WHO: Drug Trump taking to fight COVID-19 best left to tests

The World Health Organization says the science is still unclear on an anti-malaria drug that U.S. President Donald Trump is taking to try to defend against the new coronavirus, and recommends its use for COVID-19 only in controlled clinical trials for now
Source: ABC News: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Health Source Type: news

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Several authors of a large study that raised safety concerns about malaria drugs for coronavirus patients have retracted the report
Source: ABC News: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Health Source Type: news
The malaria drug promoted by U.S. President Donald Trump as a treatment for COVID-19 was ineffective in preventing infection in people exposed to the coronavirus, according to a widely anticipated clinical trial released on Wednesday.
Source: Reuters: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news
Questions raised over study claiming drug linked to higher rate of mortality and heart problems in Covid-19 patientsSign up for Guardian Australia ’s coronavirus emailDownload the free Guardian app to get the most important news notificationsCoronavirus Australia maps and cases: live numbers and statisticsThe World Health Organization will resume clinical trials of an anti-malaria drug researchers hope may treat Covid-19, after a study of the drug published in May by a major medical journal prompted them to halt trials due to safety concerns.The paper, published in the Lancet, said hydroxychloroquine was associated w...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: World Health Organization Medical research Coronavirus outbreak Infectious diseases Australia news Science Source Type: news
On June 3, the World Health Organization (WHO) resumed a study looking into whether the malaria drug hydroxychloroquine could be effective in treating COVID-19. Last week, the WHO temporarily stopped people from enrolling in the trial, part of a larger study called Solidarity that is investigating a number of different potential coronavirus therapies, over concerns about the hydroxychloroquine’s adverse effects on the heart. That followed the publication of a Lancet study on May 22, involving more than 96,000 people, which found that the drug did not improve survival among patients hospitalized with COVID-19, and tha...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news
The White House medical team kept a close eye on President Donald Trump’s heart rhythms, including at least one electrocardiogram, when he took a two-week course of a malaria drug to try to prevent the coronavirus
Source: ABC News: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Health Source Type: news
Results published Wednesday by the New England Journal of Medicine show that hydroxychloroquine was no better than placebo pills at preventing illness from the coronavirus. The drug did not seem to cause serious harm, though -- about 40% on it had side effects, mostly mild stomach problems.
Source: The Economic Times - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
U.S. President Donald Trump had no side effects from a two-week course of hydroxychloroquine, an anti-malaria drug that can cause heart problems, after using it as a preventive measure against the coronavirus, his White House physician said on Wednesday.
Source: Reuters: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news
The malaria drug promoted by U.S. President Donald Trump as a treatment for COVID-19 was shown to be ineffective in preventing infection in people exposed to the coronavirus, according to a widely anticipated clinical trial released on Wednesday.
Source: Reuters: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news
Eunice G. Kamwendo is an Economist and Strategic Advisor with UNDP Africa in New York. Chaltu Daniel Kalbessa is a UNDP Fellow and Strategic Analyst with UNDP Africa in New York.By Eunice G. Kamwendo and Chaltu Daniel KalbessaNEW YORK, Jun 3 2020 (IPS) With very weak health systems and overall capacity constraints to effectively respond to the deadly coronavirus disease, Africa’s fate against the invisible enemy, was going to be nothing short of catastrophic according to early predictions. Although Africa is yet to reach its peak, many countries are not seeing the exponential growth in case numbers, or in mortality r...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tags: Africa Aid Headlines Health Humanitarian Emergencies TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news
Concerns are mounting about studies in two influential medical journals on drugs used in people with coronavirus, including one that led multiple countries to stop testing a malaria pill
Source: ABC News: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Health Source Type: news
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