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Periodontal Disease Linked to Certain Cancer Types
In this interview we discuss a recent study that linked periodontal disease with an increased cancer risk, specifically melanoma and cancers of the lung, breast, esophagus, and gallbladder. (Source: CancerNetwork)
Source: CancerNetwork - August 18, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Jean Wactawski-Wende, PhD Source Type: news

'Junk food' may increase cancer risk in 'healthy weight' women
"Women who eat junk food such as burgers or pizza are increasing their risk of cancer even if they're not overweight, new research has warned," reports the Daily Mail. The story is based on research from the US looking at the diet of postmenopausal women in the 1990s and then tracking the development of a variety of cancers over about 15 years. "Junk food" is often defined as food that is rich in calories (energy dense food) but low in nutrients. Having a diet high in energy dense foods, such as biscuits, chocolate and pizza was found to increase the risk of cancer in these women, specifically in those ...
Source: NHS News Feed - August 18, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cancer Source Type: news

Gum Disease Tied to Cancer Risk in Older Women
Periodontal disease was associated with an increased risk of esophageal and gallbladder cancers, cancers of the breast and lung, and melanoma. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - August 2, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: NICHOLAS BAKALAR Tags: Smoking and Tobacco Teeth and Dentistry Gums (Mouth) Cancer Gallbladder Melanomas Source Type: news

Gallbladder cancer: THIS common condition can increase risk - do you know the symptoms?
THE gallbladder is a small organ which stores bile - the fluid produced by the liver which helps to break down food. But now scientists have revealed a common condition can increase the risk of developing cancer in the organ. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - August 2, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Periodontal Disease History Linked to Increased Cancer Risk
For older women, risk of total cancer, melanoma, and breast, lung, esophagus, gallbladder cancers up (Source: Pulmonary Medicine News - Doctors Lounge)
Source: Pulmonary Medicine News - Doctors Lounge - August 2, 2017 Category: Respiratory Medicine Tags: Dermatology, Family Medicine, Geriatrics, Gastroenterology, Gynecology, Internal Medicine, Nursing, Oncology, Pathology, Pulmonology, Radiology, Surgery, Journal, Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Women with gum disease may need to watch out for cancer
A new study finds associations between gum disease in women over 54 and many different types of cancer, including gallbladder cancer and esophageal cancer. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - August 1, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cancer / Oncology Source Type: news

Gum Disease and Significantly Increased Risk for Many Cancers Gum Disease and Significantly Increased Risk for Many Cancers
Periodontal disease history was associated with a significantly increased risk for cancer overall, as well as several site-specific cancers, including gallbladder cancer.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - August 1, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Hematology-Oncology News Source Type: news

Gum Disease Significantly Increases Risk for Many Cancers Gum Disease Significantly Increases Risk for Many Cancers
Periodontal disease history was associated with a significantly increased risk for cancer overall, as well as several site-specific cancers, including gallbladder cancer.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - August 1, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Hematology-Oncology News Source Type: news

Gum Disease and Increased   Link to Many Cancers Gum Disease and Increased   Link to Many Cancers
Periodontal disease history was associated with a significantly increased risk for cancer overall, as well as several site-specific cancers, including gallbladder cancer.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - August 1, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Hematology-Oncology News Source Type: news

Gum disease raises the risk of cancer by up to 14%
Researchers from the University of Buffalo found that periodontal disease is significantly associated with an increased risk of developing esophageal and gallbladder cancer in postmenopausal women. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 1, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Study: History of gum disease increases cancer risk in older women
(University at Buffalo) Postmenopausal women who have a history of gum disease also have a higher risk of cancer, according to a new study of more than 65,000 women that's also the first to report an association between gum disease and gallbladder cancer risk. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 1, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Gallbladder cancer symptoms - five signs you could be suffering from digestive disease
THE gallbladder is a small organ which stores bile - the fluid produced by the liver which helps to break down food. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - July 7, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Coffee Consumption and Risk of Gallbladder Cancer Coffee Consumption and Risk of Gallbladder Cancer
Can that daily cup of coffee decrease risk of gallbladder cancer? Read this to find out.Journal of the National Cancer Institute (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - July 6, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Hematology-Oncology Journal Article Source Type: news

Time Between Surgeries Helps Predict Mesothelioma Survival
A new study from researchers at the City of Hope cancer center in Los Angeles and Wake Forest University School of Medicine in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, reveals how the length of time between initial and follow-up cytoreduction surgery and HIPEC plays a role in patient survival. The study, published in June in the Journal of Surgical Oncology, shows peritoneal mesothelioma patients who repeat the procedure between one and two years after the initial surgery have the most favorable outcome, with a median overall survival of nearly four years. Peritoneal mesothelioma is an aggressive, asbestos-related cancer, and recu...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - June 23, 2017 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Matt Mauney Tags: appendiceal cancer city of hope cancer center colon cancer cytoreduction surgery debulking surgery Dr. Konstantinos Votanopoulos gastrointestinal cancer heated intraperitoneal chemotherapy HIPEC Journal of Surgical Oncology moffitt can Source Type: news

Lenvatinib for Unresectable Liver Cancer Noninferior to Sorafenib
Lenvatinib demonstrated noninferiority to sorafenib with regard to overall survival in patients with previously untreated, unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma. (Source: CancerNetwork)
Source: CancerNetwork - June 19, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Dave Levitan Tags: Gastrointestinal Cancer Liver, Gallbladder, and Biliary Tract Cancers News Source Type: news

Expanding waistline linked to an increased risk of cancer
Conclusion This study provides more evidence of the link between excess body fat and 10 cancers. Though the percentage increases sound large, it's important to put these results into context. For example, the baseline risk of postmenopausal cancer was 2.2% – it occurred in 555 of the 24,751 women in the study. For women who hadn't used hormone therapy, this would increase to a risk of 2.7% if they had a BMI of 30 compared with 26, or a waist circumference of 95cm compared with 84cm. This accounts for only an extra 5 cases in every 1,000 women. This large study involved older adults from European countries, so ...
Source: NHS News Feed - May 25, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cancer Obesity Source Type: news

Adjuvant Oral Chemo in Biliary Tract Cancer Extended Survival
The addition of adjuvant oral chemotherapy with capecitabine extended the overall survival of patients with biliary cancers by a median of 15 months, according to the results of the BILCAP study. (Source: CancerNetwork)
Source: CancerNetwork - May 18, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Leah Lawrence Tags: Conferences/ASCO Gastrointestinal Cancer Liver, Gallbladder, and Biliary Tract Cancers News Source Type: news

Oral chemotherapy extends survival by more than a year in biliary tract cancer
(American Society of Clinical Oncology) A phase III randomized clinical trial of 447 patients with biliary tract cancers (BTCs, cancers of the bile duct and gallbladder) showed that giving capecitabine after surgery extends survival by a median of 15 months compared to surgery alone. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - May 17, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

FDA Approves Regorafenib for Liver Cancer
The FDA has approved regorafenib (Stivarga) for the second-line treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) for patients who have previously received sorafenib. (Source: CancerNetwork)
Source: CancerNetwork - April 28, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Ian Ingram Tags: Gastrointestinal Cancer Liver, Gallbladder, and Biliary Tract Cancers News Source Type: news

Gallbladder cancer rates decreasing in men, not women; late-stage diagnosis on the rise
(University of Missouri-Columbia) Gallbladder cancer is a rare, but aggressive disease. A new study by University of Missouri School of Medicine researchers has found that gallbladder cancer rates have decreased in men in recent years but not in women. The researchers also found that more people are being diagnosed with late-stage disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 24, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Nivolumab Yields 12-Month Survival of Nearly 60% in Advanced HCC
Interim data from CheckMate 040 showed that nivolumab produces durable responses with promising long-term survival rates in patients with advanced, unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma. (Source: CancerNetwork)
Source: CancerNetwork - April 21, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Ian Ingram Tags: Gastrointestinal Cancer Liver, Gallbladder, and Biliary Tract Cancers News Source Type: news

Young Obese Men at Risk for Liver Cancer
Young men who are overweight or obese are at risk of developing severe liver disease or liver cancer in later life, particularly those who have type 2 diabetes mellitus. (Source: CancerNetwork)
Source: CancerNetwork - March 29, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Mark L. Fuerst Tags: Gastrointestinal Cancer Liver, Gallbladder, and Biliary Tract Cancers News Source Type: news

Overweight young men 'more likely to get severe liver disease'
Conclusion This cohort study aimed to assess whether a high BMI in late adolescence is associated with an increased risk of severe liver disease and liver cancer in later life. The researchers generally found a higher BMI was associated with an increased risk of severe liver disease, including liver cancer. A diagnosis of type 2 diabetes during follow-up was associated with a further increased risk of severe liver disease, regardless of BMI at the start of the study. This study included a very large population, and has used reliable sources of data for medical diagnoses and cause of death. But there are limitations to ...
Source: NHS News Feed - March 21, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Obesity Cancer Source Type: news

Study identifies common gene variants associated with gallbladder cancer
(Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health) By comparing the genetic code of gallbladder cancer patients with those of healthy volunteers at nearly 700,000 different locations in the genome, researchers say they have found several gene variants which may predispose individuals to develop the disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 5, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Wide range of cancers now linked to being overweight
Conclusion The results of this study provide further evidence for the link between increasing levels of fat and the risk of developing certain cancers. There was strong evidence for nine cancers, with another two – ovarian cancer and stomach cancer – included when comparing obesity with healthy weight. This study is important in showing the significance of fat levels and obesity in cancer risk. But there are some important things to consider: The study doesn't tell us how excess body fat might play a role in the development of certain cancers, just that there's a link. Some studies might have been missed,...
Source: NHS News Feed - March 1, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cancer Obesity Source Type: news

Adjuvant GEMOX Did Not Improve RFS for Localized Biliary Tract Cancer
Adjuvant chemotherapy for biliary tract cancer using GEMOX (gemcitabine/oxaliplatin) was feasible, but did not result in an improved recurrence-free survival or quality of life compared with surveillance in the phase III PRODIGE 12-ACCORD 18 trial. (Source: CancerNetwork)
Source: CancerNetwork - January 23, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Leah Lawrence Tags: Conferences/ASCO 2017 Gastrointestinal Cancers Symposium Liver, Gallbladder, and Biliary Tract Cancers News Source Type: news

Cancer Facts and Figures: Death Rate Down 25% Since 1991
By Stacy Simon The death rate from cancer in the US has declined steadily over the past 2 decades, according to annual statistics reporting from the American Cancer Society. The cancer death rate for men and women combined fell 25% from its peak in 1991 to 2014, the most recent year for which data are available. This decline translates to more than 2.1 million deaths averted during this time period. “Cancer Statistics, 2017,” published in the American Cancer Society’s journal CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians, estimates the numbers of new cancer cases and deaths expected in the US this year. The estimat...
Source: American Cancer Society :: News and Features - January 5, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: General Information Source Type: news

10 Powerful Survivor Stories From 2016
In Stories of Hope, we regularly publish the stories of people who have a positive message to share, whether their cancer diagnosis was just recently, or long ago. Our featured survivors share words of inspiration, wisdom, hope, and support in these stories about how their lives have been changed by cancer. Our editors have chosen 10 of the most inspirational stories of 2016. For many who are facing a cancer diagnosis, or any other illness or hardship, hearing from others who've been through one already can be a great source of comfort and support. We hope you will find inspiration in these stories of cancer survivors. &nb...
Source: American Cancer Society :: News and Features - December 21, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Coping with Cancer Source Type: news

Tumors Make Their Won Blood Vessels
By Drs. David Niesel and Norbert Herzog It is well established that tumors can induce our own cells to form new blood in a process called angiogenesis. This supplies tumors with the nutrients and oxygen to support their growth. But in 1999, scientists hypothesized that tumor cells themselves can form blood vessels, a process called vasculogenic mimicry or VM. That started a fierce, but healthy debate about how tumors acquire their blood supply. Nearly 17 years later, a drug that targets VM has gone into clinical trials and if successful would go a long way in bolstering the case that this phenomenon contributes to tumor g...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - December 19, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Better late than never as they say! – Karron ’ s story
The post Better late than never as they say! – Karron’s story appeared first on Hysterectomy Association. I write this story some 6 months after my hysterectomy, I was one of those people that used to pop in and read all the stories, which I must confess really helped me, especially the hints and the special things that would help. So here is my story. Sorry it is late. I presented at A&E this time last year with gallstone pancreatitis seriously ill, at the time the medics found I had a mass in my womb, which I did not know about, I just thought I had a bulky tummy. Turns out my womb was full of fibroids, t...
Source: The Hysterectomy Association - December 8, 2016 Category: OBGYN Authors: Linda Tags: Your Stories fibroids Source Type: news

Sweetened Beverages and Risk of Biliary Tract Cancer Sweetened Beverages and Risk of Biliary Tract Cancer
More reason to avoid soft drinks? Research finds that two or more servings per day of sweetened beverages may up the risk of biliary tract cancer -- especially gallbladder cancer.Journal of the National Cancer Institute (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - November 29, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Hematology-Oncology Journal Article Source Type: news

Timing of Gallbladder Cancer Reoperation Affects Survival Timing of Gallbladder Cancer Reoperation Affects Survival
In a first-of-its-kind study, surgeons say that when gallbladder cancer is incidentally discovered, the optimal interval between initial cholecystectomy and second surgery is 4 to 8 weeks.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - November 1, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Hematology-Oncology News Source Type: news

The relationship between vegetable & fruit consumption and gallbladder & bile duct cancer
Vegetable and fruit consumption may have a protective effect against several types of cancers. However, the effect on biliary cancers is unclear. We investigated the association of vegetable/fruit consumption with the risks of gallbladder cancer (GBC), intrahepatic bile duct cancer (IHBDC) and extrahepatic bile duct cancer (EHBDC) in a population-based prospective cohort study in Japan. Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using the Cox proportional hazard model, and the exposure level was categorized into quartiles, with the lowest group used as the reference. A total of 80,371 people a...
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - November 1, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

September Is Childhood Obesity Month -- Get The Facts
The obesity epidemic continues to dominate headlines--and for good reason. Obesity is a leading cause of heart disease, diabetes, high blood pressure, and stroke. Many of these conditions occur in adults but often begin in childhood. This September is National Childhood Obesity Awareness Month. By knowing the facts and taking steps to help your children live a healthier lifestyle, childhood obesity and its resulting complications may be prevented. The Facts According to the Centers for Disease Control & Prevention (CDC), one in three children in the U.S. is overweight or obese. Childhood obesity doubled in children ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - September 28, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Study reveals excess pounds drives up risk of brain, blood and ovary tumors
The study adds stomach, liver, gall bladder, pancreas, ovary and thyroid cancers, as well as a type of brain tumor and blood cancer to the official list of obesity-linked cancers. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - September 1, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The Laser Probe, The iKnife and The Cutting Edge of Surgery
If the thought of going under the knife fills you with fear, be reassured. No longer is surgery the brutal and hazardous experience faced by our ancestors. Thanks to wonders such as laparoscopy, robotic solutions, and, more recently, the iKnife and the laser probe, surgical intervention is getting safer all the time. Archaeologists believe that people have been carrying out surgery for up to 11,000 years. Cranial surgery, known as trephination, probably dates back to the Neolithic era. It involved drilling a hole in the skull of a living person. Speculation suggests it was done to cure disorders such as convulsions, fr...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - August 31, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Excess body fat now linked to 13 different types of cancer
"Experts have linked eight more cancers to being overweight or obese, nearly tripling the list from five to 13," the Daily Mail reports. This is the latest finding of the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), a group of cancer experts from around the world that look at risk factors for cancer.  What is the basis for these reports? The headlines are based on a report published in the peer-reviewed New England Journal of Medicine. The report is not exactly new research, but a review of previously published studies that looked at the link between weight and cancers. It is the result of...
Source: NHS News Feed - August 25, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cancer Obesity Lifestyle/exercise Source Type: news

Scientists link obesity to THIRTEEN types of disease
Excess weight increases the risk of stomach, liver, ovary, gall bladder, pancreas, thyroid, blood cancer and a type of brain tumour, researchers from Washington University have now found. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 25, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Excess weight linked to eight more cancer types
There's yet another reason to maintain a healthy weight as we age. An international team of researchers has identified eight additional types of cancer linked to excess weight and obesity: stomach, liver, gall bladder, pancreas, ovary, meningioma (a type of brain tumor), thyroid cancer and the blood cancer multiple myeloma. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - August 25, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

World Health Organization Links 8 More Cancer Types to Excess Weight
By Stacy SimonThe International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), part of the World Health Organization, has added 8 types of cancer to those it had previously linked to being overweight or obese. The newly linked cancer types are: stomach, liver, gallbladder, pancreatic, ovarian, thyroid, multiple myeloma, and meningioma (a tumor of the lining over the brain and spinal cord).IARC also confirmed its previous conclusions, that excess weight is a risk factor for cancers of the esophagus, colon and rectum, breast (in postmenopausal women), kidney, and endometrium. IARC also said being overweight or obese may raise the ris...
Source: American Cancer Society :: News and Features - August 24, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Diet/Exercise/Weight Source Type: news

Excess Weight Tied to Higher Risk for Many Cancers, Experts Say
WEDNESDAY, Aug. 23, 2016 -- Staying slim throughout your life might lower your risk of developing at least eight types of cancer, an international cancer research group says. Those include cancers of the stomach, liver, gallbladder, pancreas, ovary... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - August 24, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Source Type: news

Excess weight linked to 8 more cancer types
(Washington University School of Medicine) There's yet another reason to maintain a healthy weight as we age. An international team of researchers has identified eight additional types of cancer linked to excess weight and obesity: stomach, liver, gall bladder, pancreas, ovary, meningioma (a type of brain tumor), thyroid cancer and the blood cancer multiple myeloma. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - August 24, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Women's cancer risk may increase the longer they're obese
Conclusion This study adds to evidence that being overweight or obese for long periods of time may increase the risk of certain cancers, just as it increases the risk of cardiovascular disease and diabetes. The study's size and use of BMI measurements over time mean it is likely to be more reliable than smaller studies, or those that look at BMI only at one time point. The design allows researchers to look at how weight during a lifetime, rather than at one single point in life, may affect cancer risk. However, there are limitations. It's an observational study, so while researchers took account of known confounding facto...
Source: NHS News Feed - August 17, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cancer Obesity Source Type: news

Soda and Other Sweet Drinks Tied to Risk for Some Rare CancersSoda and Other Sweet Drinks Tied to Risk for Some Rare Cancers
People who drink lots of soda or other sugary beverages may have a higher risk of developing biliary tract cancer, particularly gallbladder cancer, a Swedish study suggests. Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Gastroenterology Headlines)
Source: Medscape Gastroenterology Headlines - July 15, 2016 Category: Gastroenterology Tags: Hematology-Oncology News Source Type: news

Soda and Other Sweet Drinks Tied to Risk for Some Rare Cancers Soda and Other Sweet Drinks Tied to Risk for Some Rare Cancers
People who drink lots of soda or other sugary beverages may have a higher risk of developing biliary tract cancer, particularly gallbladder cancer, a Swedish study suggests. Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Gastroenterology Headlines)
Source: Medscape Gastroenterology Headlines - July 15, 2016 Category: Gastroenterology Tags: Hematology-Oncology News Source Type: news

Cancer and Sugar: Study Suggests a Link
(MedPage Today) -- Large prospective study finds higher risk of gallbladder cancer (Source: MedPage Today Endocrinology)
Source: MedPage Today Endocrinology - June 8, 2016 Category: Endocrinology Source Type: news

Do These Four Things to Cut Your Cancer Risk
This study found that overall, 20% to 40% of carcinoma cases and about half of carcinoma deaths could potentially be prevented through certain lifestyle modifications. Here are the 4 lifestyle behaviors that if practiced throughout a lifetime, were found to be linked to a lower rate of cancer incidence and death: 1. Don't smoke The study revealed that smoking contributed to 48.5% of deaths from the 12 smoking-related cancers in the United States including lung, pancreas, bladder, stomach, colon/rectal and esophagus. The message here is plain and simple -- don't ever start smoking and if you already are, quit. Smoking ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - May 27, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Duke cancer care in Wake County
Treatment Terms Cancer Anal cancer Bile duct cancer Bladder cancer Breast cancer Colon cancer Esophageal cancer Gallbladder cancer Kidney cancer Liver cancer Lung cancer Oral cancer Ovarian cancer Pancreatic cancer Prostate cancer Rectal cancer Skin cancers Skull base tumor Spine cancer Stomach cancer Testicular cancer Throat and voice box cancer Thyroid cancer Tracheal cancer Uterine cancer Vaginal cancer and vulvar cancer Additional SEO Keywords cancer imaging and treatment in Cary...
Source: dukehealth.org: Duke Health News - May 20, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: dg62 Source Type: news

Off-label use could broaden contrast ultrasound in U.S.
Tired of waiting for U.S. Food and Drug Administration clearance of ultrasound...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: AIUM: Contrast US biopsy combo finds high-grade prostate cancer CEUS shines for indeterminate small renal masses CEUS can monitor antiangiogenic therapy in children ICUS: Ultrasound contrast backers urge new approach Contrast US flexes muscle against gallbladder disease (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - April 1, 2016 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Minority Cancer Awareness: What Everyone Should Know
Every April the American Cancer Society and other organizations work together to raise awareness about cancer among minorities in honor of National Minority Health Month and National Minority Cancer Awareness Week, celebrated this year April 10-16. Cancer affects different populations differently, and minority groups in the United States continue to bear a greater cancer burden than whites. Much of this difference is due to factors like poverty and lack of access to prevention/detection services and high-quality treatment, according to reports produced by the American Cancer Society. For instance, African Americans and His...
Source: American Cancer Society :: News and Features - March 22, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Disparities Source Type: news