Breast Cancer and Hormone Therapy: What Do the New Data Mean? Breast Cancer and Hormone Therapy: What Do the New Data Mean?

A large British study takes another look at the question of the link between hormone replacement therapy and breast cancer.Medscape Ob/Gyn
Source: Medscape Hematology-Oncology Headlines - Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Hematology-Oncology Commentary Source Type: news

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uet D Abstract Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer in women and the first cause of cancer death in France. Among the different subtypes of breast cancer, the predominant form is characterized by positive hormone receptors (more than 70% of breast cancers). Hormone therapy thus plays a key role in the strategy of management of these cancers both in adjuvant and metastatic situations. The two types of adjuvant hormone therapy used are selective estrogen receptor modulators and aromatase inhibitors. Fulvestrant, an anti-estrogen, is used alone or in combination with other molecules in metastatic sit...
Source: Bulletin du Cancer - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Bull Cancer Source Type: research
Authors: Anagnostis P, Bosdou JK, Vaitsi K, Goulis DG, Lambrinoudaki I Abstract Menopausal hormone therapy (MHT) is effective in preventing menopause-related bone loss and decreasing vertebral, non-vertebral and hip fracture risk. MHT contains estrogens that exert both antiosteoclastic and osteoanabolic effects. These effects are dose-dependent, as even ultra-low doses preserve or increase bone mineral density. The transdermal route of administration is effective on cancellous and cortical bone, although fracture data are still lacking. Hormone replacement therapy is the treatment of choice to preserve skeletal hea...
Source: Hormones - Category: Endocrinology Tags: Hormones (Athens) Source Type: research
The risk of breast cancer in transgender women continues to be a topic of debate in the medical literature. Studies have theorized an increased risk in transgender women taking feminizing hormone therapy on the basis of established risk factors and histological characteristics in cisgender men and established increased risk in cisgender women on hormone replacement therapy. Historically, testing this theory has been challenging due to a relative lack of cases and large-scale, long-term studies reported in the literature.
Source: Clinical Imaging - Category: Radiology Authors: Tags: Breast Imaging Source Type: research
Can women in menopause get the benefits of hormone replacement therapy without the risks? Anew UCLA study conducted with mice points in that direction, but additional research is necessary.Women commonly experience hot flashes and weight gain, among other changes, during and after menopause. Hormone therapy, which gives women additional estrogen, can help alleviate some of these symptoms, but it has been linked to a higher risk of heart disease and breast cancer.UCLA life scientists now report that a gene called reprimo, which is expressed by certain neurons in the brain, may play a role in menopause-related weight gain, a...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news
CONCLUSIONS: Hormone replacement therapy may slightly improve overall survival in women who have undergone surgical treatment for EOC, but the certainty of the evidence is low. HRT may make little or no difference to quality of life, incidence of breast cancer, TIA, CVA and MI as the certainty of the evidence has been assessed as very low. There may be little or no effect of HRT use on progression-free survival. The evidence in this review is limited by imprecision and incompleteness of reported relevant outcomes and therefore the results should be interpreted with caution. Future well-designed RCTs are required as this is...
Source: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews - Category: General Medicine Authors: Tags: Cochrane Database Syst Rev Source Type: research
Excess body weight is an established risk factor for breast cancer. Research suggests that’s because too much body fat can elevate levels of sex hormones like estrogen, especially among postmenopausal women. But despite knowing there is a correlation between extra weight and breast cancer, it’s been difficult to study how losing that weight could affect an individual woman’s chance of developing cancer. Now, a new paper published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute provides encouraging evidence that, for women 50 and older, virtually any amount of sustained weight loss translates to a reductio...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Cancer embargoed study Source Type: news
FRIDAY, Dec. 13, 2019 -- The ongoing debate about postmenopausal hormone therapy and breast cancer risk may have turned even more muddy: A large, new study suggests that two different types of hormone therapy have opposite effects on women's...
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - Category: General Medicine Source Type: news
A study published in theBMJhas suggested that transgender women are at a greater risk of developing breast cancer after hormone replacement therapy.Daily Mail
Source: Society for Endocrinology - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: news
This study demonstrated that the incidence of ischemic heart disease and death were three times higher among men with low birth weight compared to men with high birth weight (5). Epidemiological investigations of adults born at the time of the Dutch famine between 1944 and 1945 revealed an association between maternal starvation and a low infant birth weight with a high incidence of hypertension and coronary heart disease in these adults (23). Furthermore, Painter et al. reported the incidence of early onset coronary heart disease among persons conceived during the Dutch famine (24). In that regard, Barker's findin...
Source: Frontiers in Endocrinology - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
Our panel this morning discussed the issues surrounding how the WHI results were interpreted and communicated to women and their health care providers. We recognize that hormones are not appropriate for all women, and look forward to hosting a future panel that highlights alternatives. The speakers have a variety of backgrounds and experiences (and genders), and we aim to promote diversity of voices. This was not normal breakfast conversation. Today was a jolting – and disruptive – talk about what happens to women’s bodies when they age. (Who knew that if you’re menopausal and you don’t take y...
Source: Disruptive Women in Health Care - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs
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