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Plan Ahead to Help Prevent Caregiver Burnout
Dear Carol: My Dad cared for Mom for seven years until she died from Alzheimer’s. Now, Dad needs a little help. He knows how hard caregiving can be, and with my working full time, he's worried that I’ll burn out or get sick if I take on his care. He has money to pay for some hired help at home which is where he wants to stay. He has a personal alarm and is safety conscious. I live with depression, though I’m treated. Still, I have kids at home so I do have limits in what I can do for Dad. When I read about caregiver burnout I worry about that happening to me. I don’t want to get so that I hate ...
Source: Minding Our Elders - May 20, 2018 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

The Vitamin Folic Acid May Aid Elders During Heat Waves
The type of heat exhaustion or mild dehydration that a middle-aged caregiver may feel during a heat wave is uncomfortable, but the same occurrence could be deadly for an elder. Because of the seriousness of overheating, some older people take a prescription drug that helps increase blood flow to the skin which in turn helps them cool off. Read full article on HealthCentral about how folic acid may help your elder stay safe in a heatwave:  Support a caregiver or jump-start discussion in support groups with real stories - for bulk orders of Minding Our Elders e-mail Carol        ...
Source: Minding Our Elders - May 19, 2018 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Cyber Safety for People Living With Dementia
In the age of cyber sophistication, scammers and others can wreak havoc with our lives if we even momentarily let down our guard. For older adults who may not be technologically savvy, the threat is even greater. For them, like for someone speaking a second language, red flags might go unnoticed. People living with dementia may be at even more risk because of changes in the brain that can cause confusion. Here are tips for us all, including people living with dementia. View full slideshow on HealthCentral about how people with dementia can still use the Internet: Support a caregiver or jump-start discussion in support grou...
Source: Minding Our Elders - May 18, 2018 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Getting and Staying Organized While Caregiving
Caregiving is a continual learning process and no two situations are identical. But, becoming as organized as possible and consistently trying to stay that way can help us relieve stress and use our time more efficiently. It might seem overwhelming to maintain order in such a hectic situation, but a reasonably small amount of effort applied regularly will prove to be far easier than frantically trying to handle everyday mishaps and especially larger emergencies. Read full article on Agingcare about how to get and stay organized when you're a caregiver: Photo credit ng-tr-n-qu-c:Unsplash Support a caregiver or jump-start di...
Source: Minding Our Elders - May 17, 2018 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Attending To the Needs of 'Elder Orphans' a Growing Concern in Aging Population
“Elder orphan” is a term used by medical professionals to describe individuals living alone with little to no support system. In a research article published in Current Gerontology and Geriatrics Research, in July 2016, “Elder Orphans Hiding in Plain Sight: A Growing Vulnerable Population,” Maria T. Carney, M.D., and her colleagues**,** sought to help clinicians identify adults with multiple chronic diseases who are aging alone and are geographically distant from family or friends. Identifying these individuals might well increase the availability of services for this population as a whole. Rea...
Source: Minding Our Elders - May 16, 2018 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Planning a Picnic for Your Loved One Living In a Care Facility
Would you prefer a hot dog or hamburger? Ketchup, mustard, relish? Chips, salad, dessert? All were available during the annual barbecue picnic at the nursing home where my parents, my uncle and my mother-in-law lived at different times. While people also enjoyed the monthly birthday dinners and holiday festivities hosted by the nursing home, the summer barbecue was one of the most anticipated events of the year. Read full article on Agingcare about how to bring a picnic to your loved one in a care facility: Photo caredit Stephanie McCabe: Unsplash Support a caregiver or jump-start discussion in support groups wit...
Source: Minding Our Elders - May 15, 2018 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Planing a Picnic for Your Loved One Living In a Care Facility
Would you prefer a hot dog or hamburger? Ketchup, mustard, relish? Chips, salad, dessert? All were available during the annual barbecue picnic at the nursing home where my parents, my uncle and my mother-in-law lived at different times. While people also enjoyed the monthly birthday dinners and holiday festivities hosted by the nursing home, the summer barbecue was one of the most anticipated events of the year. Read full article on Agingcare about how to bring a picnic to your loved one in a care facility: Photo caredit Stephanie McCabe: Unsplash Support a caregiver or jump-start discussion in support groups wit...
Source: Minding Our Elders - May 15, 2018 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Summer Excursions for Care Partners to Enjoy
Think about the personality of your ailing elders and consider excursions or entertainment that they may enjoy. A short outing of some type can leave a lasting memory, or it can simply mean that there were some enjoyable moments, but either way, you’ve done something positive for them. Remember to take into account the fact that heat can be dangerous to elders, so prepare for outside activities by educating yourself about how to keep elders safe in the heat.   Read full article on HealthCentral about activities for summer fun with your older loved ones:  Support a caregiver or jump-start discussion in ...
Source: Minding Our Elders - May 14, 2018 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Guilt Over Nursing Home Placement Needs Perspective
Dear Carol: Because of repeated strokes my mother couldn't live alone so I moved her in with me. As years went by I struggled to transfer her from her wheelchair to her bed or commode so I tried in-home help. That didn’t work so I had to place her in a nursing home. The facility was excellent and I was deeply involved yet I still feel guilty for not being able to keep Mom in my home until her death. Intellectually, I know that I wasn’t capable of providing what she needed, but when I read about abuse and neglect of elders in nursing homes I feel like I’m being directly criticized. Do people ever get ...
Source: Minding Our Elders - May 13, 2018 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Caregivers Subject to Unearned Guilt Often Years After the Event
...Realty check: Most caregivers will, at least occasionally, have these feelings. You are not alone and you are not a bad person. You are a human being who’d like some control over your own life. You didn’t ask to be put in a situation where you have little chance to work on fulfilling even the simplest of your own dreams. Yet, the situation presented itself and you stepped up to the plate. Read full article on HealthCentral about caregiving and that inevitable guilt: Photo credit Sharon McCutcheon: Unsplash Support a caregiver or jump-start discussion in support groups with real stories - for bulk orders...
Source: Minding Our Elders - May 11, 2018 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Do You Feel as Old As You Are? A Grandmother and Granddaughter Discuss Life and Aging
Historically, aging has been a difficult topic for women and when it is talked about all, most likely it is in a negative light. Seldom do we read about all that women gain as we pile on the decades. Anne Simpson, 81, is changing that by discussing the complete picture. In “Do You Feel as Old as You Are? Conversations With My Granddaughter,” Simpson answers 40 questions asked of her by her 21-year-old granddaughter, Alison Leslie. The book explores ideas about aging and how women have related to one another across generations. Read this fascinating interview on HealthCentral about how generations of women ...
Source: Minding Our Elders - May 10, 2018 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

What to Get for Mom When She Has Dementia
A special day for your mom is coming up and she’s deep in the land of dementia. You struggle internally about whether you should even go through the motions of celebrating since she won’t understand what you are doing. Will making a big deal of the day just confuse her more? Is it even worth going through this routine when knowing that she doesn’t understand what you’re celebrating nearly breaks your heart? Read full article on HealthCentral about gifts for your Mom who lives with dementia: Purchase Minding Our Elders: Caregivers Share Their Personal Stories – paperback or ebook   &...
Source: Minding Our Elders - May 9, 2018 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Excuses From Siblings Who Don't Help With Caregiving: Familiar?
Many caregivers ask how to respond to siblings who, after being directly and distinctly asked for help, either skirt responsibility with excuses or react nastily to the request. The proper response will depend entirely on the sibling and the nature of the family relationship. Let’s look at a few examples and contemplate responses. Perhaps these can inspire other ideas for how to handle your unique circumstances. Read full article on Agingcare about the excuses that many siblings give for not helping out with parents: Photo credit JEShoots.com: Unsplash Support a caregiver or jump-start discussion in support groups wi...
Source: Minding Our Elders - May 9, 2018 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

DICE: Non-drug Approach to Alzheimer's Management
DICE is an acronym for Describe, Investigate, Evaluate, and Create: The DICE program recommends that caregivers - both professional and family - treat each person with dementia as an individual and also be aware that as symptoms change, approaches by caregivers should also change. DICE is a partnership between the physician, the patient, and the caregiver. Read more about the DICE program on HealthCentral: Support a caregiver or jump-start discussion in support groups with real stories - for bulk orders of Minding Our Elders e-mail Carol     Photo credit: Mikhail Rakityanskiy  Related art...
Source: Minding Our Elders - May 8, 2018 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Alzheimer's: Aromatherapy Has Been Shown to Be a Tool
...Don’t let a bias against alternative medicine put you off. While we now have the blessing of the NIH to use rosemary, lemon, lavender, and orange by the inhaled method to help calm Alzheimer’s symptoms, we can also seek advice from trained professionals who may help us make the most of any number of ancient practices for ourselves and our loved ones. Read full article on how aromatherapy can help people with Alzheimer's (NIH study): Support a caregiver or jump-start discussion in support groups with real stories - for bulk orders of Minding Our Elders e-mail Carol   Photo credit Kelly Sik...
Source: Minding Our Elders - May 7, 2018 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Macular Degeneration Treatments Can Help Maintain Quality of Life
Dear Carol: My dad is 86 and quite healthy other than his eyes. Recently, he developed the wet form of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and needs to get regular injections in his eyes to slow the leaking of the blood vessels. Dad tolerates the treatment well, so I’ve been taking him to the clinic for this but my sister is having a fit. I know that she loves Dad, but she lives 1000 miles away so rarely sees him.  She says that older people shouldn’t go through a lot of treatment. I’d agree if we were talking about extensive surgery or chemotherapy but this seems different. Dad’s mind ...
Source: Minding Our Elders - May 6, 2018 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Tough Conversations: Talking With Your Aging Parents About Where They Want to Live
Ideally, family members see one another often enough that they can become comfortable discussing issues that come up naturally as parents grow older. When this is the case, adult children are likely to hear when close friends of their parents have moved to assisted living, or have become ill. They may even hear stories where their parents’ friends didn’t assign powers of attorney for healthcare and their finances so that when one or both became very ill, their children are left trying to care for their parents with their hands legally tied. Read full article on HealthCentral about how to work your way into thes...
Source: Minding Our Elders - May 5, 2018 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Dementia Diagnosis Doesn't Mean That People Quit Living
People living with dementia are anxious to teach the public that while a dementia diagnosis is not what anyone wants to receive, it’s not as if they are "healthy" the day before the diagnosis and in late-stage dementia the day after. Many people live for years with manageable dementia, and any number of them would call their lives satisfying. Read full article on HealthCentral about how the stigma of dementia gives a false impression of a diagnosis: Support a caregiver or jump-start discussion in support groups with real stories - for bulk orders of Minding Our Elders e-mail Carol   Photo cre...
Source: Minding Our Elders - May 4, 2018 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Dementia Diagosis Doesn't Mean That People Quit Living
People living with dementia are anxious to teach the public that while a dementia diagnosis is not what anyone wants to receive, it’s not as if they are "healthy" the day before the diagnosis and in late-stage dementia the day after. Many people live for years with manageable dementia, and any number of them would call their lives satisfying. Read full article on HealthCentral about how the stigma of dementia gives a false impression of a diagnosis: Support a caregiver or jump-start discussion in support groups with real stories - for bulk orders of Minding Our Elders e-mail Carol   Photo cre...
Source: Minding Our Elders - May 4, 2018 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Did Caregiver Stress Cause a Blowup? How to Apologize
Immediately, you recognize that your nasty response is way out of proportion to your friend's comment. She's been there for you, even though when caregiving starts, friends often scatter.The person you are really angry at is your sister who repeatedly criticizes your caregiving ability. The problem is that words, once uttered, can't be withdrawn. Read full article on Agingcare about how to get through a stress-caused blowup: Support a caregiver or jump-start discussion in support groups with real stories - for bulk orders of Minding Our Elders e-mail Carol   Related articles At What Moment Did You Realize ...
Source: Minding Our Elders - May 3, 2018 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Some Universal Truths About Dementia Caregiving
This article was written years ago, friends, but I still find that the truths hold. Carol Most of us find, as we travel our unique journeys, that certain phrases or concepts take on the status of truth in our worldview. Our personal truths may not be identical to those of others, but we know what is true for us. Below, I've shared, as food for thought, a few of my own truths that have developed during my personal caregiving journey. Read the full article on these universal truths and then find your own:  Support a caregiver or jump-start discussion in support groups with real stories - for bulk orders of Min...
Source: Minding Our Elders - May 2, 2018 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Anxiety Can Be Contagious When You're a Caregiver
...You know where I'm going with this, right? The care receiver is then anxious and worried, but can't explain why. The caregiver isn't aware that his or her anxiety over a job issue has been passed on in a general form to their loved one. Knowing that they are leaving an anxious elder at home alone increases the anxiety of the caregiver as he or she heads out to work. And on it goes. Read the full article on Agingcare about how anxiety can affect your care partner: Support a caregiver or jump-start discussion in support groups with real stories - for bulk orders of Minding Our Elders e-mail Carol   Photo cr...
Source: Minding Our Elders - May 1, 2018 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

What Did Your Mom Have Right - or Wrong?
Nearly every person's childhood leaves them with mixed memories. Even siblings raised together by the same parents can have wildly different views on how their shared childhood played out. For most of us, there are times when we think, "Hmm, Mom was right about that." Other times, we know for certain she was wrong. The same goes for Dad, of course, but we'll focus on Mom in this particular article. Read the full article on Agingcare about the times that Mom may have been right - or wrong: Support a caregiver or jump-start discussion in support groups with real stories - for bulk orders of Minding Our Elders ...
Source: Minding Our Elders - April 30, 2018 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Age Shouldn't Determine If Elder Needs Facility Care
Dear Carol: I’ve been reading a lot about when if/when it’s time to force a parent into some kind of care. Your position seems to be that it’s the older adult’s decision unless there is dementia present. I can see that working at 70, but my mom is 90. She’s mentally sharp and still likes her home and her garden but she refuses extra help except for hiring lawn care, snow removal, and grocery delivery. She gave up driving on her own but she is adamant about not wanting to move to assisted living. At what age do adult children finally say enough and use our Power of Attorney to force a...
Source: Minding Our Elders - April 29, 2018 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

UCLA MEND Protocol: Non-Drug Approach Shows Promise In Reversing Memory Loss
Rather than a drug or treatment, MEND is a protocol where patients made dramatic lifestyle changes. According to the ABC report, “They avoided simple carbs, gluten, and processed foods. They increased their fish intake, took yoga and meditated. They were instructed to take melatonin, get adequate sleep, incorporate vitamin B-12, vitamin D-3 and fish oil.” Read more about this UCLA study on HealthCentral that shows a reversal of Alzheimer's in some patients: Support a caregiver or jump-start discussion in support groups with real stories - for bulk orders of Minding Our Elders e-mail Carol   ...
Source: Minding Our Elders - April 28, 2018 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Stimulation May Prevent Alzheimer's Apathy
Non-drug, hands-on, personal care incorporating stimulating activity has been shown in the past and, I believe, will continue to show the best results in Alzheimer’s and dementia care. Our care facilities need to be funded in such a way that activity specialists can be part of the staffing. These specialists will be able to provide the strong, focused stimulation required to prevent apathy in our loved ones who have Alzheimer’s or another dementia. Read full article on HealthCentral about how stimulation has proven to help prevent Alzheimer's apathy: Support a caregiver or jump-start discussion in support ...
Source: Minding Our Elders - April 27, 2018 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Making Tough Decisions: Is There No Choice But a Nursing Home?
It’s something many of us have done. Our parents are in their middle years and have come home from visiting someone in a nursing home. The hospital-like structure of the older nursing home was disturbing to them. While relating their experience to you they say that they’d hate to end up in a place like that. You jump in and say with feeling and genuine belief, "I’d never put you in a nursing home." Read full article on HealthCentral about breaking the promise to never put a loved one in a nursing home: Support a caregiver or jump-start discussion in support groups with real stories - for bu...
Source: Minding Our Elders - April 26, 2018 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Biological Age Overrides Chronological Age When It Comes to Alzheimer's
Increasingly, Alzheimer’s specialists and researchers stress the importance of early detection. In fact, most drugs now considered as possible methods for holding off Alzheimer’s symptoms seem to be dependent on starting the drug early – as much as a decade earlier than symptoms appear. The question that travels hand in hand with these studies is who should start these drugs if they do prove to be effective? It’s not prudent to simply give the drugs to the whole aging population. Read full article on HealthCentral about how much it means to stay biologically young: Support a caregiver or jump-s...
Source: Minding Our Elders - April 25, 2018 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Can Dancing Change the Trajectory of Alzheimer ’s Disease? One Woman Says Yes
(Source: Minding Our Elders)
Source: Minding Our Elders - April 24, 2018 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Don't Pester: Accepting a Degree of Risk May Be Important to Elders' Dignity
...Think about it. Barring dementia – and as much as we hear about dementia, not everyone over 65 has become unable to make decisions – our elders should be able to exercise their rights as adults. Aging should increase dignity, not take it away. Maturing should earn us respect for what we’ve been through, not derision for being a bit weathered physically and somewhat different in how we may process information.  If you carefully read the first paragraph of this article you’ll see that much of what I describe sounds like raising children. Ouch! Read the full article on HealthCentral about ...
Source: Minding Our Elders - April 23, 2018 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Changing Living Arrangements May Preserve Family Closeness
Dear Carol: I’m 78-years-old and I have lived with my son and his wife for two years. I’m feeling hemmed in and I think that they may feel the same way. They are kind, but my daughter-in-law seems stressed when we’re together too much even though in the past we have always gotten along well. The house doesn't allow much privacy which may be why we get on each other's nerves. I also miss being around people my own age. This arrangement seemed like a good idea, but I’m afraid we all think it’s a mistake. I’d gladly move to assisted living but I’ve been paying rent to the kids, w...
Source: Minding Our Elders - April 22, 2018 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Worried About Memory Loss? It's Lack of Awareness that Points to Dementia
Middle-aged and worried about your memory slips? You probably don’t have dementia. The majority of the memory slips that concern this age group, and even those significantly older, are due to stress and other factors rather than impending dementia. However, researchers have now found that people who are suffering from memory loss but are unaware of their problem are most likely developing the disease. Read full article on lack of awareness of memory loss and dementia: Support a caregiver or jump-start discussion in support groups with real stories - for bulk orders of Minding Our Elders e-mail Carol   ...
Source: Minding Our Elders - April 21, 2018 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Restructuring Your Life After Caregiving
Many of us start our caregiving career by assisting an elder in his or her home, or we have a spouse who declines and we become the default caregiver in our own home. This care expands to a point where we need some type of respite, often in the form of in-home care agency help. Eventually, the move to assisted living or even a nursing home may become necessary for everyone's health and wellbeing. Whatever happens, we remain caregivers. Many of us continue to see our care receiver daily. Most of us continue to be involved as advocates and support throughout the time of need. When our loving attention and care is no longer n...
Source: Minding Our Elders - April 20, 2018 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

MIND Diet Often Recommended for Alzheimer's Prevention
Part of a healthy lifestyle, one that may prevent heart disease, Alzheimer’s and other diseases, involves consuming a nourishing diet. According to a recent study, one way to obtain these nutrients is through the MIND diet. This berry-heavy diet, which was created by nutritional epidemiologist Martha Clare Morris, PhD and colleagues at Rush University Medical Center in Chicago, IL, is a tweaked combination of the Mediterranean and the DASH diets. The acronym MIND stands for Mediterranean-DASH Intervention for Neurodegenerative Delay. Read full article on HealthCentral about the MIND diet and what it can do for your h...
Source: Minding Our Elders - April 19, 2018 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Reminiscing One of the Most Powerful "Drugs" for People Living with Dementia
"Evoking memories can be as casual as asking a parent to tell a story, or as formal as a professionally produced video" cautions the extent of the project depends on the patient. Memories can be stirred by old movies with a favorite Hollywood star. Music almost always jogs the memory. … two female patients who hadn’t spoken in months until they heard the song ‘You Are My Sunshine.’ They were subsequently able to sing every lyric perfectly." Read full article on HealthCentral about how reminiscing can help people living with dementia: Support a caregiver or jump-start discussion in su...
Source: Minding Our Elders - April 18, 2018 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

April is Parkinson's Awareness Month: How Informed Are You About PD?
According to the Alzheimer's Association, the brain changes caused by Parkinson’s disease begin in a region that plays a key role in movement. As the brain changes gradually spread, they often begin to affect mental functions as well as physical functions. These changes can include memory and the ability to pay attention, the ability to make sound judgments and the ability to plan the steps needed to complete a task. Read full article on HealthCentral about types of Parkinson's, how it's diagnosed and awareness issues: Support a caregiver or jump-start discussion in support groups with real stories - for bulk or...
Source: Minding Our Elders - April 17, 2018 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

A Caregiver Shares Her Favorite Apps to Make Dementia Care Easier
Smartphones and tablets have become an integral part of modern life, but who would have thought that caregivers and their loved ones living with dementia would be some of the people most excited about the possibilities? While non–digital books, guides, articles, and support are still necessary, apps have added another way for caregivers and their loved ones live their best lives. View slideshow on HealthCentral about caregiving and dementia friendly apps: Support a caregiver or jump-start discussion in support groups with real stories - for bulk orders of Minding Our Elders e-mail Carol   Related artic...
Source: Minding Our Elders - April 16, 2018 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Aging Parents, No Matter Their Challenges, Never Become Children
Dear Carol: I have several friends who are caring for their parents in various ways.  They talk about their parents like the parents have become the family children and it upsets me. My parents are living in their home and doing well. We’ve been planning for the future with the necessary legal documents and I know that they’d like to stay in their home as long as possible but if a move is necessary, they will do it.  I’m troubled by the thought that I may slide into treating my parents as children when they do need help. Is this a default attitude for adult child caregivers? – SB Read...
Source: Minding Our Elders - April 15, 2018 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Are you looking for quality content from a seasoned professional?
Author Carol Bradley Bursack, operating as her business of Minding Our Elders, writes articles and blog posts for her clients' websites. She is a veteran caregiver, having spent more than two decades as the primary caregiver for a combination of seven elders. Carol consults with website owners and managers to help them better understand what caregivers and elders need to know and what kind of support they need. She also moderates forums and Q&A sessions with caregivers and seniors.  Carol’s ideal client is a company that appreciates professional writing infused with warmth, compassion, and humor where a...
Source: Minding Our Elders - April 14, 2018 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Hindsight for Caregivers: If You Knew Then What You Know Now
Much like an adult who realizes that he or she has a "wounded child" living inside – a child who suffers from unearned self-blame or low self-esteem because of life events – many adult caregivers carry the guilt from their "infant" caregiving years to their grave. They spend precious time thinking about how they should have understood someone's needs better, could have been more patient, would have done any number of things better, if only they knew then what they know now. Read full article about how hindsight can affect caregivers: Support a caregiver or jump-start discussion in support gr...
Source: Minding Our Elders - April 14, 2018 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

What to Do When Your Elder Refuses Change Clothes or Bathe
The issue of elders who were once reasonably clean adults refusing to take showers and wear fresh clothes is one that is far more common than most people think. To remedy this often-malodorous situation, it is crucial to first understand why a loved one is not bathing and/or changing their clothes regularly. There are many possible culprits and often several of them combine to form the perfect unhygienic storm. Getting to the root of their avoidance is the best way to devise a successful strategy for cleaning up their act. Read the full article on Agingcare about the reasons why some elders avoid the baths and cl...
Source: Minding Our Elders - April 13, 2018 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Family Members Who Care More About the Inheritance Than Parents' Care
...When you tell your siblings that your parents are more than you can now handle, that Dad's  Alzheimer's is causing him to wander and he is not safe at home, they tune you out. When you tell them that Mom's incontinence is at a point that you can't physically keep up with it, they respond by sulking, or even implying that you are bailing out on your responsibility. You took the elders' care on. You need to deal with the increasing problems. But don't even think of putting them in a home. They'd hate that! Read the full article on Agingcare about family members who care more about inheritance than anything else:...
Source: Minding Our Elders - April 12, 2018 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Free Caring for the Caregiver Summit to Save for Anytime Listening
Readers, I'm thrilled to be a presenter for this exciting free global caregiving summit and hope that you'll join us! Today is my day, but once signed up you can go back to listen to others and collect the free gifts. More are coming.  You will receive an email with each speaker as they go through the week and listen at your convenience. The Caring for the Caregiver Summit is a Global Telesummit hosted by Gerontologist Dr. Diane Darby Beach. It begins April 4th. There are 21 experts and influencers who will share their best advice for creating the optimal caregiving experience. What makes this telesummit so great?&nbs...
Source: Minding Our Elders - April 12, 2018 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Caregiver for Multiple Elders Tells the Tale
...I hope, through my work with caregivers, that I can help others do what I didn’t do for myself. I hope to help them learn the importance of self-care. One article in particular that I wrote for Healthcentral.com brings home the fact that long-term caregiver can shorten the life of a caregiver by eight to 10 years. This information comes from a well-respected study done by Ohio State University.   Read more on HealthCentral about how a veteran caregiver waded through the sometimes rough waters of caring for multiple elders: Support a caregiver or jump-start discussion in support groups with real stories&n...
Source: Minding Our Elders - April 11, 2018 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Why Some Caregivers Refuse Help for Seemingly Good Reasons
Caregivers frequently feel stressed and many eventually become burned out—a condition that should not be taken lightly. Many caregivers, even when they have access to outside resources, still come up with excuses to actively refuse assistance. Throughout my years of experience providing care for loved ones, I’ve encountered a variety of reasons why caregivers deny the need for help. Ultimately, family caregivers should understand and work through their motivations to be the sole care provider. Accepting help benefits both the caregiver the care recipient, but it can be hard to accept, particularly if you don't ...
Source: Minding Our Elders - April 10, 2018 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Is Dementia As Hard on the Caregiver as the Person with the Disease?
It seems shocking to hear people ask whether dementia, particularly Alzheimer’s since it’s the best known, is as hard on the caregiver as it is on the person with the disease. After all, developing dementia of any kind is one of our greatest fears, even overtaking cancer. A caregiver who asks this question must be incredibly heartless and selfish, right? Yet, people who’ve never been a caregiver for someone with dementia need to think this through. When a loved one develops dementia, both the care receiver and the caregiver have entered an incredibly challenging time of their lives. Read full article on H...
Source: Minding Our Elders - April 9, 2018 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Criticism from Uninformed Outsiders Difficult for Caregivers to Swallow
Dear Carol: I’m wondering if you have advice for people who are shamed by others who judge their caregiving. I am an around-the-clock caregiver and have been for several years. I love my dad unconditionally and owe him everything. We live in an extremely rural area and don’t have access to agencies that can come in for a few hours so it’s me or no one. I get stressed and emotionally tired. Then, when I do take a little time away, I hear from outsiders about how I’ll regret it and how they’d be thrilled to care for their parent and would never complain. I’m sorry if I sound...
Source: Minding Our Elders - April 8, 2018 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

The Grief Caregivers Live with While Watching a Loved One Struggle
Nearly everyone involved in caring for aging loved ones is experiencing grief. Often, however, we're not aware of this grief. We have a parent who used to be strong and capable begin to ask for a little assistance. No big deal, right? We're happy to help. But underneath, often unnoticed, there's a knot in our hearts. We're grieving the loss – the loss of function that made our parent need to ask for help. Weren't they the ones who helped us? Weren't they the ones in charge? Read the full article on Agingcare about how caregivers deal with the grief that they feel while a loved one struggles with a debilitating d...
Source: Minding Our Elders - April 7, 2018 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Tips: How to Be a Friend to an Isolated Caregiver
Caregivers are often isolated by the nature of their responsibilities. Some can’t leave home without arranging for someone to come and care for their loved one. Others are simply taxed to expend energy on friends no matter how lonely they may feel. So, how can you be a friend to an isolated caregiver?   View slideshow for tips on HealthCentral about how to be a good friend to an isolated caregiver: Support a caregiver or jump-start discussion in support groups with real stories - for bulk orders of Minding Our Elders e-mail Carol   Related articles Celebrating Love: Dementia Caregivers Talk A...
Source: Minding Our Elders - April 6, 2018 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Tips for Refreshing the Caregiving Routine for Both Care Partners
It’s human tendency to get stuck in our ways as we carry out life’s demands, and caregiving is no exception. But the routines that we fall into could often use some improvements as time passes and new factors arise. With spring upon us, it’s a good time to take a fresh look at our care plans to see if there are areas that need fixing or at least a fresh twist. Read full article  on Agingcare with tips on how to spring clean your caregiving routine: Support a caregiver or jump-start discussion in support groups with real stories - for bulk orders of Minding Our Elders e-mail Carol   Pho...
Source: Minding Our Elders - April 5, 2018 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs