fire. A questionnaire survey conducte... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - October 15, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Burns, Electricity, Explosions, Fire, Scalds Source Type: news

11 Killed in Crash in Greece
THESSALONIKI, Greece (AP) — A speeding car carrying migrants collided with a truck in northern Greece on Saturday, killing 11 people, police said. Ten of the victims were believed to be migrants who crossed into the Greece from Turkey. The 11th person was the car's driver and a suspected migrant smuggler, police said. Police said the car in which the migrants were packed had another vehicle's license plates and is suspected of having been used for migrant trafficking. The car hadn't stopped at a police checkpoint during its journey, but it wasn't immediately clear how close to the site of the crash that it happened. ...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - October 15, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Costas Kantouris, Associated Press Tags: Major Incidents News Mass Casualty Incidents International Source Type: news

Book Review: Calm Clarity:  How to Use Science to Rewire Your Brain
While there are many goals we may pursue in life — a better career, a better relationship, a greater sense of meaning, and deeper connection with those around us — they all start with first gaining a sense of clarity over what is getting in our way, what is helping move us toward our goals, and how we can begin to take ownership of our brains in a way that allows us to live the kind of lives we want. For Due Quach, a survivor of PTSD and a successful management consultant, understanding how to improve her brain function wasn’t just necessary, but advantageous. She writes, “It took many years for me ...
Source: Psych Central - October 13, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Claire Nana Tags: Book Reviews Disorders General Habits Happiness Memory and Perception Mindfulness Motivation and Inspiration Personal Stories Psychology Self-Help Trauma Calm Clarity Due Quach Higher Self Inner Sage PTSD Source Type: news

Between medicalisation and normalisation: antithetical representations of depression in the Greek-Cypriot press in times of financial crisis - Orphanidou M, Kadianaki I.
Media offer people ways of understanding mental health and illness, shaping their attitudes and behaviour towards it. Yet, the literature on media representations of depression is limited and fails to illuminate sufficiently the content of representations.... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - October 11, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Commentary Source Type: news

Study finds that apples improve sexual function in women
(Natural News) For the Greeks, the apple was a symbol of abundance and fertility. However, according to a study, the fruit may actually be a natural aphrodisiac for women. The study, which was published in the journal Archives of Gynecology and Obstetrics, involved a group of doctors in Trento, Italy, who observed 731 healthy and sexually active... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - October 6, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Airway, Breathing or Consequences: Use Your Tools and Trust the Technology
“An esophageal intubation is no sin, but there is great sin in not recognizing such a placement.” — Special Operations Combat Medical Skills Sustainment Course (U.S. Special Operations Command) How hard is it take to properly intubate the trachea? Actually, it’s far more difficult than most people think. Recent anesthesia research shows that at least 75 live adult intubations are needed to achieve a 90% initial competency.1 Yes, 75! Not the very limited live number that are experienced in many paramedic schools, and certainly not only practicing with manikins. And how hard is it to intubate the esop...
Source: JEMS Special Topics - October 2, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Scott DeBoer, RN, MSN, CEN, CPEN, CCRN, CFRN, EMT-P Tags: Airway & Respiratory Exclusive Articles Source Type: news

Women who begin the menopause before 40 are '50% more likely to develop type 2 diabetes'
Researchers from Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, found that women who stop having their periods before 45 are 15 per cent more at risk compared to the 'normal' age of 45-to-55. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 2, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Vitamin D supplements help obese children shed weight, study finds
An estimated 70 percent of children in the US are vitamin D deficient. A new Greek study suggest that taking supplements to make up for what their diets lack may help obese kids slim down. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - September 28, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Is Greek yogurt good for you?
Greek yogurt is a popular addition to a healthful breakfast and other meals. In this article, learn about the health benefits of Greek yogurt, such as improving bone and gut health. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - September 25, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Nutrition / Diet Source Type: news

IRC warns of mental health crisis on Lesbos as Greece moves asylum seekers
Greece moved another 400 people from its biggest migrant camp on Tuesday as the International Rescue Committee (IRC) charity warned of a mental health emergency there with 30 percent of people having attempted suicide. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - September 25, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Spiders Cover Shores Of Greek Town With 1,000-Foot Web
Someone in Aitoliko is going to have to do a lot of dusting. (Source: Science - The Huffington Post)
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - September 21, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: news

Alydia Health raises $10m in Series B
Alydia Health, formerly known as InPress Technologies, said today it closed a $10 million Series B financing round to help support its technology platform designed to prevent maternal morbidity and mortality caused by postpartum hemorrhage. The round was led by the Global Health Investment Fund and joined by Astia Angles and other existing investors. As part of the round, Global Health Investment Fund managing partner Dr. Curt LaBelle will join the company’s board of directors. “Alydia Health’s solution for postpartum hemorrhage offers tremendous potential for mothers and families around the world, starti...
Source: Mass Device - September 20, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Business/Financial News Funding Roundup Women's Health alydiahealth Source Type: news

Study: Most Yogurts On Store Shelves Packed With Sugar
BOSTON (CBS) – Yogurt is often regarded as a healthy snack but a new study finds that most yogurts on store shelves are chock-full of sugar. In fact, some contain as much sugar as soda. Researchers studied the nutrient content of more than 900 yogurt products from five online supermarkets in the United Kingdom, including children’s yogurts, yogurt drinks, fruit-flavored yogurts, Greek and organic. Dessert yogurts contained the most sugar, not surprisingly, but children’s yogurts and organic yogurts had almost as much. Only natural/Greek yogurts met the UK’s criteria for “low-sugar”. Jus...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - September 19, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Boston News Health Syndicated Local Watch Listen Dr. Mallika Marshall Yogurt Source Type: news

Can a novel high-density EEG approach disentangle the differences of visual event related potential (N170), elicited by negative facial stimuli, in people with subjective cognitive impairment?
(IOS Press) Thessaloniki- Macedonia, Greece -- Sept. 14, 2018 -- Greek researchers investigated whether specific brain regions, which have been found to be highly activated after negative facial stimulus, are also activated in different groups of people with subjective cognitive impairment (SCI), mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and Alzheimer's Disease (AD) compared to healthy controls (HC). (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 14, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Nigeria:When What We Eat Turns Poisonous
[Guardian] Lagos -"Let your food be your medicine, and your medicine be your food." - Hippocrates (460 - 370BC), Greek Doctor. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - September 6, 2018 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Early Results Give Hope For Human Gene Editing to Change DNA
(PHOENIX) — Early, partial results from a historic gene editing study give encouraging signs that the treatment may be safe and having at least some of its hoped-for effect, but it’s too soon to know whether it ultimately will succeed. The results announced Wednesday are from the first human test of gene editing in the body, an attempt to permanently change someone’s DNA to cure a disease — in this case, a genetic disorder called Hunter syndrome that often kills people in their teens. In two patients who got a medium dose of the treatment, urine levels of large sugar compounds that are hallmarks of ...
Source: TIME: Health - September 5, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: MARILYNN MARCHIONE / AP Tags: Uncategorized Disease onetime Source Type: news

Olive Oil May Be Better For Men Than Viagra, Study Claims
GREECE (CBS Local) – A new study on sexual health may have a lot of men running to their favorite Italian restaurant tonight. According to scientists in Greece, olive oil may be better than Viagra when it comes to boosting sexual performance. The study, published by the University of Athens, examined over 600 men and found that an olive oil-rich diet cut the risk of erectile dysfunction by up to 40 percent. The men, who had an average age of 67, switched to a Mediterranean-style diet which focused on eating fruits, vegetables, fish, nuts, and replaced all butter with olive oil. Patients also reduced the amo...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - August 30, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health Offbeat Chris Melore Local TV Men's Health Olive Oil talkers Viagra Source Type: news

Over 800 Passengers Evacuated from Greek Ferry Fire
ATHENS, Greece (AP) — A fire broke out on a ferry sailing to the island of Crete from mainland Greece early Wednesday, forcing hundreds of passengers to don life vests and wait on the deck for hours before they were safely evacuated when the ship returned to port. The fire on the Eleftherios Venizelos ferry started in the parking bay and was contained after activating an automatic extinguishing mechanism. Still, it left smoke billowing out of the ship as it turned back to the port of Piraeus, near Athens. The 875 passengers onboard disembarked using mobile safety stairs from a side entrance of the ship. "It is a...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - August 29, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Major Incidents News Source Type: news

Simple strategies that activate your body's natural detoxification process
(Natural News) You may have tried or heard of different detoxification techniques, such as detox diets and juice cleanses, but there is one natural detox program by the body that you can activate. Autophagy, the body’s natural detoxification process, literally means “self-eating” in Greek. It can be considered as the ultimate detox for the body... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - August 27, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

West Nile virus cases in Greece jump in 2018
Eleven people have died and 107 infected by the mosquito-borne West Nile virus in Greece so far this summer, authorities said, the highest number of reported cases since 2012. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - August 24, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Measles Is Returning to a Range of Places —But Not for the Same Reasons
By now, measles ought to be optional. As long as parents are conscientious and governments are competent, no child has to contract the sometimes fatal disease again. But across Europe and in the U.S., that’s not what’s happening. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), there were more than 40,000 cases of measles–including 37 deaths–across Europe in just the first six months of 2018. That’s a huge jump: in all of last year, there were 23,927 cases, and only 5,273 the year before. More than half of those 2018 cases were found in Ukraine, while six other countries (Serbia, France, Ital...
Source: TIME: Health - August 23, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized global health Source Type: news

Measles Is Returning to a Range of Places — But Not for the Same Reasons
By now, measles ought to be optional. As long as parents are conscientious and governments are competent, no child has to contract the sometimes fatal disease again. But across Europe and in the U.S., that’s not what’s happening. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), there were more than 40,000 cases of measles–including 37 deaths–across Europe in just the first six months of 2018. That’s a huge jump: in all of last year, there were 23,927 cases, and only 5,273 the year before. More than half of those 2018 cases were found in Ukraine, while six other countries (Serbia, France, Ital...
Source: TIME: Health - August 23, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized global health Source Type: news

West Nile virus kills 22 in Europe
Health officials have warned there has been a spike in mosquito-borne West Nile virus this year, with 401 recorded human cases across Europe, with most in Serbia, Italy and Greece. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 21, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Outbreak of West Nile virus kills 22 in Europe
Health officials have warned there has been a spike in mosquito-borne West Nile virus this year, with 401 recorded human cases across Europe, with most in Serbia, Italy and Greece. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 21, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Put some muscle into it
SARCOPENIA might sound like a nasty rash and if you haven't heard of it, you're not alone. However it's something all of us will experience - men and women of all ages. And in case you were wondering, the term comes from the Greek words "sarc" and "penia" . (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - August 21, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Medical News Today: The best breakfast foods for health
Starting the day off right with a healthful breakfast is essential for curbing hunger and boosting metabolism. In this article, learn about the best foods to eat in the morning, including oatmeal, bananas, Greek yogurt, and flaxseed. We look at the evidence behind the health benefits. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - August 20, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Nutrition / Diet Source Type: news

Prisoners in Greek prisons: correlation of demographic and psychosocial data with committed crimes - Apostolopoulos A, Michopoulos I, Rizos E, Manthou V, Tzeferakos G, Kalemi G, Papageorgiou C, Douzenis A.
Previous literature shows an association between several psychosocial factors or life events in general and delinquency. Factors such as gender, cannabis and drugs use are firmly connected to delinquency. Similarly, interpersonal violent behavior appears t... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - August 18, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Violence and Weapons Issues Source Type: news

How Karate Helped an Aging Expert Age Better
The ancient Greek karate style known as pankration offers time-tested lessons on aging well. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - August 16, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: KAREN WEINTRAUB Tags: Exercise Karate Research Age, Chronological Source Type: news

Caravans and containers: children on the move, immobilized - Esmaili BE.
On the Greek island of Leros, newly arriving families from Syria, Somalia, Afghanistan, Pakistan, and beyond are routinely received at the landing dock and escorted into barbed wire –lined refugee camps. Many ask if they are being taken to prison. Insi... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - August 4, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

Chicken Is the Number-One Cause of Foodborne Illness Outbreaks. Here ’s How to Stay Safe
This article originally appeared on Health.com. (Source: TIME: Health)
Source: TIME: Health - August 3, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Amanda Macmillan / Health Tags: Uncategorized Diet/Nutrition healthytime onetime Source Type: news

Meet our NHS
Kalliopi Kolagki, front centre, with colleagues at Watford General          © Jess Hurd Kalliopi Kolagki is a nurse in the Accident and Emergency ward of Watford General Hospital. Originally from Greece, she’s been in Watford for 18 months and is one of hundreds of EU workers on the hospital staff. She’s enthusiastic and professional, and speaks of her experience as “very positive”. But she also has a very particular anecdote that speaks volumes about today’s NHS, for good and ill. “On the shop floor – that’s how we talk of A&E – I&rsqu...
Source: UNISON Health care news - August 1, 2018 Category: UK Health Authors: Demetrios Matheou Tags: Magazine BREXIT eu migrant NHS recruitment Source Type: news

Preliminary results from active landslide monitoring using multidisciplinary surveys - Nikolakopoulos K, Kavoura K, Depountis N, Kyriou A, Argyropoulos N, Koukouvelas I, Sabatakakis N.
This study presents the synergy of multidisciplinary surveys for the monitoring of an active landslide in Western Greece. The aim of this paper is to highlight and validate a methodology based on multiple sensors data integration which can successfully be ... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - July 31, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Disaster Preparedness Source Type: news