Celebrate World Menopause Month with Education
Why is there such a stigma concerning menopause? It's a natural process that all women who live long enough will go through. Many actually welcome the cessation of their periods, but others dread it as a sign that they are getting "old."   As with most things, the more you know about a topic the better so if you'd like to learn a little more about menopause - or just celebrate the awareness of this month - read more on the Egosancares blog: Minding Our Elders: Caregivers Share Their Personal Stories. “I hold onto your book as a life preserver and am reading it slowly on purpose...I don't want it t...
Source: Minding Our Elders - October 18, 2021 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

When Someone Living with Dementia Is Agitated Consider Pain
Photo credit David Hinkle Dear Carol: My dad has advanced dementia and can’t tell me what he needs so it’s hard to know how to help him. He can get extremely agitated and distressed. When that happens, I try one thing or another and eventually he’ll calm down but how do I know whether I’m doing the right thing or if he’s just tired of trying to make me understand? I’ll admit that I can get exhausted so some of this might be my fault, but I want so much to make him comfortable. What should I look for when I try to help him? – LD Continue reading on Inforum for more informa...
Source: Minding Our Elders - October 17, 2021 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Caring for someone with incontinence? Check out these helpful resources
Incontinence products aren’t just for older adults, and there’s a variety of reasons a person may need incontinence products at some point in their life. Sometimes, it’s a short-term need, like after surgery or childbirth, or due to an infection or medication. But for some individuals, the need for incontinence products is long-term. Whether’s it’s caused by dementia or diabetes, stroke or special needs, MS or mental health disorders, incontinence represents a challenge for caregivers and the person with the diagnosis, as it impacts daily life in many ways.. Continue readin...
Source: Minding Our Elders - October 16, 2021 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Incontinence Battles with Parent Living with Dementia Ruining Relationship
Many well-meaning families move a parent who shows signs of dementia into their home feeling that this arrangement makes it possible to provide the best care. For some, especially those who are willing to learn how to work with people living with dementia in ways that can smooth out the tough areas, this works out well all the way through. Many, however, can make it work until complete incontinence becomes an issue. This is a big challenge because the incontinence person is incapable of understanding their own incontinence.  Read more on Egosancares about this couple and their frustration with dementia and incontinenc...
Source: Minding Our Elders - October 15, 2021 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Traveling with Incontinence As Well As Multiple Sclerosis a Challenge
Traveling with MS can be challenging. Traveling with incontinence can be challenging. Traveling with both?  Oh, yeah - lots of challenges. But it can be done with careful planning. Read more on Egosancares blog about how we advised this couple to handle the double challenges Minding Our Elders: Caregivers Share Their Personal Stories. “I hold onto your book as a life preserver and am reading it slowly on purpose...I don't want it to end.” ...Craig William Dayton, Film Composer Request a free sample from Egosancares.com Need incontinence support for yourself or someone else? Try Egosan’s Inc...
Source: Minding Our Elders - October 14, 2021 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

We Want to Keep Our Parents Safe but They May Need Some Risks for Their Mental Health
Falls. Strokes. Heart attacks. Ugh. All worries when we have aging parents. Sometimes we'd like to keep them wrapped in bubble wrap. That, however, is not doable, right? We might even have to grit our teeth while they ride bikes or cross-country ski. Why don't they quit this stuff? Well, it's because they want to live their lives. Of course, there are things that they need to be cautious about, but there's a risk vs. benefit going on here.  Read more  on Egosancares blog about knowing when to interfere with our older parents' activities due to safety concerns  - ad when to step back: Minding Our Elders: Care...
Source: Minding Our Elders - October 13, 2021 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Overwhelm Is Familiar to New Caregivers: Some Tips to Manage
Caregiving for one's older parents can be a huge challenge for any number of reasons but the process can be made a little smoother with some planning. Egosancares offers this new caregiver some tips about how to plan: Continue reading about not going under as a new caregiver on Egosancares: Minding Our Elders: Caregivers Share Their Personal Stories. “I hold onto your book as a life preserver and am reading it slowly on purpose...I don't want it to end.” ...Craig William Dayton, Film Composer Request a free sample from Egosancares.com Egosan wants to help you live your life fully: Try Egosan premium u...
Source: Minding Our Elders - October 12, 2021 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Phase 3 Clinical Trial for Alzheimer's Treatment Seeks Volunteers
Sponsored The ADvance II Study sponsored by Functional Neuromodulation is currently seeking volunteers to participate in a clinical trial for mild Alzheimer’s disease. With a lack of effective long-term treatments, researchers are working hard to find new and better future treatments for patients with Alzheimer’s. Advances in treatment are possible through volunteers participating in clinical research studies like ADvance II. The ADvance II Study is researching the use of a surgically implanted device that delivers mild electrical pulses to specific areas of the brain in people with Alzheimer’s. This deep...
Source: Minding Our Elders - October 11, 2021 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Geriatric Care Manager Shares Decades of Experience In “The Empowered Caregiver”
Discussions with Elders about Housing  (Source: Minding Our Elders)
Source: Minding Our Elders - October 10, 2021 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

10 Things Not to Say to a Person Living with Dementia
Providing care for someone who lives with any type of dementia — whether it’s Alzheimer’s, vascular, Lewy body or any of the myriad incarnations — can be intimidating. We watch helplessly as someone we love changes dramatically in how they view the world, and in the words and actions that they can understand. These changes can lead to situations where we unintentionally say and do things that make life harder for everyone involved. This list is only a start, but avoiding or rewording these questions and statements may improve your caregiving. Continue reading to learn more about what your loved...
Source: Minding Our Elders - October 9, 2021 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Caregiving During Middle Age Inspired Author to Start Foundation to Help Caregivers
When people think about caregiving spouses, they often think of older adults. We only have to look at a young mother diagnosed with multiple sclerosis (MS), a young husband diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), or in this case, a woman whose healthy husband had a sudden, massive stroke, to know differently. Kathi Koll, author of “Kick-Ass Kinda Girl: A Memoir of Life, Love, and Caregiving” knows the drill. She and her husband, Don, lived a life of glitz and glamour, working and playing alongside friends who were celebrities and politicians... Continue reading on HealthCentral for more about Kathi Koll's fou...
Source: Minding Our Elders - October 8, 2021 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

End-of-Life Care: ER Doctor Answers Our Questions
Discussions with Elders about Housing  (Source: Minding Our Elders)
Source: Minding Our Elders - October 7, 2021 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Tips to Ease Discussions with Elders about Housing
As you watch your parents or other beloved elders age, sometimes worry becomes inevitable. Should they have housing upgrades? Can they continue to live independently? Your intention isn’t to take over their lives, but you may genuinely want to start the conversation about possible future changes. How do you do this without causing a backlash? View the full slideshow on HealthCentral for more about helping along your discussions with your older parents about their future: Request a free sample from Egosancares.com Egosan wants to help you live your life fully: Try Egosan premium underwear for discrete, digni...
Source: Minding Our Elders - October 6, 2021 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Pain: How Is It Perceived by People with Dementia?
Photo credit Aleksandar Popovski It's far too easy for onlookers to view someone with dementia as unable to feel pain. Since the disease eventually renders most people helpless and cognitively inexpressive, they can't articulate what hurts or why they are upset. Caring researchers have now brought new insight into this issue. In an article on altered pain processing in patients with cognitive impairment, Medical News Today states that new research shows how wrong previous ideas about what people with cognitive disorders could feel have been. Ruth Defrin, PhD, of University of Tel Aviv, Israel... Continue reading on He...
Source: Minding Our Elders - October 5, 2021 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Lewy Body Dementia: Caregivers' Personal Experiences
As with most types of dementia, family members are the primary caregivers by default, at least at the beginning of the disease. They are usually the people who notice that something is not right with their spouse or parent. Again, like Alzheimer’s and most other types of dementia, care needs escalate with time. This ongoing care can be physically arduous and emotionally demanding. Jeanne Gibbs, whose husband had LBD, illustrates her husband’s state of mind with the scenario below, which she handled like a pro: Continue reading more about Lewy body dementia and how family and caregivers experienced the care...
Source: Minding Our Elders - October 4, 2021 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Grandmother Regrets Providing Home for Extended Family
Photo credit Cathal Mac an Beatha Dear Carol: I realize that this is the reverse of your usual column questions, but I wanted to warn others not to make the mistake I made. My son lost his job during the pandemic, so I bought a house with my life savings to provide myself and the family a place to live. I'm seeing that I made a huge mistake. Both my son and his wife have jobs now and can support themselves.  I want to move out, but it would be a physical and financial challenge for me. I’m afraid, too, that ending this arrangement would also end the relationship I have with my daughter-in-law, which affects my a...
Source: Minding Our Elders - October 3, 2021 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Gregory Finds Double Incontinence Harder to Accept than His Muscular Dystrophy
Any number o diseases including those of muscles, nerves, and conditions (such as dementia)  can cause incontinence. Due to the social stigma of adult incontinence, people who have these diseases not only suffer from their primary disease but from the "shame" that surrounds their incontinence. Gregory is just 36 but as his MD progresses it's his incontinence that bothers him the most - even more than his pain, He needs a caregiver who must handle his incontinence which increases his sense of humiliation exponentially. Gregory's story not only helps us understand that many younger people are incontinent, but ...
Source: Minding Our Elders - October 2, 2021 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

The Emotional Impact of Losing a Loved One to Dementia
“Carol!” The hospice nurse’s voice was quiet but urgent. I instinctively knew what was happening. She had been shifting Dad’s position so that he wouldn’t develop bed sores, but as she was laying him back on the bed, something changed in his respiration. This was it. His body was preparing for him to take his last breath. I slid back in my spot beside Dad and took him in my arms. His head drifted to my shoulder and that last, gentle breath slipped by unnoticed by me. What I felt was the positive force of Dad’s spirit leaving his body. And then... Continue reading on HealthCentral fo...
Source: Minding Our Elders - October 1, 2021 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

How to Talk About a Friend's Death When Someone Has Dementia
A friend recently faced the task of letting her mother, who has mid-level dementia, know that the mother's elderly brother had died. This death was not unexpected, but when a person has dementia and short-term memory loss is a problem, the news would likely be unexpected by the mother. My friend can be forgiven for dragging her feet. Her mother has been told often that the brother was ill. It was new information to the mother each time. There was no reason for the daughter to think that the telling of her uncle's death was not going to shock her mother all over again. She seriously thought of not mentioning it. It's n...
Source: Minding Our Elders - September 30, 2021 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Phase 3 Clinical Trial for Alzheimer's Treatment Seeks Volunteers
Sponsored The ADvance II Study sponsored by Functional Neuromodulation is currently seeking volunteers to participate in a clinical trial for mild Alzheimer’s disease. With a lack of effective long-term treatments, researchers are working hard to find new and better future treatments for patients with Alzheimer’s. Advances in treatment are possible through volunteers participating in clinical research studies like ADvance II. The ADvance II Study is researching the use of a surgically implanted device that delivers mild electrical pulses to specific areas of the brain in people with Alzheimer’s. This dee...
Source: Minding Our Elders - September 29, 2021 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Medication Management Tips for Older Adults
Eight out of 10 older adults take at least one medication and many take three or more daily. Older adults comprise 13 percent of the population but account for 34 percent of all prescription medicine use and 30 percent of all over-the-counter medicine use. Also, older adults often use multiple medicines (averaging 14 prescriptions each), increasing the risk of drug interactions, mix-ups, and the potential for harmful side effects.  You can view the complete slideshow on medication management for older adults here on HealthCentral: Minding Our Elders: Caregivers Share Their Personal Stories. “I hold onto you...
Source: Minding Our Elders - September 28, 2021 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Incontinence Due to Abuse Suffered As a Child Is Not As Rare As We'd Like to Think
Child abuse causes untold mental, emotional, and physical trauma to millions of kids. Most of us can't even wrap our minds around some of it. What an eye-opener it's been to hear the stories of many younger people who live with incontinence due to this type of abuse. Heartbreaking it is. Disgusting to think that this happens. But this is reality to many who are teased and tormented for being "babies" ad wearing "diapers" because they are so damaged by this abuse. Here is another story to spur on our drive to stop the stigma that surrounds incontinence. Continue reading Chris' story on Egosan care and jo...
Source: Minding Our Elders - September 27, 2021 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Dementia care: Discovering What ’s Behind Anxiety or Anger Can Smooth Things Out
Photo credit Aaron Andrew Dear Carol: My dad has dementia, probably Alzheimer’s, and I’m struggling with how to help him. He fights everything that I tell him would make his life easier. I know that assisted living is in his future but I’m trying to care for him in his home for now. How do I convince him that I ​just​ want to help him​ stay safe and his being mad at me for everything I do​ is making this impossible? - SL Continue reading on Inforum for some tips that may help SL manage her dad's care better at home and even in memory care: Minding Our Elders: Caregivers Share Their Personal Storie...
Source: Minding Our Elders - September 26, 2021 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

How Do I Get Dad Out of His Cluttered, Unsafe Home?
Photo credit Ashim d'Silva People want to stay in their own homes. You hear it and read about it all the time. And there's some merit to that. Most of us can relate to the fact that relocating is emotionally charged. Add the fact that our parents get sick and tired of suffering the indignities of aging and often feel bossed around by everyone from the government to their kids, and you can understand why they often get stubborn. Where they live might be, in their minds, their "last stand."  Many elders do well in their homes. They graciously accept... Continue reading for some tips about how to (possibly) mak...
Source: Minding Our Elders - September 25, 2021 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

“I Promised My Parents I'd Never Put Them in a Care Facility”
Photo credit Abilgail Keenan Caregiving is a job that is full of ups and downs. Many of us take on this role out of love and concern, but as care needs increase, the pressure ramps up and we are faced with increasingly difficult care decisions. One of the most heart-wrenching choices a family caregiver must make is whether to place a loved one in a nursing home. Continue reading on agingcare for some suggestions about how to let go of the guilt when you need to break that promise. Minding Our Elders: Caregivers Share Their Personal Stories. “I hold onto your book as a life preserver and am reading it slowly on purpos...
Source: Minding Our Elders - September 24, 2021 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Dementia: Theft, Paranoia or Forgetfulness?
Photo credit Cristian Newman The truth, as they see it, is still the truth in their eyes. Delusions, hallucinations, agitation, aggression, and depression are all part of the gradual progression of psychosis in patients with Alzheimer’s disease (AD). An average of 41% of these patients will experience these psychotic symptoms. One of the most common delusions these patients have is theft-related. An experienced caregiver offers her advice on how to deal with accusations of theft, which are common in dementia patients. Continue reading on Agingcare for more insight into the difficult problem of paranoia and delusions ...
Source: Minding Our Elders - September 23, 2021 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

If Falls Are a Problem, Look At Medications As a Possible Contributor
Falls are a big fear for older adults because they can be disabling or even fatal. Therefore, looking for reasons behind the falls - other than just age - is important. One potential risk factor is medications, either on their own or in combination. If falls are an issue, it's time to check with the doctor. Read more on Egosancares for other reasons for falls, as well: Minding Our Elders: Caregivers Share Their Personal Stories. “I hold onto your book as a life preserver and am reading it slowly on purpose...I don't want it to end.” ...Craig William Dayton, Film Composer Request a free sample from Ego...
Source: Minding Our Elders - September 22, 2021 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Planning a Picnic with Your Loved One in a Senior Living Community: Get Creative
Photo credit Bonnie Kittle While most senior living communities offer an array of programs and events, activities directors often work with limited budgets and are challenged to meet their residents’ varied abilities and interests. I was fortunate to have an exceptional nursing home close to my house during my caregiving years, and my parents, my uncle, my mother-in-law, and even an elderly neighbor all resided there at some point. There were plenty of activities and events offered year-round and on holidays, but the annual summer barbecue and picnic was by far one of the most anticipated events. This nursing home fe...
Source: Minding Our Elders - September 21, 2021 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Caring for Kids and Parents: A Story from the Sandwich Generation
Photo credit John Mark Smith When my elderly neighbor, Joe, was widowed, I did what most neighbors would do. I didn’t know him or his wife well, but I knew he was completely deaf and that he was probably lonely. I started to visit, thinking I could help him if he needed groceries or something. What began as a neighborly check-in continued into a kind of adoption of Joe, by myself and my two sons, ages six and eight. For five years, the kids and I were Joe’s family. Shortly after Joe passed, my aunt and uncle moved from Virginia to North Dakota to be near us, their only family. Then my parents and in-laws b...
Source: Minding Our Elders - September 20, 2021 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Dementia Caregiver Worries About Genetic Risk for Younger-Onset Alzheimer's
Photo credit Sander Weeteling Dear Carol: My mom had younger-onset Alzheimer’s and my dad had Lewy body dementia, so I’ve spent years as a dementia caregiver. I don’t regret what I did for them, but I don’t want to put that worry on my own kids. I’m 60-years-old and try to live a healthy lifestyle, but every time I misstate an idea, forget a word, or neglect to do something routine, I wonder. Is this it? Is this the first sign? I can even see the concern in my kids’ faces when I do something a little off. I know that others with this genetic risk have the same fears. How do they handle t...
Source: Minding Our Elders - September 19, 2021 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

How Hiring a Handyman Can Help Your Older Parents
Photo credit Greyson Joralemon Many elders want to keep their homes. Many are not in undue danger of falling unless they climb a ladder they shouldn't climb. They can shovel the sidewalk after a light snow shower, but not after a blizzard. And those pesky home tasks - a dead light fixture needs fixing, the squeaky dryer drum needs to be looked at, some boards on the deck need replacing or one fence post needs fixing. It's these items that make many a homeowner want to throw in the towel. When "the husband" was younger he could take care of these things. But no... Continue reading on Agingcare for some guidan...
Source: Minding Our Elders - September 18, 2021 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

To Further Their Effort to Eliminate the Stigma of Incontinence, Egosan Launches Support Group
Sure, incontinence is inconvenient. It's a hassle to change when out ad about, supplies cost money, and people worry about if they have leaked on their clothes. But by far the worst of it is the social stigma. Even people with other serious disbilities often say that their incontinence is the worse because it's so embarrassing. It doesn't have to be this way but society will hang on to its poorly educated judgment. This is the reason that Egosan has launched a support group for people living with incontinence.  Continue reading on Egosancares to learn more about living with incontinence and the value of support: Mindi...
Source: Minding Our Elders - September 17, 2021 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

A Caregiver ’s Struggle: Balancing an Elder's Sense of Purpose with Their Safety
Photo credit Serhat Beyazkaya ...This post really struck a chord with me. Most seniors need to feel useful to enjoy a high quality of life. They maintain a sense of purpose by sticking to their everyday routines and engaging in activities and hobbies they enjoy. But if caregivers believe an elder’s actions are risky or downright dangerous, when should they step in? Continue reading on Agingcare for more about this tricky balance of whether or not to interfere with an older adult's activity if we feel it's dangerous: Minding Our Elders: Caregivers Share Their Personal Stories. “I hold onto your book as a life pr...
Source: Minding Our Elders - September 16, 2021 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

What to Do When Siblings Can ’t Agree on a Parent’s Care Needs
Photo credit Sharon McCutcheon For some lucky families, having all adult siblings gather around and plan how to take care of Mom and Dad as their parents’ health begins to fail is a great comfort. For other families, things can take a disastrous turn when siblings who never got along as kids and have had little to do with each other as adults are thrown together to make caregiving decisions. For most families, navigating eldercare decisions fall somewhere between these two extremes. Caregiving has a way of sneaking up on people, though. Generally, the adult child living nearest the aging parent(s) is who becomes...
Source: Minding Our Elders - September 15, 2021 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Siblings Who Care More About Their Inheritance Than Mom and Dad ’s Care
Photo credit Jesshoots Ah, siblings. Some are a joy—our very first and forever friends in life. Others are more of a nuisance, a source of drama that comes and goes over the years. But when a parent falls ill or needs additional help as they age, these family relationships are truly put to the test. Some adult children work seamlessly together to find the best care solutions for their aging parents. However, some siblings don’t contribute at all, leaving the heavy lifting, sacrifices, and difficult choices up to one adult child, often a daughter.  Still others are involved sporadically, only deigning to gi...
Source: Minding Our Elders - September 14, 2021 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Should You Convince Your Aging Parents to Move Closer to You?
Photo credit Armin Lotfi As a columnist for a newspaper on the northern prairie, I often have readers write me that they are begging their parents to “come back home.” Upon retirement, many seniors like to leave the cold winters behind, because warmer climates tend to be much easier on aging bodies. They either relocate permanently or summer up north and then head south for the snowy months. But aging parents aren’t the only family members on the move. These days, adult children are less likely to stay put in their hometowns. Instead, they follow educational opportunities, jobs and significant others...
Source: Minding Our Elders - September 13, 2021 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Widow Trying to Rediscover Identity After Years of Caring for Others
Dear Carol: After seven years of living with early-onset Alzheimer’s, my 59-year-old husband passed away. Both before and during the early years of his diagnosis, I was also caring for his parents who both had dementia. I’ll be honest and say that it was never a happy marriage. He was controlling and jealous so my feelings of having no identity other than wife, mother, and caregiver are longstanding. I have a good relationship with my children, but they are grown and don’t live nearby so not even being a mom/grandma keeps me occupied. Our friends were mainly my husband’s friends, so who am I now? I ...
Source: Minding Our Elders - September 12, 2021 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Four Things to Consider Before Moving Aging Parents in With You
Photo credit Engin Akyurt Decades ago, it was fairly common to have grandparents living with family and it often worked well. It did for my family. My parents built a new house that could accommodate all the different generations and afforded some privacy for all. Grandma moved in, and the arrangement worked. My mom did not work outside the home, so there was nearly always someone home with Grandma. I was also a born caregiver and gladly did what I could to help with both my toddler sister and my grandmother. These days, having an aging loved one move in is still an option for some families, but it has become more com...
Source: Minding Our Elders - September 11, 2021 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

The Emotional Toll of Moving Your Elderly Parent to Senior Living
Photo credit John Mark Kuznietosov ...Now, put yourself in your parent’s shoes. They’ve likely lived in the same home for many years, but they’re getting older and their needs are changing. Mom or Dad is having trouble getting around, needs more help with activities of daily living (ADLs), and could probably use some more company. You know that a move to senior living would be wise, but you’re also well aware of the many obstacles that lie ahead on that path. Before jumping right in, do some soul searching and think carefully about how you plan to maintain compassion, boundaries, and self-awareness ...
Source: Minding Our Elders - September 10, 2021 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Neglect or Abuse: Caring for Aging Parents Who Didn ’t Care for You
Photo credit Abigail Keenan Initially, she felt that her experience was unusual. After all, we mostly hear about family caregivers who are forced to choose between their careers and quality time with their spouses, children, and friends when parents’ needs begin increasing. What Nancy didn’t know—and many caregivers don’t—is that countless adult children grapple with the impossible decision of whether to care for parents who were unsupportive, neglectful, and/or downright abusive. A Daughter’s Attempt to Reconcile a History of Abuse... Continue reading on Agingcare for insight into how t...
Source: Minding Our Elders - September 9, 2021 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Keeping Older Adults Busy and Active: Some Ideas
Photo credit Tim Doerfler ...Redirecting a busy-body elder: I recently spoke with a caregiver named Ann, who was struggling with how to adapt to life as a caregiver. For the last several decades, Ann has had no problem loading her dishwasher, washing her clothes, or making her bed. That is until her widowed father moved in with Ann and her family. Now, her father follows her and her husband around the house, telling them how things should be done. Ann just doesn’t know how to handle it graciously. Sound familiar? At first, the arrangement seemed perfect for everyone. After... Continue reading on Agingcare to learn mo...
Source: Minding Our Elders - September 8, 2021 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Adult Day Service Can Fill a Gap for Seniors and Their Caregivers
Photo credit Georg Arthur Pflueger Most seniors are keen on staying in their homes as they age, but family caregivers often struggle to meet their loved ones’ needs and still carve out time for work, family time, hobbies, social engagements, and leisure time. Caregivers can become overburdened quickly, and it is crucial to seek out help to keep from getting burned out. Other family members and friends are frequently recruited for assistance, but these people have busy schedules, too, and are only willing to contribute so much of their time. In-home care is an excellent option, but some families are nervous about invi...
Source: Minding Our Elders - September 7, 2021 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

When Caregivers Go Beyond Burnout
Photo credit Claudia Soraya Most caregivers experience times when the fatigue and frustration of providing care for a loved one can border on caregiver burnout. Even though I’ve handled caring for multiple elders and their unique needs reasonably well, there have been moments when I’ve wondered how much longer I could keep it up. During those times, I came dangerously close to burnout, but I have always gotten through with a focus on faith, respite, and self-care. After my caregiving days ended, however, I learned that there is another stage that is more severe than caregiver burnout—one that can... Conti...
Source: Minding Our Elders - September 6, 2021 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

75-Year-Old Caring for 96-Year-Old Mom Has Double Worries
Photo credit Nickolas Nikolic Dear Carol: I am a 75-year-old woman living at home with my 96-year-old mother. Mom has dementia and needs around-the-clock care. My younger brother, who lives 500 miles away and only visits twice a year, insists that Mom should be cared for by family for as long as possible. His contribution is doing the financial management online. I worry that I could fall or have a heart attack and Mom wouldn't be able to call for help. I’m in reasonable health, but I do have some risk factors. My doctor is concerned about my being a full-time caregiver at my age, but my brother insists on “the...
Source: Minding Our Elders - September 5, 2021 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

September is Prostate Cancer Awareness Month: Get Educated!
The prostate,  a mall organ located just below the bladder and in front of the rectum, can cause men a lot of anxiety and trouble as they age. It wraps around the urethra (the tube that carries urine and semen out of the body). As men age, the prostate tends to grow larger which can eventually cause any number of health issues including urine retention, but it can become cancerous, as well. Read more on the Egosancares blog about prostate function and why things go wrong: Minding Our Elders: Caregivers Share Their Personal Stories. “I hold onto your book as a life preserver and am reading it slowly on purpose......
Source: Minding Our Elders - September 4, 2021 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Caregiver or Care Partner? What Evolving Terminology Means for Now
Decades ago, when began my caregiving life, I just did what I did. I’m not sure I was referred to as anything other than the daughter, the niece, or the mom, and I was too busy to care. However, as my elders became more dependent I began to hear myself, at least in medical settings, referred to as “the caretaker.” Somehow, that word made me grind my teeth. My loved ones were not a patch of land. They were not a house. They were not an object. Yet the term “caretaker” brought such images to mind. As the years went by, however, I slowly began to notice a change in terminology in the cl...
Source: Minding Our Elders - September 3, 2021 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Sexually Abused As a Child, Bryan Lives with Life-Long Scars Including Dual Incontinence
Egosan has been sharing the stories of people who live with incontinence in order to make others aware that there are many reasons for this condition and they are just as "legitimate" as any other health condition. Yet, the social stigma persists. Bryan K is a courageous young man who has overcome more in his life than most of us will ever be required to overcome. Because he's a kind human being, he wrote to us saying that he wanted people to know his story in order to help others understand.  Continue reading on Egosancares for Bryan's story about getting through the worst to get to where he is: Minding Our...
Source: Minding Our Elders - September 2, 2021 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Sexually Abused As a Child, This Man Lives with Life-Long Scars Including Dual Incontinence
Egosan has been sharing the stories of people who live with incontinence in order to make others aware that there are many reasons for this condition and they are just as "legitimate" as any other health condition.  Yet, the social stigma persists. Bryan K  is a courageous young man who has overcome more in his life than most of us will ever be required to overcome. Because he's a kind human being, he wrote to us saying that he wanted people to know his story in order to help others understand.  Continue reading on Egosancares for Bryan's story about getting through the worst to get to where he is:...
Source: Minding Our Elders - September 2, 2021 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Dementia Caregivers Can Find That Managing Incontinence Is One Of the Toughest Challenges
While caring for someone who lives with dementia has many rewarding moments, there are times and situations that can nearly break the caregiver. One of those can be the difficulties of managing incontinence with someone who doesn't understand that cooperation is needed to make it work. Read more about dementia and incontinence on Egosancares blog: Minding Our Elders: Caregivers Share Their Personal Stories. “I hold onto your book as a life preserver and am reading it slowly on purpose...I don't want it to end.” ...Craig William Dayton, Film Composer Egosan wants to help you live your life fully: Try Egosan...
Source: Minding Our Elders - September 1, 2021 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Tai Chi shown to boost brain size, increase memory in Chinese seniors
Could non-aerobic exercise help prevent Alzheimer's and other dementia? Possibly. A recent article in The Atlantic reported on a study involving a group of seniors residing in Shanghai, China, and the practice of the ancient art of tai chi as a way to prevent Alzheimer's.  Tai chi, as described by the Mayo Clinic website, is " a noncompetitive, self-paced system of gentle physical exercise and stretching. To do tai chi, you perform a series of postures or movements in a slow, graceful manner. Each posture flows into the next without pause, ensuring that your body is in constant motion. Continue rea...
Source: Minding Our Elders - August 31, 2021 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs