Cyberaggression in adolescents of Bolivia: connection with psychopathological symptoms, adaptive and predictor variables - Garaigordobil M, Mollo-Torrico JP, Machimbarrena JM, P áez D.
Concern about the increase of cyberbullying underlies this study, which had four objectives: (1) to calculate the prevalence of cyberaggressors; (2) to compare non-cyberaggressors with cyberaggressors in other bullying/cyberbullying roles, in psychopatholo... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - February 15, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

Reflections for a New Year
By Roberto SavioROME, Jan 3 2020 (IPS) In a world shaken by so many problems, it is difficult to look at 2020 and not make some kind of holistic analysis. While enormous progress has been made on many fronts, it is clear that the tide has turned, and we are now entering – or have already entered – a new low point in the history of humankind.. Roberto SavioToday, we face an unprecedented existential threat brought about by the climate crisis. According to scientists, we have until 2030 to stop climate change, after which human conditions will be under several threats. Yet, we have just had a world conference in...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - January 3, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Roberto Savio Tags: Climate Change Democracy Economy & Trade Education Environment Featured Financial Crisis Gender Global Headlines Health Human Rights LGBTQ Migration & Refugees Poverty & SDGs Religion TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news

Here are the 2019 PBJ Photos of the Year
With a docket that included taking pictures of swimmers in the Willamette, townspeople in Bolivia and would-be superheroes who are rising in the Portland business world, my job kept me running throughout the year. It was a fertile year to be the PBJ's photographer, a truism that hit home as I assembled the above shots for our year-end look at 2019's top photos. Click through on the picture above to see some of the people, the sights and the stories that made this year a great one. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - December 19, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Cathy Cheney Source Type: news

Here are the 2019 PBJ Photos of the Year
With a docket that included taking pictures of swimmers in the Willamette, townspeople in Bolivia and would-be superheroes who are rising in the Portland business world, my job kept me running throughout the year. It was a fertile year to be the PBJ's photographer, a truism that hit home as I assembled the above shots for our year-end look at 2019's top photos. Click through on the picture above to see some of the people, the sights and the stories that made this year a great one. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - December 19, 2019 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Cathy Cheney Source Type: news

Why a second American Revolution is necessary for the entire world
(Natural News) On November 11th, the very disturbing but clearly true “Lessons To Learn From The Coup In Bolivia” was posted to the Web. That anonymous author (a German intelligence analyst) documented the evilness of the overthrow of Evo Morales in Bolivia, and the threat now clearly posed to the world by the US regime — a... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - December 4, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Fires scorching Bolivia's Chiquitano forest
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - November 28, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Romero-Munoz, A., Jansen, M., Nunez, A. M., Toledo, M., Almonacid, R. V., Kuemmerle, T. Tags: letters Source Type: news

Evo Morales: Hero or Villain?
By Jan LundiusSTOCKHOLM / ROME, Nov 20 2019 (IPS) To be president in a country like Bolivia might be like a precarious act performed by a tightrope-dancer between “the Devil and the deep blue sea”. After 23 years as Bolivia’s President, Evo Morales finally lost his foothold and ended up as political refugee in Mexico, adding his name to a long list of previous revolutionary exiles, like Augusto Sandino, Fidel Castro, and most prominently – Leon Trotsky. The last one was murdered, though the others came back, something Evo Morales has promised to do: “Sisters and brothers, I leave for Mexico, ...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - November 20, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Jan Lundius Tags: Crime & Justice Development & Aid Economy & Trade Education Featured Food & Agriculture Headlines Health Human Rights Indigenous Rights Labour Latin America & the Caribbean TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news

Thursday ’s Daily Brief:  Envoy heads for Bolivia, ICC on Myanmar, dignity for sanitation workers, sterilizing mosquitoes
A recap of Thursday’s main stories: UN chief on Bolivian crisis; International Criminal Court to hear Myanmar genocide case; health risks for sanitation workers; farmers’ guidelines to conserve crops; and sterilizing mosquitoes to battle diseases. (Source: UN News Centre - Health, Poverty, Food Security)
Source: UN News Centre - Health, Poverty, Food Security - November 14, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

To Protect the Amazon Rainforest and Beyond, We Must Start in the Andes
If the Amazon rainforest are the lungs of the planet, then the Andes are its lifeblood. The world’s last remaining hotspot for agrobiodiversity, the region is the origin of many nutritionally important crop species and superfoods—grains like amaranth and quinoa; lupine pulses and maca roots—that underpin ecosystems, economies and diets. At the same time, agriculture at the highest altitudes in the world is acutely threatened by climate change, with increasingly extreme droughts, hailstorms and frosts. Home to more than 85 of the planet’s 110 climate zones, the Andes is a living laboratory—for ...
Source: TIME: Science - October 17, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Stef de Haan Tags: Uncategorized climate change Source Type: news

Not so fast! Cash transfers can increase child labor: evidence for Bolivia - Chong A, Yanez-Pagans M.
Using data for Bolivia we study how a national-level unconditional cash transfer programs can causally affect child labor. We estimate intent-to-treat effects under a fuzzy regression discontinuity approach by taking advantage of the fact that the probabil... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - October 16, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Infants and Children Source Type: news

A New World? Are the Americas Returning to Old Problems?
By Jan LundiusSTOCKHOLM / ROME, Sep 12 2019 (IPS) When I in 1980 first arrived in America it was a new world to me. I went from New York to Puerto Rico and the Dominican Republic and like so many visitors and migrants before me I was overwhelmed by both familiar and strange impressions. Familiar due to books I had read and movies I had seen, strange since I encountered unexpected things and new because both I and several of those I met compared themselves to the “old world”, i.e. Euroasia and parts of Africa. A sense of uniqueness, admiration for an assumed freshness and difference, can be discerned in the wri...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - September 12, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Jan Lundius Tags: Crime & Justice Development & Aid Economy & Trade Featured Global Headlines Health Human Rights Migration & Refugees TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news

The Amazon Fires, From an Extraterrestrial Perspective
A version of this first appeared as the TIME Space newsletter sent on Aug. 30. Space is aspirational. Merely the act of looking through a telescope is an exercise in questing. It’s vast, exciting, and gorgeous out there. Even scenes of cataclysm—a supernova, a Jovian cyclone—can be beautiful from so safe a remove as Earth. Orbiting telescopes like Hubble or Spitzer or Kepler also have the luxury of avoiding the sometimes-dispiriting business of looking down at Earth. Never has that seemed like more of a good idea than this summer, when, to look back at the surface of the planet rolling by below is to loo...
Source: TIME: Science - September 6, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized Environment Space Source Type: news

Study finds cultural differences in attitudes toward infidelity, jealousy
This study is part of a growing body of work over the last decade from social scientists who seek to be more inclusive and not just focus their research on western, educated, industrial, rich and democratic — also known as WEIRD — societies, Scelza said.“For a long time in psychology there was a tendency to use student samples from U.S. and European universities, and if they found a consistent result, extrapolate that as something that could be a ‘human universal,’” she said. “But there are many reasons to believe that people from WEIRD p opulations are unlikely to be representativ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - July 25, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Science shops inspire better research and innovation
Poor communication can have dire consequences in vital areas like the environment and health. Innovative 'science shop' projects, which translate society's questions into a language that scientists understand, are making a difference in remote Bolivian communities learning about Chagas disease, among Hepatitis C patients in Tunisia, and in projects closer to Europe's shores, too. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - July 24, 2019 Category: Research Source Type: news

Geriatric trauma in Santa Cruz, Bolivia - Ludi E, Boeck M, South S, Monasterio J, Swaroop M, Foianini E.
BACKGROUND: The population of Latin America is aging. Research from high-income countries demonstrates geriatric trauma is associated with higher morbidity and mortality. Very little research exists on geriatric patient (GP) injury prevalence in low-resour... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - July 15, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Elder Adults Source Type: news

Conservation efforts for giant South American river turtles have protected 147,000 females
(Wildlife Conservation Society) By analyzing records in countries of the Amazon and Orinoco basins--which include Brazil, Venezuela, Colombia, Bolivia, Peru and Ecuador -- a paper published today in Oryx -- The International Journal of Conservation, categorized 85 past and present initiatives or projects that work to preserve the South American River Turtle, or charapa (Podocnemis expansa), a critically endangered species. These projects are protecting more than 147,000 female turtles across the basin, an unprecedented figure. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 25, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Always on the defensive: the effects of transit sexual assault on travel behavior and experience in Colombia and Bolivia - Kash G.
This mixed-methods study uses surveys and interviews with transit users to document the prevalence and effects of transit sexual assault in two Latin American transit systems: Bogot á, Colombia's TransMilenio BRT and informal transit in El Alto, Bolivia. T... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - June 19, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Jurisprudence, Laws, Legislation, Policies, Rules Source Type: news

Ayahuasca fixings found in 1,000-year-old bundle in the Andes
(University of California - Berkeley) Today's hipster creatives and entrepreneurs are hardly the first generation to partake of ayahuasca, according to archaeologists who have discovered traces of the powerfully hallucinogenic potion in a 1,000-year-old leather bundle buried in a cave in the Bolivian Andes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 6, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Running in Bolivia
At just shy of 4,000 meters, my wheezing lungs and leaden legs remind me that I ’ m in foreign territory in every sense. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - May 2, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: OLIVER BALCH Tags: Running Travel and Vacations Bolivia Source Type: news

Archaeologists discover 'exceptional' site at Lake Titicaca
Underwater haul of Tiwanaku ceremonial relics is unprecedented, say academicsAn ancient ceremonial site described as exceptional has been discovered in the Andes by marine archaeologists, who recovered ritual offerings and the remains of slaughtered animals from a reef in the middle of Lake Titicaca.The remarkable haul points to a history of highly charged ceremonies in which the elite of the region ’s Tiwanaku state boated out to the reef and sacrificed young llamas, seemingly decorated for death, and made offerings of gold and exquisite stone miniatures to a ray-faced deity, as incense billowed from pottery pumas.C...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 1, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Science editor Tags: Archaeology Anthropology History Bolivia Americas Peru World news Higher education Science Source Type: news

Study shows shorter treatment for Chagas disease as effective, and significantly safer
(Drugs for Neglected Diseases Initiative) A two-week treatment course for adult patients with chronic Chagas disease showed, when compared to placebo, similar efficacy and significantly fewer side effects than the standard treatment duration of eight weeks, according to the results of a clinical trial in Bolivia led by the Drugs for Neglected Diseases initiative (DNDi). (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - March 14, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Shorter treatment for Chagas disease could be just as effective, and significantly safer
(Barcelona Institute for Global Health (ISGlobal)) A two-week treatment course for adult patients with chronic Chagas disease showed, when compared to placebo, similar efficacy and significantly fewer side effects than the standard treatment duration of eight weeks, according to the results of a clinical trial in Bolivia led by the Drugs for Neglected Diseases initiative (DNDi). (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - March 14, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Self-stigma in patients with schizophrenia: a multicentric study from three Latin-America countries - Caqueo-Ur ízar A, Boyer L, Urzúa A, Williams DR.
The aim of this study was to describe the degree of self-stigma in patients with schizophrenia across three Latin-Americans countries (Bolivia, Chile and Peru). The study included 253 outpatients that were assessed using the Internalized Stigma of Mental I... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - February 28, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Suicide and Self-Harm Source Type: news

At Least 24 Dead in Bus Crash in Bolivia
LA PAZ, Bolivia (AP) — A passenger bus crashed head-on with a dump truck in southern Bolivia on Monday, killing at least 24 people and injuring 12 more, police said. The accident occurred in a dense fog on the high-plains highway connecting Potosi and Oruro, about 135 miles (220 kilometers) south of the capital. Police said the bus was en route to Oruru from the town of Villazon on the Argentine border. Police Col. Jose Pizarro told state television that the cause of the accident was under investigation. Two buses collided on the same highway in January, killing 22 people. All contents © copyright 2019 As...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - February 18, 2019 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: International Major Incidents News Mass Casualty Incidents Source Type: news

Support your local farmers: Bolivia's strategy to achieve food independence by 2020
(Natural News) If there’s an effective method to develop a country for the better, then the Bolivian government would be the perfect example. By coming up with a law that betters the country’s food sufficiency, Bolivia is on the way to achieving food independence by 2020. The Bolivian government invested $40 million in local food production,... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - February 15, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Vulnerability to alcohol and drug addiction in adolescents: an experience in Bolivia - Saavedra AM, Tornese EB.
The objective of this study was to identify indicators of vulnerability to alcohol/drug use and abuse in certain adolescent personality profiles through the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory for Adolescents (MMPI-A) and obtain warning... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - February 12, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

Romeo, The World's Loneliest Frog, May Have Finally Found His Juliet
Bolivian biologists spent 10 years looking for a mate for a lovelorn frog they feared was the last of his kind. (Source: Science - The Huffington Post)
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - January 15, 2019 Category: Science Source Type: news

Water from sewage rivers used to grow vegetables in Bolivia
Water from rivers that carry sewage from Bolivia's capital used to grow vegetables (Source: ABC News: Health)
Source: ABC News: Health - December 12, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Health Source Type: news

Amazonian tribe have the 'healthiest hearts ever studied'
The farmer-forager community Tsimane from lowland Bolivia used to consume a staggering 2,738 calories a day, with plantain and rice making up 64 per cent of their meals. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - November 6, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Can this Amazonian diet offer a solution to heart disease?
One indigenous population from the Bolivian Amazon may have a lesson or two to teach us about how diet and lifestyle can protect heart health. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - November 6, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Nutrition / Diet Source Type: news

Food for thought
(University of California - Santa Barbara) From the standpoint of heart health, the Tsimane are a model group. A population indigenous to the Bolivian Amazon, the Tsimane demonstrate next to no heart disease. They have minimal hypertension, low prevalence of obesity and and their cholesterol levels are relatively healthy. And those factors don't seem to change with age. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - November 2, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

US, South American paleontologists ID two new Miocene mammals in Bolivia
(Case Western Reserve University) Researchers at Case Western Reserve University and two other universities have discovered the 13-million-year-old fossils of a pair of new species of extinct hoofed mammals known as 'litopterns' from a site in Bolivia. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 27, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Loyola Medicine physician Susan Hou, MD, receives award in humanities and medical ethics
(Loyola University Health System) Loyola Medicine kidney specialist Susan Hou, MD, who co-founded a clinic that provides free medical care to indigent people in the Bolivian rain forest, is co-recipient of the 2018 American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE) Excellence in Humanities and Medical Ethics Award. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Good Intentions, Bad Habits: Reforming Mental Healthcare In LatAm
The Latin America and Caribbean (LAC) region is a vast patchwork of countries, cultures and ethnicities with a total population of more than 645 million, ranging from 209 million-plus in Brazil to islands with fewer than 100,000 inhabitants.The diversity is also economic; recent years have seen marked improvements in income distribution and a burgeoning middle class, particularly in countries such as Argentina, Bolivia, Ecuador, Peru and Nicaragua. Yet, LAC remains the region with the highest levels of income inequality worldwide.All of this has a significant bearing on the state of mental health, where good intentions and...
Source: EyeForPharma - April 9, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Marc Yates Source Type: news

Genetics of the modern heirs of the Inkas shed new lights about their origins and lineages
(Universidad de San Martin de Porres) A study of the Inka origins and their lineages was performed in twelve contemporary families with presumed patrilineal lineage to Inka monarchs. A comparison of Y-chromosome and mtDNA markers of these descendants with a database of about 2400 South American native individuals of Peru, Bolivia, Brasil and Ecuador showed two distinct patrilineal clusters, and a very diverse matrilineal origin. In addition they show great affinity to areas South of Cusco including the Lake Titicaca. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 6, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Genetics of the modern heirs of the Incas shed new lights about their origins and lineages
(Universidad de San Martin de Porres) A study of the Inka origins and their lineages was performed in twelve contemporary families with presumed patrilineal lineage to Inka monarchs. A comparison of Y-chromosome and mtDNA markers of these descendants with a database of about 2400 South American native individuals of Peru, Bolivia, Brasil and Ecuador showed two distinct patrilineal clusters, and a very diverse matrilineal origin. In addition they show great affinity to areas South of Cusco including the Lake Titicaca. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 6, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Latin America & the Caribbean Edging Towards Eliminating Tuberculosis
Tuberculosis, world's top infectious killer. Credit: UNBy Grace VirtueWASHINGTON DC, Mar 16 2018 (IPS)Known as El Libertador throughout the Latin America and Caribbean (LAC) region, Simón Bolívar was central to the battle for independence from Spanish rule in Venezuela, Bolivia, Colombia, Ecuador, and Peru. A less known fact is that Bolívar, the son of a wealthy Venezuelan creole family, died from tuberculosis (TB) on December 17, 1880, at age 47. His compatriot, renowned impressionist Cristobal Rojas, painted La Miseria in 1886, depicting the social conditions of the day that gave rise to TB. He died ...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - March 16, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Grace Virtue Tags: Development & Aid Economy & Trade Featured Headlines Health Latin America & the Caribbean Population Poverty & SDGs TerraViva United Nations Trade & Investment Source Type: news

Bolivian women weave devices to patch holes in hearts
(Reuters Health) - A team of Bolivian women are using indigenous Aymara weaving patterns to craft devices that can help repair heart defects, doctors involved in developing the device report in JAMA. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - March 13, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Elder abuse in the Iberian Peninsula and Bolivia: a multicountry comparative study - Carmona-Torres JM, Carvalhal R, G álvez-Rioja RM, Ruiz-Gandara Á, Goergen T, Rodríguez-Borrego MA.
The objective of this study is to determine the prevalence of abuse of vulnerable older persons in the family and community environment in the following regions-Spain (Andalusia-C órdoba), Portugal (Azores), and Bolivia (Santa Cruz de la Sierra)-and to ide... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - January 30, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Elder Adults Source Type: news

Women's decisions to stay in or leave an abusive relationship: results from a longitudinal study in Bolivia - Heim E, Ajzen I, Schmidt P, Seddig D.
This study examined Bolivian women's decisions to stay with or leave their violent partners. The theory of planned behavior (TPB) was used as the theoretical framework. One hundred thirty-four women were assessed 3 times over 6 months. The TPB constructs w... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - January 17, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Research Methods, Surveillance and Codes, Models Source Type: news

Amazon biodiversity hotspot to suffer even more losses after contentious law passed
(Cell Press) In August 2017, the Bolivian government passed a contentious law that paved the way for construction of a new 190-mile road cutting through one of the country's most iconic and biodiverse protected rainforests. But a report in Current Biology on Jan. 8 shows that the Isiboro-S é cure National Park and Indigenous Territory (or TIPNIS) has been subject to alarming levels of deforestation within its borders for many years, a reality that is too often overlooked. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 8, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Debate on Glyphosate Use Comes to a Head in Argentina
Academics discuss the impacts on health and the environment of the use of glyphosate in Argentine agriculture, during a Dec. 6 conference at the University of Buenos Aires. Concern about this topic is now on the country’s public agenda. Credit: Daniel Gutman / IPSBy Daniel GutmanBUENOS AIRES, Dec 8 2017 (IPS)In and around the city of Rosario, where most of Argentina’s soybean processing plants are concentrated, a local law banned the use of glyphosate, the most widely-used herbicide in Argentina. But two weeks later, producers managed to exert enough pressure to obtain a promise that the ban would be overturned...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - December 8, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Daniel Gutman Tags: Active Citizens Civil Society Development & Aid Economy & Trade Editors' Choice Environment Food & Agriculture Headlines Health Latin America & the Caribbean Population Poverty & SDGs Regional Categories Source Type: news

Bolivia lawmakers vote to ease right abortion restrictions
Bolivian lawmakers have voted to ease the country's tight restrictions on abortions, shrugging aside opposition from religious groups (Source: ABC News: Health)
Source: ABC News: Health - December 7, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Health Source Type: news

Bolivia lawmakers vote to ease abortion limits
Bolivian lawmakers have voted to ease the country's tight restrictions on abortions (Source: ABC News: Health)
Source: ABC News: Health - December 6, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Health Source Type: news

The development and implementation of a layperson trauma first responder course in La Paz, Bolivia: a pilot study - Boeck MA, Callese TE, Nelson SK, Schuetz SJ, Fuentes Bazan C, Saavedra Laguna JMP, Shapiro MB, Issa NM, Swaroop M.
BACKGROUND: Ninety percent of nearly five million annual global injury deaths occur in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), where prehospital care systems are frequently rudimentary or nonexistent. The World Health Organization considers layperson fir... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - December 6, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Community-Based Prevention Source Type: news

Learning a mother tongue: A universal process?
(CNRS) Specialists in language development in children have studied a traditional population in the Bolivian Amazon, the Tsimane. They show that, on average, less than one minute per hour is spent talking to children under the age of four. This is up to ten times less than for children of the same age in industrialized countries. This observation should prompt us to conduct more studies of this kind in various cultures. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 2, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Chapman University receives $3.7 million federal research grant to study Alzheimer's
(Chapman University) Chapman University has earned the largest federal research grant in the university's history. The National Institutes of Health/National Institute on Aging awarded a $3.7 million grant to Hillard Kaplan, Ph.D., to pursue his research on Alzheimer's disease. The five-year grant will support Dr. Kaplan's work with the Tsimane people in Bolivia, as part of a larger project called The Tsimane Health and Life History Project. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - October 17, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Plant substance inhibits cancer stem cells
(Lund University) Lab experiments show that the chemical compound damsin found in the plant Ambrosia arborescens inhibits the growth and spread of cancer stem cells. The similar but synthetically produced ambrosin has the same positive effect, according to researchers at Lund University and University Major of San Andr é s in La Paz, Bolivia. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 27, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Mercury Mining Awaits International Control in Mexico
Artisanal gold mining in Latin America uses mercury, a practice that should be modified in countries that have ratified the international Minamata Convention for the control of this toxic metal. Credit: Thelma Mejía/IPSBy Emilio GodoyMEXICO CITY, Sep 26 2017 (IPS)For environmentalist Patricia Ruiz the only word that comes to mind is “devastating,” when describing the situation of mercury mining in her home state of Querétaro in central Mexico.“There are a large number of pits (from which the mercury is extracted), and there are the tailing ponds containing mining waste, all of which drains i...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - September 26, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Emilio Godoy Tags: Development & Aid Economy & Trade Editors' Choice Environment Global Governance Headlines Health IPS UN: Inside the Glasshouse Latin America & the Caribbean Natural Resources Regional Categories gold mining mercury Mexico Minam Source Type: news

50 Years Ago This Week: ‘Individuals Marry, Not Races’
Milestone moments do not a year make. Often, it’s the smaller news stories that add up, gradually, to big history. With that in mind, in 2017 TIME History will revisit the entire year of 1967, week by week, as it was reported in the pages of TIME. Catch up on last week’s installment here. Week 39: Sept. 29, 1967 Despite the best efforts of the bride and groom and their families, a wedding that all involved had tried to keep private was this week’s cover story — and it was national news for good reason. The two parties in question were Margaret Elizabeth “Peggy” Rusk and Guy Gibson Sm...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 25, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Lily Rothman Tags: Uncategorized Civil Rights Marriage Media Source Type: news