Got Bored? A Mindfulness-Based Relapse Prevention Plan

All we have to decide is what to do with the time that is given us.  – J.R.R. Tolkien I question. I question my clients. “What’s been coming up for you?” or “How are you experiencing life these days?”  For many clients in addiction recovery, the experience of boredom will surface. Boredom, if not taken seriously, is a fast track to relapse.  When we remove elements of our life that we no longer have interest in (i.e. drugs, alcohol, people, places, and things) we are left with “empty space” — and many of us, not skillful with the use of our time, will call that empty space boredom.  A larger truth, is that the empty space is a luxury — it’s a gift — and if we can start to see it this way, our lives have potential to dramatically change.  Once we let go of x, y, and z (elements of disinterest), we can find ourselves with more time on our hands, not knowing what to do with it. We haven’t yet developed new areas of interest and this can feel uncomfortable. It feels like no man’s land, unknown, uncharted. We can’t see our way in or through this empty space.  The discomfort of not knowing how we should fill our newfound time and space can lead to feeling restless, antsy, and can lead to relapse. If there is nothing new, we can easily revert back to old habits and patterns.  Let’s consider that the empty space is good. If we find ourselves without ...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Addiction Habits Mindfulness Recovery Substance Abuse Boredom Habit Change Relapse relapse prevention Source Type: blogs

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Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Binge Eating Disorders Eating Disorders General Not Crazy Podcast Source Type: blogs
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Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Addiction General Mental Health and Wellness Not Crazy Podcast Recovery Source Type: blogs
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Source: Psych Central - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tags: Addictions Alcoholism Habits Substance Abuse Source Type: news
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Source: Psych Central - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tags: Addictions Codependence Narcissism Personal Stories Relationships & Love Addiction Recovery Alcoholism Breakups Emotional Abuse Substance Abuse Source Type: news
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Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Addiction Family Holiday Coping Recovery Substance Abuse Addiction Recovery Alcoholism Holidays Unrealistic Expectations Source Type: blogs
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Source: Cliffside Malibu - Category: Addiction Authors: Tags: Addiction Addiction to Pharmaceuticals Mental Health mental health costs mental health coverage mental illness opiate addiction opiates opioid opioid crisis opioids Source Type: blogs
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Source: Cliffside Malibu - Category: Addiction Authors: Tags: Addiction Addiction to Pharmaceuticals addiction treatment opioid opioid crisis opioids pharmaceutical addiction pharmaceutical drug abuse treatment Source Type: blogs
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Source: Cliffside Malibu - Category: Addiction Authors: Tags: Addiction to Pharmaceuticals fentanyl heroin heroin addiction opiate opiate abuse opiate addiction opiates opioid opioids Source Type: blogs
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Source: Cliffside Malibu - Category: Addiction Authors: Tags: Addiction Addiction Recovery Detox Resources for Alcohol and Drugs/Opiates Drug Rehab Information Drug Treatment anxiety in withdrawal vicodin withdrawal symptoms Source Type: blogs
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