Alzheimer's Is Only One Type of Dementia

Photo credit Matteo Vistocco One of the most commonly asked questions about cognitive issues is “Is it Alzheimer’s or dementia?” The short answer is, Alzheimer’s is one type of dementia. According to the Alzheimer’s Association, “Dementia is a general term for loss of memory and other mental abilities severe enough to interfere with daily life. It is caused by physical changes in the brain.” View this slideshow on HealthCentral for more insight into the confusion between the words "Alzheimer's" and "dementia." Purchase Minding Our Elders: Caregivers Share Their Personal Stories – paperback or ebook  Egosan wants to help you live your life fully: Try Egosan premium underwear for discrete, dignified protection. For 20% off your first order, use promo Code: 20CareGivers.                Related StoriesUrinary Incontinence Not Uncommon Yet Stigma PersistsHow Caregivers Can Weather Criticism from Outside SourcesHandling Controlling Elderly Parents Diplomatically 
Source: Minding Our Elders - Category: Geriatrics Authors: Source Type: blogs

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Photo credit Jared Rice Increasingly, stress is considered a risk factor for dementia, particularly Alzheimer’s. Stress is also a risk factor for stroke and heart attack as well as a trigger for many diseases from arthritis to psoriasis. Obviously, limiting stress in our lives is a good idea. But how? Simply living what we call modern life seems to make stress the norm. View slideshow on HealthCentral for more insight into managing stress: Purchase Minding Our Elders: Caregivers Share Their Personal Stories – paperback or ebook  Incontinence problems? Try Egosan premium underwear for discrete, dignified p...
Source: Minding Our Elders - Category: Geriatrics Authors: Source Type: blogs
Conclusions: aCH increased risk of incident MCI and cognitive decline, and effects were significantly enhanced among individuals with genetic risk factors and CSF-based AD pathophysiological markers. Findings underscore the adverse impact of aCH medications on cognition and the need for deprescribing trials, particularly among individuals with elevated risk for AD. The Study in Context: First, do no harm? Common anticholinergic meds seen to increase dementia risk Study: 46.7 million Americans have Alzheimer’s Disease brain pathology today, so it’s urgent to prevent or at least delay progression to clinical di...
Source: SharpBrains - Category: Neuroscience Authors: Tags: Cognitive Neuroscience Health & Wellness Alzheimer’s Disease anticholinergic anticholinergic medications biomarkers cognition cognitive decline cognitively dementia lower cognitive abilities lower cognitive ability MCI mild-cog Source Type: blogs
Photo credit Kari Fredrickson How can faith help both caregivers and people with dementia get through something that makes no sense even to those who believe in a loving God - or maybe especially to those who believe in a loving God? Many people have asked me this question. My own spiritual beliefs have been vital to my caregiving life, but I wanted to give people more depth than I could provide on my own. With that in mind, I asked Dr. Benjamin Mast, a licensed clinical psychologist, Associate Professor in Psychology &Brain Sciences and Geriatric Medicine at the University of Louisville author and also author of ...
Source: Minding Our Elders - Category: Geriatrics Authors: Source Type: blogs
Most of us who have cared for someone living with dementia have tried our best to determine how best to provide that care. We research. We try putting ourselves in their place. We do our best to be patient because we understand that they can’t help their having the disease. Still, we are human and we make mistakes. While we shouldn’t wallow in guilt when we do make mistakes as a care partner, there are situations that we should try extra hard to avoid. Here are nine of them. View the full slideshow on HealthCentral for more insight into what caregivers should avoid doing when they are providing care for so...
Source: Minding Our Elders - Category: Geriatrics Authors: Source Type: blogs
Photo credit Melanie Wasser Nearly everyone involved in caring for an ill or aging loved one is experiencing some degree of grief. However, we don’t usually identify the complex emotions we’re experiencing as such. When you have a parent or spouse who used to be strong and capable but begins to ask for a little assistance, it’s no big deal, right? You’re happy to help. But deep down, there’s a knot in our hearts. We’re grieving various kinds of loss, including the loss of function that comes with advancing age or a chronic medical condition. Generally, these changes are subtle and t...
Source: Minding Our Elders - Category: Geriatrics Authors: Source Type: blogs
My dad is having around-the-clock home care, which was his choice early on when he was diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease. He’s in the later stages now, but he keeps telling his caregivers, including me when I take a shift, that he wants to go home. I read an article that you wrote where you said that asking to go home didn't necessarily mean any particular home, but your comments were directed toward the idea of someone living in a nursing home. Since Dad is in the home where he lived for nearly 40 years, you'd think he'd feel some comfort from that. In fact, that's one reason we've continued to stretch th...
Source: Minding Our Elders - Category: Geriatrics Authors: Source Type: blogs
Since communication is vital to quality of life, we who care for those with Alzheimer's or other diseases that make understanding language difficult need to learn unique methods of coping with the challenge. It's not easy. When your wife thinks you are her brother, when your dad thinks his best friend is robbing him, when your 75-year-old mom insists that her baby is in danger - it will be your challenge to try to find words or actions that will calm your loved one and redirect his or her thinking. Conversely, when your loved one is trying to tell you that he or she wants coffee but is saying the word "bread... C...
Source: Minding Our Elders - Category: Geriatrics Authors: Source Type: blogs
Photo credit Aris Fackenakis The truth, as they see it, is still the truth in their eyes. Delusions, hallucinations, agitation, aggression, and depression are all part of the gradual progression of psychosis of patients with Alzheimer ’s disease (AD). An average of 41% of these patients will experience these psychotic symptoms. One of the most common delusions these patients have are theft-related. An experienced caregiver offers her advice on how to deal with accusations of theft, which are common in dementia patients. Continue reading on Agingcare for more about how Alzheimer's - yes even younger-onset Alzheimer's ...
Source: Minding Our Elders - Category: Geriatrics Authors: Source Type: blogs
Conclusions: Some comorbidities were present in both the AD and control groups, while others were found in the AD group and not in the control group, and vice versa.
Source: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Article Source Type: research
Bed sores, pressure sores, or pressure ulcers are all words used to describe a condition that people often think of as a small problem for a caregiver to handle if they think of it at all. However, this condition is anything but small. Complications from pressure sores can cause death. The Candid Caregiver asked Sharon Roth Maguire, M.S., R.N., a board-certified gerontological nurse practitioner, and the chief clinical quality officer at BrightStarCare, to help us understand more about this potentially serious condition. Roth Maguire has an extensive healthcare background including more than 35 years of experience working ...
Source: Minding Our Elders - Category: Geriatrics Authors: Source Type: blogs
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