Chemotherapeutic agent causing coronary vasospasm – Cardiology MCQ – Answer
Chemotherapeutic agent causing coronary vasospasm – Cardiology MCQ – Answer Chemotherapeutic agent well known to cause coronary vasospasm:Correct answer: c) 5-fluorouracil 5-fluorouracil and its orally active prodrug capecitabine are fluoropyrimidines, belonging to the class of antimetabolites used for treatment of malignancies of breast, head and neck tumours and gastrointestinal tumours. Mechanisms for coronary vasospasm Endothelial cell damage with cytolysis and denudation Increased endothelin-1 bioactivity leading to vasoconstriction When high dose infusions are given, coronary vasospasm with angina, arrh...
Source: Cardiophile MD - February 22, 2019 Category: Cardiology Authors: Prof. Dr. Johnson Francis Tags: Cardiology MCQ DM / DNB Cardiology Entrance Source Type: blogs

Last Month in Oncology with Dr. Bishal Gyawali
By BISHAL GYAWALI MD  Long list of news in lung cancer September was an important month in oncology—especially for lung cancer. The World Conference in Lung Cancer (WCLC) 2018 gave us some important practice-changing results, also leading to four NEJM publications. The trial with most public health impact is unfortunately not published yet. It’s the NELSON trial that randomised more than 15000 asymptomatic people at high risk of lung cancer to either CT-based screening for lung cancer or to no screening and found a significant reduction in lung cancer mortality rates among the screened cohort com...
Source: The Health Care Blog - January 4, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: matthew holt Tags: Research Bishal Gyawali Breast cancer Cancer drugs Clinical Trials health spending immunotherapy Lung cancer Oncology pembrolizumab Source Type: blogs

Fake Reform Foisted on Us by Those who Benefit Most from the Current Dysfunction
ConclusionGiridharadas suggested inan interview in New York Magazine,What all that does is create this moral glow. And under the haze created by that glow, they ’re able to create a probable monopoly that has harmed the most sacred thing in America, which is our electoral process, while gutting the other most sacred thing in America, our free press. And they do itunder the cover of changing the world.Unfortunately, he apparently has not come up with what to do about this problem.  The best conclusion I can reach derives from the end of areview of his book by Joseph Stiglitz in the New York Times,Democracy and hi...
Source: Health Care Renewal - September 5, 2018 Category: Health Management Tags: conflicts of interest Gates Foundation health care foundations health care reform Johnson and Johnson Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Source Type: blogs

The Skeptical Oncologist
By BISHAL GYAWALI, MD Why conduct post approval studies at all? Atezolizumab previously received accelerated approval in second-line metastatic or advanced urothelial cancer based on response rates from a single arm trial. The results of post approval confirmatory phase 3 are now published and demonstrate that atezolizumab did not improve survival versus chemotherapy (11.1 v 10.6 months, HR 0.87, p = 0.41). The concept of accelerated approval is to grant early and conditional approval and access to drugs in diseases of unmet need, and that the decision to fully approve or revoke be made based ...
Source: The Health Care Blog - February 7, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: John Irvine Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

More on US Healthcare Prices
In a recent post,  I showed two drugs that were much more expensive in the United States than elsewhere. One was  for rheumatoid arthritis and the other for hepatitis C. Today we get to look at a cancer drug, Avastin, … Continue reading → The post More on US Healthcare Prices appeared first on PeterUbel.com. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - October 5, 2017 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Peter Ubel Tags: Health Care cancer healthcare costs Peter Ubel syndicated Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

7 Things to Know About Glioblastoma
News recently shocked the nation that Sen. John McCain was diagnosed with an aggressive form of brain cancer called glioblastoma. Dr. Mark Mishra, a radiation oncologist at the University of Maryland Greenebaum Comprehensive Cancer Center and Maryland Proton Treatment Center who specializes in treating brain cancer, tells you 7 things to know about glioblastoma. How common is glioblastoma? Glioblastoma is the most common type of primary brain tumor that is diagnosed in adults.  There are estimated to be nearly 13,000 patients who will be diagnosed with a glioblastoma annually within the United States. Why is it so ...
Source: Life in a Medical Center - July 21, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: UMMC Tags: Cancer Source Type: blogs

Genentech & Escobar: Using Materiality to Escape False Claims Liability
In constructively bringing an end to a False Claims Act (“FCA”) whistleblower suit alleging Genentech, Inc. (“Genentech”) of defrauding Medicare by way of concealing substantive health care analytics data involving purported side effects of the company’s cancer drug Avastin, the Third Circuit of Appeals in a recent decision determined that the Plaintiff in this matter had failed to demonstrate that any noncompliance had an impact on government payments. Specifically, the Court applied the prevailing standard in Escobar that an FCA lawsuit must demonstrate that any misrepresentation is “m...
Source: Policy and Medicine - June 26, 2017 Category: American Health Authors: Thomas Sullivan - Policy & Medicine Writing Staff Source Type: blogs

Genentech Beats FCA Suit, Thanks to Escobar
On Monday, May 1, 2017, the United States Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit stopped a False Claims Act suit that accused Genentech Inc. of defrauding Medicare by concealing certain side effects of its cancer drug Avastin, stating that the whistleblower did not show that failing to report such safety information was relevant to government reimbursement for medication. Prior to filing his qui tam suit, The relator, Gerasimos Petratos, a prior global head of health care data analytics for Genentech, allegedly recommended implementing a different database that he believed would more accurately reflect the drug’s si...
Source: Policy and Medicine - May 4, 2017 Category: American Health Authors: Thomas Sullivan - Policy & Medicine Writing Staff Source Type: blogs

Genentech Beats FCA Suit, Thanks to Escobar
On Monday, May 1, 2017, the United States Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit stopped a False Claims Act suit that accused Genentech Inc. of defrauding Medicare by concealing certain side effects of its cancer drug Avastin, stating that the whistleblower did not show that failing to report such safety information was relevant to government reimbursement for medication. Prior to filing his qui tam suit, The relator, Gerasimos Petratos, a prior global head of health care data analytics for Genentech, allegedly recommended implementing a different database that he believed would more accurately reflect the drug’s si...
Source: Policy and Medicine - May 4, 2017 Category: American Health Authors: Thomas Sullivan - Policy & Medicine Writing Staff Source Type: blogs

Value-Based Pricing For Pharmaceuticals In The Trump Administration
Everyone seems to agree: Drug prices are too damn high. Scandalous prices for new drugs and enormous price hikes on old drugs have focused public ire on the pharmaceutical industry. A bipartisan consensus has emerged that something must be done to tackle drug prices. There’s less consensus, however, about what that something ought to be. Allowing Medicare to negotiate drug prices is one popular possibility; outright price controls are also under discussion. But with Republicans in control of both Congress and the White House, neither appears to be on the policy agenda. But one market-friendly alternative, “valu...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - April 27, 2017 Category: Health Management Authors: Rachel Sachs, Nicholas Bagley and Darius Lakdawalla Tags: Costs and Spending Drugs and Medical Innovation Medicaid and CHIP Medicare Payment Policy Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services drug pricing outcome-based pricing valued-based pricing Source Type: blogs

Overcoming Challenges Of Outcomes-Based Contracting For Pharmaceuticals: Early Lessons From The Genentech – Priority Health Pilot
Conclusion Outcomes-based agreements are a natural extension of a health care delivery-and-reimbursement environment that is moving toward value. With provider organizations taking increasing accountability for both costs and outcomes, it is becoming incumbent upon manufacturers to demonstrate the economic, clinical, and quality-of-life benefits of their medicines. The pilot described here was successful in that Genentech and Priority Health both learned how to overcome clinical, operational, and contractual challenges and demonstrated that this type of agreement is feasible. Genentech and Priority Health believe pilots li...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - April 3, 2017 Category: Health Management Authors: John Fox and Marc Watrous Tags: Costs and Spending Drugs and Medical Innovation Payment Policy Outcomes-based agreements Source Type: blogs

Saving billions of dollars in health care: The story of Avastin and Lucentis
I sometimes worry that my wife Paula won’t be able to see me grow old. Not that I expect to outlive her. She is four years my junior and has the blood pressure of a 17-year-old track star. It’s her eyesight I’m worried about, because she is at risk for a form of blindness called macular degeneration. Paula is the youngest in a long line of redheads, several of whom have been diagnosed with this illness. Her fair-haired grandmother developed macular degeneration and was eventually unable to see her bridge hand and had to give up her golf game, just when she was threatening to score below her age. Fortunate...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - July 17, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Meds Medications Source Type: blogs

Abort, Retry, Fail - Billionaire Bill Gates Opines, Sans Evidence, on ... the Efficacy of Hepatitis C Treatment?
Conclusions So maybe Bill Gates' seemingly ill-informed apologia for the extremely high drug prices charged in the US, and his lack of understanding of the evidence about the efficacy, or lack thereof, of some of these high priced drugs is a small humorous story that indicates just the tip of the iceberg.  It appears that in our current market fundamentalist, neoliberal world, foundations may be more about promoting the commercial interests of their board members and officers than about improving the lot of humanity.  Yet for the most part they may succeed in obfuscating what they are doing through the haze of ma...
Source: Health Care Renewal - July 14, 2016 Category: Health Management Tags: conflicts of interest Gates Foundation Genentech Gilead global health health care foundations hepatitis C Sovaldi Source Type: blogs

Proposed Drug and Device Laws Should Be Pushed to 2017
By PAUL BROWN, TRACY RUPP, and STEVEN FINDLAY Senate leaders now say they won’t consider companion legislation to the House-passed 21st Century Cures Act until September, after months of delay.  Lawmakers would then have to reconcile the differing House and Senate versions, presumably by year’s end during a lame-duck Congress. We believe the summer delay is a good thing, and that Congress should actually extend consideration of the complex legislation into 2017 when must-pass FDA funding through industry user-fees will be on the congressional calendar.   That way, lawmakers can debate the im...
Source: The Health Care Blog - July 14, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: John Irvine Tags: Uncategorized 21st Century Cures Act Consumer's Union FDA User Fees Medical Devices Steven Findlay Source Type: blogs

Congress Shouldn’t Pass The 21st Century Cures Act In A Summer Rush
The full Senate may in the next few days consider companion legislation to the 21st Century Cures Act that passed the House last year. The legislation—currently 19 separate bills—makes substantial changes to the way the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approves drugs and devices. Set to adjourn for an extended election-year summer recess on July 15, the clock is ticking. The congressional calendar in the fall is full and the Senate may simply not have the time to take up the complex legislation, and reconcile it with the House version, before the November elections. We believe that’s a good thing. ...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - July 11, 2016 Category: Health Management Authors: Paul Brown, Tracy Rupp and Steven Findlay Tags: Drugs and Medical Technology Featured Public Health Quality 21st Century Cures Act Congress FDA NIH regulation Source Type: blogs

Four Ways To Address The Ethical Tensions Around Expedited Approval Of New Prescription Drugs
The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) requires a new drug’s manufacturer to present affirmative evidence of its efficacy and safety before it can be marketed. Because testing new drugs requires a delay between identification of an important, novel prescription drug and FDA approval, some patients with serious or life-threatening illnesses and no satisfactory options will not live to see a potentially life-saving medication approved for public use. To address this concern, the FDA and Congress have established several programs—with the support of pharmaceutical manufacturers and some patient advocacy groups&mda...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - June 23, 2016 Category: Health Management Authors: Aaron Kesselheim, Spencer Phillips Hey, Dalia Deak and Bernard Lo Tags: Drugs and Medical Technology Featured Population Health Public Health Quality Bioethics breakthrough drugs Drug approval FDA priority review Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategies Source Type: blogs

A Controversial New Demonstration In Medicare: Potential Implications For Physician-Administered Drugs
According to an August 2015 survey, 72 percent of Americans find drug costs unreasonable, with 83 percent believing that the federal government should be able to negotiate prices for Medicare. Recently, Acting Administrator of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) Andy Slavitt commented that spending on medicines increased 13 percent in 2014 while health care spending growth overall was only 5 percent, the highest rate of drug spending growth since 2001. Some of the most expensive drugs are covered under Medicare’s medical benefit, Part B, because they are administered by a physician. They are often ad...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - May 3, 2016 Category: Health Management Authors: Kavita Patel and Caitlin Brandt Tags: Costs and Spending Featured Medicare Payment Policy Quality Avastin CMMI Lucentis Medicare Part B oncology care model prescription drug coverage Source Type: blogs

We want access to safe and effective Avastin. Here’s a solution.
Recently, two states in India halted all use of Avastin for the treatment of eye disease following the report of 15 patients who underwent emergency surgery for potentially blinding infections at the C.H. Nagri Municipal Eye Hospital in Ahmedabad.  Though further investigations are ongoing, there is worry that the cluster of infections centered around a tainted lot of compounded Avastin. This most recent event serves as a reminder of the risk that we take every time we inject Avastin into our patients eye. Recent cluster infections have led to greater oversight:  A good thing. In the U.S., great measures hav...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - February 15, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Conditions Medications Surgery Source Type: blogs

Bio-Tech U, Version 2 - Current Board Member of Four Biotechnology Companies, Fomer Pfizer Director, Former Genentech Executive to be President of Stanford
DiscussionTo summarize, the incoming president of Stanford, on of the most prestigious American universities, one of the foremost US sites for biomedical research, and home to an equally prestigious medical school and academic health center, spent most of the last 15 years heavily involved with the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries.  He was a top Genentech executive for eight of those years, served as a director of the then biggest US pharmaceutical company, and currently is a member of the boards of directors of four biotechnology companies, and is chairman of one of them.  He earned nearly $2.5 millio...
Source: Health Care Renewal - February 11, 2016 Category: Health Management Tags: boards of directors conflicts of interest Genentech Stanford Source Type: blogs

European Medicines Agency: Framework for Interaction with Industry
The European Medicines Agency's (EMA) Management Board has adopted a new framework to govern interaction between the Agency and industry stakeholders. The framework covers interactions involving human and veterinary medicine, however there are still unanswered questions about specific products and procedures that will be resolved by internal EMA departments. The adopted framework seeks to facilitate and streamline communication, structure interactions, increase accountability and transparency, and includes a plan to monitor and report on interactions. According to the EMA's minutes, comments by the European Commission on...
Source: Policy and Medicine - February 2, 2016 Category: American Health Authors: Thomas Sullivan - Policy & Medicine Writing Staff Source Type: blogs

Was Martin Shkreli Arrested For Hiking Drug Prices?
By SAURABH JHA, MD I don’t subscribe to conspiracy theories. I never believed a second shot was fired. Nor do I believe that Bill Clinton was stalked on the grassy knoll. So I won’t speculate that Martin Shkreli’s arrest for alleged securities fraud that happened years ago is related to his raising Daraprim’s price by 5500 %. Just because something isn’t suspicious doesn’t mean that it isn’t odd. Shkreli is a perfect poster child for rapacious pharmacocapitalism – so perfect that it’s odd. He openly admits “I have a sworn duty to my shareholders to maximize profi...
Source: The Health Care Blog - December 22, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Simon Nath Tags: THCB Saurabh Jha Source Type: blogs

Martin Shkreli and Pharmacocapitalism’s Inconvenient Truth
By SAURABH JHA, MD I don’t subscribe to conspiracy theories. I never believed a second shot was fired. Nor do I believe that Bill Clinton was stalked on the grassy knoll. So I won’t speculate that Martin Shkreli’s arrest for alleged securities fraud that happened years ago is related to his raising Daraprim’s price by 5500 %. Just because something isn’t suspicious doesn’t mean that it isn’t odd. Shkreli is a perfect poster child for rapacious pharmacocapitalism – so perfect that it’s odd. He openly admits “I have a sworn duty to my shareholders to maximize profi...
Source: The Health Care Blog - December 22, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Simon Nath Tags: THCB Saurabh Jha Source Type: blogs

Marcia Angell writes
By Marcia AngellIn 1953, a new drug was released by Burroughs Wellcome, a pharmaceutical company based in London. Pyrimethamine, as the compound was named, was originally intended to fight malaria after the microorganisms that cause the disease developed resistance to earlier therapies. The drug was used against malaria for several decades, often in combination with other compounds. It’s mostly used now to treat toxoplasmosis, a parasitic infection that can be life-threatening in people whose immune systems are suppressed, for example, by HIV/​AIDS or cancer.More than 40 years later, Burroughs Wellcome merged with ...
Source: PharmaGossip - October 3, 2015 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: insider Source Type: blogs

The 21st Century Cures Act: More Homework To Do
In July, the US House of Representatives approved the 21st Century Cures Act, which heads to the Senate for a vote this fall. While no one can complain about the Act’s purported goal of “bring[ing] our health care innovation infrastructure into the 21st Century,” or increasing funding for the National Institutes of Health, the optimism surrounding the legislation obscures measures buried within that many agree will make newly approved drugs and medical devices less safe and effective, increase the cost of medical products, and discourage innovation in biomedical research. Long-term value to the public&rsq...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - September 24, 2015 Category: Health Management Authors: Susan Molchan, James Rickert and John Powers Tags: Costs and Spending Drugs and Medical Technology Featured Health Professionals Hospitals Public Health Quality 21st Century Cures Act Big Pharma Drug approval Fred Upton Research funding Thurgood Marshall Source Type: blogs

Are Medicare Prescription Benefits Too Stingy?
The bill she received in the mail revealed a staggering figure — $9,225 for one infusion of Avastin, a chemotherapy drug. And she would need many more such infusions. Fortunately, the dollar amount is what medical experts call a “charge,” … Continue reading → The post Are Medicare Prescription Benefits Too Stingy? appeared first on PeterUbel.com. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - September 23, 2015 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Peter Ubel Tags: Health Care healthcare costs Medicare Peter Ubel syndicated Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

EFPIA Files Complaint Against French Law Promoting Off-Label Avastin Use
Earlier this week, EFPIA, Europe's pharmaceutical industry association, announced it had filed a complaint with the European Commission against the French “RTU Regime.” promoting the use of Roche's cancer drug Avastin for the off-label treatment of wet age-related macular degeneration (AMD). The decree allows the French medicines regulator (ANSM) to issue a temporary authorization for use of a product in an unauthorized indication, purely for economic purposes, notwithstanding the existence of an authorized alternative treatment. This development is troubling and contravenes European Community law and jurisprud...
Source: Policy and Medicine - September 3, 2015 Category: American Health Authors: Thomas Sullivan Source Type: blogs

Inside the Open Payments Data: Two-Thirds of Transactions Worth $20 or Less; Research and Royalties Account for Majority of Total Value
Yesterday, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services published the second year of Open Payments data, detailing the transfers of value made from pharmaceutical and device manufacturers to physicians and teaching hospitals in 2014. The top line total has received most of the headlines—“docs get $6.5 billion from drug and device companies.” Here, with data courtesy of Open Payments Analytics, we break down some of those payments in detail, with more to follow in subsequent articles. Small Payments Fill the General Database: Overall, there were 11.41 million records published, covering 607,000 phys...
Source: Policy and Medicine - July 2, 2015 Category: American Health Authors: Thomas Sullivan Source Type: blogs

To Spur Medical Innovation, Make Corporate Cheaters Pay
The past decade has seen a relatively constant rate of newly approved drugs every year. The number has even jumped in the past few years. Yet, despite such encouraging trends, we are actually facing a crisis in drug innovation today. That is because many of these new products do not offer substantial improvements over already available alternatives. At the same time, novel and effective treatments for many diseases---both rare and common---remain elusive. For example, there is widespread concern over the lack of development of new antibiotics aimed at multidrug-resistant infections. Therapeutic innovation for central nerv...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - April 30, 2015 Category: Health Management Authors: Aaron Kesselheim Tags: Drugs and Medical Technology Health Policy Lab Medicaid and CHIP Medicare corporations Cost FDA legislation Marketing medical innovation Medical Innovation Act NIH Pharma price Source Type: blogs

Top stories in health and medicine, March 31, 2015
From MedPage Today: Nephrologists Iffy About Dialysis in Expectant Moms. A third of nephrologists reported being somewhat to very uncomfortable caring for a pregnant patient on hemodialysis despite a growing number having to do so. What Makes an Opioid Stronger or Weaker Than Morphine? A February 2015 report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention provided updated estimates of prescription opioid analgesic use among adults ages 20 and over. Mixed Results for Avastin Plus Chemo in Ovarian Cancer. Women with recurrent, platinum-sensitive ovarian cancer obtained an unprecedented survival benefit with a chemo...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - March 31, 2015 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: News Cancer Nephrology Source Type: blogs

How Open Data Can Reveal—And Correct—The Faults In Our Health System
We examined sites of service for non-complex office visits across gastroenterology, cardiology, and oncology — three specialties that tend to deliver care across a range of sites. Medicare reimbursement is higher for hospital visits as compared to those in a physician office. Overall, we found that most doctors bill regular, level 3 evaluation and management visits in non-hospital settings. Oncologists have the highest percentage billed in hospital-type facilities — 15 percent of non-complex office visits. In this case, we were limited in our analysis because the dataset does not include the additional amount t...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - February 18, 2015 Category: Health Management Authors: Kavita Patel, Domitilla Masi, and Caitlin Brandt Tags: All Categories Big Data Health Care Costs Medicaid Medicare Payment Policy Research Spending Source Type: blogs

Top stories in health and medicine, January 16, 2015
From MedPage Today: Current Flu Vaccine Half as Effective as Previous Years. People receiving this year’s seasonal influenza vaccine are 23% less likely to seek medical treatment for flu-type symptoms relative to unvaccinated individuals, according to an interim CDC estimate based on reports submitted so far for the current season. New Board Offers New Recert Route. The American Board of Medical Specialties (ABMS) has competition for the board recertification process: the newly established National Board of Physicians and Surgeons (NBPAS). Post TIA Microbleed Signals Recurrent Risk. The presence of cerebral mic...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - January 16, 2015 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: News Cancer Infectious disease Neurology Source Type: blogs

Top stories in health and medicine, November 17, 2014
From MedPage Today: Ebola: Signs of Progress, CDC says. The response to the Ebola outbreak in Liberia is showing encouraging signs of progress, with downward trends in new cases especially in two regions of the country that had been hot spots. Millions Of Medicaid Kids Missing Regular Checkups. Millions of low-income children are failing to get the free preventive exams and screenings guaranteed by Medicaid, and the Obama administration is not doing enough to fix the problem. Some Pregnancy Risks for Young Kidney Donors. Young women who donate a kidney may be at higher risk of gestational hypertension and preeclampsi...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - November 17, 2014 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: News Cancer Infectious disease Nephrology Source Type: blogs

The Darker Days of Fall
Autumn is usually my favorite season. It's the time of year when the chill that I so love comes back into the air, when everything feels crisp, and rich colors dress the trees. I am one of those people who's into pumpkin spice lattes and chai, fresh seasonal apples and of course, cider. Halloween is usually a treat for me because I adore dressing up in costumes. But you may notice I've been absent from blogging about how it's okay to eat candy at Halloween with diabetes. You haven't yet seen any silly posts wherein I dress up my insulin vials. Actually, you haven't seen any posts from me at all since mid-September.I'm...
Source: Dorkabetic - October 27, 2014 Category: Endocrinology Authors: Hannah McDonald Source Type: blogs

EFPIA Disapproves of French Off-Label Initiative
On July 8, 2014, the French National Assembly voted a draft law proposal that would potentially allow healthcare professionals to prescribe off-label drugs, even if there is an approved drug available for treatment. The draft law specifically references Avastin, a Roche cancer drug, as an alternative eye treatment for wet age-related macular degeneration, an indication for which the drug is not approved and for which two authorized alternatives exist. EFPIA, the European Federation of Pharmaceutical Industries and Associations, harshly criticized the proposal. Richard Bergström, EFPIA Director General, said: "A ...
Source: Policy and Medicine - July 17, 2014 Category: American Health Authors: Thomas Sullivan Source Type: blogs

Abort, Retry, Fail? - Lancet Avoided Much Recent Unpleasantness in Reporting on New Gates Foundation CEO (Including Her Defense of $55,000 a Year for Bevacizumab)
The April 26, 2014 issue of the prestigious journal Lancet used two full pages and two separate articles by the same author to discuss the ascension of the Gates Foundation new CEO, Dr Susan Desmond-Hellmann.(1-2)Two Somewhat Redundant Lancet Articles Dr Desmond-Hellmann trained as an oncologist, spent time working on AIDS and Kaposi's Sarcoma in Uganda, but then spent much of her career as a pharmaceutical/ biotechnology executive, as described in the first article,(1)After returning from Uganda, Desmond-Hellmann joined the nascent Taxol development programme at Bristol-Myers Squibb, before being poached by Arthur Levinso...
Source: Health Care Renewal - May 5, 2014 Category: Health Management Tags: anechoic effect boards of directors conflicts of interest Gates Foundation Genentech health care foundations health care prices Lancet medical journals Procter and Gamble UCSF Source Type: blogs

Novartis and Roche fined over 180 mn euros by anti-trust
Italy's Antitrust authority said Wednesday that it had fined Swiss pharmaceutical companies Novartis and Roche a total of over 180 million euros for alleged collusion to manipulate the market in Italy."The two companies made an illegal agreement to hamper the spread of the use of a very cheap pharmaceutical, (Roche's) Avastin, in the treatment of the most widespread eye pathology among the elderly and other serious eye diseases, to favour a much more expensive product, (Novartis's) Lucentis, artificially differentiating the two products," read an Antitrust statement. It added that this had cost the Italian nation...
Source: PharmaGossip - March 5, 2014 Category: Pharma Commentators Authors: insider Source Type: blogs

Top stories in health and medicine, December 17, 2013
From MedPage Today: Breast Cancer: Adding Avastin Boosts Toxicity. Beleaguered bevacizumab (Avastin) has failed another test in breast cancer. FDA Wants Proof of Anti-Bacterial Soap Claims. Manufacturers of nonprescription anti-bacterial hand soaps and body washes will soon be required to show their products are safe for long-term daily use and are more effective than plain soap in stopping the spread of infections. AACE Rejects Heart Groups’ Guidelines. The American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists said it doesn’t endorse the latest lipid and obesity guidelines from the American Heart Association...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - December 17, 2013 Category: Family Physicians Tags: News Cancer Heart Infectious disease Source Type: blogs

Literally gouging
In conclusion, we found no evidence of increased risks of mortality, myocardial infarction, bleeding, or stroke,” their research paper said.The other danger to using Avastin, however, has attracted a lot of publicity in recent years.The fact that the drug needs to be repackaged into smaller doses introduces an element of risk because it opens the possibility that the drug could be tainted during the repackaging process. (Genentech says because the FDA has not approved it for use in the eye, the company cannot legally distribute Avastin in doses appropriate for the eye.Indeed, in three cases that made the news —...
Source: PharmaGossip - December 16, 2013 Category: Pharma Commentators Authors: insider Source Type: blogs

FDA Orders 23andMe to Immediately Discontinue Marketing "Spit for Cancer" Kit
The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) sent a WARNING letter to the CEO of 23andMe because the company is illegally marketing its 23andMe Saliva Collection Kit and Personal Genome Service (PGS). "This product," says FDA, "is a device within the meaning of section 201(h) of the FD&C Act, 21 U.S.C. 321(h), because it is intended for use in the diagnosis of disease or other conditions or in the cure, mitigation, treatment, or prevention of disease, or is intended to affect the structure or function of the body." Recall that Genentech teemed up with 23andMe -- a personal genetics firm -- to collect spit...
Source: Pharma Marketing Blog - November 25, 2013 Category: Pharma Commentators Tags: 23andMe Avastin Genentech warning letter Source Type: blogs

Orphan Drugs - The Seattle Times explains
The mining of rare diseasesThirty years ago, Congress acted to spur research on rare diseases. Today, we have hundreds of new drugs — along with runaway pricing and market manipulation, as drugmakers turn a law with good intentions into a profit engine.By Michael J. Berens and Ken ArmstrongHer vision failed first.Then she fell asleep at school from inexplicable fatigue. Even walking proved difficult, often impossible, as she knocked into furniture and walls. It was like an electrical switch in her body toggled without warning. Some days she was in control, most she was not.Specialists we...
Source: PharmaGossip - November 11, 2013 Category: Pharma Commentators Authors: insider Source Type: blogs

Cancer - Big Pharma want to drain you of cash before you die
Avastin, $5,000/month; Zaltrap, $11,000/month; Yervoy, $39,000/month; Provenge, $93,000/course of treatment; Erbitux, $8,400/month; Gleevec, $92,000/year; Tasigna, $115,000/year; Sprycel, $123,000/year. (Photo: Illustrations by Remie Geoffroi) http://nymag.com/news/features/cancer-drugs-2013-10/#! (Source: PharmaGossip)
Source: PharmaGossip - October 29, 2013 Category: Pharma Commentators Authors: insider Source Type: blogs

Pharmalot... Pharmalittle... Good Morning
Hello, folks, and how are you today? The sun is peeking through the clouds hovering over the Pharmalot corporate campus this morning, where the short people are, as usual, hustling off to the school houses, the leaves are blanketing the grounds and the official mascots are chasing down wild animals. Quite a scene. As for us, we are hustling a bit ourselves since we hope to attend an interesting panel later, which will require us to close the laptop for a spell. Nonetheless, we have the usual line up of items for you to peruse. So here you go. Have a grand day and stay in touch... Reckitt Benckiser Starts A Strategic Review...
Source: Pharmalot - October 22, 2013 Category: Pharma Commentators Authors: esilverman Source Type: blogs

New nanopharmaceutical may help overcome resistance to specific anticancer drugs
Conclusions: Results generated through this translational research plan suggest that CRLX101 can overcome HIF-1α-mediated acquired resistance to antiangiogenic drugs, assisting the use of CRLX101 in combination with antiangiogenic medicines as an exciting new paradigm for the treatment of cancer. Related Posts:Cleveland Clinic’s preventive breast cancer vaccine…Harvard Stem Cell Institute publishes initial clinical trialImportant advance in the fight against skin cancerNew IBS treatment shows possible in Phase 2 researchNew blood test could help millions of patients with…The po...
Source: My Irritable Bowel Syndrome Story - October 21, 2013 Category: Other Conditions Authors: Ken Tags: IBS News Source Type: blogs

Pharmalot... Pharmalittle... Good Morning
Good morning, folks, and nice to see you again. We hope the weekend was relaxing and refreshing, because yet another working week has just begun. You knew this would happen, yes? So did we. And to prepare, we have once again brewed a cup of stimulation to help us along. As always, we invite you to join us. After all, there is no shame in getting some assistance to fire up your brain first thing in the morning. Meanwhile, here are some tidbits. Have a grand day and do stay in touch... Bayer Hires Pfizer's Brandicourt To Run Healthcare Operations (Reuters) Roche Cancer Drug Shrinks Tumors In 26 Percent Of Smokers (Bloomberg ...
Source: Pharmalot - September 30, 2013 Category: Pharma Commentators Authors: esilverman Source Type: blogs

An Experimental Lilly Cancer Drug Misses A Lucrative Target
In a setback to Eli Lilly, a late-stage study found that a closely watched experimental drug failed to meet its primary endpoint in combating breast cancer. Although expectations on Wall Street had already been low, the compound, called ramucirumab, did not demonstrate progression free survival and also missed a secondary endpoint – overall survival. The drug, however, did yield a statistically significant benefit for the same endpoints in treating gastric cancer in a separate Phase III trial. Only top-line results from the studies were released (here is the Lilly statement). Nonetheless, the breast cancer findings h...
Source: Pharmalot - September 26, 2013 Category: Pharma Commentators Authors: esilverman Source Type: blogs

Drugmakers And Pharmacists Sue Maine Over Importation Law
This was predictable. Three months after Maine enacted a law that allows its residents to purchase prescription drugs from mail-order pharmacies in Canada, the UK, New Zealand and Australia, the state is facing a lawsuit and a request for a preliminary injunction from trade groups for drugmakers and state pharmacists and retailers. The law actually goes into effect on October 9. In their lawsuit, PhRMA, the Maine Pharmacy Association and the Maine Society for Health System Pharmacists, among others, charge that the state law circumvents federal regulations governing prescription drugs, encroaches on the power of the federa...
Source: Pharmalot - September 12, 2013 Category: Pharma Commentators Authors: esilverman Source Type: blogs

Rerun: Happy 7th birthday to the Health Business Blog
The Health Business Blog is on vacation  and re-running some classic posts. This one is from March 2012, the seventh birthday of the Health Business Blog. The Health Business Blog turns seven years old today. Continuing a tradition I established with birthdays one, two, three, four, five and six, I have picked out a favorite post from each month. Thanks for continuing to read the blog! March 2011: Why you shouldn’t feel good about paying a low price for wet AMD treatment Repackaging Avastin seems like a harmless, clever  trick to save thousands on Lucentis. But now th...
Source: Health Business Blog - August 27, 2013 Category: Health Managers Authors: dewe67 Tags: Announcements Blogs Source Type: blogs

Rerun: Happy 3rd birthday to the Health Business Blog
The Health Business Blog is on vacation this week and re-running some classic posts. This one is from March 2008, the third birthday of the Health Business Blog. —– The Health Business Blog is three years old, with close to 1700 posts and counting. For the first and second birthdays I picked out my favorite post by month, and I’m continuing that tradition today. March 2007: Eye-popping generic pricing disparities Retail prices for a 30 day supply of generic Zocor (simvastatin) ranged from $6.97 at Sam’s Club to $131.99 at Rite Aid. Can you imagine seeing price different...
Source: Health Business Blog - August 20, 2013 Category: Health Managers Authors: dewe67 Tags: Announcements Blogs Source Type: blogs

Rich pharma companies, poor patients.
Pharmaceutical companies are getting rich on the backs of their patients. Don't believe me? Here's some proof.First we have an article from New Jersey on how Roche's profits are up 10% and its revenues are up 4% on profits from its breast cancer drugs. The company is now focusing on cancer drugs and hopes to find more high profit drugs as generics come available for drugs such as Herceptin.  By the way, their cancer drugs cost between $70,000 and $100,000+ annually per patient.If you ask a pharma company you get the standard lines: 'no one pays those prices', 'they are covered by insurance', 'we do have programs for t...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - July 28, 2013 Category: Cancer Tags: patient rights medication costs Source Type: blogs