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NSF announces 14 new PIRE awards to support scientific collaboration in 24 countries
The National Science Foundation (NSF) is pleased to announce 14 new Partnerships for International Research and Education (PIRE) awards, totaling more than $66 million over the next five years. The awards will fund 14 lead U.S. institutions and U.S. partner institutions for collaborative projects involving international partners in 24 countries: Argentina, Australia, Bolivia, Brazil, Canada, China, Colombia, Cuba, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, Malawi, Malaysia, Mexico, Netherlands, ... More at https://www.nsf.gov/news/news_summ.jsp?cntn_id=243068&WT.mc_id=USNSF_51&WT.mc_ev=click This is an NSF News item. (Source: NSF News)
Source: NSF News - September 12, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

How Will Animals React to the Solar Eclipse? Depends on How Smart They Are
Crickets will chirp, cows will march back to their barns and swarms of once-busy honeybees will fly hurriedly home to their hives when a total solar eclipse sweeps across the U.S. next week. The sudden darkness that comes when the moon momentarily blocks the entire sun on Aug. 21 will cause some animals to experience a range of reactions, including confusion, fright and excitement, experts say. While animals like insects and bats behave as if nighttime has simply come early, other more intelligent animals — chimpanzees, dolphins and llamas — appear to stop and stare at the sky, showing signs of understanding a ...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - August 17, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Melissa Chan Tags: Uncategorized animals eclipse onetime space space 2017 Source Type: news

Kin By Mania: The Bond I Feel With Other Bipolar People Is Inexplicable
She moved like me. That’s what I noticed first. Her eyes and hands darted as she talked — playful, acerbic, digressive. We talked on past 2 a.m., her speech breathless, crackling with opinion. She took another hit from the joint and passed it back to me on the dorm suite couch, as my brother fell asleep on my knee. Siblings separated at birth must feel this way when meeting as adults: seeing part of yourself in someone else. This woman I’ll call Ella had my mannerisms, giddiness, and fury, so much so that I felt we were related. That we must share common genes. Our talk went everywhere. From hip-hop to Fo...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - May 31, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Three new species of extinct South American marsupials discovered
The discovery of three extinct species and new insights to a fourth indicates a little-known family of marsupials, the Palaeothentidae, was diverse and existed over a wide range of South America as recent as 13 million years ago. Fossils of the new species were found at Quebrada Honda, a high elevation fossil site in southern Bolivia, and are among the youngest known palaeothentid fossils. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - April 11, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

CWRU researchers discover 3 new species of extinct South American marsupials
(Case Western Reserve University) The discovery of three extinct species and new insights to a fourth indicates a little-known family of marsupials, the Palaeothentidae, was diverse and existed over a wide range of South America as recent as 13 million years ago. Fossils of the new species were found at Quebrada Honda, a high elevation fossil site in southern Bolivia, and are among the youngest known palaeothentid fossils. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 11, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Well : Heart Healthy in the Amazon
What some Bolivians with the world ’ s healthiest arteries might tell us about cardiac fitness. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - April 6, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: GRETCHEN REYNOLDS Tags: Heart Arteriosclerosis and Atherosclerosis Archaeology and Anthropology Carbohydrates Diet and Nutrition Age, Chronological Source Type: news

Choices, Voices, And Veganism: Diet For The Many
As I write this, I am about to leave for Boston to speak at iV, the Ivy League Vegan Conference, at Harvard. Prominent voices will gather there and collectively, one anticipates, make the case for veganism. The timing is a bit ironic. A paper was just published in the Lancet, describing the lifestyle and health status of the Tsimane. The paper generated considerable excitement, and widespread media attention, because the Tsimane, a population in the Bolivian Amazon described as living “a subsistence lifestyle of hunting, gathering, fishing, and farming,” were found to have “the lowest repor...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - March 24, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Choices, Voices, And Veganism: Diet For The Many
As I write this, I am about to leave for Boston to speak at iV, the Ivy League Vegan Conference, at Harvard. Prominent voices will gather there and collectively, one anticipates, make the case for veganism. The timing is a bit ironic. A paper was just published in the Lancet, describing the lifestyle and health status of the Tsimane. The paper generated considerable excitement, and widespread media attention, because the Tsimane, a population in the Bolivian Amazon described as living “a subsistence lifestyle of hunting, gathering, fishing, and farming,” were found to have “the lowest repor...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - March 24, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Amazon tribe may hold secrets to heart health
Deep in the rainforest of Bolivia, this primitive tribe seems to enjoy extraordinary natural protection from heart disease (Source: Health News: CBSNews.com)
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - March 20, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

World's Healthiest Arteries on Record Found in Indigenous Bolivian Population (FREE)
By Amy Orciari Herman Edited by Susan Sadoughi, MD, and Andr é Sofair, MD, MPH Researchers have identified a population with the lowest recorded prevalence of coronary artery disease — the Tsimane, an indigenous group living a pre-industrial lifestyle in the Bolivian Amazon. The findings were reported in the Lancet … (Source: Physician's First Watch current issue)
Source: Physician's First Watch current issue - March 19, 2017 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news

'Healthiest hearts in the world' found
A group of people in Bolivia could teach us all how to look after our hearts better, say researchers. (Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition)
Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition - March 18, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Indigenous Bolivians have some of the healthiest hearts
New research finds a group of indigenous people in the Bolivian Amazon has some of the healthiest hearts (Source: ABC News: Health)
Source: ABC News: Health - March 17, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Health Source Type: news

Amazon tribe have the healthiest arteries ever studied
The Tsimane people, who live in the Bolivian Amazon, spend most of every day active and have astonished scientists by their good health. Nine out of ten tribes people are at no risk of heart disease. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - March 17, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Indigenous South American group has healthiest arteries of all populations yet studied, providing clues to healthy lifestyle
An 80 year old from the Tsimane (pronounced chee-MAH-nay) group had the same vascular age as an American in their mid-fifties, suggests a new report. The Tsimane people -- a forager-horticulturalist population of the Bolivian Amazon -- have the lowest reported levels of vascular aging for any population, with coronary atherosclerosis (hardening of the arteries) being five times less common than in the US, the research shows. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - March 17, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

For healthier arteries, do as Amazon rainforest inhabitants do
Westerners could learn a lot about vascular health from the Tsimane in the Amazon, say researchers who report Bolivian rainforest inhabitants have the world's lowest levels of age-related hardening of the arteries. (Source: CBC | Health)
Source: CBC | Health - March 17, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: News/Health Source Type: news

Burger King buys animal feed from soybean plantations that burn rainforests to the ground
(Natural News) Tropical rain forests are being deliberately burned to the ground and cleared away by hundreds of thousands of acres to make way for soybean plantations. Brazil and Bolivia have been hit the hardest. Animals such as the sloth, mighty jaguar, and giant anteater are disappearing in record numbers. According to a new investigative... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - March 5, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Latin America weighs up lithium prospects
Argentina, Bolivia and Chile are preparing to profit from the global demand for lithium. Will they do it? (Source: SciDev.Net)
Source: SciDev.Net - February 21, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Bolivia Reports First Yellow Fever Case in a Decade Bolivia Reports First Yellow Fever Case in a Decade
Bolivia's government on Friday said a Danish tourist had tested positive for yellow fever, its first case in a decade, after he visited a jungle area in the far west of the landlocked Andean country.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Orthopaedics Headlines)
Source: Medscape Orthopaedics Headlines - February 14, 2017 Category: Orthopaedics Tags: Infectious Diseases News Source Type: news

Bolivia reports first yellow fever case in a decade
LA PAZ (Reuters) - Bolivia's government on Friday said a Danish tourist had tested positive for yellow fever, its first case in a decade, after he visited a jungle area in the far west of the landlocked Andean country. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - February 10, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

What humans and primates both know when it comes to numbers
(University of Rochester) University of Rochester researchers have found that adults and children in the US, adults from a 'low numeracy' tribe in Bolivia and rhesus monkeys ALL possessed the ability to distinguish between large and small quantities of objects, regardless of the surface area they occupy. This ability is likely a shared evolutionary trait, according to a study published in Nature Communications. The nonverbal visual tests could be used in assessing early math education in young children. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 18, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

3M Hosts First Annual Oral Health Council
International officials meet at 3M to explore needed improvements in oral health standards ST. PAUL, Minn. – (Dec. 20, 2016) – In too many places around the world, people are suffering immensely from poor oral health. Despite its critical role in overall health, oral care is often overlooked, resulting in a population that suffers. Children who aren ’t given proper access to care often have caries and struggle in school because they are in so much pain. These children grow up to become adults and elderly patients who aren’t nearly as educated or healthy as they could be. As a step to ignit...
Source: Dental Technology Blog - December 28, 2016 Category: Dentistry Source Type: news

Bolivia: Doctors Without Borders Ends Chagas Operations, Urges Ministry of Health to Take Over Comprehensive Care in Rural Areas
Press releaseBolivia: Doctors Without Borders Ends Chagas Operations, Urges Ministry of Health to Take Over Comprehensive Care in Rural AreasDecember 20, 2016NEW YORK, DECEMBER 20, 2016 —After 14 years of Chagas diagnoses, treatment and prevention efforts in Bolivia, the international medical humanitarian organization Doctors Without Borders/M édecins Sans Frontières (MSF) ended its Chagas operations today by presenting Bolivia’s Ministry of Health with an operating manual for managingChagasdisease in rural areas. (Source: MSF News)
Source: MSF News - December 20, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Authors: Brienne Prusak Source Type: news

Discover How Climate Change Is Rapidly Transforming Our Earth With Google Timelapse
As President Barack Obama has reminded us time and again, climate change is “no longer just a threat; it’s already a reality.” The proof is all around us ― and a new update to Google Earth’s Timelapse feature shows how much our planet has changed in just 30 years. Google released the Timelapse update last week, adding an additional four years of data to the feature (so it now spans from 1984 to 2016), as well as high-resolution images from two new satellites. This has resulted in clearer-than-ever timelapses ― each a chronicle of humankind’s impact on the Earth over the decades. If you ha...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - December 8, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Museum of Natural Science researchers publish the first birds of Bolivia field guide
(Louisiana State University) Bolivia has more species of birds than any other land-locked country in the world. It is sixth in the world in terms of diversity of bird species, which is notable given that it has no marine birds. LSU Museum of Natural Science researchers and research collaborators in Bolivia have authored the first field guide book to birds of Bolivia. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - December 1, 2016 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Brazilian Soccer Team's Plane Crashes in Colombia; 75 Dead
LA UNION, Colombia (AP) — A chartered plane carrying a Brazilian soccer team to the biggest match of its history crashed into a Colombian hillside and broke into pieces, killing 75 people and leaving six survivors, Colombian officials said Tuesday. The British Aerospace 146 short-haul plane, operated by a charter airline with roots in Venezuela, declared an emergency and lost radar contact just before 10 p.m. Monday (0300 GMT Tuesday) because of an electrical failure, aviation authorities said. The aircraft, which had departed from Santa Cruz, Bolivia, was carrying the up and coming Chapecoense soccer team from south...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - November 29, 2016 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: LUIS BENAVIDES, Associated Press Tags: News Mass Casualty Incidents Rescue & Vehicle Extrication Source Type: news

Brazilian Soccer Team's Plane Crashes in Colombia; 75 Dead
LA UNION, Colombia (AP) — A chartered plane carrying a Brazilian soccer team to the biggest match of its history crashed into a Colombian hillside and broke into pieces, killing 75 people and leaving six survivors, Colombian officials said Tuesday. The British Aerospace 146 short-haul plane, operated by a charter airline with roots in Venezuela, declared an emergency and lost radar contact just before 10 p.m. Monday (0300 GMT Tuesday) because of an electrical failure, aviation authorities said. The aircraft, which had departed from Santa Cruz, Bolivia, was carrying the up and coming Chapecoense soccer team from south...
Source: JEMS Operations - November 29, 2016 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: LUIS BENAVIDES, Associated Press Tags: News Mass Casualty Incidents Rescue & Vehicle Extrication Source Type: news

Massive'lake' discovered under volcano could unlock why and how volcanoes erupt
A huge magmatic lake has been discovered, 15 kilometers below a dormant volcano in Bolivia, South America. The body of water, which is dissolved into partially molten rock at a temperature of almost 1,000 degrees Celsius, is the equivalent to what is found in some of the world's giant freshwater lakes, such as Lake Superior. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - November 8, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Massive 'lake' discovered under South American volcano that could unlock why and how volcanoes erupt
Scientists from the University of Bristol and partner universities in Germany, France, Canada and Wales, have discovered a huge magmatic lake, 15 kilometres below a dormant volcano in Bolivia, South America. (Source: University of Bristol news)
Source: University of Bristol news - November 8, 2016 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: Research; Faculty of Science, Faculty of Science, School of Earth Sciences; Press Release Source Type: news

11 Ways The World Has Changed Since The Cubs Last Won A World Series
This article has been updated to add Tyson’s postgame tweet. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website. (Source: Science - The Huffington Post)
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - November 3, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Varian reports Q4, year-to-date revenue increases
Radiation therapy firm Varian Medical Systems reported growth in revenue and...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: Varian debuts HyperArc at ASTRO 2016 Varian releases new version of analytics software FDA clears Varian's Nexus DR system Varian touts studies on RapidPlan software Varian adds installation in Bolivia (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - October 27, 2016 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Adolescent injuries in Argentina, Bolivia, Chile, and Uruguay: results from the 2012-2013 Global School-based Student Health Survey (GSHS) - Beck NI, Arif I, Paumier MF, Jacobsen KH.
OBJECTIVES: The goals of this study were to identify the proportion of early adolescents in southern South America who were injured in the past year, to identify risk behaviours and other exposures associated with injuries, and to evaluate the most common ... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - October 22, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

[In Brief] News at a glance
In science news around the world, a new study finds that hundreds of mammals around the world are now being hunted to extinction, the U.S. Department of the Treasury authorizes U.S. biomedical and public health scientists to freely collaborate with their Cuban counterparts, U.K. scientists debate a controversial bill that would set up an organization to oversee the country's research funding, Brazilian scientists worry over how a pending constitutional amendment capping public spending will affect science research, and world leaders meet in Rwanda and agree to curb the use of hydrofluorocarbons. Also, a silica-rich ocean m...
Source: ScienceNOW - October 20, 2016 Category: Science Authors: Science Magazine (mailto:soleditor at aaas.org) Tags: SCI COMMUN Source Type: news

Receding glaciers in Bolivia leave communities at risk
Bolivian glaciers shrunk by 43% between 1986 and 2014, and will continue to diminish if temperatures in the region continue to increase. Glacier recession is leaving lakes that could burst and wash away villages or infrastructure downstream, warns one expert. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - October 20, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

10,000 Critically Endangered Frogs Have Suddenly Died In Peru's Lake Titicaca
Peruvian authorities are investigating the deaths of over 10,000 critically endangered frogs in Lake Titicaca. The cause of the Titicaca water frog massacre remains a mystery, though local activists have said water pollution and government negligence are to blame. The creature, also known as the Titicaca scrotum frog because of the folds in its skin, is endemic to the large freshwater lake that spans from Peru to Bolivia. Once common in the area, the frog has been driven to near-extinction in recent decades by habitat degradation and harvesting for human consumption. Since 1990, the frogs’ population has decline...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - October 19, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

A fresh approach to water security
Local people have more power than they think to adapt to new water supply patterns from climate change. An EU-funded project is helping communities in tropical forests in Argentina, Bolivia and Chile self-organise to ensure secure access to water and wiser use of resources. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - October 19, 2016 Category: Research Source Type: news

Pensions for All
Jomo Kwame Sundaram was United Nations Assistant Secretary-General for Economic Development. Rob Vos is Director of Agricultural Development Economics at FAO and was Director of Development Policy Analysis at the UN Secretariat.By Jomo Kwame Sundaram and Rob VosKUALA LUMPUR and ROME, Oct 1 2016 (IPS)October 1st is the International Day of Older Persons. Just another day? Perhaps, but it should remind us that the world’s population is ageing, brought about by the combined effects of declining mortality and fertility rates and longer longevity. By mid-century, one out of five people will be over 65 compared to over one...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - October 1, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Authors: Jomo Kwame Sundaram and Rob Vos Tags: Aid Gender Global Headlines Health Labour Poverty & SDGs Source Type: news

Contrary to popular belief, coca not the driving force of deforestation, report reveals
Most of the world ’s coca—the plant source of cocaine—grows in the Amazon forests of the Andean countries of Colombia, Peru and Bolivia, where many think this illicit crop causes deforestation. However, a team of researchers shows that most deforestation isn’t caused by coca cultivation. In fact, the study fo und that deforestation and coca both share a common origin in the implementation of an infrastructure plan from the 1960s to open the Amazon frontier through road construction and development projects. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - September 29, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

The Heart of Mental Health and Well-Being at the United Nations
In the normally staid halls of the U.N., energy exploded as Bolivian musician Hillario Soto entered a large conference room at the back, playing his home-made bass flute, followed Pied-Piper-style by a troupe of musicians, adult vocalists, and youth singers. Leading the revelry on keyboards was internationally-acclaimed composer and singer/songwriter Russell Daisey performing his original anthem "Happy People, Happy Planet" that celebrates a joyful connection between people and the environment. Bass flute player Hillario Soto leading the troupe in the event open. Photo: Mamadou Dabo. As they paraded down th...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - September 28, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Increased wildfire risk driven by climate and development interactions in the Bolivian Chiquitania, Southern Amazonia - Devisscher T, Anderson LO, Arag ão LE, Galván L, Malhi Y.
This study focused on the Bolivian Chiquitania, a region located at the southern edge of Amazonia. Th... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - September 23, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Burns, Electricity, Explosions, Fire, Scalds Source Type: news

Varian releases new version of analytics software
Radiation therapy firm Varian Medical Systems has released version 1.2 of its...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: FDA clears Varian's Nexus DR system Varian touts studies on RapidPlan software Varian adds installation in Bolivia Ohio center opens doors with Varian system Varian creates online group, gets Ethiopia contract (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - September 19, 2016 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

FDA clears Varian's Nexus DR system
Radiation therapy firm Varian Medical Systems has received 510(k) clearance...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: Varian touts studies on RapidPlan software Varian adds installation in Bolivia Ohio center opens doors with Varian system Varian creates online group, installs in Ethiopia Varian shows slight revenue gain in Q3 (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - September 15, 2016 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Varian touts studies on RapidPlan software
Radiation therapy firm Varian Medical Systems' RapidPlan treatment planning...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: Varian adds installation in Bolivia Ohio center opens doors with Varian system Varian creates online group, installs in Ethiopia Varian shows slight revenue gain in Q3 Varian announces name for imaging spin-off (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - September 12, 2016 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Latinos age slower than other ethnicities, UCLA study shows
A UCLA study is the first to show that Latinos age at a slower rate than other ethnic groups. The findings, published in the current issue of Genome Biology, may one day help scientists understand how to slow the aging process for everyone. “Latinos live longer than Caucasians, despite experiencing higher rates of diabetes and other diseases. Scientists refer to this as the ‘Hispanic paradox,’” said lead author Steve Horvath, a professor of human genetics at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA. “Our study helps explain this by demonstrating that Latinos age more slowly at the mole...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - August 17, 2016 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Twenty-six new species of minute litter bugs described in new book
(Entomological Society of America) A new book, " Pegs, Pouches, and Spines: Systematics and Comparative Morphology of the New World Litter Bug Genus Chinannus Wygodzinsky, 1948, " revises the genus Chinannus, and the authors describe 26 new species, expanding the known range to most countries between Nicaragua and Bolivia. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 10, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Parasite Wonders: The Case From Bolivia
This week's case was donated by Dr. Carlos Chaccour. The patient is a young girl living in a rural region of  Bolivia who presented with a painful "pustule" on the back of her left thigh. The lesion had been present for the past four weeks. What was the parasite it contained? Every week, Mayo Clinic [...] (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - August 8, 2016 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Bolivia tourist guide discovers dinosaur footprint nearly 4ft wide
Print, which is 80m years old and probably belonged to the meat-eating predator abelisaurus, represents one of the largest of its kind ever found A footprint measuring over a meter wide that was made by a meat-eating predator some 80m years ago has been discovered in Bolivia, one of the largest of its kind ever found. The print, which measures nearly 4ft (1.2 metres) across, probably belonged to the abelisaurus, a biped dinosaur that once roamed South America, said Argentine paleontologist Sebastian Apesteguia, who is studying the find. Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 26, 2016 Category: Science Authors: Reuters in Sucre Tags: Dinosaurs Science Bolivia Americas Fossils World news Source Type: news

For whom the births (and worms) toll
Studies of Bolivian forager-farmers shed light on costs of high birthrates, effects of pathogens on metabolism. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - July 22, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

For whom the births (and worms) toll
( University of California - Santa Barbara ) Studies of Bolivian forager-farmers by UCSB researchers shed light on costs of high birthrates, effects of pathogens on metabolism (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 21, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

"Coca got us here and now it's our weakness:" Fusarium oxysporum and the political ecology of a drug war policy alternative in Bolivia - Pearson Z.
BACKGROUND: A strain of Fusarium oxysporum fungus is killing coca plants in the Chapare coca growing region of Bolivia. Coca farmers are already constrained in the amount of coca they can grow under the government's community-based coca control approach, "... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - July 19, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Alcohol and Other Drugs Source Type: news